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Sewing Out Loud

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Rank #89 in Hobbies category

Arts
Fashion & Beauty
Leisure
Hobbies
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Learn the technical information you need to sew successfully from the fun ladies over at SewHere.comZede and Mallory are a mother/daughter team who run Zede's Sewing Studio in Columbia, MO. They sell sewing machines, teach sewing classes and provide excellent sewing entertainment online and in-store!

Read more

Learn the technical information you need to sew successfully from the fun ladies over at SewHere.comZede and Mallory are a mother/daughter team who run Zede's Sewing Studio in Columbia, MO. They sell sewing machines, teach sewing classes and provide excellent sewing entertainment online and in-store!

iTunes Ratings

301 Ratings
Average Ratings
224
26
14
16
21

Stop it please!

By K8sww - Dec 18 2019
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I agree with a lot of the other posts, great content, ladies know what they are talking about. I am learning a lot! However, they both need to stop talking over each other ! I think Zede does it more often, and she raises her voice! It really is annoying. There are far too many good sewing podcasts for u to risk losing your listeners.

Beat sewing podcast

By kariusogbactus - Aug 08 2019
Read more
This podcast is informative, funny and entertaining. The best sewing podcast out there.

iTunes Ratings

301 Ratings
Average Ratings
224
26
14
16
21

Stop it please!

By K8sww - Dec 18 2019
Read more
I agree with a lot of the other posts, great content, ladies know what they are talking about. I am learning a lot! However, they both need to stop talking over each other ! I think Zede does it more often, and she raises her voice! It really is annoying. There are far too many good sewing podcasts for u to risk losing your listeners.

Beat sewing podcast

By kariusogbactus - Aug 08 2019
Read more
This podcast is informative, funny and entertaining. The best sewing podcast out there.
Cover image of Sewing Out Loud

Sewing Out Loud

Latest release on Jan 24, 2020

Read more

Learn the technical information you need to sew successfully from the fun ladies over at SewHere.comZede and Mallory are a mother/daughter team who run Zede's Sewing Studio in Columbia, MO. They sell sewing machines, teach sewing classes and provide excellent sewing entertainment online and in-store!

Rank #1: FFTCM: Baby Lock Tech Dress & Leggings

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Have you recently finished a sewing project you’ve been dreading? Made that perfect fitting shirt? Join Mallory and Zede and tell us about your sewing successes in the comments so we can feel free to compliment you!

The post FFTCM: Baby Lock Tech Dress & Leggings appeared first on sewhere.com.

Feb 24 2017

17mins

Play

Rank #2: Online Fabric Shopping

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Mallory and  Zede share their online fabric shopping knowledge and offer great suggestions for how to go about making your first online purchase. They cover how to find reputable fabric sources, how to try before you buy (ordering samples and visiting JoAnn’s can be mighty helpful), and explore the new trend in fabric buying – preorder Facebook groups.

Do you have any great tips for buying fabric online?

Keep in touch with us at:

www.SewHere.com

Self Sewn Wardrobe Facebook Group

@ZedesSewingStudio on Instagram

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THIS BROADCAST IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

“THE FEEL FREE TO COMPLIMENT ME” LAPEL PIN

This enamel lapel pin lets all your sewing friends know that you’re ready for those compliments!!!

Pin is .75″x1.25″ with a military clutch fastener

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The post Online Fabric Shopping appeared first on sewhere.com.

Aug 24 2018

Play

Rank #3: Buying Fabric Intentionally

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These Show Notes contain affiliate links.  When you click through and make a purchase, SewHere receives a commission at no cost to you.

This episode of Sewing Out Loud is brought to you by MyBodyModel.  Create a custom design template based on your body measurements using this custom app created especially for garment stitchers!  Get 15% the app when you go to MyBodyModel.com and enter code SEWHERE at checkout, now through February 9th 2019.

Do you want to see what a garment would look like on your body shape, before you invest time and fabric into making it?  With MyBodyModel you can draw your fashion ideas on an outline of your own body. 

Just enter your measurements online, and get your own fashion design templates, shaped like YOU.  You can preview your body model for free!  MyBodyModel is launching the latest, new and improved version of their app with better accuracy and more body measurement data options.  

Listeners to Sewing Out Loud get 15% when you use code SEWHERE (that s S E W H E R E) for now through Saturday, Feb  9th!

The post Buying Fabric Intentionally appeared first on sewhere.com.

Feb 01 2019

38mins

Play

Rank #4: Knit Construction and Finishing Techniques

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In this installment of Sewing Out Loud Zede and Mallory discuss construction and finishing techniques for knit fabrics. They dedicate the entire first half of the episode to neck binding and treatments. If this is an area of knit garment construction you struggle with or could use some new technique information, you are not going to want to miss this episode! Mallory and Zede also talk about how they stabilize shoulder seams, construct side seams and handle hems on knits.

Have knit construction questions that weren’t answered by this episode? Leave them in the comments or join the Facebook group for more support.

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THIS PODCAST IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

THE SELF SEWN WARDROBE PLANNER

The planner is available in a universal style as well as a monthly theme that follows along with The Self Sewn Wardrobe Group on Facebook. Both planners offer helpful guidance in planning out your next wardrobe make as well as thoughtful prompts to keep your makes relevant to your likes, style, and wardrobe needs.

