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The Ground Shots Podcast

The Ground Shots Podcast is an audio project exploring our relationship to ecology through conversations and storytelling with artists, ecologists, farmers, activists, story-tellers, land-tenders and more.How do we do our work in the modern age, when the urgency of ecological and social collapse feels looming? How do we creatively and whole-heartedly navigate our relationships with one another and the land?

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Ep. 12: Turtle T. Turtlington on mead making, changing culture through fermentation, working with edgy plants, alchemy, alcohol and the poison path.

Episode 12 of The Ground Shots Podcast. This longer bonus episode of the Ground Shots Podcast features a conversation with Turtle T. Turtlington on all things mead making while we drink several bottles of homemade mead Turtle brewed. Turtle was previously a guest on episode four of the podcast, where he chronicles his walk across the width of California. We talk about: instructions on how to make mead details on primary and secondary fermentation in mead making mead circles and their importance the alchemy and mercurial process of mead making changing and creating culture through fermentation herbs to use and not to use for mead making the magic of making meads on special dates and occasions mead making culture in western North Carolina a quick view into mead and beer fermentation history the influence of 'the church' on beer and ingredients the connection between fermentation to earth-based spirituality making mead with Scotch Broom and other edgy plants the relationship between being human and fermenting food and drink philosophy around alcohol consumption and the poison path how Frank Cook may have influenced the creation of this podcast It is important to do your own research before working with plants and fermenting them and to be aware of what herbs may be contraindicated during pregnancy.   Books on mead making mentioned in the podcast:  Stephen Buhner's 'Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers' Sandor Katz's 'Wild Fermentation' and 'The Art of Fermentation' 'The Compleat Meadmaker' By Ken Schramm  Links: Turtle on youtube : https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=yBlF2BSHRPM Frank Cook on youtube : https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=XP6vDkg6Mw0 Link to my Blueberry plant profile with Turtle's blueberry mead recipe listed at the end: https://www.ofsedgeandsalt.com/blog/blueberryplantprofile Miranda Heidler of Wild Bergamot Handcrafts on Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/shop/wildbergamotcraft Wild Bergamot Handcrafts on Instagram: @wildbergamothandcrafts **** Support the podcast on Patreon Help us get to 100 patrons! Subscribe as little as $1/ month. Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: Mother Marrow Additional music: Miranda Heidler of Wild Bergamot Handcrafts covering: You've Been a Friend to Me by the Carter Family and Like a Songbird That Has Fallen by the Reeltime Travelers Produced by: Opia Creative Visit our website: http://www.ofsedgeandsalt.com or http://www.thegroundshotsproject.com

2hr 53mins

8 Mar 2019

Rank #1

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Wild Tending series / Nikki Hill and Gabe Crawford on the basics of wild-tending

Episode #31 of the Ground Shots Podcast is a conversation with Nikki Hill and Gabe Crawford, recorded on a sunny day in Paonia, Colorado on the wild edges of Small Potatoes Farm this past November. Gabe Crawford was raised on a small homestead outside of Durango, Colorado and started learning about plants from an early age. He got launched on his plant journey by studying with Katrina Blair at the Turtle Lake Refuge in Durango. He moved to Sandpoint, Idaho where he worked with Twin Eagles Wilderness School and Kaniksu Land Trust mentoring kids. Through this, he started naturalist training which opened him up to the world of wild tending, Traditional Ecological Knowledge and the ancient and intricate relationships between humans and ecology. Gabe spent time with Finisia Medrano learning about the ancient wild gardens of the west that were and still are tended by indigenous peoples and was taught how to tend these first foods and plant back for future abundance. He collects the seeds of native foods plants, fruit trees, berries and other exotics to plant feral orchards and wild gardens. Nikki Hill can be found chasing wildflowers throughout the western US. She is not sure when her adoration of plants began, but they share a kindred spirit. Nikki earned a bachelors degree in environmental science and botany which led her to the field of habitat restoration nearly 16 years ago. Disillusioned by methodology that focused on eradication, she struck off on her own. She spent six years growing food and medicine, first as an urban farmer and then as a nomadic rural farmer, and co-founded Daggawalla, a seed and herb company. Since 2014, she has been exploring her feral roots as a wildtender, planting gardens outside agricultural boundaries. Her hope is to foster habitat resilience by sowing a living seed bank for the future, in a spirit of collaboration with the non-human world. Her website can be found at www.walkingroots.net. In this conversation with Nikki and Gabe, we talk about:exploring the concepts of 'wild' and 'wild-tending' what it means to participate in a cultured landscape seeing the fabric of the landscape as a mosaic of gardens how wild-tending practices can challenge and/or reinforce certain accepted mainstream narratives around sustainable wild-crafting re-looking at what 'wild-crafting' even means in the context of prioritizing planting back the connection between mental health and wild-tending a brief introduction to some specific wild-tending techniques like seed collection and replanting, root division, burying branches and more. 'poop' talk – the importance of poop in wild-tending and planting back how anyone can wild-tend anywhere Links: ‘Tending the Wild’ by Kat Anderson Tending the Wild Broadcast special on YouTube Finisia Medrano on Youtube Gabe's instagram @plumsforbums Gabe's facebook page, where he occasionally share wild-tending info Nikki's facebook page, where she occasionally shares wild-tending info Nikki’s website: http://www.walkingroots.net/ ‘The Failures of Farming & the Necessity of Wildtending’ by Kollibri terre Sonnenblume ‘The Troubles of ‘Invasive’ Plants’ by Nikki Hill & Kollibri terre Sonnenblume, free zine download, or buy a hard copy in the store on Kollobri’s website Support Gabe via Paypal for his wild-tending efforts: paypal.me/johnnyslug Support Nikki via Paypal for her wild-tending efforts: paypal.me/nikkiphill Support the podcast on Patreon to contribute to our grassroots self-funding of this project.  Support the Ground Shots Project with a one time donation: paypal.me/petitfawn    Our website with backlog of episodes, plant profiles, travelogue and more: http://www.ofsedgeandsalt.com Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: 'Sweat and Splinters' by Mother Marrow Interstitial Music: ‘Furnace Creek’ by Marisa Anderson Extra banjo tunes by Gabe Crawford Produced by: Opia Creative

1hr 40mins

9 Jan 2020

Rank #2

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Tamara Wilder on wild foods in northern California, animal processing, wild tending and the importance of ancient technologies

