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Rank #75 in Home & Garden category

Science
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Home & Garden

Roots and All - Gardening Podcast

Updated 21 days ago

Rank #75 in Home & Garden category

Science
Leisure
Hobbies
Home & Garden
Read more

Do you want to know how to grow plants and get the best out of your outdoor space? Do you find traditional gardening media baffling and/or boring? Then you’re in the right place, because the Roots and All podcast is here to dig deep into how to create a successful garden.If you want honest information and insider knowledge about how to get results, join irreverent horticulturist Sarah Wilson as she chats to the best people from the world of plants and gardens. Sarah is on a mission to help you create your own beautiful green environment, with a focus on saving resources and working with nature.Don’t forget to subscribe to the podcast to make sure you don’t miss an episode.

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Do you want to know how to grow plants and get the best out of your outdoor space? Do you find traditional gardening media baffling and/or boring? Then you’re in the right place, because the Roots and All podcast is here to dig deep into how to create a successful garden.If you want honest information and insider knowledge about how to get results, join irreverent horticulturist Sarah Wilson as she chats to the best people from the world of plants and gardens. Sarah is on a mission to help you create your own beautiful green environment, with a focus on saving resources and working with nature.Don’t forget to subscribe to the podcast to make sure you don’t miss an episode.

iTunes Ratings

6 Ratings
Average Ratings
5
1
0
0
0

Brilliant podcast - fun and lots of information

By Ksbuk76 - Jul 30 2019
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Loving this new to me podcast - brilliant information on a wide variety of gardening topics. Keeps me feeling excited about being outside and in the process I am learning more to improve my gardening.

iTunes Ratings

6 Ratings
Average Ratings
5
1
0
0
0

Brilliant podcast - fun and lots of information

By Ksbuk76 - Jul 30 2019
Read more
Loving this new to me podcast - brilliant information on a wide variety of gardening topics. Keeps me feeling excited about being outside and in the process I am learning more to improve my gardening.
Cover image of Roots and All - Gardening Podcast

Roots and All - Gardening Podcast

Latest release on Nov 30, 2020

Read more

Do you want to know how to grow plants and get the best out of your outdoor space? Do you find traditional gardening media baffling and/or boring? Then you’re in the right place, because the Roots and All podcast is here to dig deep into how to create a successful garden.If you want honest information and insider knowledge about how to get results, join irreverent horticulturist Sarah Wilson as she chats to the best people from the world of plants and gardens. Sarah is on a mission to help you create your own beautiful green environment, with a focus on saving resources and working with nature.Don’t forget to subscribe to the podcast to make sure you don’t miss an episode.

Rank #1: EP 26 - Forest Bathing with Stefan Batorijs of Nature and Therapy UK

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Forest Bathing, or Shinrin Yoku, is the practice of immersing yourself in nature as therapy. It’s the perfect antidote for those who feel disconnected from the land and unattached from nature, which is increasingly likely to happen in a world where 55% of us live in urban areas. 

In this episode, I speak to Stefan Batorijs who founded Nature and Therapy UK in 2017, as a response to a growing need to foster a spiritual and psychological connection to the land. If you’ve always wondered what Forest Bathing, or Shinrin Yoku, entails, this is the episode for you! 

About Stefan

Stefan has been exploring the wild places for 50 years, and trained originally in Countryside Management, Conservation and Environmental Education. He is a qualified Integrative Psychotherapist and Mountain Leader, with 25 years experience facilitating individuals and groups in natural environments.

In 2008 he established the highly acclaimed Ecotherapy Project with Plymouth NHS, for people with severe and enduring mental health needs. Stefan is currently an Associate Lecturer at    Plymouth University. He teaches the role of Nature and benefits of natural immersion for mental health and recovery from trauma on the Clinical Psychology Doctorate Training.

Stefan is passionate about trees, birds and Sacred land.

Stefan is a member of INFOM, the International Society of Nature and Forest Medicine and a member of the Eco-psychology Network.

What We Cover:

  • Stefan’s personal journey through nature and into Shinrin Yoku 
  • What Shinrin Yoku entails
  • The evidence behind why Shinrin Yoku works
  • An excercise from a typical session of Forest Bathing

Links

Nature and Therapy UK - check out the Resources page for excellent links to the research surrounding Forest Bathing http://natureandtherapy.co.uk

Contact:

Stefan Batorijs

3 Barnsey Gardens 

Ashburton Devon 

TQ13 7GA UK 

stefan@natureandtherapy.co.uk 

+44 1364 652162 

Nature and Therapy UK on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/shinrinyokuUK/

Common Farm Flowers on Twitter: @TheFlowerFarmer https://twitter.com/TheFlowerFarmer

Common Farm Flowers on Instagram: @commonfarmflowers https://www.instagram.com/commonfarmflowers/?hl=en

Get in touch:

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram rootsandallpod

Patreon Link:

Help us keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall 

Jul 02 2019

27mins

Play

Rank #2: Budcast - No Dig Gardening with Charles Dowding

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Sarah attended a fantastic 2 day weekend course at Homeacres and posed these questions to Charles after the first day of the course was completed, based on what she had learnt up to that point. They talk about what No Dig means, if it works and how to apply the technique in your own garden or allotment. To find out more, check out Charles's informative website www.charlesdowding.co.uk  where you can find links to his books, YouTube channel and also find out how you can attend one of his courses.

Get in touch;

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram rootsandallpod

Patreon Link;

Help us keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall 

May 14 2019

17mins

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Rank #3: EP 20 - Container Planting with Harriet Rycroft

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This week, I’m honoured to be joined by the Queen of Containers, Harriet Rycroft. Harriet worked for many years at Whichford Pottery in Warwickshire, where she became renowned for producing season after season of the most spectacular planting and colour combinations.

Oh, and Harriet had the door open to her garden, so enjoy the birdsong!

We talk about:

  • The ideal container
  • Layer planting
  • Planting media
  • Feeding your pots
  • Well and badly behaved container plants
  • Pests in/on pots
  • Tricks for discouraging mice and squirrels
  • Planting combinations for the wow factor

About Harriet Rycroft

Harriet Rycroft switched careers to horticulture while her children were small and spent 14 years

working for Whichford Pottery. As Head Gardener she was responsible for planning, planting and

maintaining large displays of planted flowerpots of every conceivable shape and size and was careful always to provide plenty of planting inspiration for visitors all year round. With up to 500 plantings on display at any time the garden attracted many visitors and much praise from some of the UK’s leading horticulturists.

While at Whichford Harriet also planned and planted container displays for events and shows,

including Chelsea Flower Show, and gave lectures and demonstrations both in the UK and abroad.

She now divides her time between writing about gardening and container planting, giving talks and demonstrations, and teaching container gardening online at LearningWith Experts.com. She still gardens at the Cotswold Wildlife Park and Gardens and at home, where she usually has at least 200 planted containers on display. She’s a keen photographer, using her camera to record her own workbut also as a way to celebrate gardens and the natural world generally and to share  inspiration for the creative use of plants.

When she has a bit of spare time she writes a blog called “A Parrot’s Nest’ at https://harrietrycroft.com/ and can also be found chatting about plants and gardening and sharing

photos on Twitter and Instagram @HarrietRycroft

Harriet gives talks and planting demonstrations to garden clubs and groups, so if you would like a

talk about container gardening for your society please contact her at harrietrycroft@btinternet.com for more details.

She recently wrote (and took most of the photographs for) a book about the amazing gardens at the Cotswold Wildlife Park with their Head Gardener, Tim Miles. A Celebration of The Gardens is

available from the Park’s website.

Links:

 Cotswold Wildlife Park Website https://www.cotswoldwildlifepark.co.uk

Buy a copy of The Cotswold Wildlife Park - A Celebration of the Gardens https://shop.myonlinebooking.co.uk/cotswoldwildlifepark/shop/product-list.aspx?catid=8

Get in touch;

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram rootsandallpod

Patreon Link;

Help us keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall 

Apr 09 2019

31mins

Play

Rank #4: EP 25 - Growing Cut Flowers with Georgie Newbery of Common Farm Flowers

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How many of us haven’t dreamt of having an idyllic smallholding that allows us to be financially self-supporting, maybe even one that grows flowers by the barrowload? Well, this week’s guest is living the dream!

Common Farm Flowers is an artisan floristry and cut flower farm based in Somerset. Founded by Georgie Newbery and her husband Fabrizio in 2010, the ethos of the farm is to produce flowers that are Grown, Not Flown. Add to that Georgie’s passion for wildlife, organic methods and her love of everything that grows and you have a successful business that produces eco-friendly, sustainable and beautiful floral creations.

As well as selling cut flower creations, Georgie also runs workshops and courses and has written two books on the subject. Her first book, the ’Flower Farmer's Year' is a great book for gardeners who want to grow a cut flower patch, whether for pleasure or for profit, and its sister volume, 'Grow Your Own Wedding Flowers.' is an inspiring floristry book for growers and people who enjoy arranging their own flowers. Check out her website www.commonfarmflowers.com to find out more. 

