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Rank #173 in Music category

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Music

Classical Classroom

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #173 in Music category

Arts
Music
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There is a rumor going around that classical music is hoity toity. At Classical Classroom, we beg to differ. Come learn with classical music newbie Dacia Clay and the music experts she invites into the Classical Classroom.

Read more

There is a rumor going around that classical music is hoity toity. At Classical Classroom, we beg to differ. Come learn with classical music newbie Dacia Clay and the music experts she invites into the Classical Classroom.

iTunes Ratings

367 Ratings
Average Ratings
333
17
8
6
3

One of my favorite

By Yanchao - Dec 10 2018
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Thanks for being classical music to more people’s lives!

Great!

By anomalous.dispersion - Dec 04 2018
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This show is terrific and I’m thrilled that it’s back!

iTunes Ratings

367 Ratings
Average Ratings
333
17
8
6
3

One of my favorite

By Yanchao - Dec 10 2018
Read more
Thanks for being classical music to more people’s lives!

Great!

By anomalous.dispersion - Dec 04 2018
Read more
This show is terrific and I’m thrilled that it’s back!

Listen to:

Cover image of Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

There is a rumor going around that classical music is hoity toity. At Classical Classroom, we beg to differ. Come learn with classical music newbie Dacia Clay and the music experts she invites into the Classical Classroom.

Classical Classroom, Episode 64: RERUN - Journey To The Symphony’s Center

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We just heard that Classroom guest Peter Boyer is up to some big stuff (go Peter, it’s your birthday…):

First, the National Symphony Orchestra – that’s the orchestra in residence at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington D.C. – will be playing Peter’s work Rolling River (Sketches on “Shenandoah”) on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol on September 3, 2017;

And also, on September 9th, in an “It’s a Small Classical Music World After All” moment, Classroom alum Brett Mitchell will be conducting the Colorado Symphony and soloist Renee Fleming in a performance of Peter’s New Beginnings.

In honor of this news, we decided to rerun Peter’s episode. Enjoy!

Why do composers write symphonies? What goes into writing a symphony? If it has three movements, is it still a symphony? I mean, really: What IS a symphony anyway?! Grammy-nominated composer and conductor Peter Boyer answers all of these questions and more by taking us deep into his Symphony No. 1. From making dots on a page, to recording the piece with the London Philharmonic Orchestra at Abbey Road Studios, this is a tell-all of one composer’s creative process. Come along, won’t you? Goood. Goood…

Music in this episode:

Peter Boyer, Symphony No. 1. Played by the London Philharmonic Orchestra. Naxos 8.559769.

Peter Boyer, the London Philharmonic Orchestra at Abbey Road, London

Audio production by Todd “Twitchy” Hulslander with quasi-spiritual guidance from Dacia Clay.

Aug 21 2017

42mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 115: Awakening John Williams’ “Force” With Brett Mitchell

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This episode is full of spoilers – not just spoilers about The Force Awakens, but about future Star Wars episodes. Okay – they could be future spoilers. Right now, they’re just our attempts at trying to find the Easter eggs hidden in John Williams’ new score. This may be the nerdiest and most epic episode of Classical Classroom to date. Brett Mitchell, Associate Conductor of the Cleveland Orchestra and Music Director of the Cleveland Orchestra Youth Orchestra, is your guide through the music of the latest Star Wars episode. He teaches about John Williams as a composer and about important tools of the compositional trade, and reveals how this new music is tied to Williams’ scores for the original films. Mitchell takes no prisoners, and does not care for Ewoks. Prepare for hyperdrive.

Music for the episode:

  • “Ride of the Valkyries.” From The Ring Cycle, by Richard Wagner.
  • Music from the original motion picture scores for 
    • Star Wars: Episode 1, The Phantom Menace
    • Star Wars: Episode 4, A New Hope 
    • Star Wars: Episode 7, The Force Awakens

Audio production by X-Wing pilot Todd “Dameron” Hulslander with lightsaber sounds by Dacia Clay and editing by Mark DiClaudio.

Many thanks to Angela “Organa” Mitchell, Randy Davis, and Al Dahlhausen at WCLV for their help with this episode!

Like this episode? Check out Classical Classroom, Episode 4: Leitmotif In Star Wars, also featuring Brett Mitchell!