Episode #28 of the Ground Shots Podcast features a conversation with Tamara Wilder, who is based out of Ukiah, California. Tamara has been teaching various ancestral skills from wild foods preparation, primitive fire-making, hide tanning, cordage and more for several decades. She co-wrote the book 'Buckskin: The Ancient Art of Braintanning'’ with Steven Edholm. She co-founded the organization Paleotechnics with Steven, who is a past podcast guest. Paleotechnics functions as an educational resource on the art of simple, ancient and universal ancestral technologies. Tamara tirelessly travels and teaches classes all over the west coast of Turtle Island every year with suitcases full of cordage samples, wild food preparations, fire-making supplies, and primitive tools to teach others how to use them, tons of books and pamphlets to share on permaculture, ancient living skills, craft and more. I’ve assisted her teaching before and she pays such great attention to detail and process. She cares deeply for sharing these skills as much as possible so others can feel empowered to participate more directly with our natural environment. She has a heart of gold and goes out of her way to help others and be in service to the land. She also facilitates conversations about IUD awareness. We sat down outside of her light clay straw infill cabin near Ukiah, California this past Spring to record this conversation for the podcast. In this conversation with Tamara, we talk about: defining 'ancient technologies' and how many are universal and how others are regionally specific the importance and abundance of wild foods in northern California bay nuts, madrone berries, manzanita berries, acorns how eating the wild foods around us connects us deeply to the land 'mast years' with certain wild foods, including this past year's huge bay nut crop the importance of acorn processing to the cultural identity of many indigenous folks in northern California how Tamara went from punk rock vegan to teaching about animal processing the ancestral relationship many folks have around the world historically to consuming animals legal issues around picking up roadkill, why there are laws making it illegal in some states how abalone is poached and over-harvested the historical wild management practices of indigenous folks in northern California like controlled burns, and the importance of these practices to ecological health how overpopulation affects the ability for humans to live in balance with the land Tamara's teachers: Jim Riggs, Margaret Mathewson, Melvin Beattie fiber and cordage as pandemic technologies and Dogbane's importance as a superior fiber plant that grows across turtle island Links: Paleotechnics website: https://www.paleotechnics.com/ Paleotechnics on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/paleotechnics/posts Paleotechnics on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Paleotechnics/ Paleotechnics Blog: https://paleotechnics.wordpress.com/ Tamara on Instagram: @wilder_tamara https://www.instagram.com/wilder_tamara/ Buckskin book by Tamara and Steven 'The Ancient Art of Brain-Tanning': https://www.amazon.com/Buckskin-Ancient-Braintanning-Steven-Edholm/dp/0965496554 ‘Tending the Wild: Native American Knowledge and the Management of California's Natural Resources’ by Kat Anderson: https://www.amazon.com/Tending-Wild-Knowledge-Management-Californias/dp/0520280431 Support the podcast on Patreon to contribute to our grassroots self-funding of this project.  Support the Ground Shots Project with a one time donation:paypal.me/petitfawn  Our website with backlog of episodes, plant profiles, travelogue and more: http://www.ofsedgeandsalt.com Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: 'Sweat and Splinters' by Mother Marrow Music: ‘On my Knees’ by Mother Marrow Produced by: Opia Creative

1hr 39mins

28 Oct 2019

Rank #3

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Ep. 17: The Kaua'i Food Forest and subtropical agroforestry with Paul Massey and Rob Cruz

This episode of the Ground Shots Podcast features a conversation with Paul Massey and Rob Cruz of the Kaua’i Food Forest. The Kaua’i Food Forest is a community-based subtropical food ecosystem located on Kauai’s north shore in the ahupuaa (watershed) of Kalihiwai, a project born from the collaboration of three nonprofit organizations: Regenerations Botanical Garden, Mālama Kauai, and the Sanctuary of LUBOF. Regenerations is responsible for leading the ongoing design, planting, and maintenance of the forest.​ <p class="">According to the Kaua’i Food Forest website: (which I suggest you peruse for plant lists, more photos and backstory of the project!):</p> <p class="">[The Kaua’i Food Forest] is creating a constantly evolving, radiantly healthy forest ecosystem with nutritious delicious fruit and other food items as a major output. The forest is intended to serve as an educational demonstration site, where community members from Kauai and beyond can learn and innovate subtropical agroforestry techniques and management through practical hands-on experience. In addition, the forest is a renewable source of biological diversity for reproduction, distribution, and conservation. Paul Massey is one of the founding stewards of the Kaua’i Food Forest, the director of Regenerations Botanical Garden, a organization whose mission is to support the conservation of threatened plant diversity for the benefit of all life by designing, building, and implementing inclusive and sustainable community-based stewardship activities. Paul hosts a radio show called ‘In the Garden, On the Farm’ on KKCR Kauaʻi Community Radio. Rob Cruz is one of the founding stewards of the Kaua’i Food Forest, dedicates his life to creating and refining human scale food ecosystems and sharing with those willing to learn. We recorded this conversation at the community house by the food forest one evening as dusk settled in on the island. Read the blog post and my photo diary of the food forest, here.***** In this conversation, we talk about: the food forest as a community ran agroforestry project  various plants they are experimenting with at the food forest in their guilding design and grass replacement a few nitrogen fixing trees and tending techniques agroforestry in Hawai'i and on the island of Kaua'i specifically 're-culturing' and the educational component of the food forest the concept of creating easy and accessible food culture the uniqueness of saving seed on an isolated island the food forest as a living seed bank the importance of seed saving importance of preserving rare and endangered plants in their own ecosystems canoe plants and the importance of vegetative propagation the concept of being a 'guerrilla planter' who plants food everywhere, you don't need your own land the influence of colonization on Hawai’ian land connection and Hawai’ian ecology the future of the Kaua'i food forest **** Links: Cultivariable website mentioned on the podcast Kaua’i Food Forest facebook page Regenerations Botanical Garden Kaua’i Food Forest’s website: http://www.kauaifoodforest.org Paul's radio show: ‘In the Garden, On the Farm’ found at http://kkcr.org/ Rob on Instagram: @rob_cruz View the Kaua’i Food Forest hashtag: #kauaifoodforest Support the podcast on Patreon to contribute to our grassroots self-funding of this project.   The Of Sedge & Salt blog The Ground Shots Podcast page  Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: 'Sweat and Splinters' by Mother Marrow Support the recording of Mother Marrow's new album! Their kickstarter is here: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/mothermarrow/mother-marrow-records-an-album Additional Music: JaSoFuChi by Trevor Thorpe. Find his music at: https://hawksviewstudio.bandcamp.com Produced by: Opia Creative

1hr 42mins

17 May 2019

Rank #4

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Ep. 3: Laurie Quesinberry on traditional Appalachian root digging in Laurel Fork, VA, issues around wildcrafting woodland medicinals and more.