What We Cover:

  • The values behind Common Farm Flowers
  • The current state of the cut flower industry 
  • Good cut flowers for scent
  • What to grow if your space is limited
  • Shrubs that make a useful addition to your cut flower patch
  • Dealing with pests on a 7 acre site

Links

To order some of Georgie’s amazing creations, call 01963 32883

www.commonfarmflowers.com

Georgie’s Books https://www.commonfarmflowers.com/books.html

Common Farm Flowers on Twitter: @TheFlowerFarmer

Common Farm Flowers on Instagram: @commonfarmflowers

Get in touch:

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram rootsandallpod

Patreon Link:

Help us keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall 

Jun 18 2019

33mins

Play

Rank #5: EP 37: Beth Chatto: A Life With Plants with Catherine Horwood

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This week I’m talking to Catherine Horwood, authorised biographer of Beth Chatto and author of the recently released Beth Chatto: A Life With Plants. Catherine was hugely privileged to be given access to Beth’s personal diaries and I’m sure there are lots more stories she could tell you about Beth that didn’t make it into the book, but the snippets of Beth’s journals and the biographical information that are in the book paint a wonderful picture of Beth as a wife, a mother, an employer, a gardener and as the RHS crowned her this year an “Iconic Horticultural Hero”.

About Catherine Horwood:

Catherine is a freelance author and journalist and is the authorised biographer of Beth Chatto. As well as writing the recently released Beth Chatto: A Life With Plants, Catherine has written Rose (Reaktion, 2018) Gardening Women: Their Stories from 1600 to the Present (Virago, 2010) and contributes articles to Gardens Illustrated, The English Garden and several national newspapers.

What we talk about:

  • Her early career in flower arranging
  • How she changed to fit in with the socials circles she found herself moving in
  • The move to White Barn House
  • Her friendship with Christopher Lloyd
  • The inspiration for the gravel garden
  • Her awards and the recognition she gained worldwide
  • Her legacy, the future of the nursery and the Beth Chatto Education Trust

Links:

Beth Chatto: A Life With Plants - Catherine Horwood, Pimpernel Press, 2019 

Catherine Horwood www.catherinehorwood.com

The Beth Chatto Gardens www.bethchatto.co.uk 

The Beth Chatto Nursery 

Get in touch;

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram rootsandallpod

Patreon Link;

Help me keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall 

Nov 19 2019

30mins

Play

Rank #6: Budcast - Kitchen Garden Ideas with James Mellors

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Sarah chats to organic kitchen gardener James Mellors.

They discuss organic, no-kill pest control, companion planting, interesting varieties and bees in your veg plot.

Get in touch;

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram rootsandallpod

Patreon Link;

Help us keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall 

Apr 30 2019

23mins

Play

Rank #7: Podcast 51 - Mycorrhizal Fungi with Jeff Lowenfels

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This week I’m speaking to Jeff Lowenfels, author of the ‘Teaming With’ series of books, specifically about the latest volume in the series ‘Teaming With Fungi: The Organic Grower’s Guide to Mycorrhizae’. Jeff writes the longest running gardening column in the US, is a former president of the Garden Writers of America and was inducted into the GWA Hall of Fame in 2005. He lectures on organic gardening, has presented a gardening show on television and is the founder of a programme that has resulted in millions pounds of garden produce being donated to the hungry. And gardening is just his side gig. 

I start by asking Jeff what inspired him to write his series of books, which deal with some in-depth scientific concepts around plant growth and nutrition, and also to explain what mycorrhizal fungi actually is.

About Jeff Lowenfels:

Jeff Lowenfels is the author of the ‘Teaming With’ series of books;  ‘Teaming With Microbes: The Organic Gardener’s Guide To The Soil Food Web’, ‘Teaming With Nutrients: The Organic Gardener’s Guide to Optimizing Plant Nutrition’ and ‘Teaming With Fungi: The Organic Grower’s Guide to Mycorrhizae’. 

Jeff writes the longest running gardening column in the US, is a former president of the Garden Writers of America and was inducted into the GWA Hall of Fame in 2005. He lectures on organic gardening and hosted Alaska’s most popular gardening show “Alaska Gardens with Jeff Lowenfels”. He also hosted a weekly radio show. 

He is the founder of a national programme that has resulted in millions pounds of garden produce being donated to the hungry. “Plant A Row For The Hungry” runs across all 50 US states and in Canada and is something Jeff is deeply passionate about.

In his spare time, Jeff is a lawyer. 

What We Discuss:

  • What is mycorrhizal fungi?
  • How does it interact with plant roots and how does it benefit the plant?
  • How does the relationship benefit the fungi?
  • Plants that don’t form symbiotic relationships with mycorrhizal fungi
  • How can we encourage mycorrhizal fungi?
  • Do different species of plant need different types of mycorrhizal fungi? Is this particularly important in the case of trees?
  • If we’re buying a proprietary product, how can we be sure it’s appropriate for the plants we’re planting, will contain enough spores and that these will be viable?
  • How can we protect the mycorrhizal fungi that already exist in our soils?

Links:

www.jefflowenfels.com

Jeff on Twitter @gardenerjeff

Jeff on Facebook

Teaming with Nutrients by Jeff Lowenfels - Timber Press, 2003

Teaming with Microbes: The Organic Gardener's Guide to the Soil Food Web by Jeff Lowenfels, Wayne Lewis - Timber Press, 2010

Teaming with Fungi by Jeff Lowenfels - Timber Press, 2017

DIY Autoflowering Cannabis : An Easy Way to Grow Your Own by Jeff Lowenfels - New Society Publishers, 2019

Get in touch:

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk 

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram @rootsandallpod

Patreon - Help me keep the podcast free & independent!  

Or donate as much or as little as you like at GoFundMe 

Mar 10 2020

36mins

Play

Rank #8: EP 35 - Soil with Tim O’Hare

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This episode, I’m talking about one of the fundamental cornerstones that underpins everything we do as growers - soil. And to talk about this vital element, who better than soil scientist and international expert on the subject, Tim O’Hare? Tim is the principal consultant of Tim O’Hare Associates and works on a wide variety of domestic and commercial projects, both in the UK and abroad.

Tim answers questions about issues that most gardeners have faced at some point; soil compaction, poor drainage, working with the soil you have and what to look out for if you’re bringing new soil in to your garden. As well as possessing phenomenal knowledge on the subject, Tim explains things in clear and simple language and you will enjoy this episode whatever your level of gardening expertise. 

About Tim O’Hare

Tim is the principal consultant of Tim O’Hare Associates, a leading independent soil science practice that provides soil investigation, testing and consultancy services to the landscape industry. He has been a Soil Scientist for over 20 years, working on anything from domestic garden projects to major construction developments.  Tim and his team have worked on a wide variety of assignments throughout the UK and internationally, including the London Olympic Park and Commonwealth Park in Gibraltar. They also test and approve many of the topsoil and subsoil products that are sold into the landscape market nationwide.  

Earlier this year Tim was awarded an Honorary Fellowship by The Kew Guild (Association of Alumni of the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew) for his “outstanding contribution to the environment”.

We discuss:

  • Common problems with soil management
  • Storing and moving soil during building works
  • Soil compaction
  • Wet soils
  • Ways to combat poorly draining soils
  • Bringing life into new or damaged soils
  • The impacts of transporting soil into and away from a site
  • What to look for when you’re buying soil
  • Soil contamination
  • Tim’s more challenging/unusual work
  • Soil erosion and the shape of our future food production

Links:

Tim O’Hare Associates - Soil & Landscape Consultancy www.timohare-associates.com 

London Olympic Park www.queenelizabetholympicpark.co.uk

Get in touch;

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram rootsandallpod

Patreon Link;

Help us keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall 

Nov 05 2019

37mins

Play

Rank #9: Podcast 43 - Pruning Roses with Richard Stubbs of David Austin

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Hello and welcome to this week’s episode of the podcast. This week I’m speaking to Richard Stubbs who currently works as the Trade Manager at David Austin but who’s worked in pretty much every department there, including as the Head Gardener of the 2 acre show garden. Richard lectures, designs and advises all over the world and what he doesn’t know about roses you can write on the back of a stamp and still have room to lick it. I asked him about which roses need pruning and which don’t, when to do it, how to do it and how not to do it. Plus, I got some inside information on why you shouldn’t leave the label on a rose when you plant it.

About Richard Stubbs:

“My interest in gardening stretches back to my childhood as my dad was very knowledgeable and worked in the trade for a number of years after the War.

My original intention was to go to college when I left school but due to the poor economy at the time I found myself working for a bank !!!

After nearly 15 years I found myself out of work and decided a change of career was the right way to go. As I lived in the village of Albrighton the local unemployment office suggested I went to see David Austin Roses to see if they would consider me under a special Government Scheme at the time.

After a quick interview with Michael Marriott the then Nursery Manager I was taken on, on a temporary basis. My first job was to walk through a field full of 900,000 new plants picking up the tops of the rootstocks that had been chopped off to allow the actual varieties to grow on.

I loved the place from day one and still do to this day, it’s a family business and everyone who work there is treated very much as members of their family.

I was very keen to learn and obtained a copy of Mr Austin’s first book ‘The Heritage of the Rose’ which I found fascinating, and my passion for roses quickly grew. Over the years I have worked in almost all the departments, the breeding section, producing 100’s of thousands of seedlings each year and helping them test possible new varieties for various attributes, the production department, growing the roses, lifting them from the fields and packing them up to send to our customers, and for many years the head gardener of the 2 acre show garden. The garden was my passion and I became almost obsessive about it trying to make sure it was kept to a very high standard (not easy with only one person to look after nearly 5000 roses of all different shapes and sizes). I loved working and listening to Mr Austin on a daily basis and the memories of this time will live for ever.

