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Rank #188 in Entrepreneurship category

Business
Marketing
Entrepreneurship

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

Updated 6 days ago

Rank #188 in Entrepreneurship category

Business
Marketing
Entrepreneurship
Read more

“How's an entrepreneur like me supposed to grow my Shopify store?” That's what The Unofficial Shopify Podcast aims to answer. Discover new opportunities to grow your store from the world’s most successful Shopify entrepreneurs. Hosted by Kurt Elster, a senior ecommerce consultant and Shopify Plus Partner, The Unofficial Shopify Podcast is not authorized, endorsed, or sponsored by Shopify– It's a no holds barred discussion of ecommerce growth strategy & tactics.

Read more

“How's an entrepreneur like me supposed to grow my Shopify store?” That's what The Unofficial Shopify Podcast aims to answer. Discover new opportunities to grow your store from the world’s most successful Shopify entrepreneurs. Hosted by Kurt Elster, a senior ecommerce consultant and Shopify Plus Partner, The Unofficial Shopify Podcast is not authorized, endorsed, or sponsored by Shopify– It's a no holds barred discussion of ecommerce growth strategy & tactics.

iTunes Ratings

150 Ratings
Average Ratings
140
2
2
2
4

Amazing podcast

By Josh from Staten Island - Oct 08 2019
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I really love all the information you can learn on all the episodes

Great show

By TMcoast - Aug 29 2019
Read more
Lots of useful interesting eps for ecommerce pros!

iTunes Ratings

150 Ratings
Average Ratings
140
2
2
2
4

Amazing podcast

By Josh from Staten Island - Oct 08 2019
Read more
I really love all the information you can learn on all the episodes

Great show

By TMcoast - Aug 29 2019
Read more
Lots of useful interesting eps for ecommerce pros!

Listen to:

Cover image of The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

The Unofficial Shopify Podcast

Updated 6 days ago

Read more

“How's an entrepreneur like me supposed to grow my Shopify store?” That's what The Unofficial Shopify Podcast aims to answer. Discover new opportunities to grow your store from the world’s most successful Shopify entrepreneurs. Hosted by Kurt Elster, a senior ecommerce consultant and Shopify Plus Partner, The Unofficial Shopify Podcast is not authorized, endorsed, or sponsored by Shopify– It's a no holds barred discussion of ecommerce growth strategy & tactics.

Rank #1: Is dropshipping dead? What successful dropshippers know

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"Is dropshipping dead?"

That was one of the most common questions I got toward the end of the last year.

Here's the thing– I don't know! Is it? Why are you asking me? There are certainly people more suited to answer this than me.

To find out, we're talking to Tomas Slimas, Chief Marketing Officer at Oberlo. He should know– Oberlo users have dropshipped more than 100 million products during the last 24 months.

In today's episode, you'll learn the answer, as well as what it takes to become a successful dropshipper, and even how dropshipping can scale your existing store.

You'll Learn

  • Is dropshipping dead?
  • What successful dropshippers know
  • What advantages does drop shipping have?
  • How do you choose which products to sell?
  • Are there specific risks to dropshipping?
  • How can Oberlo help you build and even scale your store?

Tune in for more details!

Resources

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Help the show

What's Kurt up to?

Feb 27 2018

37mins

Play

Rank #2: $500k/mo in 4 hours/week: The Story of BombTech Golf

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Want to do seven-figures in revenue and work four hours a week? How about getting there in two years?

Today's guest has done just that. He's sold 170,000 golf clubs resulting in $6.3 million revenue last year with just three employees and a four hour work week.

We're joined by BombTech Golf's Tyler 'Sully' Sullivan who shares with his story, what's worked, what hasn't, and how you can emulate his success in your own store.

Early on, I would make videos that were terrible, but I put my face to the brand and made it personal. Attaching myself to the brand was one of the key reasons why I was able to scale up the business.

You'll Learn

  • The mindset shifts that enabled Sully's success
  • How community engagement was pivotal to building going from zero to seven figure
  • Sully's advice on how to vet a fulfillment center
  • How delegating everything in his business led him to a 4-hour work week and increased sales
  • Why design doesn't matter as much as you think.
  • How doing email really well has been critical to their success (and the three tips that have driven their success)
  • Why personal branding is necessity

Tune in for more details!

Resources

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Grow Your Store in 2018

Sponsors

Sep 18 2018

1hr

Play

Rank #3: Proven Abandoned Cart Email Tactics

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Approximately 70% of your customers will abandon their carts... if you're lucky.

That's why the most profitable email marketing workflow you can possibly run is an abandoned cart sequence.

In today's episode, we'll cover the best practice four email sequence guaranteed to help you re-engage customers and recover revenue.

After that, we'll talk through three out of the box ideas that are proven to work.

Adii Pienaar, founder of Conversio, joins us today to explain. Prior to Conversio, Adii was co-founder of WooThemes/WooCommerce, where he made his early entrepreneurial mistakes while learning about building software for ecommerce stores.

You'll Learn

  • The current state of abandoned carts in ecommerce
  • The best practices for abandoned cart sequence you need to implement today
  • Three out-of-the-box ideas to test in your sequences

Tune in for more details!

Resources

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Help the show

What's Kurt up to?

Grow Your Store in 2018

Sponsors

Aug 21 2018

56mins

Play

Rank #4: Back to Basics: Ecommerce Fundamentals with Ross Allchorn

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When starting your Shopify business, you’ll discover there’s a lot more to consider besides what you’ll be selling. Ross Allchorn takes us back to basics with some advice for first-time storeowners.

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Learn:

  • Why you need a plan
  • What to realistically expect
  • How to provide better customer service (and bust customer's objections)
  • Why you need to provide comprehensive product information
  • Ross's #1 tip for The Unofficial Shopify Podcast.

Links:

Free Guide

I want to send you a sample chapter of Ecommerce Bootcamp, absolutely free.

Tell me where to send your sample at ecommerce-bootcamp.com

Jun 14 2016

25mins

Play

Rank #5: $3M in 7 Months: The GorillaGoodies Standard Operating Procedure

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When starting an ecommerce store, it generally happens in one of two ways:

  1. You find a pain or problem in your life and realize you can solve it. And that becomes your first product.
  2. Or you want to try ecommerce, then brainstorm a dozen ideas to try.

Corey Wright has turned the latter into a science.

Corey started a digital marketing company with his brother in 2005 that focused on helping to recruit and license real estate agents throughout the United States and Canada.

In May of 2016, he and his brother Casey got the itch to start an e-commerce store to see what they could learn about selling physical products online that may help them better sell their real estate services online.

Over a weekend, they launched a store selling Donald Trump bobbleheads, which quickly grew much larger than they expected.

Fast forward three months, they had a full blown e-commerce business, processing over 5,000 orders per month with every part of the supply chain accounted for. In just 7 months, their e-commerce sales accounted for nearly 2/3 of their 2016 revenues and grossed more than $3M in sales.

Currently, they continue to run their real estate services business but place a much heavier focus on growing the e-commerce side of their business.

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Work with Kurt

Learn how:

  • How to approach vendors on Alibaba
  • How they tackled customer support issues when a product is delayed
  • How they come up with ideas for new stores and products
  • The metrics Corey uses to determine if a store is successful
  • His tips for PR wins
  • The stresses Corey faced in growing their business, and what they learned

Links:

Free Guide

I want to send you a sample chapter of Ecommerce Bootcamp, absolutely free.

Tell me where to send your sample at ecommerce-bootcamp.com

May 16 2017

43mins

Play

Rank #6: The Perfect Shopify Funnel with Richard Patey

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In an ideal world, we could point a Facebook ad at your homepage and generate sales. But we don't live in a perfect world, and that's a terrible strategy.

Joining us to share the winning strategy that he used to grow and sell his own Shopify store is Richard Patey.

Richard Patey is the founder of funnelengine.com which offers done for you marketing & sales funnels for ecommerce stores.

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Join The Unofficial Shopify Podcast Facebook Group

Learn:

  • What is an ecommerce funnel?
  • What types of ecommerce funnels work?
  • What's a landing page anyway?
  • Which tools Richard used in his winning business
  • And the perfect funnel he's giving away

Links:

Free Guide

I want to send you a sample chapter of Ecommerce Bootcamp, absolutely free.

Tell me where to send your sample at ecommerce-bootcamp.com

Oct 04 2016

31mins

Play

Rank #7: Building The Perfect Homepage

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You can think of your Shopify store's homepage as the storefront of your store. Just because someone walks by, doesn't mean they're going to come in and shop. You have to to present an alluring storefront to your customer to coax them down your sales funnel.