Universal Planner

This planner is a guide to planning and finishing any wardrobe project.  You define the project, evaluate your current wardrobe, and follow our guide to form a plan of attack.  You ll be on your way to a Self Sewn Wardrobe in no time.

This 17-page planner can be customized and printed over and over again.  You may want to print some pages more than once, depending on your project, for example, you ll probably make more than one pair of underwear in a month, but most likely only one coat in that amount of time.

This planner is available to Straight Stitch, Backstitch and Zig-Zag members of SewHere.com. Check out membership options here.

This is a printable PDF file that will be immediately available after purchase when you log in at SewHere.com/Profile.  You will not receive a physical planner.

Themed Monthly Planner

A new, themed planner will be published every month!  Each month’s planner will follow along with the theme in The Self Sewn Wardrobe Group on Facebook and include relevant planning and goal setting information as well as hand drawn sketches by none other than Mallory herself.

This planner is included in the Zig Zag SewHere Membership level. If you re interested in becoming a Zig-Zag member, the themed planner will be automatically delivered to the Downloads section of your SewHere profile each month!

This is a printable PDF file that will be immediately available after purchase when you log in at SewHere.com/Profile.  You will not receive a physical planner.

*****************************************************************************

The post Knit Construction and Finishing Techniques appeared first on sewhere.com.

Mar 30 2018

47mins

Play

Rank #5: Hobby Shaming

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In this episode Mallory and Zede explore the many facets of hobby shaming. They get personal and share how they have felt hobby shamed and have witnessed it in the sewing world, even by other sewers. That’s right, sewer on sewer hobby shaming. Zede and Mallory share their views and advice on the topic, including how they too have caught themselves with shaming thoughts before.

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This episode of Sewing Out Loud is brought to you by Makerist.

Makerist is an online platform that connects hobbyists like us to designers from around the world.  Designers take home 85% of each sale, and pay no listing fees!  Check out their $2 Pattern Sale March 12th-18th by clicking here.

Sewing Out Loud listeners get 50% off their video courses by using code “VID50SOL”

Popular Patterns include the Jordan Baby Shoes and the Yoki the Dragon Softie!

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The post Hobby Shaming appeared first on sewhere.com.

Mar 09 2018

49mins

Play

Rank #6: Sewing Projects: A Love/Hate Relationship

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Sometimes our sewing projects can get the better of us and other times they can fill us with euphoria. Zede found herself frazzled and exhausted after sewing miles of heavy drapes for a very affluent customer. She has since sworn off drapes, putting that sewing project in the hate (or the really, really don’t like) category. Mallory has found herself in camp project hate a time or two also. Sewing oodles of appliqué jersey numbers and patches might have that effect.

Sewing projects for others and oneself can at times be an emotional rollercoaster. The good news is there are highs to balance out the lows. Some of Zede’s and Mallory’ s most loved projects have been costumes. They both agree there is something magical when all your time, hard work, and perseverance turn flat fabric into something more spectacular than you initially imagined.

Have you ever had a Love/Hate sewing project?

Keep in touch with us at:

www.SewHere.com

Self Sewn Wardrobe Facebook Group

@ZedesSewingStudio on Instagram

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This weeks Podcast is brought to you by:

Affiliate Links and the Future of SewHere

Mallory and Zede want to make more awesome sewing media for you. More entertaining and informative podcasts, more instructional videos, more online classes, and more time spent socializing and answering your questions on social media. Doesn’t that sound sweet? We think so too. To free up the much needed time to accomplish this, they have decided to use affiliate links instead of fulfilling and shipping orders themselves to make sure you get the amazing sewing products you need and deserve.

They will still sell the SewHere boxes and other hard to find sewing tools and of course have some fun swag for you too, so don’t worry. But next time you need thread or pattern paper (#teamtrace all the way) we may share an affiliate link for a recommended product, this gets you sewing stuff you need/want fast and still supports us at SewHere.

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The post Sewing Projects: A Love/Hate Relationship appeared first on sewhere.com.

May 11 2018

47mins

Play

Rank #7: Zede’s Unconventional Sewing Tips Part 1

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Mallory interviews Zede about some of her more novel sewing tips. Want to know how to handle strands of sequins or why Zede stashes nail polish in her studio? All shall be revealed in this episode.

The post Zede’s Unconventional Sewing Tips Part 1 appeared first on sewhere.com.

Jan 06 2017

Play

Rank #8: What To Get When You Buy A Serger

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These show notes contain affiliate links.  When you click through and make a purchase, SewHere gets a commission at no cost to you.  Thanks!

Sewing Machine Tasha asks:

“After years of listening to the podcast, I am about to get the Baby Lock Imagine serger!! She will join Sewphie (my Baby Lock Presto II sewing machine) on the sewing table.  I am so SO ridiculously excited!!!

Most importantly, what should I name her? What are your favorite pet names for your serger or sewing machine?

Second, this is (obviously) my first serger, so please tell me your favorite things you buy with a serger. Like, I’m guessing I’ll need thread? I guess 4 of them, one for each holder-thingie-madjig? Should I buy all 4 in gray color, to blend in with most fabrics? Also, do I need any extra feet?

Background on what I sew:
Immediate serging plans: garment knits (the full range, from thin double-brushed poly all the way to thicker french terry for sweatshirts).
Long-term serging plans: nice drapes for the house (so, stable, but thick fabric).