After a short break to look after people’s gardens in the area I started back at DAR but this time in the office, passing on my knowledge to our customers and processing orders. That was nearly 15 years ago now and I have had various positions in the offices including office manager. My main role now is to look after all our trade customers (apart from Garden Centres), so Local Councils, National Trust, large public estates, garden designers and landscapers. I am also responsible for staff technical training and one of my favourite jobs is designing rose gardens for either private or trade customers. These can range from a simple small border right up to very large park projects. Mostly it is just advising on what roses to plant where but sometimes you are given a completely blank canvas to work on and I always think it is a wonderful job to be able to create a beautiful rose garden for people to enjoy over many years from a blank space. I also visit gardens in the UK and abroad to advise and my favourite rose garden of all is a garden we created 10 years ago in Assisi Italy and I hold pruning courses there every February.

I am very, very passionate about roses and love to share this passion with whoever is willing to listen !!! This is one of the main reason I started The Magnificent Rose group on Facebook along with my wife so people with the same passion could share their pictures and their knowledge with likeminded people all over the world. I also have my own photography page RICMAY PHOTOGRAPHY as I am a keen amateur and love taking flowers and landscapes with my DSLR.”

What we talk about:

  • A brief overview of the various types of roses we might find in our gardens
  • Roses that don’t need pruning
  • When to prune
  • The key tenets of rose pruning aka the 3 D’s.
  • Different types of pruning for different types of roses
  • What can go wrong?
  • What would happen if you didn’t prune your rose?
  • Pruning hygiene and good practice 
  • Common mistakes

Links:

David Austin Roses www.davidaustinroses.co.uk

Richard’s Photography Site 

Get in touch:

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram rootsandallpod

Patreon Link:

Help me keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall 

Jan 14 2020

31mins

Play

Rank #10: EP 36: Apples with Naomi Slade & Sassie Yassamee

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This episode we’re discussing apples and I have TWO guests; Naomi Slade who is the author of An Orchard Odyssey and Sassie Yassamee who runs Eve Apple Press, a mobile apple pressing service in East Sussex. We’re just harvesting the last of our apples here in Sussex, so with the tastes and sights of varieties fresh in your mind, what better time to start planning your own orchard? 

Naomi’s book, An Orchard Odyssey runs through the practicalities of growing apples, but the focus of our chat is the ways in which we use our apples and our trees as both ornamental and edible additions to our own gardens, particularly from a design perspective. We also chat about how to reconsider how we view orchards and how we can use them within our communities. 

Which leads nicely on to my interview with Sassie Yassamee, who runs Eve Apple Press in Hastings in East Sussex. Sassie run a mobile apple pressing service, which helps people conveniently and productively deal with their crops and provides an ingenious solution to gluts and food waste. 

What I cover with Naomi:

  • The definition of an orchard
  • Historical orchards
  • Our changing relationship with orchards
  • The tale of Johnny Appleseed
  • Fruit trees for wildlife
  • Designing & underplanting orchards

What I cover with Sassie:

  • About mobile apple pressing
  • Which varieties you can use
  • Preserving the juice

Links:

Naomi Slade www.naomislade.com

An Orchard Odyssey - Naomi Slade, Green Books, 2016

Naomi on Twitter @NaomiSlade

Naomi on Instagram @naomisladegardening

Eve Apple Press www.eveapplepress.co.uk

Eve Apple Press on Facebook

Get in touch;

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram rootsandallpod

Patreon Link;

Help us keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall 

Nov 12 2019

36mins

Play

Rank #11: EP 29 - Garden Design for Every Species with John Little of the Grass Roof Company

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This week I’m speaking to John Little. John founded the Grass Roof Company in 1998 and for the past 20 years, he’s been designing and implementing gardens in public spaces that work for people, for plants and for wildlife. 

Often working in urban locations, he installs wildlife habitats and planting in some unusual places including on roofs and structures such as cycle shelters. He also includes many edible plants in his schemes in order to create beautiful and useful spaces that engage the community. 

Maintenance and management is a key focus, and is vital to the success and longevity of his projects. We also talk about the need to revise traditional maintenance practices in order to reduce costs, save time and preserve wildlife. 

About John Little

“John’s life with green roofs started when he self built his own home in Essex. The green roof on John’s new house consisted of the standard green roof structure, onto which he literally dumped soil from the foundations. That was 17 years ago and the roof is still growing strong. A few years ago a colony of Bee Orchids appeared from nowhere!!

He has since designed and built small green roofs buildings throughout South Essex and London over the last 20 years. often combining the living roofs with habitat walls made designed to support solitary bees.

John’s company the Grass Roof Company does landscape contracting and green roof construction in Essex and London. John also part owns Green Roof Shelters, a company that produces modular design bike, bin and freight container green roofs.."

What We Cover:

  • How John creates gardens that mimic brownfield sites
  • Green roofs
  • The Clapton Park Estate project
  • Including edible plants in a community garden
  • John’s favourite trees and herbaceous plants for wildlife 

Links

John’s Design Practice - The Grass Roof Company https://www.grassroofcompany.co.uk

Green Roof Shelters - the sister company to The Grass Roof Company, specialising in buildings and structures incorporating green roofs of all types https://greenroofshelters.co.uk

Online Guide to building Green Roofs - co-authored by John Little & Dusty Gedge https://greenrooftraining.com

John on Twitter @grassroofco https://twitter.com/grassroofco?lang=en

Get in touch:

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram rootsandallpod

Patreon Link:

Help us keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall 

Aug 13 2019

28mins

Play

Rank #12: Plants As Art with Alyson Mowat

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Alyson Mowat runs her studio out of Shoreditch in London and has been creating botanical masterpieces for the past 5 years. She works with indoor and outdoor plants to make visually stunning green displays and specialises in terrariums, jarrariums, aquascapes and kokedama to stage plants in unique ways. 

We talk about using plants to create visual statements, finding sources of inspiration and how you can try some of these techniques for yourself. For more information about Alyson, please check out her website www.alysonmowat.com and her book Terrariums and Kokedama

Get in touch;

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram rootsandallpod

Patreon Link;

Help us keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall 

Sep 03 2019

27mins

Play

Rank #13: EP 30 - Growing Orchids In Your Garden with Dr Wilson Wall

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This week I’m speaking to Dr Wilson Wall of Bewdley Orchids. Dr Wall is also the co-author of How to Grow Native Orchids in Gardens Large and Small and is a foremost expert on UK native orchids. In this episode, he talks about growing orchids in lawns, borders, containers…they’re much more versatile than you might expect! Not only are they beautiful and versatile, if you grow them, you’ll be doing your bit to conserve these plants as their numbers in the wild diminish.

About Dr Wilson Wall

Wilson Wall is the Director of Bewdley Orchids, provider of native British orchids for individuals and groups to grow in their garden or meadow. Elected Fellow of the Institute of Biology (now the Royal Society of Biology) and Chartered Biologist, Wilson has a PhD in genetics and a long interest in growing orchids from seed. He has written several books before, of both single and joint authorship and was editor of The Clematis, journal of the British Clematis Society.

What We Cover:

  • The relationship between orchids and fungi
  • Which orchids are suitable for growing in gardens
  • Orchids that work in containers
  • Soil requirements
  • The sourcing of plants
  • Common pests and diseases

Links

Bewdley Orchids www.bewdleyorchids.com

How to Grow Native Orchids in Gardens Large and Small - by Wilson Wall and Dave Morgan. Published by Green Books. https://www.greenbooks.co.uk/how-to-grow-native-orchids-in-gardens-large-and-small

Get in touch;

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram rootsandallpod

Patreon Link;

Help us keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall 

Aug 27 2019

22mins

Play

Rank #14: Podcast 50 - Sacred Woodlands with Simon Leadbeater

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Hello and welcome to this episode of the podcast. In this episode, I’m talking to ecologist and woodland owner Simon Leadbeater. We talk specifically about whether trees are sacred; spoiler alert, Simon thinks they are and he explains eloquently and convincingly why. He touches on books by authors you may well have already read; The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben and Thus Spoke the Plant by Monica Gagliano. However, if you believe trees are sacred and sentient, a problem arises, namely do you have any right to move them, to prune them or even to move amongst them. And it’s questions like these that we touch on in the episode.

About Simon Leadbeater:

Simon has a background in local government and the third sector. He and his wife bought Rector’s Wood in 1999 and have lived there ever since. Simon has published work around the themes or ecology, rewinding and forestry. In his own words, Simon sums up his feelings on woodlands and the right to roam therein;

“I think my essential philosophy is that we lack empathy for nature and particularly her animals, and we no longer venerate nature, in particular we no longer consider trees (and other plants) as sacred. If you have empathy, and wish to act as animals’ proxy, then obviously you will give them space; if you consider trees sacred, then you will wish to look after them with reverent care. The latter would include behaving in a woodland as if you were in a temple or church – our behaviour would be appropriate for such sacred settings.” 

What We Discuss:

  • Simon’s beliefs surrounding the sacredness of trees.
  • What are the historical roots of considering trees to be sacred? How/why have we moved away from this idea? 
  • What makes Simon believe trees are sentient? How does this sentience manifest itself in the everyday lives of trees?
  • What is open access to nature? Why might it be problematic?
  • How do humans rediscover their connection with forests and woodlands?
  • Why is important to consider the feelings of the trees themselves?