Jan 18 2016

58mins

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Classical Classroom Episode 3: Daniel Webbon teaches Steve Reich’s “Piano Phase” & Minimalism

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In this episode, Dacia Clay talks with MusicLab intern and Moores School graduate student, Daniel Webbon, about Steve Reich's "Piano Phase" andclassical music minimalism.

Audio production by Todd Hulslander and Daniel Webbon.

Apr 18 2013

18mins

Play

Classical Classroom, Episode 149: Beethoven In A Nutshell, With The Cypress String Quartet

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Before you get all excited, no: the Cypress String Quartet has not reunited. It’s just that we at Classical Classroom have been so busy that we’re a wee bit behind the times. By like…5 months-ish. This episode was originally recorded back in June of 2016, 3 days before the quartet’s last performance after 20 years together, and just after the release of their CD Beethoven: The Early String Quartets. CST members Jennifer Kloetzel (cello) and Tom Stone (violin) talk about how Beethoven’s music brought the group together, and about mastering his music from end to beginning. Learn about Beethoven’s periods and how his music toys with listeners’ emotions like a bad BF (Beethoven friend). Then learn who broke up the band!

Music in this episode (all Beethoven performed by the Cypress String Quartet):

  • String Quartet in B-flat Major Op.130  Grosse Fugue 

  • String Quartet No. 1 in F Major, Op. 18 No.1: II. Adagio affettuoso ed appassionato

  • String Quartet No. 8, Op. 59 No.2 “Rasumovsky”: II. Molto Adagio

  • String Quartet No. 8 Op. 59 No. 2 “Raumovsky”: III. Allegretto

Audio production by Todd “Middle Period” Hulslander with marginal help from Dacia Clay and assistance from Mark DiClaudio.

Nov 14 2016

20mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 173: Mozart’s Death Demystified (No Really!), With Robert Greenberg

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The story of Mozart’s death has, over the years, taken on an awful lot of…story. Extant theories regarding how he died number in the hundreds and are still emerging. Even yours truly did an episode of Classical Classroom to try to get to the bottom of the whole thing. In this episode, Dr. Robert Greenberg, a music historian and bestselling creator of courses for the Great Courses and the Teaching Company (and now, for Robert Greenberg Music), explains the facts that we know that we know about how Mozart died. Plus, we explore why it’s so hard for us to accept that incredible human beings like Mozart can, and do die, of totally boring, normal causes.

Audio production by Todd “Wolfie” Hulslander with suspicious eyeballing by Dacia Clay.

Jul 17 2017

28mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 52: RERUN - Inside A Boléro With Howard Pollack

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Ravel’s Boléro. Next to most of the soundtrack to Koyaanisqatsi, it’s possibly the most repetitive piece of music ever written, amiright (respect, Philip Glass)? As it turns out, I am wrong, so wrong. In fact, Boléro is a piece built entirely around change. Howard Pollack, professor at Moores School of Music, author, lecturer, and guest on BBC specials and NPR shows like Morning Edition and Fresh Airis our tour guide through this amazing piece of music by a very subtle and sneaky composer.

Music in this episode:

  • “Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy” from The Nutcracker Suite by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
  • Boléro by Maurice Ravel as performed by Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal, conducted by Charles Dutoit

Audio production by Todd “Treble Clef” Hulslander with bass clef by Dacia Clay.

May 22 2017

42mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 132: Tchaikovsky’s Dilemma, With Mei-Ann Chen

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When you hear the music of Pyotr Tchaikovsky, pretty much the last thing that comes to mind is self-doubt (Hello?! The man wrote actual cannons into his music!). But as conductor Mei-Ann Chenexplains, the Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture took him years to write because he was deeply self-critical. And his opinionated mentor, Mily Balakirev, didn’t help the situation. Learn all about Tchaikovsky’s creative process and about one of the most romantic pieces of music ever written in this episode.

Music in this episode:

  • Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Claudio Abbado conducting the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

Audio production by Todd “Toddkovsky” Hulslander with very bad ballet dancing by Dacia Clay and editing by Mark DiClaudio.

Mei-Ann Chen was in Houston for the Texas Music Festival, which continues through July 2nd. For more information, visit their website

Jun 27 2016

34mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 118: RERUN - Alisa Weilerstein On The Romance Of Rachmaninov

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Happy birthday, Rachmaninov!

Because Rachmaninov’s birthday and our Spring Break lined up so nicely, it’s obviously the perfect opportunity to repeat this episode. Back next week with more of the usual (i.e., heavy metal car racing stories with lots of explosions).

