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EntreArchitect Podcast with Mark R. LePage

Architect Mark R. LePage explores the business of architecture, firm leadership and the everyday life of an architect. From Gābl Media, EntreArchitect Podcast features weekly interviews with inspiring, passionate people who share their knowledge and expertise… all to help you build a better business as a small firm entrepreneur architect. Proven business strategies for architects, including financial management, profit, marketing, sales, productivity, and planning.

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EA095: 5 Steps for Successfully Managing Your Architecture Client’s Experience [Podcast]

Your story in the mind of the client is your brand. That story is told, one chapter at a time, through everything you do and everything you say. At every point of contact your client is learning more about who you are and what you do. They are developing their thoughts and carrying their opinions about your firm at every step and throughout the entire process. It’s an overwhelming process with barriers and obstacles found throughout. The more we define these obstacles and develop systems that successfully guide our clients through the process with comfort and understanding, the stronger our brand will be. The story our clients tell their friends will be the story you want told. Throughout the process of delivering a typical architecture project, there is a series of touch points that our clients experience. The level of development, intention and management at each one of these points of contact determines the overall satisfaction of our clients. This week on the EntreArchitect Podcast, I will share 5 Steps for Successfully Managing Your Architecture Client’s Experience. Visit our Platform Sponsors ArchiSnapper A simple cloud-based tool for creating and managing field reports. Try the ArchiSnapper Field Report App Free for 30 Days FreshBooks The easiest way to send invoices, manage expenses and track your time. Access Your 30-Day Free Trial at FreshBooks.com/architect (Enter EntreArchitect) Referenced in this Episode EntreArchitect Hybrid Proposal Leave a review for this episode on iTunes Photo Credit: Shutterstock / Rasstock The post EA095: 5 Steps for Successfully Managing Your Architecture Client’s Experience [Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

34mins

15 Oct 2015

Rank #1

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EA130: How to Build a Successful Architecture Firm That Works with Architect Declan Keefe [Podcast]

This month, we’re shifting our focus from technology to management. How do we build a successful business? How do we build the right systems and team? How can we efficiently and effectively do what we do as architects in the most profitable way? This week on EntreArchitect Podcast, Declan Keefe of Placetailor talks about How to Build a Successful Architecture Firm That Works.  Declan spent his younger years focused on photography and fine arts before realizing that wasn’t the direction he wanted to go. He began to think about architecture as large-scale, “occupiable” sculpture, convincing himself that it was okay to transfer into architecture without compromising his creative path. While still in school, Declan found a job as a founding employee to start Placetailor, a firm that wanted to fully integrate the design and building process of architecture. Every member of the team had to have an understanding and a base skill set of being able to both design and build. Three years into the business, when he was a project manager and still in school, the founder of the company stepped away. Rather than allowing Placetailor to die, Declan stepped into the role of owner in 2013. Placetailor is working to provide a fun experience for clients by creating a brand with loud colors, snarky commentary, and relevance to the times. While splitting his time between design and working in the field, Declan realized that they needed to do some work to actually run a business. He put his head down in the office to figure out how to let people know who Placetailor was and how to convince potential clients that what they’re doing is a good idea. His plan was to transfer the business into an employee-owned cooperative. They began to test the boundaries of where architecture and construction met, and to figure out their roles in high-performance and energy-efficient buildings. How did he work to make that transition to a successful cooperative? Help each other to balance different strengths and weaknesses Incentivize with a three-year vesting period prior to becoming an employee-owner Test geographic and technological boundaries Strategized to streamline systems on larger scales for sustainability Developed bylaws as a cooperative, an operating agreement and general rules and guidelines for how they operate as a team How do they dream and decide on which decisions to move forward? A dream is born Decide how much time & money can be allotted to pursue that dream Invest in the idea first before someone else does Let ideas work through the architecture, development, construction and investment arms Prepare for meetings by trying to anticipate where different people are going to end up so the meeting can continue to think through impacts on the business Use digital minutes to track decisions throughout meetings Connect with Declan online at Placetailor.com and on Twitter @placetailor & Instagram. Visit our Platform Sponsor FreshBooks The easiest way to send invoices, manage expenses, and track your time. Access Your 30-Day Free Trial at FreshBooks.com/architect (Enter EntreArchitect) The post EA130: How to Build a Successful Architecture Firm That Works with Architect Declan Keefe [Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

53mins

1 Jul 2016

Rank #2

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How to Get Started as an Architect Developer (Best of EntreArchitect Podcast)

How to Get Started as an Architect Developer This week, enjoy the Best of EntreArchitect Podcast as Mark R. LePage invites Declan Keefe of Placetailor back to share his knowledge about How to Get Started as an Architect Developer. For full show notes and a list of references from the original podcast, visit EntreArchitect.com/EA134. Connect with Declan Keefe online at Placetailor.com and on Twitter @placetailor & Instagram. Visit our Platform Sponsors Freshbooks is the easy way to send invoices, manage expenses, and track your time. Access your free 30 day trial at EntreArchitect.com/FreshBooks. (Enter EntreArchitect) CORE by BQE Software is designed specifically for architect’s project management! Get a free 15-day trial of CORE at EntreArchitect.com/BQE. ARCAT has huge libraries of free content, Specs, CAD, BIM and more. No registration required. Want to collaborate with colleagues in real time? Visit EntreArchitect.com/ARCAT and click Charrette for more information. The post How to Get Started as an Architect Developer (Best of EntreArchitect Podcast) appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

1hr 15mins

25 Aug 2017

Rank #3

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EA187: 60 Minute Business Plan for Small Firm Architects [Podcast]

60 Minute Business Plan for Small Firm Architects Did anyone tell you you needed to know how to run a business when you became an architect? Whether clients come knocking or not, it’s not so easy to keep them knocking. The solution is to write a business plan. This week on EntreArchitect Podcast, 60 Minute Business Plan for Small Firm Architects. Maybe you’ve heard the words “business plan” and you feel yourself shutting down. Before you do that, let me share my vision. It came from years and years spent putting together my own various business plans. Finally, I put together a stripped down, one page version that I was able to put on paper quickly and develop as I went along. “The greatest value in creating a business plan is not the final document.  It’s the communication, the prioritization, the focus, the clarity, and learning that makes the process worthwhile.”  – Jim Horan Where are you now? Where do you want to be in the future? 5 Step Process for a Simple Business Plan for Small Firm Architects   Create a vision statement. Get a single piece of paper and write a single paragraph about your vision. What will your business look like? Where do you want to be? Do you want a high design firm? How much money are you making in your vision? What’s the big picture Consolidate that paragraph into a vision statement that embodies the essence of your vision. Describe your mission. Why did you become an architect? Why did you launch this firm? What propels you toward your vision? Develop simple strategies. Break it down into simple steps of how you’re going to reach your vision and mission. Create 5 steps and work your way backward from your end goal. What do you need to do to reach your goals? Make specific goals. Specify benchmarks that will lead you to execute your strategies. Be specific and give yourself a deadline for each. Commit to an action plan. What tasks will you complete to accomplish your goals? Who will work toward each goal? What does the time line look like? Find the steps required to reach your goals. Everything you need will go into this document. Once you’ve finalized your business plan, revisit it often. Revisit and revise your business plan 2-4 times a year to ensure that each piece is still relevant. This is an evolving document, and that’s okay! These periodic revisiting of your big ideas keeps you focused and wanting to push your firm further. What’s your vision for your architecture firm? Visit our Platform Sponsors Freshbooks is the easy way to send invoices, manage expenses, and track your time. Access your free 30 day trial at EntreArchitect.com/FreshBooks. (Enter EntreArchitect) Core by BQE Software is a brand new software designed specifically for architect’s project management! Get a free 15-day trial at EntreArchitect.com/BQE. ARCAT has huge libraries of free content, Specs, CAD, BIM and more. No registration required. Want to collaborate with colleagues in real time? Visit EntreArchitect.com/ARCAT and click Charrette for more information. Referenced in this Episode Leave a Rating and Review at iTunes EntreArchitect Academy The One Page Business Plan for the Creative Entrepreneur by Jim Horan Enrollment for the EntreArchitect Academy closes Friday, October 6, 2017! To learn more and sign up NOW, visit EntreArchitect Academy! Photo Credit: Shutterstock / Kucher Serhii (edited) The post EA187: 60 Minute Business Plan for Small Firm Architects [Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