Links:

Simon Leadbeater on Twitter 

Simon’s Work:

Leadbeater, S.R.B. (2019), ‘Ancient Roots to Untruths; Unlearning the past and seeing the world anew,’ Quarterly Journal of Forestry,’  January 2019 Vol 113 No.1

Nearby Wild Blog

Leadbeater S (2019) ‘In defence of tears,’ The Ecological Citizen 3(Suppl A): 101–3  

Leadbeater, S.R.B., (2018) ‘Meat: the Alpha and Omega of Extinction,’ ECOS, 39(3)  

Books Simon mentions in the interview:

Wohlleben, P., (2016) The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate, Discoveries from a Secret World (2016), Greystone Books 

Gagliano, M., (2018) Thus Spoke the Plant: A Remarkable Journey of Groundbreaking Scientific Discoveries and Personal Encounters with Plants, North Atlantic Books: Berkeley, California

Mathew Hall (2011), Plants as Persons: a Philosophical Botany, State University of New York Press

The Imagination of Plants: A Book of Botanical Mythology (out this year, not yet read – but probably excellent)

Safina, C., (2015), Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel, Henry Holt and Co.

Taylor, B., (2010), Dark Green Religion: Nature Spirituality and the Planetary Future, University of California Press

Powers, R., (2018) The Overstory, William Heinemann: London

Hill, J., Butterfly, (2000) The Legacy of Luna: the story of a tree, a woman, and the struggle to save the redwoods, HarperCollins Publishers Inc

Get in touch:

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk 

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall 

Instagram @rootsandallpod

Patreon Link Help me keep the podcast free & independent!

Or onate as much or as little as you like at GoFundMe 

Mar 03 2020

40mins

Play

Rank #15: Podcast 45 - Documenting the Natural World

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This episode is a double-bill, featuring two interviewees speaking about two historical figures who led lives with many parallels, although they were working almost two centuries apart.

The first interview is with Teri Sayers-Copper and we discuss the life and work of Marianne North. Marianne was a biologist and botanical artist who journeyed across the world during the Victorian era, documenting the flora and fauna of the countries throughout which she travelled. Marianne explored and painted in every continent except Antartica and was responsible for documenting landscapes that were rapidly changing and disappearing in the wake of a developing world. 

The second part of the interview is with Tanya Latty, Associate Professor of Entomology at the University of Sydney. Tanya talks about Maria Sibylla Merian, a naturalist and scientific illustrator who was born in Germany in 1647. Merian also travelled the globe, meticulously observing and documenting insects and plants. In fact, she was the first to document caterpillar metamorphosis in an age where her contemporaries believed they came about by “spontaneous generation”!

Links:

Teri Sayers-Cooper www.creativeforce.org.uk 

www.mariannenorth.uk

The Marianne North Gallery - Royal Botanic Gardens Kew 

Marianne North : The Kew Collection - RBG Kew, 2018

Recollections of a Happy Life: Being the Autobiography of Marianne North

www.tanyalatty.com

Hidden women of history: Maria Sibylla Merian, 17th-century entomologist and scientific adventurer - Dr Tanya Latty, The Conversation, February 20 2019

The Woman Who Made Science Beautiful - Andrea Wulf, The Atlantic, January 19 2016.

Video of a talk given at the Linnean Society - A Curious Performance: Maria Sibylla Merian and the Art of Natural History by Kate Heard, Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings at Royal Collection Trust 

Get in touch:

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram rootsandallpod

Patreon Link:

Help me keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall 

Jan 28 2020

58mins

Play

Rank #16: Budcast - The Bee Watch App with Penny Hearn

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Sarah chats with Penny Hearn about a new app that's been launched to track bees and pestcide use.

The Bee Watch App is useful for beekeepers, but also for the general public who may locate swarms and are not sure who to call. It's also a great way to track pesticide use in your local area, plus register any spraying that you yourself may be carrying out. The idea behind Bee Watch is the more data we can log and the more beekeepers, those spraying and the general public can exchange information, the more chance we have of ensuring healthy bee colonies and mapping any problems as they occur. To find out more, go to www.bee.watch

Get in touch;

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram rootsandallpod

Patreon Link;

Help us keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall 

Aug 20 2019

26mins

Play

Rank #17: Podcast 49 - Garden Sculpture with Victoria Leedham

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This episode I’m speaking to Victoria Leedham, Co-Curator and Gallery Manager of the Hannah Peschar Sculpture Garden. 

I visited the garden earlier this month and even in winter garb, it was beautiful, set as it is in ancient woodland with streams running through it that pour down from Leith Hill in Surrey. The sculptures in the garden are diverse in character and look stunning within the location,  each one fitting harmoniously into the backdrop of planting and landscape. Victoria is responsible for sourcing and placing sculpture in the garden, alongside owner garden designer Anthony Paul. We spoke about Victoria’s work, about the sculpture garden and also how you can select and place sculptures in your own garden.

This episode I’m speaking to Victoria Leedham, Co-Curator and Gallery Manager of the Hannah Peschar Sculpture Garden. I visited the garden earlier this month and even in winter garb, it was beautiful, set as it is in ancient woodland with streams running through it that pour down from Leith Hill in Surrey. The sculptures in the garden are diverse in character and look stunning within the location,  each one fitting harmoniously into the backdrop of planting and landscape. Victoria is responsible for sourcing and placing sculpture in the garden, alongside owner garden designer Anthony Paul. We spoke about Victoria’s work, about the sculpture garden and also how you can select and place sculptures in your own garden.

About the Hannah Peschar Sculpture Garden:

“The Sculpture Garden was the brainchild of owner and original curator Hannah Peschar 36 years ago, and has grown from a handful of sculptures to over 200 pieces exhibited every summer. Artists come from across Britain and Europe to exhibit their work in these breathtaking surroundings, allowing their sculptures to be seen in a whole new way.

The Garden used to be part of a large estate, laid out between 1915 and 1920. Later it was split up and sold in several lots; leaving the 15th Century, grade 2 listed cottage with ten acres of land including a large water and rock garden. The garden fell rapidly into decline after the estate was sold. Over the past 40 years the garden has been redesigned and replanted by award-winning landscape designer Anthony Paul, who has introduced many large-leaved plants in bold groups, tall grasses and created 3 new ponds.

The range of works selected by the curators is wide with styles varying from figurative to highly abstract, innovatively using contemporary metals, wire, glass, ceramics and plastics as well as the more traditional stone, wood and bronze. Each sculpture is placed in a carefully considered and meaningful relationship with the other featured works within the garden. The result is an inspired combination of peaceful, enclosed harmony and dramatic, surprise vistas in an ever-changing environment.

Throughout the 37 year lifetime of the Garden, the overriding theme is the powerful relationship between art and nature. Neither one outshines the other: every piece is placed in harmony with its surrounding to create an amazing synergy within the environment.” - http://www.hannahpescharsculpture.com/about

What We Discuss:

  • The ethos behind the Hannah Peschar Sculpture Garden
  • Considerations around placing sculpture in the garden, including planting and lighting
  • A discussion of the different materials used and their pros and cons
  • Choosing sculpture for and placing it in your own garden

Links:

Hannah Peschar Sculpture Garden www.hannahpescharsculpture.com 

The Hannah Peschar Sculpture Garden

Black & White Cottage, Standon Lane, Ockley, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 5QR

Telephone: (+44) (0) 1306 627 269 

Email: hannahpescharsculpture@gmail.com

Re-opens for the year from 3rd April 2020 

Get in touch:

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk 

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram @rootsandallpod

Patreon Link:

Help me keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall

GoFundMe gf.me/u/w7sy4c

Feb 25 2020

34mins

Play

Rank #18: Podcast 57 - Nicole Rose of Solidarity Apothecary

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This week I’m talking to anarchist organiser, agroecologist and grassroots herbalist, Nicole Rose. Nicole runs the Solidarity Apothecary, an organisation supporting mainly prisoners and refugees either by supplying herbal remedies or by facilitating the growing and making of these. We talk about Nicole’s work to help prisoners, refugees and other facing state repression by helping them with their physical and mental wellbeing through a connection to nature.  

About Nicole Rose:

“I’m undertaking a four-year clinical training with The Plant Medicine School in Ireland to develop my skills as a practitioner. This site shares my learning journey as well as the work of my project, the Solidarity Apothecary.

Plants and social struggle have always been inseparable to me. I learnt how to grow food on a 3.5 year prison sentence for a campaign to close down Europe’s largest animal testing company. Inside, it was the plants cracking the concrete that kept me going. On release, I have organised with many collectives and campaigns, from helping organise the first Radical Herbalism Gathering in the UK to stopping fracking in Somerset. I now mostly engage with campaigns against prison expansion and the prison industrial complex, as well as supporting prisoners and people experiencing repression.

As a massive and unashamed plant geek, my main field has been agroecology and food autonomy. 

I started Empty Cages Design in 2011 to offer design consultancy services and community education in liberatory forms of land use, including teaching an annual Vegan Permaculture Design Course. In 2013, I co-founded Feed Avalon, a workers cooperative that works for socially-just and ecologically sound food production in Glastonbury, Street and surrounding villages. We have community gardens, a kitchen, mushroom farm and all sorts of projects! I complimented this grassroots work with studying for a Diploma in Applied Permaculture Design, as well as a BSc Integrative Ecosocial Design and MSc Applied Agroecology with Gaia University." - https://solidarityapothecary.org/about-nicole/

What We Discuss:

The Solidarity Apothecary and what sparked Nicole to start the project

Who benefits from the herbal remedies Nicole produces? What are some of the most popular remedies?

What are the benefits to prisoners of connecting with nature? How much opportunity do they have to engage with the natural world and healing plants whilst they are in prison?

How the Solidarity Apothecary benefits people outside the prison system

The idea of Queer Ecology

How inaccessible horticulture, ecology and permaculture can seem to LGBTQ+ people. What can be done about this.

Links:

www.solidarityapothecary.org

Email Nicole Rose info@solidarityapothecary.org

The Prisoner’s Herbal by Nicole Rose

Land In Our Names

Justice for Kevan

Get in touch:

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk 

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk 

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram @rootsandallpod

Patreon Link - Help me keep the podcast free & independent!  