In this episode, Paul and Kurt break down the tested & proven homepage layout you should use to maximize your own conversions.

Paul and Kurt discuss:

  • The strategy to use when thinking about your homepage's layout
  • Why each element has a job (and what it is)
  • The right way to setup your image carousel
  • How to implement "safety nets"
  • and why you may be suffering from I-arrhea

Tune in for more details!

Resources

Share your thoughts

Never miss an episode

Help the show

What's Kurt up to?

Grow Your Store in 2018

Sponsors

Jan 22 2019

56mins

Play

Rank #8: Profitable Facebook Ads & Audiences Decoded with Kurt Bullock

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Facebook is giving us more ways than ever to quickly and inexpensively generate custom audiences. As a busy store owner, learning to navigate Facebook's myriad of advertising options effectively can be a time-consuming endeavor.

Kurt Bullock joins us to discuss Facebook's new options, and you can use them to set up a sales funnel that segments and targets customers through their relationship with your brand.

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Learn:

  • Learn why interest target isn’t every effective
  • How to reach the right people on Facebook
  • The new Facebook Custom Audiences available
  • The top of funnel ad type that converts best

Links:

Free Guide

I want to send you a sample chapter of Ecommerce Bootcamp, absolutely free.

Tell me where to send your sample at ecommerce-bootcamp.com

Transcript

Kurt Elster: Today, I've got none other than Kurt Bullock, slightly confusing we have the same first name. He's a Shopify marketing master who specializes in Facebook ads. I noticed because he's been working with me for the last several months fulfilling a lot of our projects and doing an extraordinary job.

I'm really excited to have him here with us. Anyway, we're going into it. We're recording live from Ethercycle Headquarters outside Chicago. I'm your host, Kurt Elster. Kurt, thank you for joining us.

Kurt Bullock: Good morning, Kurt.

Kurt Elster: How're you doing?

Bullock: I am doing great.

Kurt Elster: Diving right into it, Facebook ads and Shopify, we know Facebook ads are great way to drive new traffic, qualify customers to your store, bring back prospects, people who haven't bought yet but a lot people who implemented themselves do it in a way probably differently than you and I would go about it. Let's start with, what's the wrong way? How are people doing it and screwing it up?

Bullock: I think that a lot of people go at it with the approach of trying to put together a profile. This is the way that before there were all these cool new targeting methods, it was really only way to go. This is what they teach in a lot of courses.
You would go in put together a profile of your target customer, find all their interests...

Kurt Elster: Like a customer avatar?

Bullock: There you go. You're putting together a customer avatar, trying to find all the magazines that they read, their customers, their competitions, Facebook pages and try to put together a profile and run ads to that group of interests.
The problem with that is you are reaching a pool of audience at that point. They don't know anything about you and it's an expensive and a hard way to go. A lot of people come away from Facebook ads, Googling it doesn't work, I think, because they have difficulty with the targeting.

Kurt Elster: Interest targeting not very effective. What works better than interest targeting?

Bullock: When I work with a new client, the first thing I do is get them to upload, let's say, a customer list if it's larger than 100 or 200 customers or their whole newsletter list so that we can create a custom audience.

Kurt Elster: Why do we need the two different lists? Why not just lump them together?

Bullock: It's great if you can segment and find the most, let's say, your best customers. For instance, if you were to rank them just your newsletter members are going to be less targeted, less relevant than your customer list who have all gone through and decided to purchase your product.
If you have enough customers that you can upload this to Facebook and the reason you did enough, I say that, is because Facebook's then going to use their algorithm magic and try and create a new audience for you. Create a lookalike audience with completely unique people in there for you to target your ads to.

Kurt Elster: That's based on if I give them a list of email addresses or a list of phone numbers which is less successful. What's the minimum for to make a lookalike audience?

Bullock: I'm not sure what their hard number is, to be honest. I usually don't upload anything less than 200. I don't have very good luck if I go under 200. They may have a hard limit but I couldn't tell you what it is specifically.

Kurt Elster: It changes. It's hard to keep up because the stuff changes so quickly.

Bullock: Yes it does.

Kurt Elster: It used to be 100. If you upload a list of 100, that assumes 100 percent match rate, right? Not every email address will correspond to a Facebook account.

Bullock: That's right.

Kurt Elster: 200 is a totally safe number to do with. Let's say, I had a bigger list of past customers. I'm not even playing devil's advocate here. I generally wonder about this. Is it better to upload, let's say, I've got a list of 10,000 customers, and just put everybody who's ever given me $1, or more?
Or segment it and say, "All right, should I only upload the 1,000 repeat customers I have, since they'd be my best buyers, or upload the buyers who spent more than $1,000 with me in the last year?"

Bullock: That's exactly right. I would definitely go ahead and upload the repeat buyers, or the buyers that have exceeded a certain threshold, if you have numbers like 10,000 to work with. A lot of people don't. You put together the best audience that you can and give Facebook the best material to work with.
Go ahead.

Kurt Elster: For lookalike audiences, we want quality over quantity for my source material?

Bullock: You've got it. Garbage in, garbage out. That's exactly right. You want to make sure that you give them the best audience possible. They'll give you a new audience to target. Sometimes, you do have to jump up to your newsletter list, if you don't have very many people to do that with.

Kurt Elster: They generate. We give it source material. We want whatever we have, but the highest quality we have, minimum 200 to be safe. It generates a lookalike audience of that.
It just says, "All right. Facebook bought loyalty card data, and credit card data, and unbelievably creepy stuff that they know about you," but it makes for effective ads when they can build these profiles.

It's not like there's a person doing it, which if that helps you, make it feel less creepy. It's an algorithm that does it. No one can individually pinpoint people. They're very careful about that. It creates a list of two million people, say, in the US.

Once I've got that list of two million people, here's another one, where again, I'm not playing dumb. I really wonder this. Is it a good idea to run the ads against that entire list of people, or if I have a clear idea of who my best buyer is, to run some segmentation on that list? I say like, "Here's my best buyers. Give me a lookalike audience."

Now I know my best customers are women, 25 to 34. Should we limit the custom audience to just that?

Bullock: That's what I try and go with. Two million is a high number. Facebook is getting much better at being able to handle that. Before, it was a bad idea, in my opinion, to run against two million. I still try and put on some limits. Albeit, when I start a new campaign, I do try and go broad so that I can collect data.
Sometimes, I am surprised at who really is engaging and who's purchasing. I oftentimes, try and go broad. If I'm selling something that is for women primarily, I'll go ahead and select women but I might leave the age range open and then let it run for, maybe, a week or a few days at the very least.

Then go back. Check the results. I can begin to focus that in before I have wasted too much money on, maybe, those outlying age segments.

Kurt Elster: Do you use the Audience Insights tool for this?

Bullock: Yes. I use Audience Insights to research it. I build the ads in the Power Editor. It's got a real similar form that you'll find in the Audience Insights tool, you'll find in the Power Editor for building these.

Kurt Elster: I am addicted to the Audience Insights tool. It is my favorite thing. [laughs] It is the coolest thing to play with because you don't have to spend any money with Facebook to use it. You could just say, "All right. Facebook, you've got all this info. Give me all the demographic data about my Facebook page likes."
Or, "Here's an email list," or, "Here's a list of phone numbers. Tell me, what does this audience look like." They tell you like, "OK, well, they're dislikely to own a home, be married, in this age range, have this level of education." It's just unreal. I think it's a ton of fun to play with.

Bullock: It is. It's crazy. As you mentioned before, Facebook purchases all these third party, big hunks of data. They try and assimilate that, and match it to their Facebook users. You can find out stuff that's not related. For instance, if they're in a market for a car, their buying purchases, if they have a mortgage, and then stuff that you do indicate on Facebook.
I was talking yesterday with somebody that did things for people that are getting married, and weddings. You can see if people are engaged and target people that are getting engaged. It can be creepy, if you're not careful with the way that you approach it, but really, really great information.

Kurt Elster: Yeah, it's a little disturbing when we were shopping for a house, and suddenly I'm seeing ads for houses. I didn't put anything on Facebook about that. We hadn't announced to anyone that my wife is pregnant, and we're already seeing ads on Facebook. It's a little weird.

Bullock: That's a little much.

Kurt Elster: Facebook is your snoopy aunt who knows too much.
[laughter]

Kurt Elster: The end result though is it creates relevant advertising, it's very personalized, it feels real.
I've got my custom audience, I've got my Audience Insights, I've got all this stuff loaded into Facebook. Well, I always view that there's three kinds of customers that I can advertise to.