THANK YOU!!!

UPDATE: It has been decided: the Imagine will be named Lennon!”

So, what do you HAVE TO HAVE when you go home with a new serger?  We don’t want you to feel any regrets when you get home, so here are our recommendations.  This isn’t a complete list of what we use for our sergers, but it’s a list of what we think you should have to start out with!

Thread

You need serger thread!  Serger thread is special.  It’s lighter weight than machine construction thread, because you’re generally using 3-4 threads to seam.  It also comes on cones, because sergers can use a lot of thread.

Now, don’t think that just because thread is on a cone that it is serger thread.  The packaging of thread and its volume does not always indicate its weight or use.  So make sure that when you choose thread, it is actually “serger thread”.  Zede and I use other types of thread on the serger, like decorative threads and embroidery threads- but to start off, basic serger thread should get you going.

Our favorite serger construction thread is Madeira Aerolock Serger Thread.  I think that a dealer would carry nice thread, but Zede won’t commit- so go with our recommendation!

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You can use sewing construction thread in your serger, but it’s heavier and costs more, so…hence our recommendations.

Which colors should you get?  We have a whole episode on color blending!  When you start your thread library, we recommend getting:

  • 4 dark neutrals: Black, Charcoal, Brown, Medium Grey
  • 4 light neutrals: White, Cream, Beige, Light Grey/Silver
  • Magic Mauve
  • A few of your favorite colors

You don’t have to buy 4 of every color, but if you want it- your dealer will sell it to you!  Thread blending will save you money.  If you stitch up a dark purple shirt, you can use purple thread in your left-most needle and then dark value threads in the other places- only the purple will show, if you stretch your shirt.

If you do need to match threads, like with a sheer or a hem that shows, you will want to coordinate all the colors.  Should you buy more spools of the special colors, you can wind the thread onto bobbins and use it (you can’t wind a bobbin on your serger, you have to do that on your sewing machine).

Loopers do use more thread than needles, so rotate your cones if you’re using the same colors over and over again, or use your least-favorite/least-used cones to the loopers.

Needles/Blades

Do not leave the store without extra needles!  Your machine may come with a pack of needles, but buy a couple packages of each size that’s available for your machine- most sergers only take a couple of sizes.  Needles don’t go bad, so budget for a few needles, you can’t sew without them!

Tasha’s new Imagine takes HAx1SP needles- you can get those in the link below.

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Baby Lock sergers come with an extra upper blade- if you don’t get one of these with your machine, buy one to keep on hand, and bring it with you when you get your machine serviced.  If you need the blade and it’s on backorder or something- it can be very disappointing!

Serger Feet

We love so many serger feet, but what do you need right now when you go home?  Probably just the foot that comes on the machine and maybe a clear foot!  However, if there’s a sale on a foot package- you might want to jump on it.  The foot packages (even at regular price) are a great value, if they’re available!

Also, ask your dealer if you need anything special for the first project you have planned.  They could even demo how to do what you want to do when you pick up your machine.

Tools

Tweezers: If your machine doesn’t come with a pair, get a long, angled pair of tweezers to keep near your serger.

Needle Threader: also useful (if it’s not included).

Thread nets: Get more thread nets than come with your machine, and don’t cut them down in size!  Ideally a thread net should be longer than your spool.  Thread nets are great for taming metallic threads of Maxi Lock Stretch thread.  And you can even store those threads in the thread nets to keep things tidy.

Thread nets should be put on a spool of thread by inserting it into the center of the spool from the bottom, then folding the thread net up around the spool.  A lot of tension or thread breakage issues are caused by impediments to the thread path.

Auxiliary Spool Pins or Cups:  If you use specialty threads or some kind of non-cone thread, you may need an auxiliary spool pin or a cup- no biggie!

Thread Catcher: This might seem like not a huge deal, but your serger makes a ton of lint!  There are many contraptions out there that catch scraps as you’re serging.

Mini Vac Kit: once again, your serger makes lint!  Keep it clean by sucking out the lint and don’t used canned air.

amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "ewere-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "Serger Tools"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "ab902123e5dc0bbb172186a8e8ae1a80"; amzn_assoc_asins = "B077SDD6Z6,B00KIFKGF6,B003LANFXU,B001U5A0Y0,B0054P8UGC,B001ONRCL2,B00GGAAPD0";

Here’s an episode on How To Clean Your Serger

Inspirational Guides/Books

Baby Lock develops and prints their own “Inspirational Guides” (they used to be called workbooks), and they really are special!  They are like “owner’s manuals on steroids”.  Packaged in a three-ring binder, they are fully color-printed with great photographs of advanced serger techniques.  If you get a foot package, you need this book!

Zede remembers a great serger book from Plamer Pletsch.  Ask your dealer if they have any recommendations.  It’s nice to go home with some reliable resources, instead of risking getting bad advice when you come up against a problem.

amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "ewere-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "What Zede Wants You To Read"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "ab902123e5dc0bbb172186a8e8ae1a80"; amzn_assoc_asins = "0935278583,1618470442,0935278656,0935278591";

Coverstitch Machine Extras

Most things we mentioned before for your serger, you should get for your Coverstitch machine.  You may get a little more matchy-matchy on your thread, since you may see it more often on the top of your project when you hem.

