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(49)

Rank #99 in Food category

Arts
Food
Visual Arts

THE FOOD SEEN

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #99 in Food category

Arts
Food
Visual Arts
Read more

THE FOOD SEEN explores the intersections of food, art & design, and how chefs and artists alike are amalgamating those ideas, using food as their muse & medium across a multitude of media. Host, Michael Harlan Turkell, talks with fellow photographers, food stylists, restaurateurs, industrial and interior designers; all the players that make the world so visually delicious, that want to eat with your eyes.

Read more

THE FOOD SEEN explores the intersections of food, art & design, and how chefs and artists alike are amalgamating those ideas, using food as their muse & medium across a multitude of media. Host, Michael Harlan Turkell, talks with fellow photographers, food stylists, restaurateurs, industrial and interior designers; all the players that make the world so visually delicious, that want to eat with your eyes.

iTunes Ratings

49 Ratings
Average Ratings
44
4
0
0
1

Favorite podcast

By Robjitsumasta - Jul 08 2017
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Never boring. I always learn something, and I've never hunted yet.

Addicted

By LIZ1351 - Mar 06 2015
Read more
Love this podcast! Great guests, and Michael himself is charming, smart and funny.

iTunes Ratings

49 Ratings
Average Ratings
44
4
0
0
1

Favorite podcast

By Robjitsumasta - Jul 08 2017
Read more
Never boring. I always learn something, and I've never hunted yet.

Addicted

By LIZ1351 - Mar 06 2015
Read more
Love this podcast! Great guests, and Michael himself is charming, smart and funny.

Listen to:

Cover image of THE FOOD SEEN

THE FOOD SEEN

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

THE FOOD SEEN explores the intersections of food, art & design, and how chefs and artists alike are amalgamating those ideas, using food as their muse & medium across a multitude of media. Host, Michael Harlan Turkell, talks with fellow photographers, food stylists, restaurateurs, industrial and interior designers; all the players that make the world so visually delicious, that want to eat with your eyes.

Episode 140: Michael Solomonov, Zahav

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Chef Michael Solomonov takes his birthright to heart. Born in Israel, raised in Pittsburg, it wasn’t until his late teens that Michael returned to his homeland and his inner cuisine spoke to him. He didn’t speak Hebrew, so he learned to bake burekas (spinach pies) innately. Eventually making way to Philly, Michael opened Zahav restaurant, his ode to modern Israeli food. Plentiful of hummus, mezzes, and kebabs, all inclusive of the “Mesibah” (Party Time), which highlights a whole roast lamb shoulder, grilled over coals, braised in pomegranate juice, and served with crispy Persian rice. Michael finally found a way to celebrate his place in the world. Thanks to our sponsor, Whole Foods.

“In Israel, you could go to the store and buy beer whenever you wanted- it really wasn’t a big deal. And staying up and eating is a big deal.” [9:45]

“We want the menu and experience at Zahav to be sort of living and breathing, and when you start getting absolute, it doesn’t work out as well.” [25:15]

Mike Solomonov on THE FOOD SEEN

Mar 26 2013

36mins

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Episode 187: Brooklyn Farmacy presents “The Soda Fountain”

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, we’re talking floats, sundaes, egg creams, & more with Brooklyn Farmacy’s brother & sister team, Peter Freeman and Gia Giasullo. With the release of their new book, “The Soda Fountain”, they not only document their own efforts to open up what is now a neighborhood destination, but they also celebrate the history of a classic American establishment. From the days of Rx to the soda fountain’s recent revival, they channel a century worth of “soda jerks” who always serve pretzel sticks with a smile. From a Cherry Lime Rickey to The Sundae of Broken Dreams, come find out what makes Brooklyn Farmacy an American original. This program was sponsored by Whole Foods Market.