I got cold traffic people who've never seen or heard of me before. Warm traffic people, say, visited the site in the last two, three, four weeks, and purchasers, people like my active customers who bought from me. What do I do now?

Bullock: The goal would be to try and get to warm as quickly as possible. If you're brand new to the Facebook platform, if you don't have a pixel on your site, I don't know if we need to clarify that for any of our listeners but...

Kurt Elster: Yeah, explain it.
Kurt
Bullock: The Facebook pixel is just a little piece of code that you get from Facebook when you sign up for an ad account. You want to put it on all of your web properties, on every page of all your sites, whether you're marketing them right now or not.
The sooner the better, because the day will come when it's useful to you and it can be a real treasure trove if you have had it sitting there collecting information. I guess the way that it collects information is that as people visit your site, this will communicate basic information about their activities on your site to Facebook that you can then use to market to them.

For instance, I had a customer, we had put a pixel on their site about six months ago. He forgot about it. They engaged with us and for our first promotion, we had a list of 22,000 people that had visited their site and not taken any action. The owner in this case didn't know how he had collected that information, but it was because we had that pixel on there.

That's key. You really can't do Facebook advertising without a pixel. One last point on the pixel, that's what gets your analytics data. You can see if any of your ads are converting, if sales are coming from those ads, and it can really help you steer your efforts. Without it, you're pretty much going blind.

Kurt Elster: In Shopify, there's two ways to implement the Facebook pixel. I can either just drop it into...under website settings, it will say like, "Google Analytics," and then your Facebook pixel, and you just give it the ID number. Makes it very easy.
When they first rolled that out, it had issues. It didn't report right. Has that been fixed? Do you use that or do you manually write it into the theme and the checkout settings?

Bullock: I do both, depending on the customers' commitment to sending data and also their needs. You're right, it used to be really bad and almost unusable, and then they took major steps to fix that. Now, you can actually get by -- better than get by -- you can do well by just putting the pixel in there, it'll send good data.
I still run into issues with my customers that if we want to get really custom, then I usually go in and use Google Tag Manager and we do a custom setup so that we can send exactly the data that we want for different actions that they take.

You can go custom, but if you guys are getting started, by all means, just get that pixel ID number and you can Google that. I'm sure there will be 100 screenshots that show you how the pixel ID looks like, pop it into your Shopify theme, you just go to the online store, and then preferences, and then it's going to be about halfway down the page.

Kurt Elster: I've got my email lists uploaded, I've generated lookalike audience based on those, I've run through them with Audience Insights to get a clearer picture of who my customers are. I've got my Facebook pixel integrated on my site, which you can also run Audience Insights on the anonymous visitors to your site so it gets the value out of that, which is cool.
At that point, I'm set up. I'm ready to start paying money and running ads, which is cool at this point. We still haven't spent any money yet in this process. We both approach it as a funnel, right? You should always approach everything as a funnel. Where do I start? What do I do?

Bullock: Facebook's done some really cool things with custom audiences, so my first objective when I'm building a funnel is to take that cold traffic, that really wide audience, could be a few million if you scope it that high, and bring that down to just the people that have a realistic chance of being prospects for my products.
There's a lot of ways to do that, but one of the ways that Facebook has recently introduced is we can create custom audiences based on video views. What I would do is after I have all the stuff that you just described set up, you could then put a product video, explainer video. The old way to remember it was to educate, demonstrate, or entertain as many as you can.

I put together a video like that and then you can have Facebook create a new audience, a new custom audience with people that have watched a certain percentage of your videos. If you sort it by people who have watched 95 percent or more, they will be more relevant, but it will be a smaller audience. That's the trade-off.

If you need a larger audience, then you could go to people that watched 25 percent of your video or 50 percent.

The idea here is that people would only stick around and watch 50 percent or 95 percent of your video if they are interested in what you're talking about. That builds that next custom audience and this audience is going to be more focused and this is where I'm going to begin to really focus my advertising dollars and my retargeting campaigns from here down the funnel.

Kurt Elster: I love product videos, especially to get that initial traffic. They're moving in my timeline, they indicate a higher level of sophistication that if I just had an image ad. What makes a good video? What are the caveats here? How long should they be? What should I go for?

Bullock: There's a lot of testing being done and it depends on your market. That's the thing that, unfortunately, you hear over and over again, is that it's all about testing and experimenting, which is also cool because you can find out the answers for your particular store by running a few tests. Having said that, I have had really great luck with videos that are two minutes or less.
I've got a friend who actually had these seminars that he had recorded and posted. We're talking like 60, 70 minute seminars, and he posted those and gave those a shot as well, and figured, "Boy, if somebody sticks through that whole thing, then they're definitely interested in what I have to say." He came with a really small audience, the very focused.

What I normally do for an e-commerce store is a two minute product video. You could feature a bestselling product, a new product.

I've had great luck with behind the scenes footage, customer stories, all this stuff that gives customers a behind the scenes look at who's running the company and about your products. Helps to form that relationship so they can start to trust you, and the next time you speak to them, it's not, "How do you do, sir?" a cold new introduction.

Now you can speak to them as acquaintances. You already know each other and something about each other at this point.

Kurt Elster: The only caveat...Go ahead.

Bullock: One last point on that...Go ahead, Kurt.

Kurt Elster: Videos, if you watch, you can graph in Facebook how long people watch, like what the drop-off is. It looks like a black diamond ski slope the longer it gets. Even a two-minute video, I've seen you'll lose 60 percent of people in the first 30 seconds. Anyone past 30 seconds is like super engaged because they've watch the whole thing.
The only caveat I've seen is you have to assume that the video has to work without sound. Either at close captioning to it, which they make very easy, or just try use title cards to try and have it make sense without sound.

Bullock: That's exactly right. Another thing that I would like to add is you can include call-to-action link. The three that I use most often for ecommerce, I had to shop now, learn more, or signup. There's little call-to-action there.
Even if they don't take action, if they only watch the video, they are now in your funnel, which is pretty amazing.

Kurt Elster: Do these have to be professionally produced video, or can I just take my iPhone 7 and turn it horizontal and film myself talking?

Bullock: That's exactly right. It's funny. A lot of times, people see a slick production and skip it. It seems marketing material. It's something that at apartment put out, maybe.
When we see somebody that has a phone turned towards themselves or they're filming a product, as long as it's not real shaky and annoying in that way, then I've had really great results with that. Oftentimes, better results with a slightly Lo-Fi video compared to the really polished ones.

Kurt Elster: Because it feels authentic.

Bullock: Polished ones feel really effective. That's exactly right. You get the authenticity, which is what people are looking for when they're engaging and trying to learn about your business.

Kurt Elster: At this point, in theory, the person clicked through the ad or watched most of the video. Now, what do I do with them? I'm assuming they haven't bought yet.

Bullock: If they have bought, then you can eliminate them from the rest of this ad funnel. What I typically do is after I have them sorted by, let's say, people that watch 50 percent or more of your video, then I start making what maybe would be my old cold offer.
For instance, you could take a carousel ad of your five best selling products. Send that to them with a promo for new customers. First time buyers, promo code, and here're some of our top products. Now, instead of running this ad right into the huge audience, it's a more focused audience for advertising, those are more effective.

It's interesting that further you go down the funnel, the higher your ROI and the lower your cost, your CPM goes down to the cost observe a million impressions to your viewers. That's the next thing I do, is try and get them to the site to take a look at a product.

Kurt Elster: How do we do that?

Bullock: Oftentimes, I use those carousel ads.

Kurt Elster: One of those?

Bullock: Yes, carousel ads with top selling products are awesome for that step. Once they make it to your site, then the efficiency of your ads go ways up. It goes way up because you can see what they looked at, and the next ad that you show. If they didn't convert, then the next ad you show them can be related to whatever they checked out on your site, which is amazing. It's awesome.
You can deliver a message that is appropriate to a product they look at and how far they are down the funnel. If they've added the card, then you can send them a card and didn't purchased, then you can send them on a banning card message.

Kurt Elster: These are all variations on re-marketing, right?

Bullock: Yes, you got it. Everything is re-marketing below your initial cold traffic campaign. Once you have a custom audience built, then you are re-marketing, which is super effective.

Kurt Elster: I love re-marketing. Essentially, you're only showing ads to people who raised their hand. Suddenly it goes for people who you really like. You're a street vendor at that point just yelling at them in their news-feed like, "Hey, check this out. We're selling Simpson and Son Tonic."
Like that, how it feels when it's just these drive-by ads versus the re-marketing ads. Those people evolve. They have in some way raise their hand and said, "Hey, I am recently interested in what you're selling." They're familiar with it. It doesn't feel quite so strange, it feels personalized.