Cellist Alisa Weilerstein’s gives an introduction to the music of Sergey Rachmaninov. Who was this romantic man, and what makes him different from all the other guys – I mean, composers? Weilerstein walks us through Rachmaninov’s Sonata in G Minor for Cello and Piano. Plus, she talks about her musical relationship with performing partner, pianist Inon Barnatan, and what it’s like to be part of a long-term creative duo.

Music in this episode is all from Weilerstein and Barnatan’s CD, Chopin and Rachmaninov Cello Sonatas:

  • Sonata in G Minor for Cello and Piano, Opus 19. Sergey Rachmaninov.

Audio production by Todd “Toight like a toiger” Hulslander with grrrr aargh’s from Dacia Clay and editing by Mark DiClaudio.

If you enjoyed this episode with Alisa Weilerstein, check out her other Classical Classroom episode – all about the Aspen Music Festival and playing solo cello.

Mar 20 2017

24mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 4: Brett Mitchell teaches Leitmotif in John Williams’ Star Wars Score

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In this episode, conductor Brett Mitchell — Assistant Conductor for the Cleveland Orchestra, man of too many accolades to mention, and former Assistant Conductor of the Houston Symphony — talks about John Williams’ use of leitmotif in the score to the original Star Warsmovie. Listen, you must.

Audio production by Todd “Tatooine” Hulslander, with use of the Force by Dacia Clay.

For more about Brett Mitchell: www.brettmitchellconductor.com

Apr 24 2013

22mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 72: RERUN - You Don’t Know Fifth! With Emily Reese

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This show is from the Wayback Machine, and Emily has done a lot since this. She currently does a podcast called Level with Emily Reese for one, and she runs a company called Joon Media. (I’ll post what she was doing at the time of our interview below.) What I remember most about this interview is 1) having my mind blown about Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, and 2) Emily’s laugh, which I think you’ll agree is pretty great.

———————————————————————————————-

Beethoven’s Fifth. We’ve never done a show on it because everybody knows it! Right? Emily Reese, on air host for Classical Minnesota Public Radio, host of Top Score (part of the Infinite Guest podcast series), and creator of MPR’s Learning to Listen, says that we are wrong, so wrong! Emily takes us through the entire symphony, which, as it turns out, is completely surprising and amazing. Plus, we play drinking games! Or at least give you some to play.

Music in this episode:

  • Symphony No. 5, Ludwig van Beethoven. Played by Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique, and conducted by John Eliot Gardiner. Archiv.

Audio production by Todd “The Tower” Hulslander with fear of heights by Dacia Clay.

Jun 12 2017

40mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 123: Rachel Barton Pine On Bach Sonatas And Partitas

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Happy Bach’s 331st birthday! To celebrate, we had a partita party with violinist Rachel Barton Pine. (What’s a “partita,” you ask? Listen and learn, my friends.) Rachel explains Bach’s sonatas and partitas and what makes them unique, and walks us through several examples from her new album Testament, which she released on March 21st to coincide with Bach’s bday. Also discussed: What Bach means to her personally, and whether one needs to wear a beret when playing French music (spoiler alert: oui).

99% of the music in this episode is from Rachel Barton Pine’s new release,  Testament: Complete Sonatas & Partitas for Solo Violin by J. S. BachThe other 1% is the producer’s fault.

 

 Audio production by Todd “Partodda” Hulslander with sarabande by Dacia Clay and editing by Mark DiClaudio.

Mar 21 2016

23mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 192: The Hilarious History of Classical Music with Igudesman and Joo

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Aleksey Igudesman and Hyung-ki Joo make up the classical music comedy duo, Igudesman and Joo. And though they will crack you up with their performances (which you can watch on their YouTube channel along with millions of other viewers), when they talk about why they do what they do, the two musicians become surprisingly serious. They firmly believe that classical music was always meant to be fun. In this episode, they talk about the history of humor in classical music (even Beethoven was funny!), the forces that conspired to make it stuffy, and what they're doing to change that, including their upcoming performance, The Clone, with Yuja Wang. 

Music in this episode:

Special thanks to Todd Reynolds for his music, Taskforce: Farmlab from Outerbourough

Feb 11 2019

39mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 57: …To Holst’s Planets With Joshua Zinn

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Take an interstellar journey to one of classical music’s most influential works.