Fabric Guide:  Zede reminds us that she thought the fabric guide for a Coverstitch machine was unnecessary, but she was humbled at a Baby Lock training and absolutely recommends it now!  The Fabric Guide lets you perfectly hem a garment using the coverstitching function, after you’ve determined the hem depth and set it up properly.

Clear Foot: While it’s nice to have the clear foot for the serger, it’s almost a necessity for the Coverstitch machine to create very precise hems in the round.

Books: Johanna Lu has published a Coverstitching book, and it’s available on Amazon!  Apparently, Zede and I need to write one too!

Purchasing Tips

Here are some money-saving tips!  Be respectful of your dealer!

  • Sometimes you can add on other items to your purchase, this can be great if you’re using interest-free financing.
  • Ask if there’s a discount for buying notions and thread on the day that you pick up your machine- this is something we used to do.
  • Ask about bonus packages on feet, inspirational guides, etc.
  • Ask for gift certificates to your dealer to save up for your sewing supply goals!

Tangents

We’re on a Podcast Sprint!  If you have suggestions, email us!

The post What To Get When You Buy A Serger appeared first on sewhere.com.

Apr 26 2019

45mins

Play

Rank #9: Zipper Feet

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Having the right tool for the job can be invaluable and sewing is no exception to that rule. This episode is all about feet… zipper feet!

Each sewing machine brand has different types of zipper feet but for this podcast Zede and Mal will be focusing on the different types of Babylock zipper feet since that is what they are most familiar with.

Zipper Foot I

First up is zipper foot letter I, a two position snap on foot. You can snap the shank to one side of the foot and be on the right hand side of the zipper or snap it on the other side and be on the left hand side of the zipper. This foot does not require you to change the needle position which is very useful because not all machines allow the needle to move at all or in multiple positions.

Mal confesses she had a longtime misconception about this foot and how it’s used. She thought it didn’t really get close enough to the zipper and didn’t enjoy using it because she would place the edge of the foot next to the zipper teeth. However, when you look at the bottom of this foot there are steps/grooves cut out on the edges that allow the foot to accommodate the zipper teeth. Zede explains part of the foot rides on the zipper tape and the grooved part rides over the teeth. This allows you to stitch nice and close to the zip teeth.

Narrow Zipper Foot

Another foot in Babylock land, one that Mal really likes, is the narrow zipper foot. This foot has grooves on the bottom too. The center bulk of the foot rides on the fabric and the cutout rides over the teeth. This foot has one shank position not two and allows very close access to the zipper teeth while stitching.

Zede notes the intended purpose of a zipper foot is to get super close to the teeth. This may not always be your desired need or look. Exposed zips and decorative applications are becoming increasingly popular and a regular presser foot can be used to apply these. Zede says most home sewing machines will come with a standard type zipper foot – so chances are you will have one if you need it.

Zede and Mallory have been in the sewing machine world  a while and encourage you to look at the bottom of your presser feet, this will tell you how it can be used – sometimes feet can pull double duty and be used in multiple ways.

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THIS PODCAST IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

THE SELF SEWN WARDROBE PLANNER

The planner is available in a universal style as well as a monthly theme that follows along with The Self Sewn Wardrobe Group on Facebook. Both planners offer helpful guidance in planning out your next wardrobe make as well as thoughtful prompts to keep your makes relevant to your likes, style, and wardrobe needs.

Universal Planner

This planner is a guide to planning and finishing any wardrobe project.  You define the project, evaluate your current wardrobe, and follow our guide to form a plan of attack.  You ll be on your way to a Self Sewn Wardrobe in no time.

This 17-page planner can be customized and printed over and over again.  You may want to print some pages more than once, depending on your project, for example, you ll probably make more than one pair of underwear in a month, but most likely only one coat in that amount of time.

This planner is available to Straight Stitch, Backstitch and Zig-Zag members of SewHere.com. Check out membership options here.

This is a printable PDF file that will be immediately available after purchase when you log in at SewHere.com/Profile.  You will not receive a physical planner.

Themed Monthly Planner

A new, themed planner will be published every month!  Each month’s planner will follow along with the theme in The Self Sewn Wardrobe Group on Facebook and include relevant planning and goal setting information as well as hand drawn sketches by none other than Mallory herself.

This planner is included in the Zig Zag SewHere Membership level. If you re interested in becoming a Zig-Zag member, the themed planner will be automatically delivered to the Downloads section of your SewHere profile each month!

This is a printable PDF file that will be immediately available after purchase when you log in at SewHere.com/Profile.  You will not receive a physical planner.

*******************************************************************

Invisible Zipper Foot

Before Mallory and Zede were Babylock exclusive dealers they also carried Berninas. The Bernina invisible zipper foot looks like a little heart from the front view and she thinks this is cute. Zede thinks the Babylock one looks like a little bunny with a tooth that hangs down, awww.

Mallory says inviable zipper feet are “special lovely things that should be used and not feared”.

Zede says to purchase an invisible zip foot, it’s not a big deal.

Of course you can put an invisible zipper in without the invisible zipper foot but Mal and Zede use this foot and recommend using it. The foot allows the teeth to coil nicely and the zip to function as intended and to actually be invisible.

You can drive a nail in with the side of a pair of pliers, but it’s not efficient and the nail might get bent or the pliers get damaged. Again, having the right tool for the job just makes sense.