26mins

29 Sep 2017

Rank #4

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EA121: The 12 Critical Categories of Business That Will Take Your Firm from Struggling Studio to Small Firm Success Story [Podcast]

In architecture school, we all had a dream of what we would become when we became architects; designing beautiful spaces and making the world a better place with each project. We each told ourselves a story of success as an architect. We imagined a studio filled with light, working with talented people and surrounded by the iterations of our creativity. Powerful projects, patrons and processes of purpose that allowed us to pursue our passions. How is your dream looking today? Are you succeeding or are you struggling? This week at EntreArchitect Podcast, Mark R. LePage will share The 12 Critical Categories of Business That Will Take Your Architecture Firm from a Struggling Studio to Small Firm Success Story. Business is a game, and like any game, you have to be able to learn and play by the rules to win. There are critical steps that need to be taken in order for our firms to thrive and become the success stories of our dreams. The only way to small firm architecture success is to hit each one of these twelve critical categories: Finance // Are your books in order? The numbers are how we make it all work financially. How do you manage your money? How do you put together your financial reports? Should you use debt to grow or not? Business Development (Sales) // If you don't have sales, you don't have business, you don't have an architecture firm. Are you selling your services? Leadership // Are you a strong leader? How can you become a small leader? Do you know how to build strong teams? Are you familiar with the roles, responsibilities, and results expected in your firm? Culture // Have you defined what your firm’s culture looks like? Are you intentionally developing your firm culture? Client Fulfillment // How do you manage the expectations of your clients? How do you develop systems that help you fulfill clients’ needs? How can you develop strong project management skills? Are you using the EntreArchitect Hybrid Proposal? Technology // What design software are you using? Are you using the best equipment and software that you can afford to make you into the most productive in what you do? Is your technology relevant and are you looking to the future technologies that architects will be using? Business Management // Who are the people in our firm and how are they working? What are the processes that those people are working with? What are the products and services that we’re creating and serving with? Do you have an interview process, a hiring process, a conflict/resolution process, a firing process? Are they documented? Personal Development // Are you learning and exploring to build a better you? What are you doing on a daily basis to care for yourself mentally and physically to make sure that you stay strong and healthy? Are you sharing what you know with others? Marketing // What strategies and systems of marketing do you have in place now? What types of marketing should you be developing? Are you connected through social networks? Is your website telling your story in a captivating way? Is it a way for you to connect further? Life // How do you integrate your firm with your personal life? Are you learning the skills of scheduling and prioritizing to live a better, more integrated life? Community // How can you build a business that does good for others while building a business that does well? Planning // Do you take time to look back at what you’ve been doing to evaluate if you’re on the right track with your goals? Can you look forward at how your plan will evolve further down the road? If you are running a firm, these things aren’t optional. Focus on each one of them, schedule time and be intentional to develop systems and strategies. Mark struggled and searched for the answers for years, but when he focused on the fundamentals, he saw his firm turn around. His projects got better and his business grew. He wants the same for every small firm out there, and that’s why he launched EntreArchitect Academy in 2014. Every month we’re diving deeper into these critical categories beyond what you see on the blog and hear in podcasts to learn all there is to learn. We have exclusive live trainings with experts who provide resources on what they know in each of these subjects. We break into smaller groups that support one another and help one another grow. Every member has access to our digital courses, document templates, systems templates from experts, and access to a whole library of videos that talk about so many topics. Early bird enrollment with a discounted rate is open until general enrollment opens. Enrollment for the EntreArchitect Academy opens on May 2nd and is limited to the first 50 new members! Click here to enroll in the EntreArchitect Academy Visit our Platform Sponsors FreshBooks The easiest way to send invoices, manage expenses, and track your time. Access Your 30-Day Free Trial at FreshBooks.com/architect (Enter EntreArchitect) Referenced in This Episode New Year. New Budget. [Blog] Basic Financial Statements for Small Firm Architects [Blog] 6 Ways Your Architecture Firm May Benefit from Working with an Investor [Blog] Financial Intelligence for Small Firm Architects [Podcast] 4 Steps for Changing an Architect's Mind on Money [Podcast] The One Thing by Gary Keller [book] Join us in Philadelphia at the EntreArchitect Meetup The post EA121: The 12 Critical Categories of Business That Will Take Your Firm from Struggling Studio to Small Firm Success Story [Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

41mins

29 Apr 2016

Rank #5

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EA192: Earl Parson – The Entrepreneur Architect Series [Podcast]