The other thing is you're no longer biding against this huge pool. You're only targeting your own audience now. Suddenly, the cost per click goes way down.

Bullock: Absolutely. There's new features that Facebook has ruled out you. Not everybody will see this in their accounts if they were to look today, but they're ruling them out actively right now.
For instance, when somebody makes it to your site, you can now do things like you can create a custom audience of people that have added a particular item, or added anything to their cart more than once. Let's say seven-day period without making a purchase. You could target people that have purchased a certain amount in a time period. You can target people that have looked at, let's say, five pages or more.

There's all kinds of cool stuff that you can do now with these new audience. The way that you find those is when you're building custom audiences just like the way that you normally would in Facebook, there's a new button that will appear.

It says, "Advance mode." If you click on Advance Mode, that's where you can really unlock all of this potential. It has modifiers like it will sum numbers for you, do greater than, less than, at least, all kinds of cool stuff.

The goal of this is obviously to find the most relevant audience. Pick up the low-hanging fruit, the people that are ready to take that next step and give them the right offer.

Kurt Elster: If you've got an existing store, you have existing traffic sources, I would focus on editing the re-marketing because that's your low-hanging fruit. You can add this safety net of sorts to bring people back to the site. We know on the average, I don't even need to see the site.
People will have to see it like, three, four, five, maybe up to eight times before they make a purchase decision.

What was I going to say? I lost my train of thought. Versus if you have no traffic, then the re-marketing really is going to be a struggle. It's nice to put it in place early because you only need an audience of 100 people before they'll start showing. You want to focus on that top of funnel, which is so much harder.

With videos, it really makes it much easier because they're engaging. They don't have to be high production or crazy.

Bullock: This could be anywhere, but it can be the top of your funnel cold. Now, Facebook lets you target people that have engaged with your Facebook page. It lets you target people that have opened up a new type of ad. It's not that new anymore, but a lead ad. There's all kinds of ways that you can build these custom audience. It's where it used to just be people that visit your website.
Now, you can target people. They are taking different actions with your content on Facebook. If you are getting started, you don't have a great web presence, then you can start with a Facebook presence, or just start posting content on Facebook and targeting people to interact with. You can send ads to people that thumbs up your post, if you want, or share them, or all kinds of different actions.

It's a great way to fill the top of your funnel, and of course build those re-marketing audiences.

Kurt Elster: There's lots of great advice here. In 20 minutes, we packed in a ton of info. I'm sure some people's heads are swimming with the stuff. You put together a download that walks us through it. What's that about?

Bullock: I put together a download. It's got 14 different targeting custom audience setups that we run through. With screenshots, that will show you how to create them on your end.
I was talking about how to target people that had purchased two times or more in 30 days. You can see exactly how we put that together. You can download that from our site. The web address is producedept.co/unofficial-shopify-podcast.

Kurt Elster: I'll include that link in the show notes, of course, for people. You sent me the PDF. I've got it in front of me now. It is literally screenshots of here is the custom audience, here's exactly how to set it up in Facebook. It makes it super easy to start experimenting with stuff right now.

Bullock: You could start using the stuff this afternoon with your ads and see better results, make more sales, target the right audiences.

Kurt Elster: Kurt, we're coming to the end of our time together. Do you have any closing thoughts? What's one thing you wish every shopify store owner would do?

Bullock: The crown jewel of Facebook advertising is getting dynamic product ad setup, that's another episode. You could Google it, but they're amazing. It's something to strive for. It's not very difficult to setup. That's one thing.
The other thing is really just focusing on learning how to create cold traffic. As you mention, that can be the most difficult part, but that's the key. It's learning how to bring cold traffic into your funnel. If you can do that, then these other campaigns that we've talked about will take care of the rest and bring people safely down to purchase and repeat purchaser.

Kurt Elster: Where could people go to learn more about you?

Bullock: You can check out our main site, which is producedepartment.co. I've also got another site, kurtbullock.com, which has some of the other things that I work on. I have developed some software ads and that sort of thing.

Kurt Elster: That was incredibly helpful. I hope people start experimenting with these new features in Facebook ads. They're really quite extra ordinary. It was years ago, you had to be some big enterprise to have access to stuff like this, with a huge and minimum advertising budget.
Now, Facebook has absolutely democratized it. They have made it available to everybody. It's extraordinary.

Anyway, Kurt, thank you. I appreciate it. I learned a lot.

Bullock: Thanks a lot, Kurt.

Kurt Elster: I have an announcement. Our first Shopify app went live in the Shopify apps store on Tuesday of this week. This episode comes out Thursday, went live on Tuesday. It is a crowdfunding app.
If you have an existing store with an existing audience, but you want to have better pre-orders, our crowdfunding app, it's called Crowdfunder, we'll let you setup a countdown timer, show how many have purchase, set funding goals, and then chose what happens when it ends, and if it was fund or not. It's very cool. It's got a free trial. It's only 90 bucks a month after that.

[background music]

Kurt Elster: Check it out. I would really appreciate it. Go to the App Store, search Crowdfunder. Thanks, everybody, and we'll be back next week.

Dec 01 2016

30mins

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Rank #9: Becoming Known: The Case for Personal Branding

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In today's episode, you'll learn how to sell more, more often with personal branding, an often overlooked strategy that lets you sell person to person at scale by sparking that human connection.

Two reasons:

  1. People buy from people, not brands.
  2. As a business owner, you are your own best brand ambassador.

We're joined by recurring guest, good friend, and master of his own brand, Kai Davis.

Kai Davis is an Ecommerce and Shopify Marketing Expert. He helps Shopify store owners sell more, more often to their best customers.

Want to learn how to sell more, more often? Visit DoubleYourEcommerce.com and sign up today to learn more.

You'll Learn

  • What is personal branding?
  • Why is personal branding important to build trust?
  • How is personal branding different than normal branding?
  • How to craft your personal story (the easy way)
  • Why Kurt peacocks in his camo blazer (and you should too)
  • Great inspirational examples of personal branding

Tune in for more details!

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Grow Your Store in 2018

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Jun 12 2018

54mins

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Rank #10: Your 6-figure Product Launch Blueprint

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Ever wonder the best time and day to promote a product or sale? Or what strategy to use to get orders all day long? In this episode, 7-figure Shopify merchant Mark Arruda breaks down the exact strategy he's using.

You'll hear:

  • How Etsy made (and almost broke) Mark's business
  • Risks around trademarks
  • What to do when Facebook ads get too expense
  • How to focus on profitability
  • Mark's next level launch strategy
  • Why you should never do a weekend launch
  • The ideal day to launch a product

Mark is the founder and CEO of Constantly Varied Gear, co-host of the Messenger Mastermind Podcast and an avid community builder and marketer.

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This episode made possible by Rewind

Nov 07 2019

47mins

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Rank #11: Starting Adwords from scratch - From $0 to $10K as fast as possible with Daryl Mander

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Daryl Mander joins us today today with 20 minutes of actionable advice on making an extra $10k/mo with AdWords.

Daryl is the founder and CEO of Big Flare, the Adwords agency for small Ecommerce businesses. He's helped big brands like Panasonic, AOL, 20th Century Fox and the UK Royal Mint to bring in more sales via advertising and now he's dedicated to bringing those big brand lessons to small budget advertisers.

Learn:

  • The biggest mistakes that Ecommerce stores make on Adwords
  • How to start Adwords from scratch - from $0 to $10K as fast as possible
  • How to scale out a profitable Adwords account
  • And what to do when you've already maxed out on Adwords

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Daryl's offer for TUSP Listeners:

Get a full audit of your account performed by one of our certified Adwords specialists

Contact Daryl:

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Tell me where to send your sample at ecommerce-bootcamp.com

Aug 30 2016

32mins

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Rank #12: Drop Shipping and Ecommerce Automation

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We talked to Sina Djafari about dropshipping, ecommerce in general, and his dropshipping automation software, DuoPlane.

What if you could automate the manual tasks that bog you down, freeing you up to focus on growing your business?

That's what dropshipping and order management software promises, but how do you get started? Who is it good for? I didn't know very much about it myself, so I set out to find out.

And even if you don't want to hear about dropshipping, skip the first 25 minutes for a hot take on the ecommerce mistakes that Sina sees people making.

PS: Be sure to subscribe to the podcast via iTunes and write a review. iTunes is all about reviews!

Feb 02 2015

33mins

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Rank #13: How-to Sell More With Content-first Facebook Sales Funnels

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It’s tremendously easy to waste money with Facebook ads, yet we’ve heard so many successful entreprenuers talk about their success with Facebook Ads. So what can we do stack their cards in your favor?