The invisible zipper foot allows you to get as close as possible to the zipper coil which allows the zipper to appear invisible and just look like another sewn seam.

On the bottom of this foot are two little channels separated by a center ridge. When you use this foot you will first press open the zipper coils because you followed the package directions and keep the needle in the center position. The coil rides in a channel on the foot and is held to one side by the center ridge. When you are done sewing, the zipper coils will roll back toward the fabric part of the zipper (tape) and when you zip it up the two sides of your fabric roll together and meet up. This foot allows you to stitch extremely close to the coil and get that invisible look from your zipper. The only thing that should be visible is the pull at the top. Mallory and Zede use nail polish to paint the pull to match the fabric. They don’t let the zipper color stop them from putting it in a garment where it doesn’t match the fabric. After all, that zipper is invisible.

Zede and Mal are also not limited by the idea that the invisible zipper foot can only be used for placing invisible zips. When they look at the bottom of that foot and see those grooves their minds wander with possibility. They use those two grooves for couching cords, mini piping, wire, pearl cotton, crochet threads and whatever else they can think up.

Don’t have this foot? Mallory and Zede suggest going to a machine dealer for your brand of machine. If you can’t find a dealer for your specific machine brand you may need to bring your machine in to make sure the fit is right. Or you can order a plastic universal fit kind that is sold with multiple shank options.

Adjustable Universal Zipper Foot

This style of zipper foot is meant to be used with all types of home sewing machines. It looks like a long slender little spatula with small cutouts on each side of the center spatula part. This foot attaches to the presser foot bar by hooking around it and being held snug with a screw. This foot is great for single needle position machines because you slide the foot to the desired position.

Zipper feet serve their purpose well and can also be used to apply trims with flanges, pipings, bulky home dec trims and so many other unintended uses. Do you love using zipper feet? What unexpected ways do you use them?

Tangents This Week

  • Zede has been around (aka she old) – like the zipper foot. She says the concept of the zipper foot is older than her

Keep in touch with us at:

www.SewHere.com

Self Sewn Wardrobe Facebook Group

@ZedesSewingStudio on Instagram

The post Zipper Feet appeared first on sewhere.com.

Aug 17 2018

Play

Rank #10: Sharing Your Sewing Space

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Mallory and Zede have many years of sewing experience and many years of sharing their sewing space. In this episode they discuss having to share sewing space with other sewers and other non sewers. Sometimes sharing can be an area, like a dining room  or an office that is used for more than one activity and sometimes it can be sharing with multiple people at the same time or both. Zede and Mal have some fun with each other and reveal fond (or maybe less than fond) sharing memories and also some insight into how to make the sharing situation better or the space more productive.

Keep in touch with us at:

www.SewHere.com

Self Sewn Wardrobe Facebook Group

@ZedesSewingStudio on Instagram

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THIS EPISODE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY: THE EASY T CLASS

The Easy T Class is the first online sewing class from SewHere.com.

We’re excited to offer an introductory course on pattern drafting, because we know that one of the biggest obstacles in sewing your own clothes is getting the right fit. Instead of downloading a pattern, taping it together, and then cutting it apart again to try and get a perfect fit, try taking your own measurements and drafting this simple top.

The Easy T is a semi-fitted, short-sleeved shirt made from a lightweight, woven fabric.  While the possibilities for customization are endless, we recommend sticking to the basics for your first custom pattern.

One student says, “I ve purchased many (20+) online classes from Craftsy, Creative Live and others. Your Easy T videos are some of the best I ve seen. I love that you created many concise, easy to understand segments.  Breaking the steps down in separate  short sections makes it easy to follow and review things.”

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The post Sharing Your Sewing Space appeared first on sewhere.com.

Apr 20 2018

43mins

Play

Rank #11: Smart Machines

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There are three categories of sewing machine (when talking about smart machines) and those are: mechanical, electronic and computerized. The smarter the machine the more it does for the sewer. Mal and Zede talk about some of the more popular or novel “smart” machine features. Want to know when your bobbin thread is almost out, want a machine that puts your needle up automatically, or one that has a camera for perfect embroidery placement? Then you may want a smart machine.

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          THIS EPISODE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY: THE EASY T CLASS

The Easy T Class is the first online sewing class from SewHere.com.

We’re excited to offer an introductory course on pattern drafting, because we know that one of the biggest obstacles in sewing your own clothes is getting the right fit. Instead of downloading a pattern, taping it together, and then cutting it apart again to try and get a perfect fit, try taking your own measurements and drafting this simple top.

The Easy T is a semi-fitted, short-sleeved shirt made from a lightweight, woven fabric.  While the possibilities for customization are endless, we recommend sticking to the basics for your first custom pattern.

One student says, “I ve purchased many (20+) online classes from Craftsy, Creative Live and others. Your Easy T videos are some of the best I ve seen. I love that you created many concise, easy to understand segments.  Breaking the steps down in separate  short sections makes it easy to follow and review things.”

The post Smart Machines appeared first on sewhere.com.

Jan 05 2018

33mins

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Rank #12: Handmade Gifts

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Mallory and Zede offer up their thoughts and advice on receiving and giving handmade gifts. This episode is chock full of personal stories and laughter and possibly some relatable moments.