Climb aboard the great Classroom space coaster for a trip to Gustav Holst’s The Planets! Composer, MusicLab intern, and self-described professional nerd Joshua Zinn is our captain on this journey through one of classical music’s most influential and popular works. Who was Holst? How did he write the music for Star Warsbefore the movie existed!? How does one actually pronounce “Uranus”? All of these questions and more will be answered!

Audio production by Todd “Titan” Hulslander with copiloting from Dacia Clay.

All music in this episode is from Gustav Holst’s “The Planets”.

Aug 11 2014

35mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 148: The Magic Of The Sorcerer’s Apprentice, With Houston Youth Symphony

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Learn about not one, but TWO amazing things in this episode: 

  1. The Houston Youth Symphony, an organization that’s been making music an important part of young peoples’ lives for 70 years, and
  2. “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice,” the symphonic poem written by the French composer Paul Dukas that Walt Disney brought to the masses in the movie Fantasia

Michael Webster, artistic director and conductor of the Houston Youth Symphony, and HYS bassoonist Derek Marcum play examples and take us through the entire magical piece. If you’re in Houston, you can catch Michael, Derek, and the rest of the Houston Youth Symphony playing Beethoven’s 9th to mark their 70th anniversary on November 13th. Learn more here.

Music in this episode:

  • “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice,” by Paul Dukas, performed by the Houston Youth Symphony
  • Clarinet examples by Michael Webster
  • Bassoon examples by Derek Marcum

Audio production for this episode by Mark “Guardian of the Mixing Board” DiClaudio and Todd “Groot” Hulslander with witty comebacks by Dacia Clay.

Nov 07 2016

33mins

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Classical Classroom Episode 23: RERUN - Bach’s Materials – The World Inside An Invention With Kurt Stallmann

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Continuing with our Bachtober celebration, we revisit this oldie but goody with Kurt Stallmann. 

Bach’s Invention No. 1 contains an entire universe of music as we learn in this episode with Kurt Stallmann, Associate Professor of Music at Rice University’s Shepherd School of Music. It gets metaphysical up in here, you guys.

Audio production by Todd “Birthday Boy” Hulslander, with happy claps of approval by Dacia Clay.

Music in this episode includes:

  • Johann Sebastian Bach, Invention No. 1 in C Major (from his Inventions and Sinfonias BWV 772–801, aka the Two- and Three-Part Inventions), played by Kurt Stallmann.

Oct 12 2015

31mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 193: Bach in the Underground with Cellist Dale Henderson

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To get ready for Bach's March birthday, we bring you the fascinating story of a man on a mission to bring Bach to the people. Bach's music changed cellist Dale Henderson's life. Though the concert hall was a fab venue for sharing this music, Dale wasn't satisfied to stop there. Bach's music, he felt, was for everyone  - not just classical music fans. So he schlepped his cello down into a New York City subway, and started playing "pop-up" concerts (for free). And thus, Bach in the Subways was born. The ongoing project now spans more than 40 countries where hundreds of musicians participate in their own cities' public spaces.

Check out a video of Dale playing Bach at Classical KING FM (home of the Classical Classroom)!

Special thanks to Todd Reynolds for his music, Taskforce: Farmlab from Outerbourough

Feb 18 2019

28mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 33: RERUN - Cracking “The Nutcracker” – Michael Remson and Shelly Power

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Okay, so we are re-gifting this year’s holiday episode from our 2013 collection. But it’s only because we thought you’d like it! Please re-enjoy learning about this gorgeous, never-gets-old classic. And from all of us at Classical Classroom HQ: peace, joy, and ALL THE PRESENTS to you this year!

We all know The Nutcracker, right? Wrong! In this episode of Classical Classroom, Shelly Power (director, Houston Ballet Academy) and Michael Remson (executive director, AFA) blow your minds with the history of the ballet and a behind-the-scenes look at the massive undertaking that putting on the show entails every year.

All music in this episode from The Nutcracker:

  • Score by Pyotr Illyich Tchaikovsky
  • Original choreography by Marius Petipas and Lev Ivanov
  • Libretto adapted from E.T.A. Hoffmann’s story, The Nutcracker and the Mouse King

Audio production by Todd “Pas de Todd” Hulslander with sugarplum fairies dancing in her head by Dacia Clay.