Our guest today, Kurt Bullock, walks through a proven blueprint that any store can use to yield better results with Facebook Ads by leveraging content to grow your Shopify store.

Kurt Bullock is the founder of ecommerce agency ProduceDept, creator of TargetEcho and HelloSocial - which are tools for marketing agencies, and - he's someone we work with on a daily basis at Ethercycle.

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Work with Kurt

Learn how:

  • The content-first approach that lowers ad cost and increases conversions
  • How to use video to remarket to customers
  • How to find ideas for content
  • Hacks to improve your relevance score
  • Kurt’s one tip: “the best advertising is invisible…”

Links Mentioned:

Free Guide

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Tell me where to send your sample at ecommerce-bootcamp.com

Transcript

Kurt Elster: Hello, and welcome back to The Unofficial Shopify Podcast. I'm your host, Kurt Elster, recording from Ethercycle Headquarters, outside Chicago. All the way, up in the clouds, on the second floor of the historic Pickwick Theatre building. It's pretty cool, [inaudible 00:00:13]. Anyway, today, we are talking about getting more traffic to your store, using Facebook ads. Certainly, we've talked about Facebook ads, before. I think, we've made the case for, "Here's why you should be using Facebook ads." We've talked about a few ways to do better Facebook ads, examples of how to do Facebook ads. And, today's, is really no different.
One of the things, you know, in doing Facebook ads for a couple years now, we've discovered, you have to view the Facebook ads, themselves, as a sales funnel. There is no one ad, that's just going to print money for your store. Sometimes, that works for people. God bless them. I wish them the best of luck, if they can manage that. But, for most stores, the trick is to increase the total number of touch points with a customer, by using your Facebook ads to segment your audience, based on the actions they take on your site. And, then, shepherd them through, walk them through that relationship, from not knowing who you are, to discovering who you are, and then buying your product.
It takes time. The more touch points you can have with someone, the more likely they are to buy. That totally makes sense. It's the way human psychology works, right? We talk about human tissue, and selling. It is very much like dating. That initial purchase is getting married. You're not just gonna run up to somebody and say, "Hey, marry me." That's what a lot of Facebook ads try to do. Today, we're gonna walk through an example sales funnel, that we have lovingly dubbed, 'The Content First Sales Funnel.' I think it's very clever.
The discussion will be led by, none other than previous guest, Kurt Bullock, who is the founder of Ecommerce Agency Produce Department, creator of Target Echo, and HelloSocial, which are tools for marketing agencies. I use Target Echo. And, it's someone I work with on a daily basis, through Ethercycle, through my agency, and it's been hugely successful. Kurt does ... It's a little confusing that we're both named Kurt. But, Mr. Bullock does a fulfillment for email marketing setups, Facebook setups, Facebook ads, retainers. It's, all around, full of good and useful ideas. So, I said, "Oh, we gotta talk through this, on the show." So, Kurt, thank you for joining us.

Kurt Bullock: Absolutely. Thanks for the wonderful intro.
So, talking about content for sales funnel, what does that mean?

Kurt Bullock: So, content for sales funnel simply means, using content to drive people to your products, and to increase ... We use an advertising to decrease the cost of advertising, and getting a sale.

Kurt Elster: So, rather than just, you know, the go to, and this makes sense, and it'll seem straight forward, is you have one ad ... This how people used to do it. You have one ad, it's an ad for the product, they click the link, it goes to the product, and that's it.

Kurt Bullock: Right.

Kurt Elster: Now, it's traditional. And, now, that approach doesn't work so much, anymore. And, it's expensive. So, what you're advocating, instead, is what?

Kurt Bullock: Right. Sending your cold traffic, direct to go to a product page, sort of, the highest way to get a customer. The most expensive way to get a customer. We propose using content, first, to help you gain trust, and to help people raise their hand. We like to use behavioral indicators, throughout our marketing funnel. So, this gives us a way to get people to raise their hand, by reading your content. And, then, we can target them, nurture them, with a combination of email, and Facebook ads, in a funnel. I set up my Facebook ads on funnel, just like an email autoresponder. So, we have, sort of, all the same layers, and same messaging.

Kurt Elster: It's clever, but it's a little abstract. I can wrap my head around it, 'cause, you know, we've been doing this long enough. But, walk me through an example.

Kurt Bullock: Sure. I was looking through Buzzfeed the other day, and I came across ... We're doing this ... Well, we're not actually doing this. We've been talking about Whole30, because we do Paleo stuff in my family. This recipe Facebook ad caught my eye. Said, "17 recipes that actually got me through Whole30." That was the Facebook ad, on the front, to pull traffic. I click on that ad. In this case, it took me to a Buzzfeed page. Somebody had paid for this article to be created, on their behalf.
There were links, all the way down, of different recipes. They had Pinterest posts, that were embedded, that sort of thing. At the bottom, was a recipe for piña colada mix, and a link to a third party site. This is the person that paid for this article to be created. Once you click on that link, you're taken to that third party site, and it's all dedicated to Whole30 meal planning. There was an offer to get a free, seven day, Whole30 meal planning guide, with email opt-in. From there, after opting in, I'm put on an email nurture sequence, and Facebook ads would target me until I make it to that final stage, which is a purchase.

Kurt Elster: I love it. What you're doing here ... If you download the free sample of 'Ecommerce Bootcamp', ecommerce, dash, bootcamp, dot com, link in the show notes. The first chapter is 'Sales Through Education', which we, lovingly, turned into a program called 'Seducation', right? That's what's going on, here. You're educating. You're giving away value in the form of an article. That article, even if I don't purchase the piña colada mix at the end, is the article still valuable, and useful to you?

Kurt Bullock: Right. It needs to be, to be effective.

Kurt Elster: You're asking them for something. You're asking them to buy something from you, to share their very personal credit card, and home address with you. You're asking for a lot. I think, that's what people have to realize. Up front, you need to give them as much, or more value, then you're going to be taking. So, you've got ... You're leading with genuinely useful content. In the past, people would create content, but they're certainly not paying for ads to drive people to that content. Here, we're challenging that mindset. We're making an ad, that just goes straight to content. And, you say Facebook's gonna charge me less to do this?

Kurt Bullock: Exactly. There's a couple reasons for that. I'll give away some more ideas about this later on, on the Podcast. They'll charge you less to do this, because Facebook loves content. They love promoting content, and people love reading and promoting content, if it's good content. I just read, when I was just keeping my eyes open, before this Podcast, I clicked through a different article, that was sort of a similar format.
When I got to the page, it was a certain camera manufacturer. And, they outlined somebody's journey, through the day, with this particular camera. It was very painful to read, because every other paragraph says, "And, so and so uses the camera model to take pictures on the day, and uses the special setting, which is great for the active lifestyle this person had." It was an ad, and it wasn't useful, or valuable content. So, a couple paragraphs down, they'd lost all credibility, and that's important, because that's one of the main goals of this first piece of content, is to drive up trust, and credibility.
Initially, your cold traffic doesn't know who you are. They don't trust you. Without trust, making a sale is very expensive. So, that's one of the primary objectives of this first piece, is to engage people emotionally, if you can, on some level. Whether, it's educating them, or entertaining them. And, then, hopefully ... If nothing else, you have got them on your retargeting list. You can continue to re-target them with ads, and try to get them to that next step in your funnel. Which, in this case, would be an opt-in, or they could go straight through, and make a purchase, as well.

Kurt Elster: Recapping a little bit. We wanna use content first, because it's gonna build trust. But, the content ... It has a lower ad cost. In doing that, we're going to build higher quality traffic for our retargeting list. And, maybe, they'll go directly through, and buy. But, they probably won't. I mean, if you have a one percent conversion rate, one out of a hundred will, right?

Kurt Bullock: Right.

Kurt Elster: But, the highest converting stores I've seen, use this approach. Like, if I see a store, and they go, "Oh, yeah. Converts at ten percent," I don't even need to ask. I know, immediately, there is some content piece that they're getting the traffic from. And, it could be something on their own site, on a separate site, something they paid for. But, those are the sites where they have primed the traffic. It just converts tremendously well. Then, they're spending way less on customer acquisition cost, because they're using genuinely valuable content.
I gotta create a piece of content that is useful to my customers. Useful to my potential customers, ideally. Is genuine. There's no ... It does not feel like a sales pitch. The sales pitch is totally secondary to it. What else?