The Entrepreneur Architect Series: Earl Parson At EntreArchitect, you’re encouraged to share your knowledge. When we share with other architects, we all benefit. We are able to learn from one another and the profession will grow. One of the goals of EntreArchitect is to provide a platform for other entrepreneur architects to share their stories. We want to interview you! What’s your story? Do you want to share your knowledge or the story about how you were inspired to pursue this profession? How do you become an entrepreneur architect? Join us for our series called The Entrepreneur Architect, where each guest has the opportunity to share their story and answer some questions that will provide value to each of you. This week on EntreArchitect Podcast, The Entrepreneur Architect Series featuring Earl Parson. Background Earl Parson is an architect based in Los Angeles, California practicing residential architecture as Parson Architecture and is the founder of CleverModerns.com, an online platform empowering DIY owner-builders with plans and coaching. Origin Story Earl was born and raised in Muncie, Indiana, and his life intersected with architecture as a kid when his best friend’s dad was an architect. He saw the giant drawing boards and electric erasers, which may not have directly inspired him, but was a role model in his life of an option when he grew up. His dad owned a two story, three storefront building downtown as an investment and hobby, and there were constantly projects to fix it up that Earl was around. In addition, they added on to his house while he was growing up. There was a moment where he began falling in love with the old buildings. Though he knew he wanted to be an architect, he wanted to get out and explore the world. He spent time in St. Louis for his undergrad and ended up at SCI-Arc for grad school. He worked for some architects around town and then ended up on his own after the recession, and never looked back from there. After graduating, Earl and a friend took a summer off doing design work, building furniture, and other odd jobs. Later, he worked for Marmol Radziner, W3 Architects, and Studio Works, and eventually got a full time job Pasadena City College teaching drawing and Keating. After the recession, he started Parson Architecture. In 2009, some friends connected him with a gallery in Chinatown where architects and designers came together and had a show of furniture and other objects. Earl started doing some work for daycare facilities that required a certain amount of professionalism, creating a great growth opportunity to establish business practices. Where and when did you start welding? When Earl was a kid, his grandparents lived on a farm in southern Indiana. His grandpa made everything he had on his farm. He had a lightbulb moment seeing his grandpa create and realized that everything that had ever been created was first thought of and built by someone. Once he bought a house and had the space, he bought a welder and started accumulating equipment. That creative outlet kept him sane during the recession. What big goal did you achieve?  Earl entered the Charrette Venture Group Business Plan Competition. He received an honorable mention, but the real achievement was the mental and psychological hurdles it took to enter. Thought it took courage, Earl worked to develop his plan and put it out to the world. He would sit down each morning for about an hour to develop his ideas. Earl relearned how to have an idea and develop it so that it’s something worth considering. What is Clever Moderns? It’s a platform that Earl is currently developing. The idea is to be a passive income strategy to grow a community around people supporting each other in the home DIY owner-builder world. Not only do they want to sell the plans, but Earl wants to provide coaching and support for people who want to build the homes themselves. There are a lot of people out there that love the idea of having interesting architecture and design who may not go out and hire an architecture. In there is the hidden market for those who want help and encouragement to do it themselves. The lightbulb moment came when it dawned on Earl that rather than charging a better fee for his services, he just gave the plans away for free. If the plans are free, how does the rest of it work? Currently, Clever Moderns is building their first prototype houses. In northern Arizona, Earl is building Quonset huts. What has been your biggest struggle? For Earl, putting his ideas out there is terrifying. The fear of creating a newsletter was holding him back. Earl’s friend Halelly Azulay at TalentGrow LLC encouraged him to get at it and offered support. His secret method to focus is to put his phone in airplane mode. It becomes a psychological barrier that says he’s focusing his time on the most important thing in his immediate present.  Quick Questions What's your target market? For Clever Moderns, it’s DIY Quonset people. What's your fee structure? Parson Architecture is a stipulated sum generally based on a percentage, for Clever Moderns is more of an hourly consulting fee Other than architecture, what makes you happy? Playing the piano. What's the best advice you've ever received? Get your architecture license. What's one personal habit that contributes to your success? Meditation. What's a recommended app or internet resource? Google Chrome internet browser, Speed dial 2 to open various windows and easily go where you want, Trello and LastPass password manager What's a book you'd recommend? Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol S. Dweck What is the one thing that small firm architects can do today to build a better business tomorrow? “If you really want to improve your business for tomorrow, you have to do the hard work of sitting down with a blank piece of paper and develop the ideas that are going to shape your business.”  – Earl Parson Connect with Earl online at Parson.Architecture.com and CleverModerns.com. Follow his  on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Visit our Platform Sponsors Freshbooks is the easy way to send invoices, manage expenses, and track your time. Access your free 30 day trial at EntreArchitect.com/FreshBooks. (Enter EntreArchitect) Core by BQE Software is a brand new software designed specifically for architect’s project management! Get a free 15-day trial at EntreArchitect.com/BQE. ARCAT has huge libraries of free content, Specs, CAD, BIM and more. No registration required. Want to collaborate with colleagues in real time? Visit EntreArchitect.com/ARCAT and click Charrette for more information. Charrette Venture Group invests in small- to mid- sized architecture firms with the goal to create action behind aspirations. Do you want to become a larger, stronger business? Visit EntreArchitect.com/CVG to learn more! Referenced in this Episode Download the Profit For Small Firm Architects course for FREE. Leave a Rating and Review at iTunes DIY Quonset Dwellers on Facebook The post EA192: Earl Parson – The Entrepreneur Architect Series [Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

1hr 4mins

3 Nov 2017

Rank #6

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EA045: 10 Tips From a Recovering Procrastinator [Podcast]

My name is Mark R. LePage and I am a recovering procrastinator. After 40+ years, I don't have much hope of ever finding a cure, but recently I have found some ways to hang on to the wagon and stay focused on getting things done. With so many things on my plate, I often find myself paralyzed with overwhelm and I get nothing done. I fall back on old bad habits of soothing time wasters like clicking the Get Mail button on my Mac over and over again and checking my email for the next very important message. Or I find myself on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram or all three, refreshing over and over again hoping to see the next update. Anything to make myself feel like I am accomplishing something. Anything to keep me from doing the things that really matter. The things that will help me progress and take my firm to the next level. I am sure this all sounds too familiar to you. I can tell you though that I am getting much better at conquering this painful habit of procrastination. Among running my architecture firm, Fivecat Studio, building the Entrepreneur Architect platform, launching the Academy and committing to getting some real sleep, I have found it necessary to find effective ways to stay productive during the day. I have read books. I have listened to podcasts. I have searched the web, high and low, to find as much information as possible on the subject of procrastination and how to conquer it. So today on the Entrepreneur Architect Podcast, I will share 10 tips that I am using to conquer my procrastination. Please review this podcast on iTunes. Referenced in this Episode Erik J. Fisher’s Beyond the To Do List Podcast Fivecat Studio Entrepreneur Architect Academy The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business The 12/12/12 Project Archispeak Podcast *** Photo Credit: stuartphoto / 123RF Stock Photo The post EA045: 10 Tips From a Recovering Procrastinator [Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

25mins

12 Sep 2014

Rank #7

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EA185: The Passion, The Process and Problems of Running a Design/Build Architecture Firm [Podcast]