Or donate as much or as little as you like at GoFundMe 

Apr 21 2020

26mins

Play

Rank #19: Garden BirdWatch with Kate Risely of BTO

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This week, I’m talking garden birds with Kate Risely, Garden BirdWatch Organiser at the British Trust for Ornithology. Kate talks us through the trends that have occurred in our garden bird populations over the past 40 years, what and when to feed them, diseases that are on the rise and how you can attract more birds in your garden. Plus, Kate answers my question; are magpies vandals, living off the fat of our songbirds?

About Kate:

Kate leads the BTO's Garden Ecology team and co-ordinates the programme of garden ecology surveys and research, within the Communications department.

Kate has overall responsibility for running for Garden BirdWatch, a 'citizen science' project where volunteers record birds and other taxa using their gardens on a weekly, year-round basis, as well as additional garden-based surveys. Kate is interested in the research and conservation applications of our garden wildlife data.

We discuss:

  • The BTO Garden BirdWatch & how you can take part
  • Why the data collected through the Garden BirdWatch is so important
  • Trends around garden birds over the last 40 years
  • When and what to feed your garden birds
  • Diseases in garden birds
  • How to attract more birds to your garden

Links:

British Trust for Ornithology, The Nunnery, Thetford, Norfolk, IP24 2PU

Tel: 01842 750050

Garden BirdWatch www.bto.org/gbw

Garden Wildlife Health: https://www.gardenwildlifehealth.org/

Feeding affecting bird communities: https://www.bto.org/our-science/publications/peer-reviewed-papers/composition-british-bird-communities-associated-long

Blackcaps: https://www.bto.org/our-science/publications/peer-reviewed-papers/supplementary-feeding-gardens-driver-evolutionary

Disease risks of bird feeding: https://www.bto.org/our-science/publications/peer-reviewed-papers/health-hazards-wild-birds-and-risk-factors-associated

Greenfinch declines due to disease: https://www.bto.org/our-science/publications/peer-reviewed-papers/emergence-and-spread-finch-trichomonosis-british-isles

Predator effects on bird populations: https://www.bto.org/our-science/publications/peer-reviewed-papers/population-change-avian-predators-and-grey-squirrels

Get in touch;

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram rootsandallpod

Facebook @rootsandalluk

Patreon Link;

Help us keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall 

Oct 15 2019

34mins

Play

Rank #20: Podcast 52 - Grow Fruit & Vegetables in Pots with Aaron Bertelsen

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This week I’m talking to Aaron Bertelsen about his new book ‘Grow Fruit & Vegetables in Pots’. Aaron is the resident kitchen gardener at Great Dixter but as with many who work there, he lives and breathes the Great Dixter way of life and works tirelessly to support the house and garden. You may find him harvesting produce in the kitchen garden, serving lunch to guests and students, hosting horticultural royalty in the house or travelling the world to promote Great Dixter.

‘Grow Fruit & Vegetables in Pots’ is both a practical guide to growing food in containers and a recipe book, providing inspiration for what to do with the abundance of produce you’ll have once you’ve mastered the art. Aaron gives tips on the best fruit for containers, how to avoid flea beetle, what to feed your crops, cooking with lettuce, plus loads of other invaluable advice for those growing their own produce in containers. 

About Aaron Bertelsen:

“Aaron studied Social Anthropology at the University of Otago before coming to England in 1996 to volunteer in the garden at Great Dixter. He subsequently studied for a Diploma in Horticulture at Kew Gardens, and spent two years at Jerusalem Botanical Gardens in Israel, where he is still a trustee. Aaron returned to Great Dixter in 2005 and became the vegetable gardener and cook in 2007. Aaron is regularly invited to speak about gardening at events worldwide. His first book The Great Dixter Cookbook is published by Phaidon and has received international acclaim since its publication in March 2017.” - www.greatdixter.co.uk

What We Discuss:

  • What crops you can grow in containers
  • What crops you can’t
  • The best salad leaf crops
  • Feeding crops in containers
  • The best fruit for containers
  • Growing for aesthetics as well as production
  • Aaron’s top 3 crops (which turned into 4!)

Links:

Aaron’s Blog https://dixtervegetablegarden.wordpress.com

Grow Fruit & Vegetables in Pots by Aaron Bertelsen - Phaidon, 2020 

The Great Dixter Cookbook by Aaron Bertelsen - Phaidon, 2017

Get in touch:

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk 

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram @rootsandallpod

Patreon Link - Help me keep the podcast free & independent! 

Or donate as much or as little as you like at GoFundMe 

Mar 17 2020

29mins

Play

Podcast 89 - Tokachi Millennium Forest with Dan Pearson & Midori Shintani

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In this episode, I am very pleased to have a double interview with Dan Pearson and Midori Shintani, the two key horticultural forces driving the Tokachi Millennium Forest project in Hokaido, Japan and co-authors of the book Tokachi Millennium Forest: Pioneering a New Way of Gardening with Nature. I speak to Midori first, then Dan, about this vast, 1000 year project, their hopes and intentions for now and the future and about their own places with the timeline of the forest.

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Ivy Mining Bees

What we talk about:

The history of the site of the Tokachi Millennium Forest

The idea behind the project

The challenges on site, posed by flora and some big fauna!

Influences on the design

The future of the site

About Dan Pearson & Midori Shintani

Twenty years ago, Dan Pearson was invited to make a garden at the 240-hectare Tokachi Millennium Forest in Hokkaido, Japan. Part of the intention was to entice city dwellers to reconnect with nature and improve land that had been lost to intensive agriculture and this was achieved along with much more. By tuning into the physical and cultural essence of the place and applying a light touch in terms of cultivation, this world-class designer created a remarkable place which has its heart in Japan's long-held respect for nature and its head in contemporary ecological planting design. The bold, uplifting sweep of the Meadow Garden mixes garden plants with natives while the undulating landforms of the Earth Garden bring sculptural connection with the mountains beyond. 

Under the skilful custodianship of Midori Shintani, the garden has evolved beautifully to reflect principles that lie at the heart of Japanese culture: observation of seasonal changes, practical tasks carried out with care and an awareness of the interconnectedness of all living things. This beautiful, instructive book allows us all to experience something of the Tokachi effect, gain expert insights into how to plant gardens that feel right for their location, and reconnect with the land and wildlife that surround us.

Links

Tokachi Millennium Forest: Pioneering a New Way of Gardening by Dan Pearson & Midori Shintani - Filbert Press, 2020

www.danpearsonstudio.com 

Nov 30 2020

43mins

Play

Podcast 88 - Biochar with Lottie & Connor of Earthly Biochar

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This interview features two guests instead of the usual one and those guests are Lottie and Connor, founders of Earthly Biochar. Maybe you already use Biochar in the garden, maybe you’ve heard of it but aren’t quite sure what it does or how it works, or maybe you’re completely new to it as a concept. In any case, I’m sure you’ll learn such a lot from this interview.

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Spiders and their Webs

What we talk about:

The origins of Earthly Biochar

What is biochar

Biochar in the home & garden

The history of biochar and its uses around the world

‘Charging’ biochar

About Earthly Biochar

Website: www.earthlybiochar.com

Biochar maker

Organic biochar

Free biochar guide + webinar

Twitter: @earthlybiochar

Instagram: @earthly.biochar

Email: lottie@earthlybiochar.com and connor@earthlybiochar.com

"We'd love to offer the audience 10% off their order with the code ROOTSANDALL - simply place an order on our website and enter this code at checkout. All our orders come with free shipping! We're based in North Devon in Appledore and if anyone wants to meet up, talk biochar, have a go with our kiln, please reach out to us on Instagram or via email. We're currently offering a special price for our biochar makers for the first 10 orders, if anyone would like to be a raving fan and get one of our first kilns, then please email connor@earthlybiochar.com The special price is not listed on our website so if you're interested please email us

We sell only high quality, EBC certified, organic and professionally tested biochar which has been made in a carbon negative process – aka it's capturing carbon not emitting it! You can learn more about this process in our free guide and webinar, which you can sign up to receive on our website here.

Lottie is doing her PhD on biochar at Reading University, working with growers across the UK, and she is recruiting farms (of all sizes and all crops), nurseries and orchards – basically anyone growing plants on a commercial scale – who would like to take part and try biochar out. If you want to take part, please email us!

We're a growing company with great friends and partners in soil health, horticulture, agriculture and wood management but we're always looking to meet new people. We have an exciting project coming up, working with tree planting projects in the UK, and we are starting trials with the RHS.  Please get in touch if you want to learn more about us, our plans and opportunities to collaborate.

Nov 23 2020

33mins

Play

Podcast 87 - Green Roofs with Dr Anna Zakrisson

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This week I’m speaking to scientist and science communicator Dr Anna Zakrisson about green roofs, particularly with regard to their use in urban areas and the important role they can play in water management. Amongst other things, we talk about the functions these roofs can perform, whether they can work in rural as well as urban situations, how self-sustaining we should expect the plants on green roofs to be and if they’re always the best solution.

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Allium Leaf Miner

About Dr Anna Zakrisson

Anna Zakrisson has travelled extensively for work and study, including periods spent at Lucy Cavendish College, Cambridge University and Stockholm University, where she completed her doctoral thesis on cyanobacteria. She worked as a researcher for the Max-Planck-Institute before working in Berlin as a biologist. She currently works as a consultant on green roofs and is attached to US-based research company Green Roof Diagnostics.

What we talk about:

The functions green roofs can perform

Do green roofs improve our environment? 