Episode Three of the Ground Shots Podcast. Interview with Laurie Quesinberry, 'granny root digger' and founder of Bear Alchemy out of Laurel Fork, Virginia, a small community in southern Appalachia.  We talk about: the complexity of traditional Appalachian root digging the complicated nature of wildcrafting, especially in the southern Appalachia alternatives to digging highly sought after Appalachian root medicine like Black Cohosh and Ginseng-- using leaf medicine and Laurie's experiments and observations the Black Cohosh catacombs and the waste created in the disconnect sometimes between the harvester, the economics of herb buying and the strength of medicine needed for it to work changes in Laurie's community and heritage the problematic nature of getting herbal 'wide eyes' as a new herb student  Laurie receiving the United Plant Savers' 2018 Medicinal Plant Conservation Award Links:  Laurie's website: http://bearalchemy.com/ The United Plant Saver's website: https://unitedplantsavers.org/ ***** Music by Mother Marrow Produced by Opia Creative ***** Stay updated on our latest episodes: http://www.groundshotsproject.com Contact : kelly@ofsedgeandsalt.com Support the podcast on Patreon to keep the audio project going. Access Patreon-only content related to the podcast and our other projects. We will be doing a giveaway of Laurie's medicine through the Ground Shots Project Patreon page for supporters of the project. Follow us or support us there to see when we start the giveaway period. Find out more at: http://www.patreon.com/ofsedgeandsalt Read our blog, check out our store: http://www.ofsedgeandsalt.com Follow us on Instagram: @goldenberries Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ofsedgeandsalt/

58mins

2 Sep 2018

Rank #5

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Ep. 14: Aimee Joyaux of Cornmeal Press out of Petersburg, VA on processing our times through radical art making

Episode 14 of the Ground Shots Podcast. This episode of the podcast features a conversation with radical visual artist and printmaker Aimee Joyaux who runs Cornmeal Press in Petersburg, Virginia. We recorded this conversation when I visited Aimee in October 2018, before doing a multi-week printmaking residency in her studios. I met Aimee while doing an immersive eight-week artist book, printmaking and papermaking workshop at Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina a few springs ago. In this conversation with Aimee, we talk about how Aimee and her partner Alain came across the building they renovated in Petersburg by hand using materials they found at auctions, demo sites and junk sales a little history of Petersburg, Virginia as one of the oldest free black settlements in the so-called U.S. and how it fell into extreme economic decline historically. (I talk more about this as well as discuss the history of native settlements here in episodes #5 with Ryan Pierce and #6 with Tilke Elkins) how Aimee uses her art practice to react to and process racism and privilege in the south navigating race politics in Virginia a critique of capitalism Aimee's various art projects including 'City Lots,' 'The Smile Project,' and 'The Box Project'  how art is under-appreciated in American culture using your best materials now because life is short and fleeting Aimee's thoughts on copying vs. inspiration in art ******* Links:  Aimee's website with photos of and writings on her various projects we discuss: http://www.aimeejoyaux.com/ Aimee's instagram: https://www.instagram.com/aimeejoyaux/ Support the podcast on Patreon to contribute to our grassroots self-funding of this project.  Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: 'Sweat and Splinters' by Mother Marrow Additional music: 'Ghost Waltz' from On Oak and Pine, released October 18, 2007  Christopher Buckingham - Guitars  Brenna Sahatjian - Cello Produced by: Opia Creative

1hr 23mins

15 Apr 2019

Rank #6

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Alicia Toldi on promoting accessible artist residencies with the Piney Wood Atlas project, spoon carving and post-permaculture training reflections

Episode #21 of the Ground Shots Podcast This episode of the Ground Shots Podcast features a conversation with Alicia Toldi, who currently lived in Oakland, California. Alicia co-runs Piney Wood Atlas.  According to their website:  "Piney Wood Atlas is a collaborative project between citizen artists Alicia Toldi and Carolina Porras and was formed out of a desire to help spread the word about the magical world of artist residencies. Through a series of regional road trips, we travel across the country unearthing small, emerging and unconventional artist residencies. Visiting is essential in absorbing the atmosphere, embedding into the space as if we were residents ourselves. We share meals, conversations and experiences with facilitators and artists. So far, we have visited around 45 residencies across 15 states and plan to visit the whole country in the next two years, representing alternative residencies through annually printed regional guidebooks, online content, and workshops. Alternative residencies offer individual character, personalized experiences and room to experiment. Featuring these kinds of spaces allows us to connect creative thinkers with places where they can become visionaries, unlocking fresh ideas that only come from being in a new environment, and thus engaging in a symbiotic relationship between the artist, the residency locale and the outside world. Piney Wood Atlas’ intention is to bridge the gap between residency databases and word-of-mouth, ensuring that attending a residency is an attainable, productive, and fun adventure for all." We did this interview in Alicia's art studio in Oakland, California this past Spring after we both completed a Permaculture Design Course (PDC) at the Occidental Arts and Ecology Center in Occidental, California. I first met Alicia when I stumbled upon Piney Wood Atlas online. We have communicated online about the project over the past couple years and both decided to sign up for the Spring PDC at OAEC without realizing the other had also. It was a sweet surprise to finally meet Alicia. She hosted me a bunch this Spring as I came through the Bay area for interviews and meet-ups with folks. I appreciated being welcomed by Alicia and her partner and able to fit my big truck camper home in her tiny driveway by the freeway in the heart of Oakland. In this conversation with Alicia, we talk about: a little bit of the story of how Alicia co-found Piney Wood Atlas the nature of artist residencies and how they can be designed in many ways, including their ability to be accessible to everyone some of Alicia's favorite residencies featured in the PWA zines. So far the Pacific Northwest and the Southwest zines are out, and the Midwest themed zine will be out soon adventures in road-tripping for the PWA project Alicia's personal story of living in different places as an artist on the east and west coasts, and coming back home to the Bay area a few of our post-permaculture training reflections Alicia's relationship with spoon carving and making things We're giving away one copy of the Piney Woods Atlas 'Southwest' zine to a Ground Shots Project Patreon subscriber. Comment on the post for the giveaway to be entered, here. Links: Alicia's personal website: http://www.aliciatoldi.com Piney Wood Atlas' website: http://www.pineywoodatlas.com Alicia on instagram: @t0ldi Piney Wood Atlas on instagram: @pineywoodatlas Email Piney Wood Atlas: contact@pineywoodatlas.com Sierra Nevada College low-residency interdisciplinary MFA program and where PWA received a grant Elsewhere Studios in Paonia, Colorado The interstitial music for this episode is 'Mojave' by Marisa Anderson Marisa Anderson on bandcamp: https://marisaanderson.bandcamp.com/ Jim Croft's 'Old Ways of Making Books' class in Santa, Idaho where I taught hide tanning and visited during the month of July 2019. This is where I mention I edited and recorded the intro/outro for this and the next few episodes of the podcast:    https://cargocollective.com/oldway Support the podcast on Patreon to contribute to our grassroots self-funding of this project.  Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: 'Sweat and Splinters' by Mother Marrow Additional Music: 'Mojave' by Marisa Anderson Marisa Anderson on Bandcamp: https://marisaanderson.bandcamp.com/ Produced by: Opia Creative

1hr 21mins

3 Aug 2019

Rank #7

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Ep. 10: Adam Stolte and his Goats. Thoughts on modern day pastoralism, domestication, Pacific Northwest plants for goat forage, and more.