Dec 19 2016

36mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 201: Practicing Rachmaninoff in Public with Tiffany Poon

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There's a good chance that you've heard of Yale School of Music grad student and rising classical pianist, Tiffany Poon. Her YouTube vlogs have over 11 million views. In them, she talks casually with fans as she travels to gigs and invites them into the practice room. Her openness about her musical life and process has tapped into something for which fans are hungry. In this episode, Tiffany talks about Rachmaninoff 3 and about the community she created by prepping publicly for a performance of the piece.

Music in this show:

Jun 03 2019

37mins

Play

Classical Classroom, Episode 32: The Making of Handel’s Messiah with Robert Simpson

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Handel's Messiah is a beloved Christmas favorite. But, as Robert Simpson, founder and artistic director of Houston Chamber Choir, tells us, it is oh-so-much more than the "Hallelujah" chorus. Like, 250 pages more. All of which we cover in this half-hour episode. Just kidding!

Audio production by Todd “Jolly Old Saint Toddolas” Hulslander with stockings hung by the mixing board by Dacia Clay.

Music used in this episode:

– George Frideric Handel, Messiah, HWV 56

For more about the Houston Chamber Choir and their upcoming performance of Messiah, go to www.houstonchamberchoir.org.

Dec 04 2013

34mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 145: Cartoon Classical Confidential With Richard Scerbo

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This is serious, people. Classical music has a long and meaningful history in cartoons that is no laughing matter. Just kidding! There is a really long history, but it is hilarious, and so is this episode. Richard Scerbo, Director of the National Orchestral Institute and Festival and founder and artistic director of the DC-based and Grammy-nominated Inscape Chamber Orchestra, takes us on a tour of that history. Find out the practical, social, and financial reasons behind Looney Tunes use of classical music, and how cartoons both poked fun at the music and made it fresh for new audiences. Hear examples of the classical music the cartoons draw from and examples of how the music was rearranged to suit the needs of Porky and Bugs. And, um, that’s not all, folks.

Music in this episode:

  • The Bartered Bride (Dance of the Comedians) by Bedrich Smetana
  • “Zoom and Bored” (Warner Bros. cartoon featuring Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner)
  • Hungarian Rhapsody No2 by Franz List
  • “Rhapsody in Rivets” (Warner Bros. cartoon)
  • “A Corny Concerto” (Warner Bros. cartoon narrated by Elmer Fudd)
  • The Blue Danube by Johann Strauss II
  • Tales from the Vienna Woods by Johann Strauss II
  • “Ride of the Valkeries” from Die Walküre by Richard Wagner
  • “Kill the Wabbit” from What’s Opera, Doc? (Warner Bros. cartoon featuring Elmer Fudd and Bugs Bunny)

Audio production by Mark “The Martian” DiClaudio and Todd “Tweety” Hulslander with onomatopoeia by Dacia Clay.  

Oct 10 2016

32mins

Play

Classical Classroom, Episode 206: John Luther Adams Walks Through "Become Desert"

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With Become Desert, composer John Luther Adams is done "Become"-ing (learn why in this episode). First, there was the Pulitzer- and Grammy-winning Become Ocean. Then, there was Become River. Finally, in 2019, Adams put his feet on solid ground, in a terrain he's much more comfortable with. And now there's Become Desert. Here, Adams talks about what the deceptively simple pieces of the Become trilogy are, both musically and conceptually, about Desert in particular, and about why music > politics will ever be at saving the world.

Dec 04 2019

38mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 205: Nicholas McGegan on Rameau and Music that Stands the Test of Time

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Conductor Nicholas McGegan, of San Francisco Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra fame (and so much more) is an expert in conducting Baroque music. To some of us at the podcast, this sounds as obscure as being a modern day village cobbler or ironing one's hair with an actual iron. But in this episode, McGegan explains his love for this music and why it - and other kinds of music - will continue to be relevant for centuries to come. He illustrates his point by teaching about an opera by the composer Rameau with a snarky text (aka, libretto) by Voltaire which is still making audiences laugh today. Ch-check it out.

All music in this episode from Rameau: Le Temple de la Gloire, released July 2018 on Philharmania Baroque Productions.

Nov 01 2019

17mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 204: A Peculiar Harry Partch Primer, with John Schneider

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Guitarist John Schneider is clearly obsessed. In the best, passionate-music-geek kind of way. And the thing is that the object of his obsession - Harry Partch and his work - just engenders that kind of response in people. It probably comes from the fact that Partch himself who was monomaniacally focused: he was so absorbed with the idea that music should be more than just the traditional twelve notes that he invented new musical notation, new notes, new instruments to play said notes, and new music for those instruments. In this episode, John Schneider of the Grammy award-winning PARTCH Ensemble teaches all about the adventurous life and obsessions of Harry Partch, and talks about the PARTCH Ensemble's latest release, Sonata Dementia.