The adverse effects they can mitigate

Can green roofs have an application in rural areas too?

Is it responsible to supplement green roofs with water and/or nutrients?

Are green roofs always the best solution?

Pioneering work in the world of green roofs and future developments

Links:

Anna’s Imaginarium website

Anna Zakrisson on Twitter 

www.greenroofdiagnostics.com

Nov 16 2020

30mins

Play

Podcast 86 - Herbs with Barbara Wilkinson of The Herb Society

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This week I’m speaking to Barbara Wilkinson, a Trustee of The Herb Society, which was founded in 1927 in order to promote the use and understanding of herbs and to provide a worldwide forum for the exchange of ideas and information pertaining to these plants. We talk about growing herbs in different garden situations, unusual herbs to grow, why humans seem drawn to them, what Barbara refers to as “generous” herbs and why we seem to enjoy abusing them by cramming them in unsuitable containers and most importantly, what even is a herb?

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Box Tree Moths

About Barbara Wilkinson

Following a lifelong passion for health and nutrition, Barbara qualified as a Consultant Medical Herbalist in 2012. She is a member of the College of Medicine and Integrated Health, and runs The Springfield Clinic of Natural Healing in Cheshire. Barbara is an advocate of cultivating the use of plants in everyday life and keen to empower people with the confidence to embrace food as medicine. As well as running her own practice, Barbara is a Trustee for The Herb Society and has appeared as a guest speaker at numerous events and conferences. She has an allotment, where she grows produce that is used for medicines within the practice, and has worked with The Herb Society on designing gardens for the RHS Flower Show Tatton Park. In 2018, she appeared in the BBC’s coverage of the RHS Flower Show, as part of a special segment looking at fermented foods. She recently supported Horticulturist Alys Fowler in producing her new book A Modern Herbal.

What we talk about:

What is The Herb Society?

The definition of a herb

Humans’ affinity with herbs

Herbs for shade

Herbs for dry, sunny spots

Unusual herbs to grow

Links:

www.herbsociety.org.uk

The Herb Society on Instagram : @theherbsocietyuk

Evolutionary Herbalism: Science, Spirituality, and Medicine from the Heart of Nature by Sajah Popham

Tree Medicine by Peter Conway

Self-Sufficient Herbalism : A Guide to Growing and Wild Harvesting Your Herbal Dispensary by Lucy Jones 

Nov 09 2020

44mins

Play

Podcast 85 - An Economic History of the English Garden with Sir Roderick Floud

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This week I’m speaking with Sir Roderick Floud, author of ‘An Economic History of the English Garden’. The book charts the economics surrounding English gardens since the seventeenth century and talks about private gardens, public spaces, professions related to gardening and the often eye-watering amounts of money spent on achieving a bigger and better gardens. Sir Roderick calculates the cost of yesteryears’ gardens in today’s money and it’s worth reading the book alone to find out how much the likes of Capability Brown earned or the amounts spent on the gardens of Versailles!

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Cluster Flies

About Roderick Floud

“Roderick Floud has been a pioneer of two new kinds of history: using statistics to study the past and the history of human height and health. The economic history of gardens is his third innovation. 

He has taught at the universities of Cambridge, London and Stanford, has written or edited over 70 books and articles and is the long-standing editor of the Cambridge Economic History of Modern Britain. 

He has also led London Metropolitan University and Gresham College London and undertaken many other roles in the university world, such as President of Universities UK, receiving a knighthood for services to higher education.” - https://www.penguin.co.uk/authors/123901/roderick-floud.html?tab=penguin-biography

What we talk about:

Public parks

Charles II and his popularisation of garden making.

Why were extravagant gardens built? Were these gardens worth the huge sums spent on them? 

Technological advances that were later applied outside the world of horticulture

Trends around people growing their own fruit and vegetables

Trends in the numbers of people employed as gardeners

How gardeners wages over the centuries compare with those today 

Economic trends on the horizon related to gardening

Links:

An Economic History of the English Garden - Roderick Floud Paperback out 5th Nov 2020. Pre-order here.

Nov 02 2020

39mins

Play

Podcast 85 - An Economic History of the English Garden with Sir Roderick Floud

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This week I’m speaking with Sir Roderick Floud, author of ‘An Economic History of the English Garden’. The book charts the economics surrounding English gardens since the seventeenth century and talks about private gardens, public spaces, professions related to gardening and the often eye-watering amounts of money spent on achieving a bigger and better gardens. Sir Roderick calculates the cost of yesteryears’ gardens in today’s money and it’s worth reading the book alone to find out how much the likes of Capability Brown earned or the amounts spent on the gardens of Versailles! 

Paperback edition of ‘An Economic History of the English Garden’ out on 5th Nov.

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Cluster Flies

About Roderick Floud

“Roderick Floud has been a pioneer of two new kinds of history: using statistics to study the past and the history of human height and health. The economic history of gardens is his third innovation. 

He has taught at the universities of Cambridge, London and Stanford, has written or edited over 70 books and articles and is the long-standing editor of the Cambridge Economic History of Modern Britain. 

He has also led London Metropolitan University and Gresham College London and undertaken many other roles in the university world, such as President of Universities UK, receiving a knighthood for services to higher education.” - https://www.penguin.co.uk/authors/123901/roderick-floud.html?tab=penguin-biography

What we talk about:

Public parks

Charles II and his popularisation of garden making

Why were extravagant gardens built? Were these gardens worth the huge sums spent on them? 

Technological advances that were later applied outside the world of horticulture

Trends around people growing their own fruit and vegetables

Trends in the numbers of people employed as gardeners

How gardeners wages over the centuries compare with those today 

Economic trends on the horizon related to gardening

Links:

An Economic History of the English Garden - Roderick Floud Paperback out 5th Nov 2020. Pre-order here

Nov 02 2020

39mins

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Podcast 84 - Permaculture with Graham Burnett

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This week I’m speaking with permaculturist, teacher, speaker and author, Graham Burnett. Through his organisation Spiralseed, Graham has been involved with both public and private projects across the globe and has accumulated a huge portfolio of work. We talk about the principles which underpin permaculture and how to implement these in your own garden. 

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Earwigs

About Graham Burnett

“In addition to cultivating his own garden and allotments in Southend in Essex, where he lives with his family, Graham nowadays teaches permaculture and writes extensively on the subject. Graham founded Spiralseed in 2001, and he has worked with projects and organisations including Comic Relief, Naturewise, Green Adventure, the Vegan Organic Network, Ars Terra (Los Angeles), NuArc Health and Wellbeing Centre (Puglia, Italy), Wild Earth Farm and Sanctuary (Kentucky, USA) and Ekosense Ecovillage (Croatia), as well as a number of Transition Town initiatives. He has also over the years written a number of books and booklets (including The Vegan Book of Permaculture, Permaculture a Beginners Guide, Well Fed Not An Animal Dead, and Earth Writings).

Earlier this year Graham taught a permaculture course in Italy, and in summer 2015 he was one of the instructors in the first ever vegan permaculture course in the USA. He continues to teach and organise courses both at home and abroad.” - https://spiralseed.co.uk/graham-burnett-‒-path-permaculture/

What we talk about:

How Graham became involved in permaculture

The theory behind a permaculture garden

How much work is involved in establishing a permaculture garden from scratch, or from an existing garden? 

Can permaculture gardens incorporate ornamental areas?

Permaculture gardens; are they completely dedicated to production?

Vegan permaculture gardens

Can we feed ourselves without harming animals in some way? For example, how do you successfully grow brassicas without excluding birds and butterflies? 

Links:

www.spiralseed.co.uk

Online courses in Permaculture from Spiralseed 

Oct 26 2020

42mins

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Episode 83: Heritage Apples with Caroline Ball

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This week’s guest is Caroline Ball, author of a beautiful book called ‘Heritage Apples’. In normal circumstances, this week would have seen lots of events to celebrate Apple Day taking place across the country, but instead, I’m celebrating here on the podcast by delving into some of our lesser known and historic varieties with Caroline, plus there’s a very useful bit at the end where Caroline explains the mysteries of apple tree pollination.

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Leather Jackets

About Caroline Ball 

“Caroline Ball is an editor, copywriter and occasional translator. She has written on subjects from horticulture and travel to antiques and health, and has contributed to books about William Morris and a guide to historical sites. She is a keen gardener and, having been born a 'Kentish Maid’, some of her earliest memories are of apple orchards in blossom.” - https://bodleianshop.co.uk/products/heritage-apples

What we talk about:

What is a heritage apples?

The Herefordshire pomona

Why should we grow heritage apples? 

Some of the varieties described in the book; Beauty of Kent, Catshead & Oslin 

Where to taste heritage varieties 

Apple tree pollination

Links:

Heritage Apples by Caroline Ball

Paul Barnett’s Family Tree  

Oct 19 2020

36mins

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Podcast 82 - Nerines with Nick de Rothschild

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This week I’m speaking to Nick de Rothschild, President of the Nerine and Amaryllid Society and of Exbury Gardens in the New Forest. The gardens play host to a huge range of plants providing interest throughout the year, but one of jewels in the crown of Exbury is the collection of Nerines. There are many types of Nerines planted in the garden and an exhibition is currently underway of one particular species, sarniensis. We talk about the different types, how to grow them successfully and about some of the intricacies and intrigue of plant breeding. (Apologies for sounding muffled, I was wearing a mask!)

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: House Spiders

About Nick de Rothschild 

Nick de Rothschild, President of the Nerine and Amaryllid Society and of Exbury Gardens in the New Forest. 