Episode Ten of the Ground Shots Podcast.  Episode ten is part field recording, part interview done while walking with Adam Stolte and his goat herd (plus the pig Ragnar) this past September in Hood River, Oregon. On our evening walk through Douglas Fir groves, Scotch Broom died back and Hazelnut, we discuss a number of topics related to goats, pastoralism, public lands, nomadism, connecting to the land through animals, plants that goats love to forage in this specific region, writers and activists that discuss goat herding and more. Listen for a humorous, thoughtful and not so linear conversation on Adam's fresh relationship with goats, a life tuned into the land, even a goat milking session in the mix.  **** Adam on Instagram: @adamstolte Books mentioned by Adam in the interview: 'Goatwalking: A Guide to Wildland Living', by Jim Corbett   'Don Quixote' by Miguel de Cervantes   'Holistic Goat Care', by Gianaclis Caldwell   'Goat Husbandry', by David Mackenzie   'The Complete Herbal Handbook for Farm and Stable', by Juliette de Bairacli Levy   'Long Life Honey In The Heart', by Martìn Prechtel   Fibershed California  ****** Support the podcast on Patreon Visit our website Of Sedge and Salt Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: Mother Marrow Produced by: Opia Creative

1hr 6mins

11 Feb 2019

Rank #8

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Hannah Smith on hut caretaking in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, writing as an act of noticing, giving care to a dying earth

Episode #19 of the Ground Shots Podcast. In this episode of the Ground Shots Podcast, I chat with Hannah Smith, a writer, naturalist, hiking and climbing guide who lives seasonally working outdoor jobs or doing artist residencies in different parts of the country. I interviewed Hannah while we camped together in Big Sur, California early April 2019. Hannah and I studied papermaking and printmaking together at Penland School of Craft in North Carolina a few years ago. Since our time together at Penland, Hannah has continued to write, make artwork, and also work in wilderness settings while incorporating her creative practice in those places. In this conversation, we touch on a few big experiences she has had in the past few years working. Hannah also reads some of her poignant and thoughtful poetry commenting on a dying earth, our disconnection from the land and history and the relationship between our human body and the earth body.  In this conversation, we talk about: Hannah's meditation practice in relationship to the land how 'watching' is the heart of it writing as an act of noticing and medium for connecting to the land giving care to a dying earth working as a climbing/hiking guide in Switzerland with the International Girl Scouts Hannah's job working on a storytelling project in Alaska Hannah's thoughts on making the outdoors and land accessible to all physical abilities working as a hut caretaker and naturalist in the White Mountains of New Hampshire for the AMC (Appalachian Mountain Club) Links:  Hannah's writing site: https://imaginedlanguage.wordpress.com/ Hannah's Etsy page: https://www.etsy.com/shop/blueskypress Hannah on instagram: @hannahbluesky International Girl Scouts : https://www.scout.org/ Story Works Alaska : https://storyworksak.org/ Support the podcast on Patreon to contribute to our grassroots self-funding of this project.  Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: 'Sweat and Splinters' by Mother Marrow Additional Music: 3 Free by Jacob Cohen  Shoutout to Joshua Milowe for connecting me to Jacob's music.  Produced by: Opia Creative

1hr 37mins

31 May 2019

Rank #9

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Marc Williams on the Green Path, the urgency of 're-localizing' and accessibility issues around learning land-based skills

Episode #29 of the Ground Shots Podcast features a conversation with Marc Williams, who is based out of Asheville, North Carolina. I took a trip to the Southeast this past September, where I visited my folks in southern Virginia and friends in Asheville, NC. Marc and I met up for an interview in West Asheville, NC, in the backyard of our mutual friend. I’ve known Marc since 2012 or so, when I moved to Asheville to attend herbalism school. According to the Plants and Healers website: Marc Williams is an ethnobiologist. He has studied the people, plant, mushroom, microbe connection intensively while learning to employ botanicals and other life forms for food, medicine, and beauty. His training includes a Bachelor's degree in Environmental Studies concentrating in Sustainable Agriculture with a minor in Business from Warren Wilson College and a Master’s degree in Appalachian Studies concentrating in Sustainable Development with a minor in Geography and Planning from Appalachian State University. He has spent over two decades working at a multitude of restaurants and various farms. He has travelled throughout 30 countries in Central/North/South America and Europe and all 50 of the United States. Marc has visited over 200 botanical gardens and research institutions during this process while taking tens of thousands of pictures of representative plants. He is also Executive Director of Plants and Healers International www.plantsandhealers.org. Marc has taught hundreds of classes to thousands of people about the marvelous world of humans and their interface with other organisms while working with over 70 organizations in the last few years and online at the website here. His greatest hope is that this effort may help improve our current challenging global ecological situation. In this conversation with Marc, we talk about: the green path as a way to live life and as a physical gathering that is nonlinear and open to anyone Frank Cook's influence on the ideas behind the green path way of life what is the green path? fermenting processes, 're-skilling' for living closely to the land, donation based or free plant walks, the sharing that happens at earthskills gatherings, folk schools, botanical gardens, a camp at the rainbow gathering, and more different opportunities for education about the natural world and our connection to it issues around accessibility at earthskills gatherings and with the 'green path' the urgency of 're-localizing' and learning skills of sustainability Asheville, North Carolina as an incubator for the 'green path' the role of permaculture in the 'green path' the importance of pilgrimage and how a pilgrimage can be interpreted in many ways pilgrimage as a form of meditation and rite of passage addressing the reality of how travel has a large environmental footprint, even travel with good intentions! learning skills as a form of activism Links: 7Song’s The Northeast School of Botanical Medicine and CALM first aid camp at the rainbow gathering, mentioned in the podcast: http://7song.com/ Green Path facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/145910154568/ Plants and Healers International: http://www.plantsandhealers.org/ Botany Everyday: http://www.botanyeveryday.com/ The United Plant Savers and Goldenseal Sanctuary: https://unitedplantsavers.org/ The Cabbage School: http://thecabbageschool.net/ Listen to Turtle T. Turtlington's podcast episode (#4) on his pilgrimage walking across California NuMundo: NuMundo https://numundo.org/ podcast hub, and of sedge & salt blog where you can find photo diaries, ethnobotanical plant profiles, more on past podcast guests: http://www.ofsedgeandsalt.com Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: 'Sweat and Splinters' by Mother Marrow Produced by: Opia Creative

