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Parenting with a Story Podcast

Updated 15 days ago

Education
Kids & Family
Society & Culture
Self-Improvement
Parenting
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Tell a young person what to do – play fair, be yourself, stick to the task at hand – and most will tune you out. But show them how choices and consequences play out in the real world, and the impact will be far more effective and long lasting. Based on interviews with over 100 people from around the world and from all walks of life as they reflect on their most profound and unexpected moments of clarity about who they are and how they should treat others. The lessons help teach 23 powerful character traits that will help your child grow into the adult you’ll be proud to call your own. Character Traits include: ambition, open-mindedness, creativity, curiosity & learning, courage, integrity, self-reliance, grit, hard work, self-confidence, money & delayed gratification, health, positive mental attitude, dealing with loss, kindness, patience, fairness & justice, humility, respect for others, friendship, social intelligence, forgiveness & gratitude, appreciation of beauty.

Read more

Tell a young person what to do – play fair, be yourself, stick to the task at hand – and most will tune you out. But show them how choices and consequences play out in the real world, and the impact will be far more effective and long lasting. Based on interviews with over 100 people from around the world and from all walks of life as they reflect on their most profound and unexpected moments of clarity about who they are and how they should treat others. The lessons help teach 23 powerful character traits that will help your child grow into the adult you’ll be proud to call your own. Character Traits include: ambition, open-mindedness, creativity, curiosity & learning, courage, integrity, self-reliance, grit, hard work, self-confidence, money & delayed gratification, health, positive mental attitude, dealing with loss, kindness, patience, fairness & justice, humility, respect for others, friendship, social intelligence, forgiveness & gratitude, appreciation of beauty.

iTunes Ratings

14 Ratings
Average Ratings
12
0
1
0
1

Ok ok

By poopantor - Jul 27 2019
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I googled would you rather for kids and this came up I’m not trying to say this is a bad podcast but I googled would you rather and all they talk about is their children i’m listen I’m not trying to be that one guy but still

Excellent stories, great podcast

By Pankeyman LR - Jul 30 2014
Read more
Excellent stories, quick, to the point & thought provoking. A great podcast for parents.

iTunes Ratings

14 Ratings
Average Ratings
12
0
1
0
1

Ok ok

By poopantor - Jul 27 2019
Read more
I googled would you rather for kids and this came up I’m not trying to say this is a bad podcast but I googled would you rather and all they talk about is their children i’m listen I’m not trying to be that one guy but still

Excellent stories, great podcast

By Pankeyman LR - Jul 30 2014
Read more
Excellent stories, quick, to the point & thought provoking. A great podcast for parents.
Cover image of Parenting with a Story Podcast

Parenting with a Story Podcast

Latest release on Oct 16, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 15 days ago

Rank #1: Montessori Parenting Without a Montessori School

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You’ve no doubt heard that Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin were educated at Montessori schools and attribute much of their success to that upbringing.

So, what if you want those kinds of opportunities for your kids, but you don’t have the resources or the opportunity to do that where you live?

The answer, according to a Montessori teacher in Amsterdam, is that you can create the same environment at home, without the school.

This week on my podcast I was joined by Simone Davies, author of the new book The Montessori Toddler: A Parent’s Guide to Raising a Curious and Responsible Human Being.

She shared a few simple ideas parents can use at home to get those same Montessori school benefits at home. Listen to our conversation above, and check out her book here.

You can learn more about Simone, her book, and her ideas at https://www.themontessorinotebook.com/.

Click these links to subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or Stitcher, or Podbean.

Paul Smith is one of the world’s leading experts on business storytelling. He’s a keynote speaker, storytelling coach, and bestselling author of the books Lead with a StoryParenting with a Story, and Sell with a Story.

Connect with him via email here.

Follow him on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram.

Sign up for his newsletter here to get one new story a week delivered to your inbox.

The post Montessori Parenting Without a Montessori School appeared first on Paul Smith | Business Storytelling Coach.

Apr 16 2019

31mins

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Rank #2: Teaching Your Kids to Think Critically and Detect C.R.A.P. Online

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This week I got a chance to chat with digital literacy educator Diana Graber. Diana is the author of RAISING HUMANS IN A DIGITAL WORLD: Helping Kids Build a Healthy Relationship with Technology and the creator of Cyber Civics, a course taught in 42 States and 4 other countries.