The Passion, The Process and Problems of Running a Design/Build Architecture Firm Do you want more control? More money? More happy clients? More architecture with better design? Is design/build the answer to our professions problems? Will building your own projects be the solution to success for your small firm? What does it take to run a successful design build firm? This week on EntreArchitect Podcast, Mark speaks with Jim Zack and Declan Keefe about The Passion, The Process and Problems of Running a Design/Build Architecture Firm. About Jim and Declan Jim Zack is based in San Francisco, California as the co-founder and partner at his design build firm, Zack de Vito: Design + Build. He visited EntreArchitect Podcast on EA102: Risks and Rewards with Architect Developer Jim Zack. He’s a current facilitator at EntreArchitect Academy’s Design/Build Mastermind Group. Declan Keefe is a founder and owner at Placetailor and a three-time guest at EntreArchitect Podcast: EA130: How to Build a Successful Architecture Firm That Works with Architect Declan Keefe, EA141: How to Build a Brand that Resonates with Your Most Valuable Clients, EA134: How to Get Started as an Architect Developer. How are your design/build firms structured? Jim has been involved in building things for a long time and he’s been in business for 25 years. He began working construction when he was 15 and was trained in carpentry long before he was an architect. Zack de Vito is organized as two different companies: one a construction company and one architecture firm. They’ve found that a lot of liability and contractual details organize themselves well in those two separate businesses. Conceptually, they try to make it feel like one company. Architects come to the office and sit and draw, and construction workers go to the site and build. As hard as they try to integrate the two day in and day out, it may not always be as seamless of a process. Zack de Vito has a project manager, estimator, a partner at the construction company, 6-10 carpenters, and 5-8 people in the office ranging from an interior designer to Jim’s wife, who performs office management and marketing for the firm. Placetailor is set up similarly although technically their architecture and construction companies are formally one business, where their development entity is a separate business. As far as scale, Placetailor has almost the same team setup as Zack de Vito. Their business came from a true design/build model where they weren’t doing any design for any other firms, and all their projects were able to be completed internally. In the last few years, they’ve switched to provide architecture for other builders as well. Even though they’re one business, they functionally work as architecture, construction and real estate development. Development is separated because it has a much higher level of risk involved. Was there a point where you went from  a traditional architecture firm to an architecture design/build firm? For Jim, it’s been an evolution. He’s entrepreneurial by spirit, and did a design/build project with his dad when he was 23 years old to design and build two house and each have one. Eventually he went to architecture school, bought a house and remodeled it. When he opened an office and started making things, his knowledge led him here. He wanted to be a cool designing architect who wanted to get his hands dirty. A lot of their work has been self-motivated projects where they design and build buildings that they owned. The more they did it, the more they realized they needed to start doing that for their clients as well. Declan’s business was started as a design/build firm. They saw a split between architects and builders in the industry that was leading to lower quality buildings and design, and they decided to do something about it. As they began to create higher quality buildings, they quickly got into high performance, energy efficient models, which launched them into the energy efficient design side that they’re working in now. The development side came from their desire to create consistent work; they decided to take the risk and create their own projects. They wanted to create a demonstration to other developers: if they could prove the business model to other developers, they would hire Placetailor to do the design/build work they wanted to be doing. Now they’re even doing development consulting where they share how they do things and find success doing it. Declan, how does your employee-owned business work? When someone becomes an owner, they are an equal part owner: they have an equal equity stake and a equal vote. Anyone who comes into Placetailor who sticks around for three years and meets a certain line of criterion, then they can become an owner too. Right now, there’s five owners and a sixth coming in at the new year. There are five more people in the company who, if they’re around in a few years, may also have an opportunity to become an owner. The ownership decisions are defined really clearly, and everyone has to be on board for a decision to move forward. As an ownership, they’ve decided what percentage of profits are evenly distributed among the owners. What advice would you give to someone looking into design/build? It depends on the market and the person. Jim is a “maker”, and the motivation to build is what got him to this place. You have to make a decision on the front end: are you a builder or a manager contractor? There are a lot of design companies who want to start managing constructing but are effectively managing owner builder projects. They’re set up so the client takes all the risk and they just kind of assist through the process. If you’re a young architect doing it on your own, and you’re doing it to have control, you’re doing it for the wrong reasons already. Declan believes you need to learn how to communicate, facilitate and manage. Do it because it’s the business model you believe in and it’s the way in which you want to work. If you want to be able to actually manage things, you need to do the work to gain the knowledge of what’s hard, what things cost, why to make one decision over another. If it’s possible and you’re willing, find someone who’s willing to take you under your wing and learn the skills you need to know. First, figure out why you’re doing this. If you’re looking for control over the project, you may be looking for more of an architect as developer role. What are some risks of being a design/build architect? Figuring out how to profit from construction is a huge challenge. There can be a naive attitude that the contractor figures out the price, puts a markup at the bottom and walks out with a bonus at the end. It’s taken them a lot of time to work out how to best manage their finances. The “huge markup” turns into nothing if you don’t manage it well. To build a building verses design it, there’s a lot more people involved. When you deal with more people, you have the risk of dealing with all the things that could happen with all the people that are involved. These things can happen in any business, but the more people the greater the risk. It makes things difficult on the hiring side; how do you know if someone is good at their skill until you get them in the field with your team? Every little decision affects your bottom line.  A big part of being a design/builder is trusting that you have the right people in place who can do their jobs. If you can’t let go, you won’t be able to do the job with all the moving pieces that go into it. The skillset of an architect is set up to think creatively about the business side, but often we see people falling into the same, easy business model. You can do your business differently if you want. What would you say is the best part of being a design/build architect? Jim enjoys going by the job site, seeing the development, the framing, the foundation, the finishing, and the final product. He loves being involved in the day to day construction. Declan loves having the team, those who are doing the job in the field, in the office, and on the investment end. There’s a wide range of amazing people they get to put together to make amazing things for their clients. Connect with Declan Keefe online at Placetailor.com and on Twitter @placetailor & Instagram. Connect with Jim Zack online at ZackdeVito.com or on Facebook. Visit our Platform Sponsors Freshbooks is the easy way to send invoices, manage expenses, and track your time. Access your free 30 day trial at EntreArchitect.com/FreshBooks. (Enter EntreArchitect) Core by BQE Software is a brand new software designed specifically for architect’s project management! Get a free 15-day trial at EntreArchitect.com/BQE. ARCAT has huge libraries of free content, Specs, CAD, BIM and more. No registration required. Want to collaborate with colleagues in real time? Visit EntreArchitect.com/ARCAT and click Charrette for more information. Referenced in this Episode Leave a Rating and Review at iTunes EntreArchitect Academy Photo Credit: Shutterstock / Zolnierek The post EA185: The Passion, The Process and Problems of Running a Design/Build Architecture Firm [Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

59mins

15 Sep 2017

Rank #8

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EA102: Risks and Rewards with Architect Developer Jim Zack [ Podcast]

A dream for so many of us small firm architects; design, build and develop our own residential architecture. No rules. No limits. No clients. You make the decisions for what gets built and what does not. There is much risk in residential development, but there is also much reward. Creative rewards, professional rewards and financial rewards. This week on the EntreArchitect Podcast I am speaking with Jim Zack of San Francisco-based Zack DeVito Architecture about his risks and rewards as an architect developer. Visit our Platform Sponsor FreshBooks The easiest way to send invoices, manage expenses and track your time. Access Your 30-Day Free Trial at FreshBooks.com/architect (Enter EntreArchitect) For an exclusive tour inside FreshBooks, join me and Tim Lee from FreshBooks at this free video series. Referenced in this Episode Zack DeVito Architecture and Construction Jonathan Segal Architect The post EA102: Risks and Rewards with Architect Developer Jim Zack [ Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

47mins

4 Dec 2015

Rank #9

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EA126: Successful Technologies for an Architect Startup with Architect Danny Cerezo [Podcast]