“For us it’s wonderful to revive a place that already had a life to itself” [06:00]

“What we really prescribe, sell and deliver is an experience.” [12:00]

–Gia Giasullo of Brooklyn Farmacy on THE FOOD SEEN

Apr 23 2014

36mins

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Episode 158: Yossy Arefi of Apt. 2B Baking Co.

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On today’s THE FOOD SEEN, we’re excited to have Yossy Arefi of Apt. 2B Baking Co. Yossy has worked as a baker in numerous NYC kitchens, and in the same analog way, she shoots with film, though emulations for Adobe Lightroom are catching up. Hear the click of her Pentax camera as we reflect on her Pacific Northwest Seattle upbringing and Iranian ancestry, #unfiltered. Thanks to our sponsor, Consider Bardwell.

“Those moments where everything isn’t quite perfect or straight are more interesting and active then a perfectly-styled photograph.” [6:45]

Yossy Arefi on THE FOOD SEEN

Aug 06 2013

31mins

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Episode 165: Diane Mott Davidson

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On today’s THE FOOD SEEN, Diane Mott Davidson, the Agatha Christie of the food world, talks about her 17th book in her long-standing series of culinary mystery novels. The sleuthy protagonist, Goldy Schulz, a small town caterer, cooks her way through her friend’s murder investigation. Diane’s latest book The Whole Enchilada, proves to be another tasty thriller, which includes recipes for the titular Enchilada Suizas, Goldy’s Chef Salad, Spicy Brownies and more … but watch out, once you read one, you’ll want to read all Goldy’s whodunnit kitchen adventures. This program has been sponsored by Brooklyn Slate.

“Think of writing as exercise. It’s important to exercise every day, and it’s important to write every day.” [9:55]

Diane Mott Davidson on The Food Seen

Oct 23 2013

29mins

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Episode 374: The Noma Guide to Fermentation with René Redzepi and David Zilber

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, when René Redzepi opened Noma in 2003, he couldn’t have imagined that a small Copenhagen-based restaurant would send a ripple through the food scene by way of Nordic cuisine. The same goes for what we’ve recently witnessed in the world fermentation. An act of aging a piece of produce, or protein (see: chicken wing garum), is calculatedly manipulated, and matured, for maximum flavor through an ever-evolving relationship between microbes and humans, or that’s how David Zilber puts it. As head of Noma’s fermentation lab, Zilber tabulated his catalog of creation, now known as The Noma Guide to Fermentation, which documents the life choices of koji, kombuchas, shoyus, misos, vinegars, garums, lacto-ferments, and more … all which came to realization when somebody got drunk for the first time.

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Dec 11 2018

52mins

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Episode 150: “Wait, Later This Will Be Nothing: Editions by Dieter Roth” at MoMA: Curator Sarah Suzuki

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This week on THE FOOD SEEN, we’re lucky enough to be joined by Sarah Suzuki, curator of the Dieter Roth exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), “Wait, Later This Will Be Nothing: Editions by Dieter Roth”. From “Literaturwurst”(sausages made of books), passing cheese through a printing press, to Roth’s “P.O.TH.A.A.VFB” (Portrait of an Artist As A Bird Food Bust) chocolate sculptings … this show will have you hunger for more … book sausage. Hurry up as the show’s only up until JUNE 24th! This program has been brought to you by Fairyway Market. Thanks to Cookies for today’s music.

“Roth really embraced this idea that once an object was made, it would go out into the world and have a life of its own.” [17:50]

Sarah Suzuki on THE FOOD SEEN

Jun 04 2013

34mins

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Episode 228: Colu Henry, #backpocketpasta