1hr 16mins

12 Nov 2019

Rank #10

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Ep. #9: Christiana Hedlund on her art and craft practice, the feeling of color, place informed design

 Episode nine of the Ground Shots Podcast. A conversation with artist and designer Christiana Hedlund on her art and craft practice, the feeling of color, place informed design, her Signal Fire experience, and more.  We talk about:  Christiana’s study of painting and craft in the Pacific Northwest, the Southwest, France and Mexico.Colors and how they affect people differently and often reflect something about the land around us or perhaps our current social and political climate.Christiana’s experiences as a two time alumni of Signal Fire’s Wide Open Studios summer immersion trips in the wilds of the West.The importance of craft and making things we use in our everyday life.Making and curating spaces that feel good to be in and the importance of the intersection of art and shelter. Links:  Christiana on Instagram: @christianahedlundChristiana’s website and store: https://www.christianahedlund.com/Oregon College of Art and Craft : https://ocac.edu/Signal Fire: http://www.signalfirearts.org/Studio Escalier : https://studioescalier.com/The Ryder Studio : http://www.theryderstudio.com/ ****** Support the podcast on Patreon (At 75 patrons, I’ll start doing a once a month community chat!)Visit our website Of Sedge and SaltOur Instagram page @goldenberriesJoin the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodesSubscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots ProjectTheme music: Mother MarrowProduced by: Opia Creative

1hr 6mins

10 Jan 2019

Rank #11

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Ep. 16: Lindsey Leach on trauma informed council for children, systematic racism in Richmond, VA, revisioning history

Episode 16 of the Ground Shots Podcast. This episode is a conversation with Lindsey Leach, who lives in Richmond, Virginia. I recorded our conversation this past October, while I was doing a printmaking residency in Petersburg, Virginia at Cornmeal Press, the studios of Aimee Joyaux, our guest from Episode 14. When this interview was recorded, Lindsey was working as the Development Manger at ChildSavers, an organization dedicated to the mental wellbeing of children in the greater RVA area. In addition to talking about the work of the organization ChildSavers, we chat about: the importance of trauma informed council for children the history of the deliberate concentrating of poverty in black communities in Richmond, VA how a history of systematic racism is reflected in the present day reality of the city ways that schools are still segregated how trauma affects the body the link between trauma and systematic racism the need to remove the confederate statues on Monument Ave in Richmond, VA reevaluating southern identities that revolve around a selectively curated storytelling of the past the importance of representing and telling all stories of the past and present for a more accurate representation of the lived human experience in the RVA area having civil conversations with people who you don’t agree with how Richmond is making changes to acknowledge the history of all people who lived and live in the city (links to some of these things are found below) ***** To go along with this episode, Lindsey, who is an avid reader, put together an epic book list that relates to the topics we touch on in this conversation, found on the Ground Shots Project Patreon membership page. **** As of February of this year, Lindsey accepted a position at United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) as Senior Development Officer. Now she heads up fundraising for UNOS, the nonprofit that manages the nation's only organ transplant system. She continues to support ChildSavers and is involved in her community through board service for ReEstablish Richmond which is a local nonprofit that helps refugees establish roots, build community, and become self-sufficient. In addition to her nonprofit work, Lindsey is an artist. You can view her portfolio linked below and learn about her psychic landscapes depicting the inner world of emotions.  The additional music for this episode is by Ted Packard. Ted is a nature connection educator, artist and musician who runs a Patreon for his creative projects which also expand beyond music, the link to his page can be found in the show notes below. **** Lindsey's artist portfolio: https://everavidart.com/ ChildSavers: https://childsavers.org/ ReEstablish Richmond: https://www.reestablishrichmond.org/ Virginia Museum of History and Culture: https://www.virginiahistory.org/   The American Civil War Museum: https://acwm.org/   Black History Museum: http://www.blackhistorymuseum.org/   The Valentine: https://thevalentine.org/   The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA) is putting on this upcoming show in Richmond called "Cosmologies from the Tree of Life: Art from the African American South." https://www.vmfa.museum/exhibitions/cosmologies/   An article about the Maggie walker statue Lindsey mentions: https://www.richmond.com/news/local/city-of-richmond/maggie-walker-statue-unveiled-saturday-in-richmond/article_042f028e-045c-5777-98bf-31cb8ac56e7b.html   A website on the complex history of the 'monuments' on Monument Ave. : https://onmonumentave.com/ ******* Support the podcast on Patreon to contribute to our grassroots self-funding of this project.  Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: 'Sweat and Splinters' by Mother Marrow Additional music: 'Philosophers of Yeardley Drive:  Graduates of the Grapefruit' by Ted Packard Produced by: Opia Creative

1hr 19mins

4 May 2019

Rank #12

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Steven Edholm of Paleotechnics and Skillcult on bark-tanning leather naturally