Music in this episode:

Sep 12 2019

35mins

Play

Classical Classroom Special Assembly with Itzhak Perlman

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Going to class is a major part of being a classical musician. But have you heard of a "master class"? One student at a time gets up and performs a piece in front of a class, and then the "master" leading the class critiques said performance. Sounds nerve-wracking (read: ...like the stuff of nightmares) to us. Gather 'round for this special assembly in which Classroom's first substitute teacher, Maggie Molloy, talks to Maestro Itzhak Perlman about the history and importance of the master class, and how his new addition to the MasterClass online series makes it possible for even those of us not attending conservatory to take a class from him.

Jul 22 2019

32mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 203: Jason Vieaux and Jonathan Leshnoff, Musical Frontiersmen

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Jason Vieaux is not just a Grammy-winning classical guitarist - he's a pioneer, taking on new works that have never been performed or recorded before, like those of composer Jonathan Leshnoff. Leshnoff is an adventurer, too, writing virtuosic material for instruments he's never played, like the guitar. Find out how these fearless frontiersman find the fortitude to forge foreign... uh...how they make and play brand new stuff. The end. 

Special thanks to Todd Reynolds for his music, Taskforce: Farmlab from Outerbourough

Jul 01 2019

23mins

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Classical Classroom, Ep 137: Summer Music – Music Academy Of The West! The Second Nature Of Matthew Aucoin (Rerun)

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In our second annual Classical Classroom Summer Music Festival Series, we hit the (sound)waves at the Music Academy of the West in sunny Santa Barbara, California!

The third installment of our MAW series features composer, conductor, and pianist, Matthew Aucoin. Aucoin is a resident at that Music Academy of the West, and a sort of serial residentialist elsewhere (like the Peabody Essex Museum and soon, the Los Angeles Opera). He talks about what a “residency” is, and how it informs a composer’s creative process; plus, he gives us a sample of what he’s been busy creating while at the Music Academy.

Music in this episode:

  • Selections from Matthew Aucoin’s Second Nature, performed at the Music Academy of the West

Audio production by Todd “The Bartered Todd” Hulslander with pirouettes by Dacia Clay and assistance from Mark DiClaudio. Thanks to the Music Academy for their help with this series, and special thanks to Kate Oberjat (oh-bur-yacht) without whom this series simply would not.

Special thanks to Todd Reynolds for his music, Taskforce: Farmlab from Outerbourough

Jun 25 2019

24mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 202: It Was All New Music Once, with Richard Scerbo and David Alan Miller

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There's a reason that great works in classical music have stuck around for so long. Once upon a time, it was all music composed by  groundbreaking artists, churning out new sounds and ideas never heard before. But at some point, it's like someone somewhere decided that the canon was complete. Why? In this episode, National Orchestral Institute director Richard Scerbo and recent GRAMMY nominee/past winner David Alan Miller (Albany Symphony Music Director) talk about the groundbreaking composers of the past and present.  

Music in this episode:

Special thanks to Todd Reynolds for his music, Taskforce: Farmlab from Outerbourough

Jun 17 2019

40mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 75: The Democracy of Chamber Music with Cantus (Rerun)

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One of the distinguishing characteristics of chamber music is its inherent “democracy” – each part is of equal importance. Aaron Humble and Paul Rudoi of the Cantus Vocal Ensemble explain how it works when everyone involved in making the music is a special snowflake.

Audio production by Todd “Sir Toddsalot” Hulslander with unflagging devotion to somethingerother by Dacia Clay.

Music in this episode, all by Cantus:

From A Harvest Home –

  • “My Journey Yours”
  • “How Can I Keep from Singing?”
  • “The Pasture”
  • “Fiddle Tune”
  • “Eventide”

From On the Shoulders of Giants:

  • “Zikr”

Jun 11 2019

31mins

Play

Classical Classroom, Episode 201: Practicing Rachmaninoff in Public with Tiffany Poon

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There's a good chance that you've heard of Yale School of Music grad student and rising classical pianist, Tiffany Poon. Her YouTube vlogs have over 11 million views. In them, she talks casually with fans as she travels to gigs and invites them into the practice room. Her openness about her musical life and process has tapped into something for which fans are hungry. In this episode, Tiffany talks about Rachmaninoff 3 and about the community she created by prepping publicly for a performance of the piece.