It's June and all month long we here at EntreArchitect are focusing our content on the category of Technology. On the blog, here on the podcast and inside EntreArchitect Academy we are diving deep into the many technologies we can use to make our architecture firms run more efficiently and more effectively. This week Mark R. LePage invited the co-founder of a relatively new firm to join us to discuss the many technologies that he is using to launch his small firm. Architect Danny Cerezo is on the show and he and Mark discussed Successful Technologies for an Architect StartUp. Danny Cerezo is based in Los Angeles, CA and is the principal and co-founder at c|s design. After spending time in service with the Navy, Danny worked for a developer near Palm Springs. He attended Woodbury University in San Diego and graduated with a Masters in Real Estate Development geared for and taught by architects, following that up with working to earn his general contractor’s license. After finishing and selling some projects, creating relationships and getting requests for architecture work on the side, he and his wife, Pam, formed c|s design. What technologies are you using in your firm? Design Software // Whatever’s best for the task at hand. For renovation and addition projects, Chief Architect. Primarily for design they use Revit, but are considering switching to ArchiCad as Mac users. Project Management // For overall project management, Trello for the big picture to create systems, project templates, and identify steps for each phase. For detailed task management, ToDoist. Evernote to easily scan documents, record audio, organize, search and share files for each project. “If anybody’s not using EverNote, I would say pause the podcast right now, go download it and then come back. It’s fantastic.“ Danny also uses a smart pen called Livescribe that’s digitally connected so that every page from the notebook automatically gets uploaded to Evernote. Accounting // FreshBooks for the ease of use and its robustness where clients can come in to check retainers, invoices received and paid, expenses and track time. QuickBooks as a preference for their accountant, who’s then able to check their work. In order to avoid doing the work twice, a Zapier account integrates the two softwares. Communication // Primarily using email but considering using Slack to capture all the information in one repository. Mobile Apps // Dropbox as a server. Social media apps like Morpholio to share creative ideas and SquareSpace to host their website. Website // CandSDesign.com and the blog are geared more towards clients. To share within the profession of architects, Danny uses Medium to blog on topics like “6 Things I Learned My First 2 Years Running Our Architecture Firm” and “Architect as Developer. You Can Do It Too.” Connect with Danny on Facebook, Twitter @dcerezo_LA and @csdesignla, LinkedIn, Instagram and Medium @csdesignLA. Visit our Platform Sponsor FreshBooks The easiest way to send invoices, manage expenses, and track your time. Access Your 30-Day Free Trial at FreshBooks.com/architect (Enter EntreArchitect) Referenced in This Episode Check out the FreshBooks Video Rate and review the EntreArchitect podcast on iTunes Do you have an architect or entrepreneur that you’d like to hear featured on EntreArchitect Podcast? Tell us about it! Email support@entrearchitect.com. The post EA126: Successful Technologies for an Architect Startup with Architect Danny Cerezo [Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

47mins

3 Jun 2016

Rank #10

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EA004: Selling Architecture as a Product with Karl Daubmann of Blu Homes

Subscribe at iTunes Blu Homes has reinvented residential design with their patented folding prefab construction… offering architecture as a product. Todays guest at The Entrepreneur Architect Podcast is Blu Home’s VP of Design, Karl Daubmann. We talked about Karl’s background, how he landed an architect’s dream job at Blu and their integrated approach to delivering custom prefab modern homes throughout the United States. If you liked Episode 1 with my friend Christopher Pollard, you’re going to love my conversation with Karl. Blu is taking home construction and the business of architecture to the next level. We discussed how Blu is changing the home building industry and what architects can learn from Blu’s success. Topics Discussed in This Episode Roger Williams University Massachusetts Institute of Technology University of Michigan PLY Architecture Integrated design Architecture as product The differences among modular, panelized and Blu’s patented folding designs The birth of Blu Homes in 2008 Founders; Bill Haney, Maura McCarthy and Dennis Michaud CATIA 3D Software Founded by entrepreneurs and developed as a business, rather than an architecture firm Problems with past prefab companies Architects vs. Business Secrets to success for Blu Home The importance of company owned factory and on-staff tradespeople How Blu Homes is funded and future investment Similarities to tech company business structures Prefab developer markets Pricing of typical Blu Homes house Growth of the company The benefit of Blu NOT being a “architecture firm” Tips for architects wanting to explore alternative paths to the traditional firm Links Blu Homes University of Michigan Taubman College School of Architecture + Urban Planning Faculty Directory PLY Architecture Dana Smith of Dadascope Leave a Review for this Episode The Entrepreneur Architect Podcast on iTunes The post EA004: Selling Architecture as a Product with Karl Daubmann of Blu Homes appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

44mins

13 Apr 2013

Rank #11

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EA215: A Step-by-Step Guide to Becoming an Architect Developer [Podcast]

A Step-by-Step Guide to Becoming an Architect Developer If you’re interested in becoming an architect developer, this is the episode for you! This week at EntreArchitect Podcast, A Step-by-Step Guide to Becoming an Architect Developer with Danny Cerezo of cs design. Background Danny Cerezo is originally from New York City, but moved to LA long ago. He has a bachelors in Architecture from USC and a masters from Woodberry San Diego where he studied under famed architect developers Jonathan Segal and Ted Smith. He’s a liscensed general contractor who has recently started a contracting firm with a development partner where he’s now designing and building a development project as an architect. Origin Story Hear Danny’s origin story in EA126: Successful Technologies for an Architect Startup with Architect Danny Cerezo. cs design is a small husband and wife firm in LA. In 2008, Danny decided he wanted to pursue the architect as developer route, and today the firm is split between traditional projects and partnering with developers to do their own projects. In LA, there is so much development that isn’t necessarily attractive, and it made Danny wonder why people weren’t developing things that were more architecturally significant. Through talking with others, he found a whole world of people who were architects and developers and took a leap. If someone wants to be an architect developer, what should they do? For Danny, he knew that he wanted to do it but didn’t have any money. The natural action for him was to find someone to partner with. The developer he went to work for was willing to do some smaller projects with their funds and equity. How do you show someone that you have the skills needed to take their money and turn it around for a profit? You have to learn how to walk the walk and talk the talk. What are the fundamentals of real estate development? Do you know how to do a pro forma? Can you talk about risks and potential pit falls of a project? Are you familiar with comps? Build up a base of tools and knowledge. Figure out how to convey your goals to those who you’re hoping will fund your development. Danny has written the whole process out on Medium. What’s a pro forma? It’s typically a spreadsheet that shows what it would cost to do Project X, where that money comes from, what the return will be, and what everyone gets from the project. How much are you putting in and how much are you getting out? What is the process as an architect developer? Danny suggests staying local. Jonathan Segal says, “If you can’t get to it in 15 minutes, it’s too far”. You’re familiar with what’s closest to you. Once you find the land, figure out how you’re going to borrow the money for the lot. Get as creative as you want with how you acquire the land. Once you pull the money together, give a verbal offer or letter of intent. Next, there’s 12 months to pay the financiers back through the construction loan. That means there’s 12 months to design, permit and get a construction loan. The construction loan that you get covers the cost of the land to pay back your sellers, the money for the fees, and pay for construction. Usually the bank will loan you 75% of the total development cost, which allows us to pay back the sellers and start construction. If you borrowed a dollar, you have a dollar to spend. As an architect developer, you only have the money that you have to spend, because you have to pay out what the pro forma says to each party at the end. After we’re done and we get our certificates of occupancy, we hope to sell them for the prices we had in the pro forma. Then, we pay back the bank for the construction loan and those who gave us the money for the  soft costs. Whatever’s left goes to the developer, the fee and interest negotiated over time. During construction, is the process different doing it as a developer? The only difference is that you’re way more involved. On a typical project you may be doing some construction administration and some site meetings. For architect developers, you’ll go to the job sites every week and sometimes more. You’re way more invested in it than a typical agreement, and that’s a selling point when you’re looking for a partner. You care about the project more than the next firm because you want it to succeed. You also know the pro forma and what the parameters are around what can make this project fail or succeed. Having been there from the beginning, you know what the project hinges on and you have to be involved to makes sure it stays on track. What do you do for marketing? Throughout the project, stay on social media and share what you’re doing. Pick a good real estate agent who can get the word out and create interest. Where are you now and what are your next steps? Danny’s first project started in 2015, and now they’re framing the second project and have another one they’re about to submit for permits. They have a general contractor company and are starting to look at larger projects. Are you rolling your profits into the next project? Once this project sells, part of the money will go to savings and the other part will allow him to contribute more to the pro forma and become a bigger stakeholder in deals moving forward. Eventually, the goal is to have enough paydays to be ready if a great opportunity comes along. What is the one thing that small firm architects can do today to build a better business tomorrow? “Play a simple ‘what if’ game. What if _____. Think of something beyond your comfort zone. What if you did that? What’s the worst that could happen if you did?”  – Danny Cerezo Download Danny’s free Architect Developer Worksheet Connect with Danny online at CandSDesign.com or find him on social media on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Medium. Visit our Platform Sponsors Freshbooks is the easy way to send invoices, manage expenses, and track your time. Access your free 30 day trial at EntreArchitect.com/FreshBooks. (Enter EntreArchitect) ARCAT has huge libraries of free content, Specs, CAD, BIM and more. No registration required. Want to collaborate with colleagues in real time? Visit EntreArchitect.com/ARCAT and click Charrette for more information. Referenced in this Episode Join The EntreArchitect Community on Facebook Download the Profit For Small Firm Architects course for FREE. Leave a Rating and Review at iTunes EA126: Successful Technologies for an Architect Startup with Architect Danny Cerezo [Podcast] The post EA215: A Step-by-Step Guide to Becoming an Architect Developer [Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