Now celebrating more than 100 years, Exbury Gardens encompasses a spectacular collection of woodland, herbaceous, contemporary, formal and wildflower gardens.

At over 200 acres, these impressive gardens located in Hampshire, were created and are now managed by the Rothschild family. They boast a number of special collections including world-famous rhododendrons and azaleas, unprecedented swathes of hydrangeas and the National Collection of Nyssa trees - https://www.exbury.co.uk/gardens

What we talk about:

The different nerine species

Growing nerines outdoors and under glass

The history of Nerine sarniensis cultivars

Breeding Nerine sarniensis

Pests and diseases

Links:

www.exbury.co.uk

Nerine & Amaryllid Society

Oct 12 2020

27mins

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Podcast 81 - Probiotics for Your Garden with Sue Allen of Microbz

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This week I’m speaking to Sue Allen of Microbz, which produces and distributes probiotics for gardens. The concept of probiotics in gardens is new to me, but it dovetails nicely with previous episodes looking at soil health and mycorrhizal fungi so I was delighted to speak to Sue and find out more about how probiotics work in gardens and what we can do to encourage them.

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Woodlice

About Susan Allen 

I’m co-founder and co-director of Microbz Ltd, producers and distributors of probiotics for gardens. Most of all I love gardening. I love long summer evenings out on our land nurturing our plants and vegetables, and even cold wet winter days preparing for the next season. Part of the reason I am so passionate about microbes is because I really see the difference that they have made to my garden. They really work. My soil is healthier, my plants are more robust, and the best thing is: it is all natural. 

I want to share my love of using microbes so that other people feel confident to give it a go. It will benefit their health and the long-term health of soil and plants all over the UK. 

About Microbz

In 2007 my husband was asked to join a philanthropist who travelled the globe looking for solutions to environmental problems. His job was to mediate the potential conflicts of interest between investors and innovators. It was a fascinating time of travel and discovery. 

When he got home, Jeff described the technology he saw that really excited him: Microbial Balancing Technology. The excitement we both felt for the potential of this ‘solution’ for the planet, was immediate. 

We committed to learning more and quickly turned one of our outbuildings into a mini-brewery.

The first brews in 5-litre jars were trialled by us, and by friends and family. Now we’re up to 100 and 300-litre containers, regular lab tests and a fully functioning business. 

Our involvement with microbes is all that you would wish a love affair to be, full of enthusiasm to be learning and growing and caring for and nurturing the brews. Our hope is that every person who uses microbes sees a health benefit and is aware that they are contributing to the sustainability of our precious planet. 

What we talk about:

Microorganisms as the fundamental building blocks of life

What microbes do in our gardens

How do they work

Why it’s important to have them in the soil

What happens when you don't have a diversity of microbes or you use a lot of chemicals in the garden?

How does introducing beneficial microbes back into your garden work? 

How do microbes impact each stage of the cycle of life e.g. seeds, growth, flowering, death, decay, composting, back to new life?

Links:

www.microbz.co.uk 

Microbz on Instagram

Microbz on Facebook

Susan on Facebook

Probiotics Research

Soil Your Undies Challenge 

Life at the Edge of Sight by Scott Chimileski, Roberto Kolter 

The Garden Jungle by Dave Goulson 

Oct 05 2020

36mins

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Podcast 80 - Hedgerow Foraging with Joff Curtoys

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This week I’m speaking to Joff Curtoys, conservationist, ecologist and founder of Sloemotion Distillery. Saturday just gone saw the launch of National Hedgerow Day, an annual event launched by Joff to inspire people to undertake their own foraging missions to spot what’s growing and living in their local hedgerows. Hedgerows are historically important, biodiverse and fascinating, as Joff explains.

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Fruit Flies

About Joff Curtoys 

Joff is the founder of Sloemotion Distillery, a family-run Yorkshire business producing small batch spirits and liqueurs, and a passionate advocate of wildlife conservation. He has a background working for the RSPB and his respect for the environment and protection of the countryside is deeply embedded into how Sloemotion operates. The brand has its roots firmly in the Yorkshire countryside and this is a huge influence on the premium spirits they produce providing not only a source of sloes and hedgerow fruits, but also inspiration on their doorstep. 

What we talk about:

The history of hedgerows

Hedgerows and biodiversity

When and what to forage from hedgerows

Managing hedgerows for foraging

Links:

https://www.sloemotiondistillery.com

National Hedgerow Day 

A Natural History of the Hedgerow - John Wright 

Sep 28 2020

28mins

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Podcast 79 - Gardening Post-Lockdown with Adam Kirtland

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This week I’m speaking to Adam Kirtland, who began gardening seriously at the start of lockdown. His initial interest has become a full-blown obsession and we talk about the challenges presented by going back to work full time and having less time to garden. For more seasoned gardeners, this episode may be a useful reflection upon how we communicate with newer gardeners.

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Flatworms

About Adam Kirtland

“Bookseller by day, gardener by night. I work as part of the head office team at Waterstones looking after some of the gifting products rather than books, but it’s still the love of books that got me here in the first place.

Gardening has always been something that I’ve used as a tool to relax and wind down but it’s only this year, during lockdown that I really found what it was to be a gardener. For me it’s not just mowing the lawn every fortnight or doing a bit of weeding, it’s become so much more. Making a garden for both me and my family that can be used in all season.

Lockdown opened my eyes to the world of Instagram and how huge the community is there and that’s where my gardening journey has taken me now.”

What we talk about:

Sources of gardening information

Catching the gardening bug

Gardening post lockdown and post-furlough

Gardening social media 

Links:

Adam’s Instagram account - @viewfromthepottingbench 

Episode 20 - Container Planting with Harriet Rycroft

Episode 1 - Dahlias 

Sep 21 2020

30mins

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Podcast 78 - Sweet Peas with Philip Johnson

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This week I’m speaking to Philip Johnson of Johnson’s Sweet Peas. Philip grows and sells plants and seeds via his website and he sells and exhibits his plants at shows across the country, when they’re on! He judges at major shows and has put in 25 years service as a Sweet Pea judge. He is a former chairman of the National Sweet Pea Society/RHS Sweet Pea trials held at Wisley and is currently serving as a member of the RHS Herbaceous Committee. So what Philip doesn’t know abut sweet peas you could write on the back of a stamp and still have room to lick it.

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Woolly Aphids

About Johnson’s Sweet Peas 

Johnson's Sweet Peas is a traditional Sweet Pea specialist, growing their own seeds and plants at their nursery in Kent. Through their extensive breeding programme, they occasionally have brand new varieties available for naming and introduction.

Philip grows and sells plants and seeds via his website and he sells and exhibits his plants at shows across the country. He judges at major shows and has put in 25 years service as a Sweet Pea judge. He is a former chairman of the National Sweet Pea Society/RHS Sweet Pea trials held at Wisley and is currently serving as a member of the RHS Herbaceous Committee.

What we talk about:

When to sow sweet pea seeds

Can we succession sow to prolong the season?

Pinching out seedlings

Deadheading; why? Essential?

Why do stems get shorter as the season progresses? 

Watering, feeding, soil requirements

Best kinds of supports for sweet peas

Pests and diseases

Wildlife value

Best varieties for scent

Colours in sweet pea flowers

Colour trends for next year. Exciting developments on the horizon in sweet pea breeding?

Links:

www.johnsonssweetpeas.co.uk

Philip Johnson on Twitter

Johnson’s Sweet Peas on Instagram

National Sweet Pea Society on Twitter 

Sep 14 2020

30mins

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Podcast 77 - More Than Weeds and More with Sophie Leguil

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This week I’m speaking to biologist and ecologist Sophie Leguil. Sophie is an outspoken and passionate advocate for nature, plants and wildlife and can often be found on social media, helping make sense of complex concepts that affect gardeners and their outdoor spaces. We talk a bit about public spaces, a bit about gardens and urban areas and we touch upon what can happen when you try to stand up for what you believe in.

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Tardegrades

About Sophie Leguil:

“Trained as a biologist & ecologist, with experience in horticulture, I am fascinated by the natural world in all its forms. I have a soft spot for plants, from the tiniest orchid at the top of a Vietnamese mountain, to the blousiest iris in a 18th century garden.

I currently work freelance in the UK and France, as a writer, photographer, speaker, translator and wildlife tour leader.

My BSc research focused on pollens of Psychotria (a fascinating genus with ethnobotanical uses), and my MSc on systematics of a small genus of African orchids.

I am particularly interested in the love-hate relationship between plant conservation and horticulture, and more specifically how growing plants can help us better understand, preserve and raise awareness on need to conserve plants.” https://naturanaute.com/about/

What we talk about:

Rewilding

Warren Park

Meadows and wildflower planting

Sophie’s ‘More Than Weeds’ Project

Brownfield sites and their ecological value

The future of nature under our current government

Links:

www.naturanaute.com

www.morethanweeds.co.uk

Sophie Leguil on Twitter

Sophie Leguil on Instagram

More Than Weeds on Twitter 

Sep 07 2020

41mins

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Podcast 76 - I Want to Like my Garden with Rachel McCartain

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This week I’m speaking to garden designer, writer and podcast host Rachel McCartain. Rachel believes the garden should work for you, that it should suit your lifestyle. If you struggle to reconcile the garden you want with the time you have to spend on it, this is the episode for you. Whether you have your own garden or you create gardens for others, Rachel’s advice will no doubt prove useful.

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Tree Bumblebees

About Rachel McCartain:

Rachel founded PlantPlots.com an online garden design company which is now one of the world's most popular websites. PlantPlots offers uniquely practical garden design advice, with the aim of making gardening easier for everyone.