It was an eye opening discussion and I’m definitely going have some different discussions with my kids about their use of technology — and probably my own as well.

Her new book covers a number of topics related to kids and their online behavior, including:

  • What is appropriate screen time per week,
  • How to maintain your privacy online (Hint: Don’t take quizzes! They just collect your information to sell to advertisers),
  • How to protect your reputation online, and
  • Online relationships: cyber bullying, sexting, and safety

But what I wanted to talk to Diana about was a chapter in her book called Critical Thinking, which is really about media literacy and how to not be fooled by everything you see on the Internet. Gullibility to propaganda has caused nations to crumble, and ruined the lives of people unable to spot truth from fiction.

We had a wide ranging discussion that touched on a lot of problems and solutions. Click the play button above to listen. If you’re in a hurry, you can read an excerpt from that chapter of her book below. But the conversation is more fun.

Excerpt from Raising Humans in a Digital World

If you’re at all familiar with middle school kids, then you know they love anything remotely scatological (think fart jokes). That’s why I love telling kids I’m going to teach them about crap. It gets their attention every time. . .

In [his book] Net Smart, something of a guidebook for the digital age, [Howard] Rheingold suggests that a crucial “digital know-how” skill needed today is “crap detection.” He defines “crap” as “information tainted by ignorance, inept communication, or deliberate deception.” According to Rheingold, “Learning to be a critical consumer of web info is not rocket science. It’s not even algebra. Becoming acquainted with the fundamentals of web credibility testing is easier than learning the multiplication tables. The hard part, as always, is the exercise of flabby think-for-yourself muscles.”

I try to help my students exercise these muscles by using crap detection’s handy acronym, C.R.A.P. An unforgettable tool to assess the veracity of online information, C.R.A.P. is a set of four questions you can ask yourself whenever you encounter something dubious online. Variations can be found all over the internet, and here are mine:

Currency
• How current is the information?
• How recently was it was posted? Has it been updated?

Reliability
• How reliable is the information?
• Does the author provide references or sources?
• What proof do you have that the information is reliable?

Author
• Who is the creator or author of the information? What are her credentials?

Purpose/Point of view
• What is the purpose of this information? Is it intended to inform, entertain, or persuade?
• Does the information sound like fact or opinion? Is it biased?
• Is the creator or author trying to sell you something?

Personally, I rely on the C.R.A.P. test a lot. Like most people, I’m a sucker for salacious headlines. But if they seem suspicious, I give them the test (please bear in mind, online misinformation is nonpartisan, examples exist on both sides of the political aisle). Here’s one example:

One day while scrolling through my Facebook feed, a friend’s post caught my eye. The headline she shared read: “Shock Revelation: Obama Admin Actively Sabotaged Gun Background Check System.” Intrigued, I clicked on the article and discovered it was posted on a website called Conservative Tribune. While the website and article appeared current enough, neither seemed entirely reliable. The site was full of clickbait headlines sporting words like “vile,” “stunner,” and “disgraced.”

I checked out the author, and his humorous bio and few Twitter followers (only three people when I checked) made me wonder if he was a true journalist. So, I looked up Conservative Tribune on “Media Bias/Fact Check.” This is a media bias resource site—one of many online—that claims to be an independent outlet “dedicated to educating the public on media bias and deceptive news practices.”

There I learned that Conservative Tribune is a “questionable source” that “exhibits one or more of the following: extreme bias, overt propaganda, poor or no sourcing to credible information and/or is fake news.” I also discovered that the site “consistently fails fact checks, glorifies violence against Americans and Muslims,” and more. Finally, a scroll back through the Conservative Tribune website revealed a distinct purpose and point of view.

The article seemed like crap to me.

Back on Facebook, I returned to where the article was posted and in the upper right-hand corner selected “Report Post.” A box popped up that read, “Help us understand what’s happening,” under which I selected “It’s a false news story.” Facebook presented me with some options. I could block, unfollow, or unfriend the person who posted the story. I didn’t select any of those options, because I don’t want to end up in a filter bubble. Instead I selected “Mark this post as false news” and was done.