Episode #23 the Ground Shots Podcast features a conversation with Steven Edholm who homesteads outside of Ukiah, California.   Steven co-runs an educational land skills project called Paleotechnics with Tamara Wilder and a skills-based YouTube channel called Skillcult which focuses on axes, fruit trees, grafting, hide tanning, primitive fire making, making lime for the garden, among many other topics. Steven has been researching and teaching self-reliance skills for several decades.   Steven Edholm and Tamara Wilder co-wrote a book on brain-tanning buckskin. The book is currently out of print, but they hope to get the popular guide reprinted soon! It's one of my favorite guides to the art of naturally tanning animal skins. If you can get a hold of one, I HIGHLY recommend it.    I housesat for Tamara Wilder for a short stint this past Spring. While on the homestead she shares with Steven, he and I sat down and recorded a conversation about bark tanning leather. It's a topic I'm really interested in and a skill I have taught a little bit over the years. It was a treat to chat with someone I consider an expert in the craft and ask them questions. In this conversation with Steven, we talk about: how natural bark tanning methods fell out of mainstream commerce why naturally tanned bark tanned leather is superior to chemically tanned leather Steven's history with various forms of hide tanning and reasons for getting into ancestral skills the basics of how to bark/vegetable tan leather using plants (we get super geeky here!) examples of possible plants to use in the leather making process some botanical tannin science troubleshooting bark tanning issues that come up ideas for a sustainable closed loop natural tannery network that integrates the garden why care about bark-tanning animal skins and other similar processes? philosophy: we were made to interact with the natural environment – what is it to be human? the importance of reviving old world craft processes accepting that we are nature too, and being involved with handcrafts gives a sense of deep satisfaction Links: Steven Edholm's website: http://skillcult.com/ Paleotechnic’s website: https://www.paleotechnics.com/ Skillcult on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/SkillCult Steven's free Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFZ-LGULm1gGhd3uOjiZr-A Lotta Rahme, Swedish author on bark-tanning leather mentioned on the the podcast: http://www.lottasgarveri.se/English.html info on sudden Oak death, a disease inflicting Oaks currently with possible devastating effects ecologically, mentioned in the podcast. Support the podcast on Patreon to contribute to our grassroots self-funding of this project.  Support the Ground Shots Project with a one time donation: paypal.me/petitfawn Follow our Instagram page for info on plants, the podcast and our travels: @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes and topics we visit Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project and general rambles The theme music for the podcast: 'Sweat and Splinters' by Mother Marrow Interstitial music: ‘Strong Like Sinew’ by Pterodactyl Plains Pterodactyl Plains on bandcamp : https://pterodactylplains.bandcamp.com Here's short film featuring Jessica Kilroy, one of the musicians behind Pterodactyl Plains, and a glimpse into the process behind the album ‘Creek Sessions’ from which ‘Strong Like Sinew’ comes. The album features sounds from open lands and natural soundscapes, while communicating the need for their protection.  Watch here: https://youtu.be/ypOPRjsf8AQ Produced by: Opia Creative

2hr

1 Sep 2019

Rank #13

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Katie Russell on building political and cultural bridges with the Buffalo Bridge Project outside of Yellowstone National Park

Episode #27 of the Ground Shots Podcast features a conversation with Katie Russell, the founder of the Buffalo Bridge Project on the ongoing work of the Buffalo Bridge Crew. We sat down to chat in my camper behind the laundromat in Twisp, Washington while we ate cherries and saskatoon berries.   Katie Russell lives in the Methow valley in Washington state, on the east side of the Cascades, which is in the rain shadow of those towering mountains. It’s an area with expansive rolling hills and mountains with dry and desert like conditions but also features a diversity of eco-zones with various conifers, quaking aspens, Ceanothus and more. Katie currently runs the Saskatoon Circle Gathering, an ancestral skill gathering that is held in the valley every year. Katie has a homestead in the valley, teaches ancestral skills and has such a cute family! (Thanks to Em for babysitting her child Ranger during our laundromat-camper hosted chat.) I’ve known Katie informally over the years and went to the Saskatoon Circle Gathering back in 2016, this summer being the first time I’ve been back in awhile. I’ve also been following the Buffalo Bridge Project for some time. Katie often will do presentations at ancestral skills gatherings about what the work entails, so I’ve learned a bit about it. Katie agreed to do an interview about Buffalo Bridge LAST year when I asked her (Spring of 2018) and we finally were able to sit down and do it this summer. To give you a little bit of a background to the project, I’m going to quote whoever wrote the description of their indigogo campaign (perhaps Harmony?) to raise money for the expenses involved, because they wrote it so poignantly: (words taken from BBP’s indigogo campaign:) During the winter of 2013, Katie stumbled upon the native buffalo hunt outside Yellowstone National Park. After meeting a few of the hunters and diggin' around in some gut piles, she knew she HAD to return to explore the possibilities. In winter of 2014, Katie gathered a small crew and returned to Yellowstone to make use of the left-behind pieces of the hunt - hides, skulls, bones, fur, organs, and more. The crew set up camp right outside the hunting grounds, ready at any time to help, to share knowledge, and to offer skills in anyway the families needed. In the process, BBP began making connections with the buffalo, the native hunters, the Buffalo Field Campaign, park officials, tourists and townsfolk alike. Focused on using every part of the animal, The Buffalo Bridge Project is building a bridge between cultures, factions, and political lines in the common recognition of the innate worth of the buffalo, and our own shared humanity. The project has continued every year since the initial camp outside of Yellowstone National Park. Less than 200 years ago, 60 million buffalo roamed the country. Their grazing patterns maintained the integrity of our native grasslands. They recycled nutrients back into the soil with every step, planting seeds, fertilizing and watering as the herds migrated over the prairies. Their wallows created much needed prairie lakes and ponds with precious freshwater ecosystems. They provided food and shelter for innumerable species, from frogs and lizards to antelope and beetles. The buffalo were one of the most important keystone species in the ecology of the plains, often referred to as "large scale ecological engineers."      Many of the nation's First People depended on the buffalo for most of their survival needs. Because they provided so much, the herds of bison became integral to almost every part of human life; they offered food, shelter, clothing, children's toys, silverware, blankets, clothing, rope, bags, water carriers, bowstrings, glue, tools, fire fuel, and more. The herds once numbered in the millions, and provided a comfortably abundant life for many of the buffalo hunting people. By the early 1900's, however,  European colonization had almost completely eradicated the species. Within a few generations, as few as 23 wild Bison remained. These solitary animals had survived by finding refuge deep in Yellowstone National Park's boundaries. The decimation of the wild buffalo was crippling to the cultural biosphere of the First Nations. The very fabric of the native's way of life had been destroyed, and as a result, much of the culture of the buffalo people was lost, relegated to the memories and stories of the people who still remembered the way it once was. Today, through many years of political conflict and ecological turmoil, the bison population in Yellowstone has grown to around 4,900. These are the last truly wild bison in the country. Yet every year, there is a state-funded culling of the bison, in which Yellowstone officials ship portions of the buffalo herd out to slaughter.  Very recently, several Native tribes have started exercising their treaty rights to hunt the wild bison, just as their ancestors have for hundreds, if not thousands of years. After almost 200 years of being severed from the very animal that was once the very heart of everyday life, many families are finally able to reclaim their traditions and reconnect with their cultural heritage once again. Buffalo Bridge is dedicated to honoring Buffalo Culture by remembering the traditions of the Buffalo People who have been living with and hunting buffalo since time immemorial. The Buffalo Bridge Project wishes to celebrate the sophistication, ingenuity, and resilience of these people by attempting to reconnect with these Old Ways of living and being. BBP also recognizes that these traditions are not our own, and think that its important to re-imagine our own ways of connecting with the land we now call our home. BBP feels that all of humanity has a shared past; one in which we all hunted animals and transformed animal skins into clothing, used stone knives, gathered plants, and made friction fire, and through enacting these very ancient patterns, we are able to remember our shared humanity. In this podcast episode with Katie, we talk about: what the Buffalo Bridge project is and how it started the different perspectives on how the buffalo should currently be treated a little on the history of the intertwined genocide of the buffalo and indigenous peoples who lived with the buffalo some information on when the state of Montana sued the federal government for the buffalo crossing out of federal land the area where Yellowstone National Park is as the 'cradle' of where buffalo spring from the earth, and where the last wild herd of buffalo still live the treaty that gave rights to indigenous people to hunt buffalo on their own ancestral lands and how that treaty was revived with the intentional revival of buffalo populations in the 90's how the folks at Buffalo Bridge navigate the cultural and political bridges in buffalo country how the folks at Buffalo Bridge play a role as scavengers in the buffalo hunt the 'ship and slaughter' baiting practice happening during the buffalo hunt to keep the buffalo numbers at a certain population and how it is a politically charged issue navigating why certain people fear the wild the important role of the buffalo ecologically Links: Facebook page for the project: https://www.facebook.com/oldwaysbuffalo/ Outside magazine article on the Buffalo Bridge Project: https://www.outsideonline.com/2086566/montanas-grid-bison-scavengers @buffalobridge https://www.instagram.com/buffalobridge/ @saskatooncircle https://www.instagram.com/saskatooncircle/ Saskatoon Circle website: https://www.saskatooncircle.com/ Buffalo Field Campaign, mentioned in the podcast: https://www.buffalofieldcampaign.org/ Support the podcast on Patreon to contribute to our grassroots self-funding of this project.  Support the Ground Shots Project with a one time donation: paypal.me/petitfawn  Our website with backlog of episodes, plant profiles, travelogue and more: http://www.ofsedgeandsalt.com Check the podcast page for beautiful photos of the Buffalo Bridge Project taken by Matt Hamon. Thanks for permission to use these photos, Matt!  Check out Matt Hamon's photography here: http://www.matthamon.com/the-gleaners Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: 'Sweat and Splinters' by Mother Marrow Insterstitial Music: ‘On my Knees’ by Mother Marrow Produced by: Opia Creative