Kurt Bullock: That's very important. They did some research in the last couple years. This group, I think it's called, 'LAB 24', that did some research. They actually found that, as long as you are able to make editorial integrity primary, that people actually ... Conversions were better, than if it was a product sale's primary message. It's important to people, that it feels like real content, in order to keep that trust level up.
Another way to do it is, video. We've talked about video, before, on this Podcast. But, video's a great way to do it. You can follow a really similar structure with video, where, now Facebook ... Before, you would need to take somebody off of Facebook, in order to pixel them, right? So, you would wanna host a video on your own blog, for this strategy. Now, Facebook lets you pixel people, right on Facebook's platform. You could run a Facebook video ad, get people that watch a certain percentage of that video, let's say, and then, Facebook can put them into an audience, so that you can, then, re-target those people, and continue down that same funnel.
Bring them to your product page, bring them to a lead magnet page, and collect their email opt-in. There's lots of different lead magnet concepts, and, I guess, top of funnel concepts. Now, you can even target people that engage with your page, and your posts. You could keep the posts on Facebook, if you wanted to. But, in terms of our clients, we've had the most success creating something, typically off sites, when it comes to blogs, so the content could be a little bit richer. 'Cause, Facebook doesn't let you make it a real nice, like, article reading place, right? It doesn't format it very well for articles.

Kurt Elster: Yeah. It's okay. It's not great. I like to send them ... As long as you send them to site that's totally responsive, that's gonna look good, regardless of device. 'Cause, Facebook traffic's probably 80 percent mobile. You could see this, in the stats, people who do tons of Facebook ads ... At this point, a majority of track is mobile. But, it starts skewing much stronger toward mobile traffic.

Kurt Bullock: Yeah.

Kurt Elster: So, always check that out on mobile.

Kurt Bullock: It's interesting. If we look back at one of our shared clients, PrairieMod, for example, right? They sell pottery. When we first started working together, we were trying to come up with a strategy, and we ended up using one of their most popular blog posts, and creating a PDF download out of it. It was 'How to Choose the Right Vase for Your Room.' That wouldn't have come to me, right off the bat.
If you do a little bit of thinking, then, you can come up with a piece of content, or a blog post, for essentially, any store, or any topic, as long as it's useful. It was, actually, a very successful campaign. It drove down the costs of purchase for PrairieMod, and did very well for them. You can generate content for pretty much any type of store.

Kurt Elster: Very good. I'm taking a couple notes, here. What's the best way to come up ... It's easy to say, "Hey, you need to make content for your store to sell your stuff." How do I do it? What is the approach I should take, here?

Kurt Bullock: Yeah. Good question. I like to use a couple ways. One is, BuzzSumo. I know, that's a product that you use, as well. But, BuzzSumo's a great way to do research. For those of you that aren't familiar with it, you can type in a keyword, or some phrase, and it's gonna give you all the most shared articles on the top social media sites. This includes your competitors. You can actually type in their specific URLs, and find what's performing best for them.
One thing I like to do is, to check out the way that they create their titles. How are all the titles formatted in that top 10, top 20 list? And, then, that's a great way to get hints. Another way, I use the Google autosuggest, which is essentially, when you go into Google, type in a search, and it gives you those little lists of suggestions, after you've typed in the search term. Scroll down that list, and see if there's any phrases that might clue you into a direction that you could take with your content.
That's two quick ways. BuzzSumo has a free ... You could do that first search for free. Actually, I guess, you could get those first 10 results for free. Anybody could use that.

Kurt Elster: Yeah. I like BuzzSumo, is nice, and it'll give you some basic stuff. I really like the top 10, are what's gonna be most useful to you. It is valuable, if you wanted to pay for it. SEMrush can do some similar things. It's more focused on, "Hey, let's find back links." That's, also, useful in itself, if you could find the back links. 'Cause, you could often find, like, "Oh, this is ... " You get interesting article ideas, that they've got published on external sites. I find that useful for doing competitive analysis.
If BuzzSumo doesn't yield something, then I'll usually ... Like, something obvious. Then, I'll combine it with SEMrush. The Google autosuggest trick works a lot. The only caveat is, it'll try, like, Google ... If you're logged in, Google's gonna try to tailor the results to you. Usually, it's fine. It's totally fine.
But, someone on my email list called me out. Or on, like, a YouTube comment. "Look, well, you have to do it in the Incognito window." "Okay, fine." I mean, it's not gonna, like, hugely change the results. But, if you wanna make sure it's not tailored to you, open it up in a private window, or in Incognito window, so they can't do it.

Kurt Bullock: Right. Also, if I may talk just a little bit about, as you're executing this strategy, relevance score. Relevance score, for those of you that aren't real familiar with it, when you run ads, Facebook gives you a score from one to 10, that's going to, essentially, tell you how engaged your audience is with your ad, or how well your ad is resinating with your audience. This is all because, a few years back, in the wild west of the early days of Facebook, advertising a bunch of wily internet marketers were promoting aggressive ads. It got a little bit out of control. Facebook's very concerned about their user experience, right?
They figured out that they could use this score, that shows advertisers how well your campaign is doing, in terms of, "Are people sharing it, commenting, liking it? Or, are they pressing the 'Do not show this ad' button, in the upper, right hand corner of the ad?" It'll give you that score. If you can manage to get that score on the upper end of the scale, Facebook will reward you with a lower CPM, which is a way to measure the cost of your traffic. This is a really important number to monitor, as you're running these content campaigns, at the top of your funnel.

Kurt Elster: What affects the relevance score? It goes one to ten. The lower it goes, these ads are gonna cost me more. It implies they're not effective. How do I get a perfect ten on a relevance score, and how realistic is it to do that?

Kurt Bullock: Yeah, so, initially, for me, it was not realistic at all. I would never get tens, and I really struggled with making it happen. After I really started paying attention, and doing some research, I came across a couple methods that help out with this. One example is, if you create your ad, and instead of creating it in the ... If you start by putting it as a post, on your Facebook page, then you can take that ad, run it with the goal of engagement for a few days, right? The idea, here, is to try and get some social proof on the ad. If you can get people to comment on the ad, give it some thumbs up, and boost that relevance score, and you can see that go up. Once you've got that score going up, a little bit ...
More than anything, I'm just looking for those engagement cues, that it's being shared and commented on, then ... I usually show that to a friendlier audience. That would be the followers of my Facebook page, or warmer targeting audiences. People that are most engaged with my brand. I wanna go for the easy audience, that's gonna help me get some of that engagement on there. After I've done that for a few days, then, I like to move it over, and start sending that to wider audience of traffic.
I found that that has brought me from, sort of, the six, to seven range, on average, is where I was doing, a lot of times. Eight, as well, depending. On a retargeting ad, it's really easy to get higher score. But, on a cold ad, an ad to cold traffic, it can be really hard to get a higher score. So, this trick, if you first get some engagement on that ad, and then move it over ... You can do this by pulling out ... It's called the 'Post I.D.' You can pull up that little number, or you can search for it when you're creating a new ad. You select 'Use Existing Post,' and find that same post.
Then, you can run it, using the traffic, or the conversions objective, as you normally would. But, now, it's gonna convert better, and have a higher relevance score. That's, actually, made a really big difference, bringing me up to the nine, and sometimes, 10 range, for cold traffic, which, is pretty awesome. It makes a big difference on the price of your ad campaigns.

Kurt Elster: All right. So, to recap. I gotta come up with an idea for an original piece of content. I can use, if I don't have an idea already, I can use BuzzSumo, SEMrush, and Google auto complete to try and come up with a title, and a topic. Once I've got that, I'm gonna create the content, be it, I create it myself. I hire somebody off Upwork. Something to that effect. Then, once I've done that, I wanna make sure the content is not sales-y at all. It's gotta be genuinely educational. It can't be this affiliate, nasty stuff. It needs to be genuine, and authentic, and real, and helpful.
Then, at the very end, I will link to, if it totally makes sense, then I'm gonna link through to the offer. To my product page, to a lead magnet. I got that out. I'm gonna post it, as to my Facebook page, then I'm gonna grab my post I.D., use it to create a Facebook ad for that post, run it to a warm audience. By doing that, I'm juicing my relevance score, 'cause it's gonna go up. They all start at five. Then, as people engage positively with it, by liking it, by adding comments, by sharing it, it's gonna go up, six, seven, eight. That's gonna bring my end cost down, and establish, like, "Oh, this is a positive thing you should check out," when it starts showing up in, like, total strangers' Facebook feeds. Correct?

Kurt Bullock: Tah-dah. Yes.

Kurt Elster: Okay, cool. Now, what do I do, then? I've got the ads running. It doesn't cost me much, it's got low quality score, or a good quality score. People are going to this article. I'm just spending money. I'm not getting customers. What am I doing? What do I do next?