Music in this show:

Jun 03 2019

37mins

Play

Classical Classroom, Episode 84: JoAnn Falletta Shares Scheherazade (Rerun)

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JoAnn Falletta is celebrating her 20th anniversary as Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, so we've gotta give her a shout out with this old gold from the Classroom vault! By the way, did you know that a 2014 survey found that in a list of the 150 top conductors in the world, only five were women? New episode topic?

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Who was Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov and why does he have two last names? And why would a 19th century Russian composer write a symphonic poem based on a collection of West and South Asian folk tales written in Arabic in the 16th century? What does it all mean?? Most* of these questions and more are all answered within by Buffalo Philharmonic/Virginia Symphony Orchestra conductor, guitarist, music advocate, and all around amazing lady, JoAnn Falletta.

Music in this episode from the Buffalo Philharmonic’s recording of Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Sheherazade,” conducted by JoAnn Falletta.

Audio production by Todd “Twister” Hulslander with high kicks by Dacia Clay and editing by Mark DiClaudio.

May 20 2019

35mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 200: Top 10 Countdown!

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It's been nearly six years since we started the Classical Classroom podcast in a small shed that also housed producer Todd's lawn mower. Since then, a lot has happened. We've learned so much from our amazing guests, traveled to music festivals, had parties and game show quizzes, talked to the dead, had trumpet lessons, and we moved into a storage unit behind KING FM in Seattle. Todd also got a new lawn mower. 

In this episode, we'll revisit some of our favorite moments from the last 200 episodes and hear from some friends of the show along the way. Join us, won't you?

May 13 2019

34mins

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Field Trip to the Opera: Carmen in 3D

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When you think of opera, words like "grandiose," "extravagant," and "whoa" come to mind. Those words all describe Georges Bizet's Carmen. Singing, dancing, costumes, sets, orchestras, fight scenes, wigs, drama! How on Earth does something with so many moving parts even get to the stage? Much less, successfully and entertainingly?! We wanted to know. And as it happens, the Seattle Opera was staging Carmen right down the street. So, we went on a field trip to see the show and - because we're us - badgered the cast and crew about their parts in bringing this magnificent beast of an opera to life. Learn all about the story - the one the audience sees and the one behind the stage - in this special Classical Classroom/Seattle Opera Podcast crossover episode. 

All music in this episode from Seattle Opera's performances of Carmen.    

P.S., The Seattle Opera is performing Carmen from May 4 - 19, 2019! Learn yet more about it (and hear more podcasts about it).

May 06 2019

1hr 7mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 16: From Schubert to Gaga, the Unfinished Symphony with Jade Simmons (Rerun)

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We love celebrating our alumni here at Classical Classroom, and Jade Simmons is one of our faves. This episode is from way back in 2013 when Jade was merely a very successful woman. Now, she's the host of iTunes #1 music podcast, Decomposed. A podcast rock star. We couldn't be more stoked for her. And we're kind of riding on her coattails by posting this rerun. Just a little. 

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Artists as entrepreneurs, Lady Gaga, horror movies, and Schubert! In this episode, concert pianist, author, lecturer, Huffington Post contributor, and probable superhero, Jade Simmons chats with Dacia about how Schubert's "Unfinished" Symphony changed her life.

Audio production by Todd “ToHu” Hulslander with knowing winks of encouragement from Dacia Clay.

Music from this episode includes:

  • Schubert, Symphony, No. 8 in B minor D.759, aka the “Unfinished Symphony”

Apr 27 2019

32mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 89: Awadagin Pratt on Brahms, Brunge, and Beards (Rerun)

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We're rerunning this episode with Awadagin Pratt basically because we felt like it. But we don't think you're going to mind, as he is awesome. Let his dulcet tones wash over you as Pratt teaches you all about why Brahms is one of the Big Daddies of classical music, what it has to do with Edith Bunker, and how the beard made it all possible.

All music in this episode from Awadagin Pratt and Zuill Bailey’s CD “Brahms Works For Cello And Piano”.

Audio production by Todd “Are You There Todd? It’s Me, Dacia” Hulslander with Tiger Eyes by Dacia Clay and editing by Mark DiClaudio.

Special thanks to Todd Reynolds for his music, Taskforce: Farmlab from Outerbourough.