This entire process didn’t take much longer than it took you to read what steps I completed. It felt good, too! It’s the small part I can play to help curb the flow of fake news stories online. I encourage my students to take action when they see false information online, too. It’s important for them to use their critical thinking muscles and to feel like empowered digital citizens.

You can find Diana’s book wherever books are sold. Here’s a link to it on Amazon: https://amzn.to/2ENCwcV

If you’d like to learn more about Diana, you can find her at Cyberwise.org and Dianagraber.com. And you can learn more about her cyber civics course here: Cybercivics.com

Use these links to subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or Stitcher, or Podbean.

Paul Smith is one of the world’s leading experts on business storytelling. He’s a keynote speaker, storytelling coach, and bestselling author of the books Lead with a StoryParenting with a Story, and Sell with a Story.

Connect with him via email here.

Follow him on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram.

Sign up for his newsletter here to get one new story a week delivered to your inbox.

The post Teaching Your Kids to Think Critically and Detect C.R.A.P. Online appeared first on Paul Smith | Business Storytelling Coach.

Mar 06 2019

18mins

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Rank #3: Curiosity, and the Invention that Almost Never Happened

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One day, nine-year-old James was in the kitchen with his mom’s sister. Well, while Auntie was sitting at the table having a cup of tea, James was standing at the stove watching the tea kettle boil.

And he was just fascinated with it. He watched as the steam came out of the top of the kettle, and he held a spoon up into the jet of steam and watched as little drops of water condensed and ran down the spoon and dripped into a little cup. He just watched that cycle go over and over and over, just fascinated with it.

Well, eventually his Aunt just got frustrated with his laziness and barked at him, saying something like, “James, I’ve never seen such an idle boy! Go ride your bike, read a book, or do your homework. Aren’t you ashamed of yourself just wasting your time like this?”

Fortunately, young James was undaunted by his Aunt’s admonition. Because 20 years later, at the age of 29, and in the year 1765, James Watt reinvented the steam engine, ushering in the Industrial Revolution that we, of course, all benefit from today, and all based on a fascination with steam that he developed at the age of 9 in the kitchen.

How bad would it have been if that, and his other fits of “laziness” watching steam, had been squelched out of him by his parents or family? Just because your child doesn’t look like they’re working hard, doesn’t mean they’re not doing something important.

William Bennett, the former Secretary of Education, once observed,

The opposite of work is not leisure or play or having fun, but idleness—not investing ourselves in anything.”

Be careful not to discourage play. Discourage idleness. And for the record, watching TV is usually not play.

As with all of these stories, I encourage you to share this with your kids, and then have a discussion about it. Here are some questions to get you started.

  1. What do you think would have happened if James Watt’s aunt had kept him from ever playing with the tea kettle?
  2. Have you ever created anything interesting after just playing around with something?
  3. When do you think you’re most creative? In the morning? At night? When you’re bored? When you’re super busy?
  4. When are some times when it’s important to be serious and not play?

Use these links to subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or Stitcher, or Podbean.

Source: Parenting with a Story: Real-life Lessons in Character for Parents and Children to Share, by Paul Smith.

Paul Smith is one of the world’s leading experts on business storytelling. He’s a keynote speaker, storytelling coach, and bestselling author of the books Lead with a StoryParenting with a Story, and Sell with a Story.

Connect with him via email here.

Follow him on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram.

Sign up for his newsletter here to get one new story a week delivered to your inbox.

The post Curiosity, and the Invention that Almost Never Happened appeared first on Paul Smith | Business Storytelling Coach.

Jan 30 2019

3mins

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Rank #4: “Is that really what I need to be happy?”: How one Summer in Bombay Changed Me Forever

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Ami Desai Mathur was born in New York, a first-generation natural-born American citizen. Her parents were born in India and immigrated to the United States after getting married. During her first few years of life, Ami spent half the year living in New York and half the year in her aunt and uncle’s home in Bombay, India visiting family. Even after she started going to school, Ami and her mother traveled to Bombay for a few weeks every year or two until Ami graduated from high school.