The post Handmade Gifts appeared first on sewhere.com.

Dec 15 2017

40mins

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Rank #13: Zede’s Sewing Process

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Mallory interviews Zede about her sewing process. Zede shares her evolution from using patterns and picking specific fabrics to now having a fabric and sloper library to make her wardrobe.

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THIS BROADCAST IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

The SewHere Patreon Page

Hello Stitchers!

Thank you for Sew-pporting the media and community that Zede and Mallory Donohue offer via SewHere.com, the Self Sewn Wardrobe Facebook Group, and our Sewing Out Loud podcast.

We are constantly overwhelmed by the generosity and curiosity of our community, and we love serving you.

Some of our audience has requested a way to say “Thanks” for our services and entertainment as patrons.

While we sell sewing supplies and online classes on our site, some stitchers just simply enjoy the community we provide, and prefer to shop locally, or avoid huge shipping costs overseas.  We listened, and after a lot of consideration, we opened this Patreon account.

Thank you again for your Sew-pport!
Zede and Mallory Donohue

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Dec 08 2017

41mins

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Rank #14: How To Take Out Stitches

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Zede and Mallory share their top tips for stitch editing (yes, we like to be fancy and call seam ripping that). When taking lock stitches (regular sewing machine stitches) out of woven or knit fabrics always pull the bobbin thread. They both agree snipping the thread every few inches and stitching with the longest stitch length possible for your project and desired effect (even if that means only going to a 3 mm) will be a big help if you need to do some stitch editing. They are also huge advocates for using a slightly different colored bobbin thread than your fabric and top thread. This will make it easier to differentiate which is the bobbin thread.

Overlock (serger) stitching is a little different. They again highly suggest thread blending. This time you will be pulling the needle threads. If done correctly the looper threads will just fall away from your fabric edge.

To remove satin type stitches like buttonholes and embroidery you will want to gently shave the back of the stitches with a razor or specialty tool. They urge you to keep the stabilizer on the fabric and to NOT unhoop your embroidery project. Once you remove the stitching you will be all set to restitch.

Do you have another way you like to remove stitching? We’d love to here about it.

Keep in touch with us at:

www.SewHere.com

Self Sewn Wardrobe Facebook Group

@ZedesSewingStudio on Instagram

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THIS PODCAST IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

THE SELF SEWN WARDROBE PLANNER

The planner is available in a universal style as well as a monthly theme that follows along with The Self Sewn Wardrobe Group on Facebook. Both planners offer helpful guidance in planning out your next wardrobe make as well as thoughtful prompts to keep your makes relevant to your likes, style, and wardrobe needs.

Universal Planner

This planner is a guide to planning and finishing any wardrobe project.  You define the project, evaluate your current wardrobe, and follow our guide to form a plan of attack.  You ll be on your way to a Self Sewn Wardrobe in no time.

This 17-page planner can be customized and printed over and over again.  You may want to print some pages more than once, depending on your project, for example, you ll probably make more than one pair of underwear in a month, but most likely only one coat in that amount of time.

This planner is available to Straight Stitch, Backstitch and Zig-Zag members of SewHere.com. Check out membership options here.

This is a printable PDF file that will be immediately available after purchase when you log in at SewHere.com/Profile.  You will not receive a physical planner.

Themed Monthly Planner

A new, themed planner will be published every month!  Each month’s planner will follow along with the theme in The Self Sewn Wardrobe Group on Facebook and include relevant planning and goal setting information as well as hand drawn sketches by none other than Mallory herself.

This planner is included in the Zig Zag SewHere Membership level. If you re interested in becoming a Zig-Zag member, the themed planner will be automatically delivered to the Downloads section of your SewHere profile each month!

This is a printable PDF file that will be immediately available after purchase when you log in at SewHere.com/Profile.  You will not receive a physical planner.

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May 25 2018

44mins

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Rank #15: Sewing Don’ts

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Jul 12 2019

36mins

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Rank #16: The 12 Days of Sewing Part 1

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Dec 06 2019

28mins

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Rank #17: Tearing Wovens and Indie Pattern Knowledge

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These show notes may contain affiliate links.  When you click through and make a purchase, SewHere receives a commission at no cost to you.

Today’s podcast is a question and answer session!  We asked for topic suggestions and questions in The Self Sewn Wardrobe group a while back, and we were not disappointed.

Sometimes, we have to remember that everyone is at a different place in their sewing journey, and maybe they weren’t around when we’ve answered questions before- so getting topic suggestions from you all is so important!

Tearing vs Cutting Wovens

Colette asks:  “Tearing vs. cutting wovens.  Is one better than the other and why did fabric stores stop the practice?”

Let’s discuss why you’d tear a woven fabric and when it might be useful.  When you tear a woven fabric, you are finding the true grain of the fabric, because if it does tear, it tears along one thread.  You’ll also find that your fabric might not be on grain.  Fabric gets contorted when it’s been on the bolt or it’s been stored improperly.  Bolts that are stored upright on their ends can easily get out of shape.

Colette’s experience seems to be that fabric stores used to tear her woven fabrics, and now they don’t.  When Zede managed a fine fabric store, we would tear when we could.  The alternate method to find the grain is to clip the selvage and pull a thread to find the grain.  Some wovens won’t tear.  Twills, unevenly woven fabrics, or fabrics made from very strong fibers.  So, tearing is not always an option in the first place.  If you know that your fabric is on grain in the first place, making a straight cut after you have a good start will ensure that your cuts are on grain.