1hr 8mins

10 Oct 2019

Rank #14

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Ep. 13: Aganaq Kostenborder on weaving with Willow, reconsidering weaving with culturally sensitive plants, getting to know plants over time

This episode of the Ground Shots Podcast features a conversation with Aganaq Kostenborder, a mixed indigenous weaver, craftsperson, seamstress, and artist currently living in Oregon. We talk about her relationship to Willow, rethinking weaving with culturally sensitive plants, watching plants and learning from them all throughout the year, how baskets can hold moments in time and place, how baskets can gravitate towards the people they are meant for. Aganaq and I have been friends for years, and met up this summer and recorded this conversation August 2018 in the back of my camper on the land she lived on at the time. Links: Aganaq on instagram: @aganaq buy a basket from her or send her money via Paypal so she can continue to do her work. **** Support the podcast on Patreon Help us get to 100 patrons! Subscribe as little as $1/ month. Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: buy Charity’s music!  Mother Marrow Additional music: ‘The Longest Loom’ by Mother Marrow Produced by: Opia Creative

55mins

25 Mar 2019

Rank #15

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Ep. 11: Woniya Thibeault on connecting to the wild through ancestral skills, farming, hide tanning and cultural sensitivity, Woniya's book projects and more.

Episode 11 of the Ground Shots Podcast. A conversation recorded by the south fork of the Trinity River in Hyampom, California with ancestral skills instructor Woniya Thibeault. We talk about: connecting to the wild through ancestral skills, the pros and cons of farming, wild tending, having cultural sensitivity around ancestral skills and an awareness of colonization, various fibers for spinning or knitting, the Weaving Earth program, Woniya's various book projects, and more.  **** Links: Buckskin Revolution - Woniya's website Woniya on Instagram: @buckskin_revolution ****** Support the podcast on Patreon : gain patron-only access to exclusive content associated with this conversation with Woniya.  Visit our website Of Sedge and Salt Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: Mother Marrow Additional music: Ary Feral Katz Produced by: Opia Creative

1hr 9mins

22 Feb 2019

Rank #16

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A musical ode to the Arrowleaf Balsamroot: a morning with Epona and Rainan Heathen at the Saskatoon Circle Gathering, in the Methow Valley, Washington

Episode #24 the Ground Shots Podcast features a field recording of a morning spent with Epona Heathen and her child Rainan outside their camp at the 2019 Saskatoon Circle Gathering in the Methow Valley, near Twisp, Washington. Epona sings a few striking and emotive songs for me, and speaks about her intentions behind her music. This episode is especially focused on Epona’s song ‘Our Lady of the Sunflower,’ an ode to the Arrowleaf Balsamroot, Balsamorhiza sagittata (Asteraceae), a common and gloriously beautiful plant of western turtle island that paints the hillsides yellow in Spring. In this conversation with Epona, we talk about: octave mandolins and Epona's relationship with the instrument some occasional comments and conversations from Rainan, Epona's child, in the background some of the seasonal and life cycle themes that inspire Epona's music Epona's journey writing music for Rainan and connecting with her ancestors for him Epona's Irish and West African roots in the mountains of western North Carolina opening up to the love of the land faces us with the grief of it's loss too Epona's relationship with the Arrowleaf Balsamroot plant Sitting with the land when grief arises Epona sharing some of the wisdom that Finisia Medrano shared with her over the years an experience Epona had in Hell's Canyon a few thoughts on tending the wild food gardens 'hoop' in the west thoughts on the coyote and modern culture Links: The Heathen Family on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/the_heathen_family/?hl=en Epona’s personal instagram: https://www.instagram.com/once_epona_tone/ A collaborative music project of Epona and Alex Heathen: Mirror Fauna. https://mirrorfauna.bandcamp.com/ Bob Gernandt instruments– octave mandolin/ irish bazooky: http://www.gernandt.com/ A book I think folks should read to follow up on our coyote talk in the conversation: 'Coyote America' by Dan Flores Movie trailer on film being made about Finisia Medrano called ‘The Life of Fin:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Vv9V-K7wc0 Support the podcast on Patreon to contribute to our grassroots self-funding of this project.  Support the Ground Shots Project with a one time donation: paypal.me/petitfawn Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: 'Sweat and Splinters' by Mother Marrow Produced by: Opia Creative