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, how did native New Yorker Colu Henry, turn her Italian heritage and a #hashtag into a pasta phenomenon? Colu’s great grandparents came to the New World from Campania, and with them, brought a culture of cooking that still exists today in everyone’s pantry, “use what you have in stock to make something delicious”. After years working in PR with high-profile chef like Marcus Samuelsson, Kurt Gutenbrunner, Scott Conant, developing the Oregon Wine Board through her love of Pinot Noir, working with Kyle MacLachlan on marketing his Bordeaux-inspiried cabernet “Pursued by Bear”, and becoming Director of Special Projects at Bon Appétit, it was the virtues of her Nonni that brought Colu back to #backpocketpasta, inspired by a childhood of marinara, tuna-clam sauce, meatballs with grated pecorino, braciole with pine nuts and raisins, and warm semolina sesame bread from Arthur Ave. Join in the fun, and show Colu your #backpocketpasta on Instagram:http://instagram.com/coluhenry. This program was brought to you by Bi-Rite Market.


“It’s really about the people that are around the table in addition to what you’re serving.” [20:00]

–Colu Henry on THE FOOD SEEN

Mar 17 2015

29mins

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Episode 318: "Six Seasons" with Joshua McFadden

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On today's episode of THE FOOD SEEN, we extend our concept of seasonal produce, by adding two seasons (consider summer divided into Early Summer, Midsummer & Late Summer). Chef Joshua McFadden of Ava Gene's and Tusk in Portland, OR, delivers Six Seasons: A New Way with Vegetables, by way of east and west coast farming practices through the scene of Roman and Middle Eastern cuisines. At the core of better vegetable preparations, you must have indispensables like good olive oils & vinegar, and a well-stocked larder of dried pasta, cheese, canned tomatoes, pickles, preserved fish, olives and capers. It also helps to have an acumen for knowing what's fresh when; in spring we celebrate artichokes, asparagus, English peas, fava beans, lettuces and radishes, but oh so quickly we're past that and abundant of beets, carrots, fennel and turnips. Here's how best to live in the season, without letting it pass you by.

May 16 2017

28mins

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Episode 224: Spring Street Social Society with Patrick Janelle & Amy Virginia Buchanan

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN , what happens when a self-proclaimed “man about town” / Instagram aficionado, and a steel ukelele playing avant-garde thespian throw a dinner party? Answer: Spring Street Social Society, ssssociety.com. Patrick Janelle & Amy Virginia Buchanan seek to bring people together in unexpected spaces, pulling off variety show, meets dinner theatre events, complete with coursed dinners. Collaborating with artists and chefs alike, they’re now traveling the globe in search of their next location, and meal. This program was brought to you by The International Culinary Center



“You want a space that speaks for itself then it becomes a conversation that takes place between you and the space.” [14:00]

–Amy Virginia Buchanan on The Food Seen

“Its about taking our expectations about the way things are at the moment and subverting that.” [16:00]

–Patrick Janelle on The Food Seen

Feb 17 2015

35mins

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Episode 215: Francis Mallmann, ON FIRE

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, the master of live fire cooking, Francis Mallman, is ON FIRE! Well, not literally, but it’s the title of his new book, Mallman on Fire, a follow up to his international hit, Seven Fires: Grilling the Argentine Way. A self-proclaimed son of Patagonia, Francis embodies the spirit of South America’s finest wood fire cooks, like the indigenous Mapuches, and gauchos on the range. For this book, Francis traveled the world, from Brooklyn to Paris, with a an array of portable chapas (griddles/planchas) and parillas (grills), even cooking infiernillo (between two fires). We’ll talk about wood, which ones to use, how to control their flame, turn them into charcoal, and use the ashes and embers (rescoldo). Recipes such as, Cowboy Ribeyes, Potato and Chicken Galette, Charred Herb Salsa (which is not chimichurri), Coal Burnt Pimento Oil, Tuna Churrasco and Avocado Sandwiches … are all about patience, enjoying conversation, and LOVE. This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market.