Why did fabric stores stop?  Maybe they don’t want you to know it’s off grain!  Ha!  Another motivation behind Colette’s question is probably that she’s received cuts of fabric that are terribly off-grain.  Us too!  We think that the employees in most fabric stores nowadays are not trained sufficiently to know when to tear fabrics, what will tear well, or even how to identify the grain of the fabric.  It can be a time consuming practice, and most stitchers would probably be happy to accommodate the time- but company’s aren’t interested in compensating people for the time it takes to do this.

Tearing can freak customers out too!  The sound can be unnerving.  Also, certain fabrics that can tear, shouldn’t be torn.  Tearing can sometimes distort the edge of the fabric.  If you’ve ever torn a polyester satin, it can almost looked melted on the ends.

Another useful tip is that you can tear fabric to find the grain, but do not tear pattern pieces.  If you need a bunch of 4″ strips, don’t clip into the selvage every 4″ and then expect the strips to be the perfect width.  Torn edges can be wavy, and have stray threads poking out.  Tear to find the straight of grain on your fabric, but then cut your pattern pieces with your rotary cutter or scissors- even if they are a bunch of pieces with straight edges.

Even though knits can’t be torn, they deserve some attention here.  It’s very easy to get knits of grain, and then they continue to get off grain as more and more cuts are taken off the bolt.  It’s harder to determine the grain of a knit.  Do so by lining up the selvage edges. and making sure it’s hanging straight

Sometimes fabric can appear off-grain, but they’re actually just distorted, you can wet it down and reblock the fabric into shape.  Sort of like a knitter blocks a shawl.  You’ll need to identify the grain first.

Indie PDF Pattern Knowledge

Anne asks: “Are PDF patterns ruining my sewing game? I’ve been sewing garments for almost 2 years and everything I know I’ve learned from indie pattern makers. Sometimes different patterns have conflicting information (do you sew a knit sleeve in before or after sewing up the bodice side seams?) and I worry that I’m learning bad techniques. Of course I supplement with everything I glean from Mal and Zede, but still, I worry that I’m missing out on the “right way” to sew by using only indie patterns.”

A couple people in the group beat us to the punch by saying that there’s no wrong way to learn!  We’ve seen bad instructions from Indie patterns and the “Big Four”.

Zede says she remembers when she first started learning to sew that Butterick patterns seemed harder to understand, but she liked their patterns.  Then, she got to the point where she didn’t need to read the instructions

The issue of whether or not you sew a sleeve in before seeming up the bodice is a fun question to explore.  There might be a reason to do it one way or another- and both can be right!  Say you’re sewing for show choir and making 42 knit tops, and you know you might have alterations to make.  We’d sew the seam in flat, because we know we might zip right up the side seam and down the sleeve to alter the shirt.

The more skilled and practiced you become, the less this distinction will matter.  The problem with setting in a sleeve flat is that sometimes people can over-distort the sleeve.  But, that might not be a problem for you.  The reason the process of setting in a sleeve originates from the set in sleeves on woven garments.  This subtlety isn’t necessary in the world of knits.

An aside- apparently there’s a big controversy about knit sleeves being symmetrical and a group of stitchers out there that think this is anathema…or something.  Knit sleeves can be symmetrical, because there’s more flexibility in the fabric that in a woven.  Of course, you can make an asymmetrical sleeve if it suits your needs better!

Another topic that came up in the group was overstitch hemming.  A member said that they always hem before seaming together their garment.  We don’t do it this way.  Upon further exploration, the member said that some angles are too acute to handle with their coverstitch machine.  Aha!  We always make sure that our shirt tale hems have enough of a curve at the side seam to make it more comfortable for coverstitching!  So, it wasn’t that one way was wrong or right, but that we were accommodating the process that we wanted to use.  It was a productive exchange!

We don’t think Ann should be automatically wary of Indie patterns just for the sake of the brand.  You’ll decide what works for you and what doesn’t- and you can find comfort and discomfort in any pattern!  One time, Mallory used an Indie pattern to make trousers, but used the instructions for a fly front from another indie pattern, because they made more sense to her.

Of course, sometimes inexperienced designers create patterns.  Zede’s pet peeve is words like “up” or “down” that can be confusing or even subjective.

And sometimes major pattern brands mislabel pattern pieces or mess up grading- it can happen!

Zede reminds us that it’s important to know the rules before you break them, and you’ll start to anticipate when you want to make accommodations for yourself- like the angle of your shirt tale hem!  We always end up modifying the process of constructing a garment.

It’s so important to soldier on and keep sewing, making, and experimenting.

I think sometimes people want to make sewing rules where hard and fast rules don’t belong.  It’s great to question why people make certain claims, and we try to justify our reasons for why we construct things the way we do.  (cough, cough 3TN).

Group member and guest blogger Fred actually made our RhapsoTee with an asymmetrical sleeve.  That’s not the way we instructed the drafting guide to be interpreted- but it worked for her- so great!

Keep in mind that everyone you follow or see on the internet might be using equipment or materials that are different from what you have!  This really keeps things interesting when you’re trying to sort out the best way to do something.  We’d be wary someone who makes absolute claims with no explanation.  All you have to do is politely ask why someone does things the way they do, and hopefully they’ll answer in a way that helps you to know if it’s a good solution for you or not.