Kurt Bullock: After that, you're gonna wanna have retargeting ads that bring people to the next stage of the campaign. I use retargeting ads that bring people to, if I have a lead magnet, then it's bringing them to that lead magnet stage. If not, then, you can bring 'em right to the product page. I've got an outline for everybody. I usually use a three stage funnel, at the very top. This is for cold traffic. We'll bring 'em to a lead magnet. That could be an email course, whatever you have as a lead magnet, and then to the product page, at the end. Does that answer your question?

Kurt Elster: Can I build custom audiences off of this traffic?

Kurt Bullock: Yes.

Kurt Elster: People just go, like, they visit the ad. What's the custom audience for that look like?

Kurt Bullock: Got it. What I would use for, if I'm doing the blog post, I would create a custom audience of people that visited that blog post page. That's the most general way I would do it. If I had a lot of traffic ... [crosstalk 00:22:11]

Kurt Elster: Yeah. Simple. Straightforward.

Kurt Bullock: Yeah. If I had a lot of traffic, then you can use one like that. But, it takes the top 25 percent of people that engage on ... So, by time spent. That's another way you could do it. The simplest way, take everybody that visited that page. Then, I would use that audience, and send them the next stage of my funnel, which would be sending them to my lead magnet.

Kurt Elster: So, lead magnet, email opt-in offer, what does that look like?

Kurt Bullock: In terms of building a custom audience, or the lead magnet, itself?

Kurt Elster: The lead magnet, itself.

Kurt Bullock: Lead magnet, itself, I've had a lot of luck with checklists, can be really great. Or, purchase guides, like, let's say, a recipe guide. That was one of my most successful campaigns. We created 40 different recipes for this essential oil company. They like to mix and match oils, and put them together, this way. We had 40 of those recipes as a downloadable PDF.
Another great way to do it is to have some sort of email drip. People could opt in, and maybe over the next three to five days, it's dripping out content every day, that kind of takes them through your ... Teaches them about your offering, and offers value. At the end, then, you would want to redirect them to your product page. [crosstalk 00:23:31]

Kurt Elster: Why not do both? So, I go, like, "Download my PDF." They download the PDF. It's a checklist. It provides value. Maybe it's pretty, maybe it's not. You could buy a template, you could hire a designer to put it together. But, as long as it provides value, who cares?

Kurt Bullock: Right.

Kurt Elster: From there ... I think, people, kind of, they overemphasize the importance of design. And, I say that as a designer. Step two, we say, "All right. You got your lead magnet. Keep it. You can unsubscribe right now," or, "Stay subscribed, and I will send you my free email course, over the next five days, seven days, whatever it is." Then, follow up that lead magnet with this email course. Now, we're in their inbox every day, staying top of mind, building trust, giving them opportunities to reply to us, and say, "Hey," you know, which questions. Then, hopefully, ideally, purchase along the way. We've radically increased the total number of touch points, at this point.

Kurt Bullock: Right. That's perfect.

Kurt Elster: I think that's a clever way to do it. I suggest that, because that's what my lead magnet is. I have a couple, that, no matter what, it's, "Hey, here's your quick hit of info. Here's your PDF. Stick around. I'll give you an email course, and follow up with you, and you can hit, 'Reply.' It goes to me. I'm a real person. I'll answer your questions." Then, from there, then, "Okay. I'm just gonna follow up. You're on my regular newsletter, and I'm just gonna followup with you a couple times a week."
It builds engagement. Especially, for like, higher tech items. You don't know where people are in the sales process, in the sale cycle. You don't know when they're ready to buy. You don't have to worry about it. It just happens. At that point, then, I really provide a lot of value to them. I could run a Facebook ad, that finally, just sends them to the product page.

Kurt Bullock: Right. Yeah, you're absolutely right. It's a wasted opportunity, once you collect their email address, to not put them on a nurture sequence, and continue emailing them. Then, yeah. You want all those things to point to your next largest offer. So, your product page. Whatever that next product is. But, it shouldn't be the focus of your content, right? It should, sort of be, a result of your content, is that they would want to check that piece out.

Kurt Elster: That makes sense. Geez, I don't know. I mean, that alone, that's a ton of info. That's a lot of strategy we just dumped on people. You have ... Well, wait. We were talking about The New York Times, and how they were employing the strategy. Can you share that example with us?

Kurt Bullock: Yeah, absolutely. The New York Times, I think, it was October of 2016, purchased a few Ecommerce properties. You may have heard them. [crosstalk 00:26:13]

Kurt Elster: Such as?

Kurt Bullock: Yeah. Sweethome, and The Wirecutter.

Kurt Elster: I love both of them.

Kurt Bullock: Yeah. Great sites. So, they are using this same strategy, right? So, they're coming up. They spent a lot of time on their content. They usually do a lot of research. They employ experts, and they do all sorts of testing, and they usually document their testing, in the article. So, you could see they've got, you know, 20 pressure cookers lined up, or something like that, and they're testing them all out. Then, their strategy is to make recommendations, and they are monetizing this, by sending people to Amazon links, or Home Depot links, and getting an affiliate fee on those purchases.

Kurt Elster: Yeah. Which is, like, it's seven percent. But, they don't have to do anything. They do no fulfillment. I guess, as far on Ecommerce's side, there's no customer support. There's no fulfillment. There's kind of a cool model.
But, yeah, man. Wirecutter and Sweethome, people go to them, because they trust 'em, because there is genuinely valuable content. Like, I go, and I'm like, "Yeah. This review totally makes sense. Helps me make a decision." I go there, like ... It's cool. So, the concept works. I know what they're doing. I know full well, the way it works. I totally trust it. I totally buy into it. I've never seen them use Facebook ads.

Kurt Bullock: Yeah. They're not ... I don't believe that they're using Facebook ads to push people to this ... I haven't seen it, either, that way. But, I think, that just the model works. You can see it. You know, if you wanna study how to do this yourself, you go look at the bottom of The New York Times' website, and look at all of their promoted content, right?
The articles that are there, because people are advertising. Study the way that they do those, and you can see for yourself, which ones are well done, and, which ones aren't. Also, go to Buzzfeed, and these other sorts of sites, and study the way that they create their articles. That's a really good way to get ideas for your store.

Kurt Elster: Also, a good idea. You have a download, you have a bonus for people. It's free, so they can try and do this, themselves. Tell me about that.

Kurt Bullock: Yeah. So, I've created a few maps of this strategy, because it is a lot of content that we went through on the Podcast, so far. It maps out, visually, the way that the funnel works, and then give you some spaces to, sort of, fill in the blanks, and come up with your own content first strategy. Tells you which custom audiences to build. The whole thing's mapped out.
I have two maps built. One is for using blog post content, and the other one is for a video style content, using video views. You can download those maps at produce ... The link is, produce d-e-p-t, dot co. That stands for 'produce department,' slash content, dash first. [crosstalk 00:29:14]

Kurt Elster: I will put that into the first ... Produce department, dot co, slash content, dash first. I will include that as the first link in the show notes. I took notes on all of the links you've mentioned. So, we've got those in here. People can grab those, check that stuff out. And, to go further over it, we're gonna go over Facebook funnels, in a upcoming webinar.

Kurt Bullock: Right.

Kurt Elster: In the next coming weeks. So, keep an eye out for that. Sign up for my newsletter. Kurt Elster dot com. I'll promote the webinar there, or join us in our Facebook group, where Kurt Bullock is also active. So, you can ask your questions there, as well. And, other than that, anything else you'd like to add? Anything you wish it restored, or would do? Anything like that?

Kurt Bullock: Well, I think that this is the direction that the people are going. People don't want to see ads, anymore. Research is showing, the best type of ad is, essentially, or advertising, is invisible. Right? People don't want to see blatant advertising. At least, not until they know who your brand is. And, later on, the advertising can be more blatant, and it serves a purpose, because you are interested in the product, you know how it could enhance your life, if advertising is done well.
I think that this is the direction that people should be going to. To start simple, just start experimenting. You can do this with very little down, in terms of ad spend. Five bucks a day, to give it a test. Post, again, as Kurt mentioned, in the Facebook group. I'm happy to answer questions, and help you through it.