Apr 22 2019

37mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 79: The Women of Classical Guitar with Valerie Hartzell (Rerun)

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April is International Guitar Month! In honor of that, we're bringing back this episode with one of our fave guitarists, Valerie Hartzell, creator/director of the Classical Minds Festival and Competition. Valerie talks about the ladies of classical guitar. Who are they? Why did their numbers diminish over time? And what can we do about it??

Audio production by Todd “Not Tony Danza” Hulslander with editing by Mark DiClaudio and bossing by Dacia Clay.

Music in this episode:

  • "Valerie Loves Me," by Material Issue
  • “Rosita” by Francisco Tarrega. Played live in studio (also available on Valerie’s Ex Tenebris Lux CD).
  • Chaconne in G Major by George Frideric Handel. Played by Ida Presti and Alexandre Lagoya.

Special thanks to Todd Reynolds for his music, Taskforce: Farmlab from Outerbourough.

Apr 15 2019

34mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 199: Jack of All Emotions - the Music of Elliott Carter with the JACK Quartet

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"Classical music is relaxing." "I listen to classical music because it's soothing." "I turn on classical music when I want to concentrate."

These are all things we're guessing very few people have said about the composer you're going to learn about in this episode. Elliott Carter's music is about something much more vast and complex than chillaxing: it's about the full range of human experience. If you've been alive for long enough to read this, you know that being a person is not always easy - that, in fact, ease can't exist without difficulty. It's a thing that we expect other art forms to reflect. And in this episode, Austin Wulliman and Christopher Otto of the JACK Quartet teach all about a composer who used this music to convey It All, too.

PS, You can go see the JACK Quartet perform the music of Elliott Carter, or go check them out at the Ojai Festival this summer. Find out more here.

Music in this episode:

Special thanks to Todd Reynolds for his music, Taskforce: Farmlab from Outerbourough.

Apr 08 2019

43mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 198: Music Education Month - Idyllwild Arts

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In the beautiful San Jacinto Mountains, southeast of Los Angeles, is a place that is basically the ultimate experience in music and arts education: Idyllwild Arts Academy. It's a residential arts high school where young people are immersed in their chosen practice every day. Here, music students learn alongside peers studying visual arts, dance, and more, and collaborate with them. One hundred per cent of Idyllwild grads go off to college. What does the dream of music education look like? What could music education be like? And how does it impact young people? President and head of the school Pamela Jordan and faculty piano instructor Doug Ashcraft tell all in this episode. 

Music in this episode:

Special thanks to Todd Reynolds for his music, Taskforce: Farmlab from Outerbourough.

Apr 01 2019

34mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 197: Music Education Month - The Village School

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Neither Sarah Perkins nor Michael Barber ever intended to become music and arts educators. No, they both had their sights set on the Big Time - performance and Broadway. But life presented each with opportunities to teach music to young people, and before they knew it, they Sarah and Michael were hooked. Now they're both staffers at a unique school in Houston, Texas called the Village School. In this episode, learn about what makes teaching music and the arts so rewarding, and about a school so amazing that even the dazzling lights and dizzying heights of Broadway can't lure educators away.

Special thanks to Todd Reynolds for his music, Taskforce: Farmlab from Outerbourough

Mar 25 2019

33mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 40: Simone Dinnerstein Goes Bachpacking (Rerun)

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March is Music Education Month on the Classical Classroom, but it's also Bach's birthday month. So, it's obviously the perfect time to revisit this episode with Simone Dinnerstein in which we discuss a music education program she started about the music of Bach. (Bam. Venn diagram intersection = achieved!) Learn about the music of Bach, and perhaps, take some cues from Simone on bringing music ed to your own community.

Special thanks to Todd Reynolds for his music, Taskforce: Farmlab from Outerbourough.

Mar 18 2019

32mins

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Classical Classroom, Episode 196: Joyce DiDonato - When Musical Worlds Collide

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People are pretty much never just one thing. Each person is made of the stuff in their individual history, including the music. That includes Grammy-winning opera singers. Mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato recently completed a project that brought the disparate parts of her own musical history together. And because she's Joyce DiDonato, this meant bringing top notch performers from across the musical spectrum into the studio to work together. In this episode, she talks about the fascinating process of bringing jazz and Baroque together, and the surprising connections between the two.   

Music in this episode:

Special thanks to Todd Reynolds for his music, Taskforce: Farmlab from Outerbourough.

Mar 11 2019

23mins

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