54mins

13 Apr 2018

Rank #12

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EA270: How To Build a Brand as a Small Firm Architect

How To Build a Brand as a Small Firm Architect No matter what business you’re in today, a lot of your business success relies on branding and marketing. What should your small architecture firm be doing to make sure that your brand is being shared correctly? This week at EntreArchitect Podcast, How To Build a Brand as a Small Firm Architect with Bryon McCartney. Connect with Bryon online at ARCHMARK.co or find him on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. You can access your free web presence audit at ARCHMARK.co/EntreArchitect. Join us in Las Vegas for the 4th Annual Small Architecture Firm Meetup! CLICK HERE for details and to RSVP. Visit Our Platform Sponsors Freshbooks is the easy way to send invoices, manage expenses, and track your time. Access your free 30-day trial at EntreArchitect.com/FreshBooks. (Enter EntreArchitect) ARCAT has huge libraries of free content, Specs, CAD, BIM and more. No registration required. Want to collaborate with colleagues in real time? Visit EntreArchitect.com/ARCAT and click Charrette for more information. Resources from this Episode StoryCanvas example for a Commercial Real Estate Developer StoryCanvas example for the movie Star Wars Differences between Advertising, Marketing, Public Relations and Branding: The post EA270: How To Build a Brand as a Small Firm Architect appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

55mins

10 May 2019

Rank #13

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EA089: Field Guide Series – Passive Income for Small Firm Architects [Podcast]

Imagine working in your studio, designing a great project for another happy client and your receive a notification on your iPhone that Paypal dropped $50 in your pocket. Then after work, you head over to the ball field to watch your daughter's game. As you are cheering her on, Paypal drops another $50 in your pocket. The next morning, you wake up, check your email and there are 5 more notifications. Two hundred and fifty dollars was delivered to your account while you dreamed. Sounds crazy? Well it's not… That could be you with some work up front and minimal maintenance, you can develop strategies for an additional income to supplement your income as a practicing architect. This week on the EntreArchitect Podcast, I've invited my good friend Eric Reinholdt of 30×40 Design Workshop to join us for Round 2 of the Field Guide Series. This week, we're talking Passive Income for Small Firm Architects. Visit our Platform Sponsor ArchiSnapper.com (Creating and Managing Field Reports – 30 Days Free) Referenced in this Episode Field Guide Series – Building,Branding and Marketing Your Startup Design Business 30X40 Design Workshop The Unofficial Guide to Houzz.com: Create a Profile That Resonates with Clients and Outranks Your Competition (Book – Affiliate Link) Architect and Entrepreneur: A Field Guide to Building, Branding, and Marketing Your Startup Design Business (Book – Affiliate Link) Smart Passive Income (Pat Flynn) WordPress.com (Free Blog Platform) WordPress.org (Self-Hosted Blog Platform WooCommerce (WordPress Plug-in) GumRoad.com Amazon Associates Affiliate Program " target="_blank">Bluehost.com (WordPress Hosting Service – Affiliate Link) YouTube Advertising HowToArchitect.com Doug Patt on EntreArchitect Podcast Episode 52 30X40 Design Workshop Channel on YouTube Aweber.com (Email List Service – Affiliate Link) MailChimp.com (Email List Service) Fedora.com (Digital Courses) Udemy.com (Digital Courses) ArchiOffice Charrette Venture Group Fulfillment by Amazon Marmol Radziner Jewelry Houzz.com e-junkie.com (Selling Digital Products – Affiliate Link) EntreArchitect Facebook Group Join Eric’s “Street Team” for his next book Photo Credit: Shutterstock / Max Sattana The post EA089: Field Guide Series – Passive Income for Small Firm Architects [Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

1hr 5mins

3 Sep 2015

Rank #14

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EA252: How to Develop an Architecture Fee Proposal that Converts [Podcast]

How to Develop an Architecture Fee Proposal that Converts As architects, we know that our fees are a direct reflection of the work we do. Yet all too often, the way that our potential clients perceive our fee proposals doesn’t address our clients’ emotional needs and the value that we bring as design professionals. This week on EntreArchitect podcast, How to Develop an Architecture Fee Proposal that Converts with Ian Motley of Blue Turtle Consulting. Connect with Ian online at BlueTurtleMC.com or find him on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Want to learn more about how to address the emotional needs of your clients? See if Ian is coming to a city near you for his Fee Proposal Workshop Series! Enroll in the EntreArchitect Membership FREE for 30 days! To learn more and sign up NOW, visit EntreArchitect. Visit our Platform Sponsors Freshbooks is the easy way to send invoices, manage expenses, and track your time. Access your free 30 day trial at EntreArchitect.com/FreshBooks. (Enter EntreArchitect) ARCAT has huge libraries of free content, Specs, CAD, BIM and more. No registration required. Want to collaborate with colleagues in real time? Visit EntreArchitect.com/ARCAT and click Charrette for more information. Referenced in this Episode Join EntreArchitect Membership Request Free Access at The EntreArchitect Community on Facebook Leave a Rating and Review for the Podcast at iTunes The post EA252: How to Develop an Architecture Fee Proposal that Converts [Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

4 Jan 2019

Rank #15

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EA204: Construction Administration for Architects is NOT an Option [Podcast]