The home her aunt and uncle lived in wasn’t just the home they lived in at the time. It was the home her mother and uncle had grown up in, and the one her grandmother had grown up in, and her great–grandmother had grown up in.

But if you’re picturing a fancy suburban estate the family owned, think again. It was a two-bedroom apartment they’d been renting for generations. In addition to the two small bedrooms, it had an eating area with a simple table and a cabinet against the wall for dishes, and a kitchen about five feet by five feet with a refrigerator, sink, and pot burner. And there was one bathroom with a sink and a hole in the ground for a toilet. By Western standards, it would be considered severely impoverished. But by local standards, it was quite normal.

And Ami has fond memories of visiting Bombay. During those visits, that simple two-bedroom apartment housed six people: her aunt and uncle, mother, grandmother, sister, and Ami. During the day, she would go shopping with her mother and buy all sorts of exotic things with their Western-size bank accounts, which were large by local standards, although quite modest back home in New York.

Well, at the end of one her visits to Bombay, Ami vividly recalls her uncle feeling some pressure to give her a gift before she left for home. And then he gave her, with some fanfare, a tiny gold-plated clock. She said, “I remember they were so excited and proud to give it to me. But I also remember feeling guilty taking it. I knew they didn’t have much money. And we had so much.”

But that wasn’t the only reason Ami felt awkward accepting that gift. The other reason was that while they clearly wanted to be generous, she realized they probably thought what Ami needed to be happy was a gift. In other words, they thought that for her to be happy, she needed more stuff.

The Lesson

That’s when it dawned on her, still at a young age, that more stuff wasn’t necessary for happiness. And she didn’t have to look far to see examples. Her aunt and uncle and grandmother living there were very happy people, and they had next to nothing.

So she started watching how they spent their time and noticed some differences.

In the U.S., what seemed to make people happy was buying a new TV, or some other material possession. But my aunt and uncle seemed so happy just going to the market to buy their daily food, or picking up a visitor at the train station.”

“When we got home every day, my grandma would cook the most wonderful meal for us. Then we would all go out and play together.

And friends and family were always stopping by to visit. We’d have tea and biscuits and talk with each of them every time. Back home in New York you’d need an invitation before showing up at someone’s house to visit. It would be rude to do otherwise. But in Bombay, it happened every day because you had dozens of friends who lived in the same building. We were never by ourselves and never bored. It was like an adventure every day.”

So, how did that trip affect Ami’s perceptions of money and material possessions? She told me, “I remember being upset just before leaving for that Bombay trip because my mom wouldn’t buy me the Keds sneakers with the blue dot that was all the rage at school.

But by the time I got home, somehow it didn’t seem all that important. The cheaper pair she got me at Walmart suddenly seemed just fine.”

Not everyone can afford the time and expense of a trip halfway around the world to learn the lesson Ami learned in Bombay. But you can start by sharing her story with your young person. Then talk about ways to spend your time that doesn’t involve buying lots of stuff.

As with all of these stories, I encourage you to share this with your kids, and then have a discussion about it. Here are some questions to get you started.

  1. How does your home compare to the one Ami’s family rented in Bombay?
  2. If having a fancy home isn’t what they needed to be happy, what do you think made them happy?
  3. How would you feel if you found out that your friends and family thought what you needed to be happy was a constant supply of gifts and other material possessions? Would you agree or disagree with that assessment? Would you be proud of it?]
  4. What does make you happy?
  5. What are the few basic material possessions you think you would absolutely need to be happy?

Use these links to subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or Stitcher, or Podbean.

Source: Parenting with a Story: Real-life Lessons in Character for Parents and Children to Share, by Paul Smith.

Paul Smith is one of the world’s leading experts on business storytelling. He’s a keynote speaker, storytelling coach, and bestselling author of the books Lead with a StoryParenting with a Story, and Sell with a Story.

Connect with him via email here.

Follow him on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram.

Sign up for his newsletter here to get one new story a week delivered to your inbox.

The post “Is that really what I need to be happy?”: How one Summer in Bombay Changed Me Forever appeared first on Paul Smith | Business Storytelling Coach.

Nov 28 2018

6mins

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