One “absolute” we often trot out is to never try on garments inside out for fitting purposes.   We justify it by saying that you won’t get an accurate fit, because the garment is turned around, and things fit differently when they’re right side out vs. inside out- I think those are pretty good justifications.

You might sometimes look at a pattern and question the method.  Maybe give it a try and see if you’re missing anything.  If not, go back to your old ways.  If it’s helpful, adopt a new technique.  It’s not always necessary to make a value judgement.

Mallory talked about how she swapped out the lapped zipper for a lapped zipper on the Jenny Trousers- it was just a different choice- not right or wrong.  You may also find that certain parts of a garment or certain techniques become second nature- like waistbands or zippers.

So, Anne, keep growing, trusting your instincts, and asking questions!  We think that since you’re asking these questions, you’re on the right track to be a thoughtful, successful stitcher.

Tangents

Turn the WiFi off!:  If you use Audacity to record your podcast, turn off your WiFi when recording.  If you don’t, you might end up with terribly corrupted files- ask us how we know!

The post Tearing Wovens and Indie Pattern Knowledge appeared first on sewhere.com.

Apr 12 2019

35mins

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Rank #18: The Best Marking Pen

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Zede and Mallory explore the world of marking pens. There are a plethora of choices including chalk (in multiple styles), iron away or wash away markers, tracing wheels, sharpie and good old pencils to name a few. They both agree that the fabric to be marked upon can really dictate what color or type of marking utensil you will use. Do you have a favorite or a few go to marking pens in your sewing space?

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THIS BROADCAST IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

The SewHere.com Membership

Why become a member?

Do you enjoy the “Sewing Out Loud” and “Self Sewn Wardrobe” Podcasts? Become a Sewpporter and help keep us on the airwaves and aid our efforts to transcribe every episode!

Mallory and Zede host and moderate a large online sewing community. It takes love, care, and lots of hours to foster an inclusive and positive environment. Our Sewpporters make it possible!

Become a Sewpporter

Get even more fabulous sewing goodness from Zede and Mallory. Choose from three levels of support to sustain sewing media that’s hilarious, inclusive, and sometimes a bit sweary.

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Jan 19 2018

33mins

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Rank #19: Bonus Episode: Now Available! SewHere Box – Dressmaker’s Delight Edition

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In this fun bonus episode Mal and Zede talk about the newest edition of the SewHere Box. Want to get a sneak peak of what’s inside? Check out the latest episode of Sewing out Loud!

To order your very own Dressmaker’s Delight Box go to sewhere.com/box

The post Bonus Episode: Now Available! SewHere Box – Dressmaker’s Delight Edition appeared first on sewhere.com.

Jan 31 2017

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Rank #20: Sewing is Complex, Only Smart People Do It

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Mal and Zede discuss how sewing is viewed differently than other skills and how much multi-tasking and knowledge is required.

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Dec 30 2016

26mins

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Mallory’s Questions for Zede

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Jan 24 2020

25mins

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Butchering and Building Shoes

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Jan 17 2020

45mins

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Building and Butchering Bras

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Jan 10 2020

46mins

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FFTCM: Mallory’s Sparkly Outfit

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Jan 02 2020

37mins

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Zede’s Razzle Dazzle Aerial Costume Winter 2019

Dec 27 2019

50mins

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The Glitter Tolerance Scale for Glittery and Shiny Fabrics

Dec 20 2019

42mins

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The 12 Days of Sewing Part 2

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The post The 12 Days of Sewing Part 2 appeared first on sewhere.com.

Dec 13 2019

28mins

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The 12 Days of Sewing Part 1

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Dec 06 2019

28mins

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The 12 Days of Sewing Carol

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Enjoy a Sewing Christmas Carol!

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Dec 06 2019

4mins

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Holiday Gift Strategy 2019

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Nov 29 2019

37mins

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Sewjo

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Nov 22 2019

42mins

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The Creative Process

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Nov 15 2019

46mins

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Halloween 2019 Debriefing

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Nov 08 2019

56mins

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Digital Pattern Drafting

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Nov 01 2019

47mins

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Home Decor Episode 5: Hollywood Chair

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Oct 25 2019

36mins

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Home Decor Episode 4: Draperies and Curtains

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Oct 18 2019

54mins

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Home Decor Episode 3: How to Recover Dining Room Chairs

Oct 11 2019

47mins

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Home Decor Episode 2: Tools, Glue, and Hardware

Oct 04 2019

51mins

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Home Decor Episode 1: Fabrics and More

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Sep 27 2019

36mins

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Home Decor Series Introduction

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Sep 20 2019

46mins

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iTunes Ratings

301 Ratings
Average Ratings
224
26
14
16
21

Stop it please!

By K8sww - Dec 18 2019
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I agree with a lot of the other posts, great content, ladies know what they are talking about. I am learning a lot! However, they both need to stop talking over each other ! I think Zede does it more often, and she raises her voice! It really is annoying. There are far too many good sewing podcasts for u to risk losing your listeners.

Beat sewing podcast

By kariusogbactus - Aug 08 2019
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This podcast is informative, funny and entertaining. The best sewing podcast out there.