52mins

3 Sep 2019

Rank #17

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A candid evening of conversation in Santa, Idaho with Alyssa Sacora of the Patchwork Underground on The Ground Shots Project, travel, trauma, love, old ways of making things, connecting to the land through our work

Episode #22 of the Ground Shots Podcast This episode of the podcast features a conversation with Alyssa Sacora of the Patchwork Underground, who lives near Asheville, North Carolina. Alyssa came out to northern Idaho to take Jim Croft's 'Old Ways of Making Books' class held every year or every other year on the homestead of Jim Croft and Melody Eckroft, where I have been teaching the leather, parchment and brain-tan buckskin portion of the class. Alyssa makes books and paper, weaves baskets, and homesteads on her small property. We met back in 2013 when we both attended the Chestnut School of Herbal Medicine's in-person summer immersion program which at the time was held out of Leicester, NC. It was sweet to catch up with Alyssa, an old friend. We decided to do something different for this episode, where we chat informally and candidly about life, my project, our motivations for things and generally processing our shared experiences being at the class together in northern Idaho. This episode gets extra vulnerable for me, and you hear a lot more about my process and experience doing my work on the road. We have some guest mosquitoes buzz by the mic! In this conversation with Alyssa, we talk about: some of my own personal stories around trauma, travel  what is love? Alyssa reflecting on her experience at the 'Old Ways of Making Books' class exploring what it means to make things for your life linear vs. non-linear ways of teaching and learning the nature of acceptance and letting go, leaning into vulnerability and discomfort how we can plant seeds of inspiration for one another trusting in the mystery of the process Links: Alyssa Sacora's website: https://www.thepatchworkunderground.com/ Alyssa Sacora on instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thepatchworkunderground/ Interstitial music for this episode is Pretty Polly by Marisa Anderson  Marisa Anderson on Bandcamp:  https://marisaanderson.bandcamp.com Jim Croft's 'Old Ways of Making Books' class in Santa, Idaho where I taught hide tanning and visited during the month of July 2019. This is where I mention I edited and recorded the intro/outro for this and the next few episodes of the podcast:    https://cargocollective.com/oldway Support the podcast on Patreon to contribute to our grassroots self-funding of this project.  Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: 'Sweat and Splinters' by Mother Marrow Produced by: Opia Creative

1hr 15mins

3 Aug 2019

Rank #18

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Ep. 8: Mario Tarasco, N.D., on navigating accessibility of care in Naturopathic medicine, harm reduction approaches working with addiction, the opiate crisis and more.

Episode eight of the Ground Shots Podcast. A conversation with Naturopathic doctor and herbalist Mario Tarasco on working with low-income & at-risk populations as a Naturopathic doctor, taking the harm reduction and non-shaming approach to working with addiction, the current opiate crisis in the U.S., herbal apprenticeships and more. We talk about: How Oregon's laws make it easier than in other states for Naturopathic doctors to provide care for low-income and at-risk populations like trans youth, migrant workers, and more. Navigating how Naturopathic Medicine can be inaccessible and different techniques for working with people where they are culturally, financially, physically, etc. Mario's experiences working at the Rainbow gathering's first aid station while apprenticing for herbalists Corey-Pine Shane of the Blue Ridge School of Herbal Medicine and Sevensong of the Northeast School of Herbal Medicine and how these experiences in the field influenced the trajectory of his work. Taking the harm-reduction approach to providing care for folks with addiction and the importance of non-shaming and meeting people where they are and where they want to be with their health. Links:  Mario on Instagram: @amtarasco Mario's email if you have any questions: atarasco@nunm.edu Meet the Residents page on National University of Naturopathic Medicine's website featuring Mario and other current residents ****** Support the podcast on Patreon Visit our website Of Sedge and Salt Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: Mother Marrow Produced by: Opia Creative

1hr 11mins

6 Dec 2018

Rank #19

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Acoustic Ecology mixtape with Lisa Schonberg: using sounds from the Brazilian Amazon, Hawai'ian islands

Hey ya’ll, Episode #26 of the Ground Shots Podcast is a mixtape of work composed by the musician and ecologist Lisa Schonberg influenced by soundscapes from the land where she does scientific research. Lisa is featured in conversation in Episode #25 of the podcast. Listen to our conversation about Lisa’s music and research in #25, and then listen to this mixtape to enjoy Lisa’s work. Lisa plays with Secret Drum Band, a collaborative music project called Pattern Ecology, and UAU. More info and artwork can be found on our website: https://www.ofsedgeandsalt.com/ground-shots-podcast/lisaschonberg ****** Playlist: boulders (UAU) vons tundra (From Secret Drum Band’s ‘Dynamic’s’ album) Surface of Abyss at Ducke (From UAU’s Music for percussion // Soundscapes and ant acoustics of the Brazilian Amazon) dadada (From Secret Drum Band’s ‘Dynamic’s’ album) multispecies (Ants) with percussion (From UAU’s Music for percussion // Soundscapes and ant acoustics of the Brazilian Amazon) kīpukapuaulu (From Secret Drum Band’s ‘Dynamic’s’ album) polihale-kilauea-south point (From Secret Drum Band’s ‘Dynamic’s’ album) ******** Links: Lab Verde Brazil : an art immersion program in the Amazon: https://www.labverde.com/ Secret Drum Band: https://secretdrumband.bandcamp.com/ Lisa's website that features info on ATTA, the Hylaeus Project, Pattern Ecology and more: http://www.lisaschonberg.com/ HJ Andrews Experimental Forest https://andrewsforest.oregonstate.edu/ Signal Fire http://www.signalfirearts.org Digital Naturalism Conference we mention in the episode: https://www.dinacon.org/ @secret drum band : https://www.instagram.com/secretdrumband @patternecology: https://www.instagram.com/patternecology @lisaannschonberg https://www.instagram.com/lisaannschonberg/?hl=en @atta_ https://www.instagram.com/atta_ Support the podcast on Patreon to contribute to our grassroots self-funding of this project.  Support the Ground Shots Project with a one time donation: paypal.me/petitfawn   Our website with backlog of episodes, plant profiles, travelogue and more: http://www.ofsedgeandsalt.com  Our Instagram page @goldenberries Join the Ground Shots Podcast Facebook Group to discuss the episodes Subscribe to our newsletter for updates on the Ground Shots Project Theme music: 'Sweat and Splinters' by Mother Marrow Produced by: Opia Creative

40mins

26 Sep 2019

Rank #20