In addition PlantPlots creates affordable and practical garden design for anyone with a garden. She has designed gardens in both the UK and the USA and presents the popular gardening podcast The Plotting Shed. It was whilst transforming her second garden, she began to wonder why with all the thousands of gardening books available do so many gardens all look the same! A lawn in the middle surrounded by borders hugging the fence and a couple of hanging baskets.

It began to dawn on her that the reason was because all these books showed how to make A garden but didn't say how the reader could change THEIR garden - and that's why PlantPlots was founded. To help you make the gardening easier.

Rachel currently lives by the sea in West Sussex UK, she is married with 3 children. Although having pets has never been high on her list of must haves, her garden does boast a chicken wire heron named Eric, a shoal of wire ‘Michael’ fish (named after a departed uncle) and in pride of place a 7-foot sunbathing topiary leopard called Ingwe. Rachel is currently planning whether to ‘grow’ a giraffe or some antelopes.

What we talk about:

Useful ways of analysing your garden from a planting and design perspective

Having a garden that works for your skills and your schedule

Buying plants for your garden

Links:

I Want to Like my Garden by Rachel McCartain

The PlantPlots website

PlantPlots on Facebook

PlantPlots on Instagram

Aug 31 2020

36mins

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Podcast 75 - Botanical Storytelling with Amanda Edmiston

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This week I’m speaking to botanical storyteller Amanda Edmiston. Amanda trained in herbalism and has an encyclopaedic knowledge of historical plants and botanical figures but in this episode, we focus mainly on what Amanda does and her work around Elizabeth Blackwell’s book ‘A Curious Herbal’.

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Conopid Flies

About Amanda Edmiston:

“Amanda takes people into the stories she tells and brings other worlds, redolent with layers of history into people's lives. Immersion into one of Amanda's stories involves all the senses and often reveals facts which are often threatening to drift from the everyday consciousness. Each session is a magical experience and often stays in participants memories for years.

Her work weaves together plants, herbs and flowers with traditional tales, facts and her own stories.Amanda creates an enchanted world to take people into, one that is frequently funny and full of unexpected twists. Her work illustrates and is inspired by oral traditions, history, food, smells, places, objects and the audience themselves. Working with people in museums , botanical gardens, libraries, wherever they are, Amanda's work opens up different possibilities and can enhance a range of events and projects.” https://www.botanicafabula.co.uk/about

What we talk about:

The art of botanical storytelling

Elizabeth Blackwell’s ‘A Curious Herbal’

The lost connection with nature?

Historical herbals

Links:

Amanda’s website: www.botanicafabula.co.uk

The Botanica Fabula Facebook group 

Aug 24 2020

35mins

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Podcast 74 - Wasps with Richard Jones

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This week I’m speaking to nationally acclaimed entomologist and author of the book ‘Wasp’, Richard Bugman Jones, about a species of wildlife that may not spring to mind as one of your immediate favourites. Wasps, yellow jackets, jaspers, stripy bastards…whatever you call these members of the insect world and whether you love them or loathe them, you will certainly learn lots about them as Richard explains their life cycles and the role they play in ecosystems. If you’re not convinced to become a full-blown wasp lover by the end of the episode, I suspect you will at least have a grudging respect for these resilient creatures. (FYI This episode was recorded a while ago, so it may sound as if we're talking in late winter.)

About Richard Jones:

Richard writes about insects, wildlife and the environment for a number of publications such as Gardener’s World and BBC Wildlife magazines, The Guardian and The Sunday times. He guests on programmes such as Radio 4’s Home Planet and Natural Histories, plus is the author of many books, full list below. He is a fellow of the Royal Entomological Society and of the Linneaen Society of London. He’s past president of the British Entomological and Natural History Society. 

What we talk about:

  • The number of species of wasps plus which wasps you’re most likely to find in your garden
  • The life cycle of a wasp
  • A look at a typical nest
  • What stings worse, a wasp, bee or hornet?
  • Invasive species

Links:

Richard Jones’s website: www.bugmanjones.com

Books by Richard Jones

Wasp - Reaktion Books, 2019

Beetles - Collins New Naturalists Series, 2018 

Call of Nature: The Secret Life of Dung - Pelagic Publishing, 2017 

House Guests, House Pests - Bloomsbury Publishing, 2016 

Nano Nature - Collins, 2008 

Mosquito - Reaktion Books, 2012 

The Little Book of Nits - A & C Black Publishers, 2012 

Extreme Insects - HarperCollins, 2010 

Get in touch:

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram rootsandallpod

Patreon Link:

Help me keep the podcast free & independent! Donate as much or as little as you like at https://www.patreon.com/rootsandall 

Aug 17 2020

32mins

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Mycorrhizhal Fungi Part 2 with Petra Guy

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This episode is somewhat of a follow-up to my interview with Jeff Lowenfels in Episode 51. Following that interview, I found myself asking a few more questions, particularly about how we’re progressing with research into mycorrhizal fungi here in the UK. So here I am talking to Petra Guy, who’s based at Reading University. Petra looks mainly at woodland health from the perspective of mycorrhizal fungi but we cover a lot of garden territory too including proprietary fungi mixes, composts and replant disease.

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Crab Spider

About Petra Guy:

Petra is a postgraduate researcher at the University of Reading modelling the responses of trees to climate, land-use soils and mycorrhizal symbioses. Currently exploring game theory as a means of understanding different ectomycorrhizal/plant relationships and responses.

What We Discuss:

How long mycorrhizal fungi can persist in the soil without a host

The efficacy of proprietary mixes

Saving soil over the winter to inoculate next year's crop

Replant disease

Should we be building ‘soil bridges’?

Susan Simard’s concept of mother trees in forests

Links:

Episode 51: Mycorrhizal Fungi with Jeff Lowenfels

Suzanne Simard TED Talk

Paul Stamets - Host Defence Mushropoms

Get in touch:

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk 

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk

Twitter @rootsandall

Instagram @rootsandallpod

Help me keep the podcast free & independent! Support me on Patreon

Or donate as much or as little as you like at GoFundMe 

Aug 10 2020

31mins

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Podcast 72 - Saving Our Plants with Vicki Cooke of Plant Heritage

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This week I’m talking to Vicki Cooke of Plant Heritage. Plant Heritage is a UK charity that works to conserve cultivated garden plants, predominantly through the National Plant Collection scheme and their Plant Guardians initiative. Think National Plant Collections are the preserve of stately homes with huge gardens or horticultural institutions? Not at all! In fact, you could start you own on an allotment, in your greenhouse or porch, you could choose a genera with a 1000 species or just one and choose anything from trees to houseplants. All you need is a passion for a particular group of plants and you can join the ranks of experts and plant fans helping to look after our cultivated plants for future generations. 

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Gooseberry Sawfly

About Vicki Cooke:

Vicki Cooke is the Conservation Manager at Plant Heritage, and has spent much of her career delving into plants and their history. From Garden Organic's Heritage Seed Library, growing and saving seed from heirloom vegetables, to the Hampton Court Palace kitchen garden and now at Plant Heritage, Vicki has always been passionate about growing and conserving our garden plants.

What We Discuss:

What is Plant Heritage

National Collections and why they are important

The Missing Genera project

Some of the genera that don’t already have a home

What is involved in becoming a National Collection holder?

How you can take part

Links:

www.plantheritage.org.uk

Missing Genera top 10 for 2020, plus a link to the long list of all genera without a National Plant Collection 

How to start a National Plant Collection 

Join and support the National Plant Collections 

Get in touch:

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk 

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk 

Twitter @rootsandall 

Instagram @rootsandallpod

Help me keep the podcast free & independent! Support me on Patreon

Or donate as much or as little as you like at GoFundMe 

Aug 03 2020

27mins

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Podcast 71 - Tapestry Lawns with Dr Lionel Smith

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This week I’m talking to Dr Lionel Smith, horticulture lecturer and author of the book Tapestry Lawns: Freed from Grass and Full of Flowers. As the title suggests, a tapestry lawn replaces grass with flowering dicots, increasing biodiversity, lowering maintenance needs and seriously upping the aesthetic value of a lawn. Living with a tapestry lawns involves a little bit of self-education around how you treat plants and I start by asking how to overcome one of my own biggest worries about having one…

Dr Ian Bedford’s Bug of the Week: Painted Lady Butterfly

About Dr Lionel Smith:

Dr Lionel Smith received his PhD in Biological Sciences from the University of Reading in 2014. He is currently Lecturer in Horticulture at Myerscough College, Lancashire, and lives in St. Anne’s-on-Sea.

What We Discuss:

The history of lawns

What is a Tapestry lawn?

Tapestry lawn maintenance

Height convergence and why it's relevant to Tapestry lawns

Tapestry lawns and wildlife 

Tapestry lawns over winter

Sourcing plants for a Tapestry lawns

What does the future hold for Tapestry lawns? 

Links:

www.grassfreelawns.co.uk

Tapestry Lawns : Freed from Grass and Full of Flowers by Lionel Smith - Taylor & Francis, 2019

Get in touch:

Email podcast@rootsandall.co.uk 

Website www.rootsandall.co.uk 

Twitter @rootsandall 

Instagram @rootsandallpod

Help me keep the podcast free & independent! Support me on Patreon

Or donate as much or as little as you like at GoFundMe 

Jul 27 2020

33mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

6 Ratings
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Brilliant podcast - fun and lots of information

By Ksbuk76 - Jul 30 2019
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Loving this new to me podcast - brilliant information on a wide variety of gardening topics. Keeps me feeling excited about being outside and in the process I am learning more to improve my gardening.