Kurt Elster: Very good. Thank you for joining us. You have absolutely ... You've opened the kimono on the very saying, sales funnel process for Facebook ads, that people are presently hiring us to implement for them, in their ecommerce stores, and seeing effective return on investments on these ads, which is fantastic. Typically, you know, any kind of marketing, any kind of advertising, is an investment. Like all investments, carries a risk.
But, approaching it this way, coming at it, knowing what works for other people, experimenting with it, wildly helps you reduce that risk. You're gonna be less frustrated, spend less time, and less money, getting to those positive ORY campaigns. Once they're running, they're evergreen, because they're based on peoples' actions. You could, typically, run them for quite a long time, before you have to modify them, when they start becoming ineffective. Right? Yes?

Kurt Bullock: Yes. You're exactly right.

Kurt Elster: Fantastic. That concludes this episode. Thanks so much, for everybody, for your attention, your reviews on iTunes, and your comments in my inbox, and on the Facebook group. However you found this episode, you can find out more about it on Unofficial Shopify Podcast, dot com. It's where I'll link all the show notes. If you'd like to be notified when we post a new episode, when the webinar's coming up, sign up for my newsletter, Kurt Elster, dot com. Shoot you an email, whenever we post a new episode. Of course, if you'd like to work with us on your next project, you can apply at Ethercycle, dot com. Thanks, everybody, and we'll be back next week.

May 23 2017

34mins

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Rank #14: Jay Myers: What Successful Shopify Storeowners Know

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Jay Myers is one of the co-founders of Bold Commerce. He has a long history in ecommerce and uses that to help build some of the best apps on Shopify. Currently he heads up marketing at Bold, and works very close with the product team.

With 22 apps in the app store, and a staff of one hundred, Jay Myers and the Bold Apps team has learned a lot about ecommerce.

Jay had some online retail shops that he built on the Shopify platform, but Jay wished they could do a little more for him. After all, Shopify is a brilliant, efficient, and easy to use platform for selling your goods, but Jay wanted to do more. Big surprise. He wanted to market directly to his shoppers while they were on his website and make more sales.

Lucky for Jay, Shopify allows developers to create plugins, add-ons, and applications and put them in their App store for all to use. But Jay also found that most third party developers were creating apps for managing the back end of your store and nothing really existed to help market products on the front end, help customers buy more, and help retailers sell more. So Jay called up a couple friends of his who were very well versed in eCommerce software design and pitched them the idea of building some apps for his store that they could then also put in the Shopify App Store and provide to other store owners. These gentlemen became the ownership team of the Bold Innovation Group, Shopify's leading app developer.

With tens of thousands of app installs, Jay has learned firsthand what makes some stores succeed. In this episode, we learn what separates successful stores from the rest of the pack.

Subscribe to The Unofficial Shopify Podcast on iTunes

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Learn:

  • Learn why the most successful sites have only a few SKUs.
  • Why the most successful stores figure out a mathematical formula on how to market.
  • How to turn your angriest customer into raving fans
  • What are the future big opportunities of ecommerce?

Links:

Free Guide

I want to send you a sample chapter of Ecommerce Bootcamp, absolutely free.

Tell me where to send your sample at ecommerce-bootcamp.com

Apr 26 2016

44mins

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Rank #15: Launching Lean & Quick: Building Nimble Sites with Galen King

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In this episode, you'll learn how to think about launching lean, staying nimble, and growing fast!

Galen King from O.G. Shopify agency Lucid joins us to discuss a practical strategic approach to launching new brands on Shopify.

Galen King is the founder and creative director of Lucid, a small digital agency with offices in New Zealand and New York City. One of the first Shopify Partners, he's been dabbling with Shopify since 2006 and have designed and built many stores as well as side-projects—both on Shopify and elsewhere.

You'll Learn

  • Why Galen thinks you should probably start with this one free theme
  • The danger of 3rd party themes
  • Where to invest resources
  • How far ahead should you plan? And how should you approach it in a practical way?
  • How does "authentic storytelling" fit into the lean launch plan?
  • How important is design?
  • When launching a new site on Shopify, what should you focus on?

Tune in for more details!

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Grow Your Store in 2018

Mar 27 2018

49mins

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Rank #16: Four Ecommerce Trends for 2017 Marketing Strategy With Phil Kyprianou

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Where should you be investing your resources in 2017?

To answer that question, we're joined by serial entrepreneur, coach & speaker, Phil Kyprianou. For the past decade, Phil has been dedicating himself to internet marketing. With a Facebook group of nearly 25K Shopify storeowners, Phil is always to give back to the community.

Having built multiple successful Shopify stores, and worked with Fortune 500 companies and agencies, Phil knows what works based on hard-won experience.

In today's episode, Phil walks us through what he believes are four pillars for a successful ecommerce business in 2017.

Subscribe to The Unofficial Shopify Podcast on iTunes

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Join The Unofficial Shopify Podcast Facebook Group

Learn:

  • Why and how customization and personalization are important and more accessible than ever
  • How you can use story-telling to improve the perceived value of your products
  • Why and how to build your brand with higher touch customer service
  • The traditional marketing channels that you should add to your omni-channel marketing
  • The one thing Phil wishes every Shopify storeowner would do

Links:

Phil's Facebook group: Shopify Strategy
Phil's store: Goth Rider
Great personalization example from Jens Hansen: Forge Your Ring

Free Guide

I want to send you a sample chapter of Ecommerce Bootcamp, absolutely free.

Tell me where to send your sample at ecommerce-bootcamp.com

Feb 14 2017

49mins

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Rank #17: My Wife Started a Shopify Store! (BONUS EPISODE)

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Less than one month after launching her first Shopify store, I interview Julie Elster about her experience so far.

Julie Elster is the owner of the one-month old Disney World-planning info-product empire Double Your WDW.

In 2015, she achieved viral success among freelancers when she started (and just ended) Just Tell Julie, an accounts receivable service.

We'll find out:

  • what’s working & what’s not,
  • her marketing plan,
  • the unexpected reaction from family and friends,
  • her unfair advantages,
  • why she had to blow up her last business,

...and more in this candid interview in our pajamas.

Tune in for more details!

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Grow Your Store in 2018

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Oct 04 2018

40mins

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Rank #18: Getting People Talking About Your Brand (Even if you're not an Influencer)

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Pop-Quiz: Which marketing channel is the most effective and costs the least?

Answer: Word of mouth.

Today, David Fallarme joins us in this actionable episode to discuss the essentials behind successful word of mouth marketing.

David currently heads up marketing for ReferralCandy, a Shopify app that gives your store a referral program.

David's background includes making viral Facebook games played by millions, and he uses that experience to help ecommerce stores increase their sales with word of mouth.

Subscribe to The Unofficial Shopify Podcast on iTunes

Subscribe to The Unofficial Shopify Podcast on Stitcher

Subscribe to The Unofficial Shopify Podcast via RSS

Join The Unofficial Shopify Podcast Facebook Group

Learn:

  • How to get hundreds of people talking about your store when you launch, even if you aren't an influencer
  • The most common beginner mistakes everyone makes when setting up referral program
  • How to refine your positioning to increase likelihood of people talking about you
  • How offering social status to your buyers is a powerful motivator

Links:

Free Guide

I want to send you a sample chapter of Ecommerce Bootcamp, absolutely free.

Tell me where to send your sample at ecommerce-bootcamp.com

Mar 28 2017

26mins

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Rank #19: How Julie Elster Generates 10,000 Organic Visitors

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Last fall, my wife started a Shopify store and told us the struggle is real in a podcast episode. It became one of our all-time top ten episodes. On May 14th, she returns to the show to update us

Just six months after launching her first Shopify store, we check in with Julie Elster about her experience. She'll tell us what's worked, what hasn't, and the content marketing strategy that's generating 10,000 monthly views without any paid traffic.

We'll find out:

  • what’s working & what’s not,
  • a Pinterest strategy that works
  • how to lose money with influencers
  • her simple but effective content marketing strategy
  • and her best lead magnet

Julie Elster is the owner of the Disney World-planning brand Double Your WDW, which she started in September 2018.

Tune in for more details!

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May 07 2019

59mins

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Rank #20: PostedProtein: Bootstrapping from 0 to £250K+

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Today's guest did what some people will tell you is impossible.

From his kitchen, he built an ecommerce business from 0 to £250K+ in 2 years in a saturated market without borrowing money.

UK-based entrepreneur Tom Brown joins us to discuss the journey, mindset, and tactics that helped him build a successful business selling protein bars online.

You'll Learn

  • How Tom got his first customers with zero money on social media
  • Which apps were most effective in scaling their business
  • The mindset that's empowered his continued growth
  • How he leverages the Shopify ecosystem
  • The surprisingly simple way he raises cash on demand

Tune in for more details!

Resources

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What's Kurt up to?

Grow Your Store in 2018

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Jul 10 2018

45mins

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