Construction Administration for Architects is NOT an Option A very popular topic around EntreArchitect is the role of the architect in the construction phase.  The number of firms providing architecture services and forfeiting Construction Administration is surprising. One member of The EntreArchitect Community recently shared, “I need to get better at selling my clients on construction administration. Most think they don’t need it and refuse it when I offer. I had a recent client back out on the service because my drawings were essentially too well done. Once they saw the final drawings, they decided the contractor could handle it without my involvement.” This week at EntreArchitect Podcast, Construction Administration for Architects is NOT an Option. During the past few years, we’ve began to discuss, as a profession, taking back the process.  The goal is to be viewed once again as the leaders of the construction industry. To make this happen, we must literally take control of our projects and lead the process from beginning to end. Construction Administration is not an option to be offered as an additional service, it’s an integral part of the architecture process. Do you need to get better at selling your clients on construction administration? Imagine a surgeon preparing for surgery and then handing it over to someone else to execute, or a lawyer spending months preparing a prosecution and then heading back to the office to prepare for a new case before the trial is over. It’s no different for architects. We spend months preparing a design, we work our way through three levels of increasingly difficult development and documenting exactly how a structure is to be built. How can we give it away? We’re responsible for the health, safety and welfare for the creations we make and we’re legally liable for what’s constructed from our designs. It’s our responsibility as licensed professionals to observe the construction of our designs and confirm that they are being built as we designed them. Fivecat Studio Architecture provides Construction Administration on every project from a storage shed to a completely new construction. How do we do it? We’re a full-service architecture firm. We help our clients organize from their first ideas of the projects all the way through the end of construction. Most clients have no idea how our process actually works, and yours don’t either. If you offer a service as optional, a client will look at it as such. Fivecat Studio proposes one fee that includes Construction Administration as a part of the overall service. If a client asks if they’ll work without construction administration, Mark and Annmarie let them know it isn’t an option for them. 8 Reasons Why You Provide Construction Administration We lead weekly project meetings and review the progress of construction.We’re there to monitor things and support them in answering questions throughout the process. We confirm that the contractor is executing the project as per the design and specifications.Our client just went through a whole process that involved a lot of time and money, so they want the project done the correct way. We’re available to quickly resolve unforeseen issues and unexpected conditions so construction progress isn’t delayed.Time = money, and, in our clients’ mind, having an experienced professional to walk through that process and keep things on track during inevitable crisis is invaluable. We review the contractor’s payments so we can have more leverage during construction.This allows us to protect the clients’ interest and confirm that they’re only paying for what’s appropriate at that stage of the project. Now the client feels confident that what they’re paying is accurate. We review shop drawings and submittals.We make sure they’re what the owner has payed for and help the contractor resolve any issues that may arise. We assist with preparing and confirming the completion of the punch list and that the certificate of occupancy is issued. We’re there to review and assure that everything is taken care of. We are legally responsible for the health, safety and welfare of the users of the buildings we design.We confirm that all the building and environmental codes are being observed. As licensed professionals, it’s our firm’s policy to be involved in the construction of every project. Ultimately, we need to protect our firm’s legal exposure in terms of liability. If you want to work with us, we have to be involved in Construction Administration. The success of our firm depends on this. When we waive Construction Administration, we lose our ability to resolve issues quickly and may create bigger problems for ourselves. We’re ultimately working for our clients’ satisfaction, and, if we’re absent during construction, it’s really hard to manage expectations and keep our clients happy. The experience during construction is what clients will remember most when others ask for their referral. The success of your firm depends on your involvement every step of the way.  Visit our Platform Sponsors Freshbooks is the easy way to send invoices, manage expenses, and track your time. Access your free 30 day trial at EntreArchitect.com/FreshBooks. (Enter EntreArchitect) Core by BQE Software is a brand new software designed specifically for architect’s project management! Get a free 15-day trial at EntreArchitect.com/BQE. ARCAT has huge libraries of free content, Specs, CAD, BIM and more. No registration required. Want to collaborate with colleagues in real time? Visit EntreArchitect.com/ARCAT and click Charrette for more information. Gusto is making payroll, benefits, and HR easy for small firm architects. Get an exclusive, limited time detail. Sign up today and get three months free.  Visit EntreArchitect.com/Gusto and claim your free three months today! Referenced in this Episode Download the Profit For Small Firm Architects course for FREE. Leave a Rating and Review at iTunes EntreArchitect Membership Access Mark’s fully customizable Owner/Architect Agreement at EntreArchitect.com/hybrid. The post EA204: Construction Administration for Architects is NOT an Option [Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

32mins

26 Jan 2018

Rank #16

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EA013: Profit… Then Art | Architects Build a Better World By Making More Money [Podcast]

It’s Official! The Entrepreneur Architect Podcast is now on a weekly schedule. In this, my 13th episode, I share the new schedule for everything Entrepreneur Architect including the weekly podcast and the new publication date for The Entrepreneur Architect Report, my free weekly newsletter. My weekly blog articles will continue to be published on Monday mornings. A new episode of the podcast will be posted every Thursday morning, taking the slot from the newsletter. The newsletter will move to Friday afternoons. Read the newsletter while you are preparing for your weekend, or save it to read with your Sunday morning coffee. The best part is that there will be more Entrepreneur Architect every week for you to enjoy. This episode of the podcast is my first solo show since introducing the podcast over a year ago. With the new weekly schedule, I will have the time to produce more solo shows where I will share more of my personal thoughts on business success in architecture, as well as anything else I care to discuss. No worries though… my interviews with interesting and inspirational people will continue as well. The topic for this episode is Profit… Then Art. It is inspired by the first section of my ebook, The Entrepreneur Architect Manifesto, which reads; I believe we need to focus on profit before art. I hear it everyday from architects, saying that the money doesn’t matter. We should do it for the love of the profession, for the art of architecture. Yes. We must do it for the love of the profession and for the art, but we should be rewarded commensurate with what we bring to this world. We bring beauty and function and design and comfort and consistency and warmth and convenience We do that. Architects do that. No other profession can do that. Each time we board an airplane, we are reminded of the procedures in case of an emergency. We are told, if the cabin loses pressure, oxygen masks will drop from above. We are told to first care for ourselves before assisting other passengers. Why is that? We must care for ourselves first because if we are unconscious or incapable, we can be no help to other passengers. Similarly, if we do not first care for our businesses before we care for our art, we will not be around to create our art. We must have healthy, profitable businesses in order to continue our mission of making the world a more beautiful, more functional place. If you want to read all of The Entrepreneur Architect Manifesto, you will receive a copy for free when you subscribe to my newsletter, The Entrepreneur Architect Report. If you are already a subscriber and did not receive a copy of the ebook, thank you, because you were an early subscriber. Send me an email and I will send you a copy for free. Other links from this episode: How to Become the Richest Architect You Know Sign up for the Entrepreneur Architect Academy Pre-Launch List *** photo credit: jirotrom via photopin cc The post EA013: Profit… Then Art | Architects Build a Better World By Making More Money [Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

30mins

9 Jan 2014

Rank #17

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EA003: Storytelling with Architect Collier Ward [Podcast]

Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe via RSS Architects are storytellers. We all know stories inspired by architecture. Stories of success and failure. Our greatest works of architecture hold stories that are passed down from generation to generation; no different than great works of art or a classic novel. Today on the podcast we’re speaking with architect and storyteller Collier Ward. By day, Collier is an architect with the firm CASA Designs in Huntsville, Alabama, but at every other waking moment, he’s a storyteller. Sit back, relax and listen as Collier tells us a short story that he wrote just for us at the Entrepreneur Architect Podcast. Links from This Episode http://www.getstoried.com (Know Your Story) http://www.duarte.com/ (Tell Your Story) http://www.nanowrimo.org/ (Write Your Story) Collier’s blog: http://www.buildingcontent.highercontent.com On Twitter: collier1960 AND BuildingContent E-mail: collier1960@hotmail.com Please remember to leave a review of The Entrepreneur Architect Podcast at iTunes. The post EA003: Storytelling with Architect Collier Ward [Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

27mins

13 Mar 2013

Rank #18

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EA091: Beginning Your Career in Architecture with Kevin J. Singh [Podcast]

One guest-post that has made a major impact on the EntreArchitect Community was written by architect and educator Kevin J. Singh about a year ago. That post, 21 Rules for a Successful Life in Architecture, is consistently one of the most visited articles on the site. This week I invite Kevin to join us here on the EntreArchitect Podcast to expand his thoughts on that article and discuss his new e-book, Beginning Your Career in Architecture, inspired by that original post. Visit our Platform Sponsor ArchiSnapper.com A Simple Cloud-Based Tool for Creating and Managing Field Reports Try the ArchiSnapper Field Report App Free for 30 Days Referenced in this Episode The Journey to Success Begins Within You (blog) 21 Rules for a Successful Life in Architecture (blog) Beginning Your Career in Architecture: Candid Advice for Emerging Professionals (e-book) The post EA091: Beginning Your Career in Architecture with Kevin J. Singh [Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

30mins

17 Sep 2015

Rank #19

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EA146: Design-Build is the Future of Architecture with Luis Jauregui [Podcast]

Design-Build is the Future of Architecture Architecture, construction, interiors and furniture. This week’s guest is a successful architect from Austin, Texas serving the high-end residential market. He started his firm with a single speculative project and grew it into a $20 million integrated design-build firm. How does a design-build firm like this work? How do they structure their fees and communicate with one another? How do they ensure that every project is built to the exact standards promised by their powerful brand? This week at EntreArchitect Podcast, Design-Build is the Future of Architecture with architect Luis Jauregui. Luis is originally from Mexico, and his family moved often when he was a child giving him great exposure to different architecture styles throughout the country. His father was a civil engineer, so the construction concept was already built into him. In high school, he discovered how exciting building was to him. He enrolled in the school of architecture in Mexico City, and within two months of starting school the teachers went on a strike that lasted for months. He then came to the US and attended Texas A&M with a degree in Environmental Design and a Masters in Architecture. He felt fortunate to have a professor who saw some of his work and helped him find a job with an architect. By the time he graduated with his Masters degree, he had six years of experience working with four different architecture firms. One of his mentors began developing his own projects as an entrepreneur and influenced Luis greatly. In Mexico, architects typically run their own construction companies and the consumer comes directly to them for a building. Within two years of graduation, Luis was ready to start his own design-only firm. Soon after, he pulled together some money for a lot and began developing properties in Austin and San Antonio. In 1986, the market crashed and and he felt really fortunate to still find some great commissions despite the downturn. Currently, Luis’s firm practices in Houston and Austin, and serves design-build clients throughout the Dallas area as well. Why did you decide to pursue client-service projects, rather than continue with spec buildings? Design came from a lesson learned: the speculative market has a lot of ups and downs. The custom business emphasized great design, and built them into a great, well-known brand which allows them to spread to other cities. They started the interior design branch of the company, which hurt the brand a bit with a lack of control of the interiors. When a client asked if they could offer furniture recommendations, the interior design team kicked Luis under the table so they jumped into furniture design despite the fear to try something new. Where did your initial fear with selection furniture come from? The fear came from it being an unknown thing and the fact that there were others in the market who were doing a great job. The entrepreneurial spirit pushed Luis forward to being a leader in the industry. How does your fee structure work? The speculative work is one price for everything. Because they’re selling a product, everything is included in the sale price. Client services are the custom part of the business so it works very traditionally. Instead of “architectural services”, Luis wants his clients to understand that they’re engaging a design-build enterprise; the final project is not going to be a design only. In the contract, they specify that they have ownership of the drawings until they go to construction. From that point on, they move to the “pre-construction” and then the construction contract from the state of Texas. Can you walk us through your process? The preliminary stage prepares a cost estimate with every specific piece of the project projected. That way there’s no mystery of cost, so they can move forward to the construction process and continue to fine-tune the cost as they go. Having control of the cost allows them to manage the experience that the client has. How do you create an experience for your clients? Luis feels the responsibility and burden of the control that they have, and uses it strictly for the benefit of the client. In order for their brand to work well and maintain trust with their clients, Luis is very conscious of the fears that the client may arrive with and works to put those to rest with his presentation and process. How does your marketing work? Luis deemphasizes referrals because he doesn’t want to have to rely on his busy, wonderful clients to get his next client; that’s not a very reliable way to do it. What makes the phone ring is having a great brand (a great website, advertising in magazines, hosting events at homes, etc.) that you can spread around to others. Do you have a specific sales process? Over many years, Luis has tried to have someone strong at sales by his side throughout the process. His wife (who is his partner and a real estate specialist) knows the company, the costs and the firm’s story. She is a great person to pick up the phone and work with the client. It’s important to recognize what your strengths are and allow everyone to work in their area of expertise. What’s one of the biggest challenges you have? Because they control the design and the construction, it’s too easy for the construction arm to talk to the design team and ask them not to throw in any difficult designs. It’s important to Luis that the architectural design stays in tact. While everyone needs to listen to one another, it needs to be the right balance that ultimately clients benefit from. It’s a constant process of fine-tuning to prepare for and move through each aspect of the project. What is the one thing that small firm architects can do today to build a better business tomorrow? “Communication is key. Talk to your team, learn about construction, be involved and create those kind of networks. Step away from the keyboard and the design table and spend time in the field. Pay attention and connect to other networks of people.” – Luis Jauregui Connect with Luis online at JaureguiArchitect.com or on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Visit our Platform Sponsors TruStile is a leader in high end, architectural interior doors. Visit them at TruStile.com to learn more! Tanglewood Conservatories combines the romanticism of the 19th century glass architecture with state-of-the-art technology today. Learn more at TanglewoodConservatories.com. Referenced in this Episode Cyber Monday 50% Off! Check out our Hybrid Proposal Course, Construction Management Course, Get Focused Productivity and Foundations Business Forms and Checklists from the Black. Available Friday, November 25 through Cyber Monday, November 28, 2016. Offer is available only to subscribers of the EntreArchitect Report. Not subscribed? Visit EntreArchitect.com/newsletter to sign up and take advantage of this great deal before Monday! EntreArchitect Profit Plan Course (free) The post EA146: Design-Build is the Future of Architecture with Luis Jauregui [Podcast] appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

47mins

25 Nov 2016

Rank #20