*photo by Peter Buchanan-Smith

“I love to be out in the rain. I love to cook in the snow – I do it a lot. It’s so romantic.” [05:00]

“The first step [to grilling] is to burn a big fire in your backyard, sit in your chair and see what happens as it burns down.” [06:00]

“Every time people see a fie and see you cooking with fire there’s a language that bonds you.” [19:00]

“You need patience for cooking with fire and that’s the beauty of it.” [23:00]

–Francis Mallmann on The Food Seen

Dec 02 2014

36mins

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Episode 138: Tom Colicchio

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On today’s hour-long special edition of The Food Seen, we treat our time with Tom Colicchio (rhymes with “Radicchio”), not as an interview, but more so, as an apprenticeship to learn from his summers cooking in 1000-person weekend “churn and burn” establishments, to haute dining in Manhattan. He’s built an empire around the idea of culinary Craft. How does this Top Chef define success? How does he stay relevant? Two 3 star reviews by the NYTimes, 10 years apart, both cite the complex simplicity that he makes looks easy. Still, Tom believes, “you’re only as good as your last dish”. Even more important than feeding his diners, Tom now sets his sights on eliminating hunger in this country. The film, A Place At The Table, produced by Colicchio and co-directed by his wife Lori Silverbush, seeks to foster the “food insecure” past the subsidies that have made calories cheap and nutrition expensive. Get hungry to end hunger! This program was sponsored by Heritage Foods USA.

“I don’t have anybody I would consider a mentor because I never stayed in one place long enough.” [24:25]

“When you’re cooking for 30 years – you start wondering whether you’re still relevant and how to maintain relevancy. You don’t want to go out.” [42:15]

“50 million Americans are struggling to put food on the table – they don’t know where the next meal is coming from.” [55:15]

“I believe that most chefs believe that food is a right we should have like air and water.” [61:02]

“We have to make hunger a voting issue. If our politicians are not going to help solve this problem – I think they need to be labeled as ‘pro hunger'” [62:50]

–Tom Colicchio on The Food Seen

Mar 12 2013

1hr 8mins

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Episode 191: Jamie Bissonnette

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, meet Jamie Bissonnette, who was a punk rock listening, straight edge vegan, rocking out to hardcore bands like Bad Brains and Gorilla Biscuits, before he found the culinary arts. Now he’s chef/partner tapas restaurants, Toro (Boston) and Toro (NYC), as well as Italian enoteca, Coppa, in Boston’s South End. How has his collaborations with Chef Ken Oringer, set new standards for Spanish cuisine in the USA, continued to manage their clientele’s high expectations from the South End to South Chelsea, all while introducing new concepts in charcuterie and promoting the idea of nose to tail eating. This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market.


Photo by Noah Fecks

“Being a chef with a dull knife is like being a musician with an out of tune guitar.” [11:00]

“Being a chef is being a teacher. Anybody can teach anybody how to fry an egg properly. I can teach anybody how to roast a chicken. As a chef, i wanted to teach cooks something different.” [25:00]

–Jamie Bissonnette on The Food Seen

May 27 2014

37mins

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Episode 388: Indian-ish with Priya Krishna

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, growing up North Indian in The Lone Star State (Dallas, Texas to be exact) didn’t mean Indian-American mashups like Roti Pizza were a given. For food writer Priya Krishna, her mother Ritu’s penchant for cooking, lead her away from the traditional dal and sabzi recipes you’d see in Hindi cookbooks, instead, considering her cuisine a coalescence. Now, it’s the eponymous name given to her daughter Priya’s cookbook, “Indian-ish": Recipes and Antics from a Modern American Family”.

Image Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

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Apr 16 2019

44mins

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Episode 301: Vivian Howard, "Deep Run Roots"

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On today's episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Vivian Howard returns to her roots, literally and figuratively. Raised in Deep Run, NC, amongst tobacco plants and hog farms, it was a move to NYC, prompted by a job in advertising, that lead her to the cooking. Kitchen tutelage from the likes of Wylie Dufrense and Jean Georges Vongerichten, she took this newfound knowledge back south to open her progressive eatery, Chef & The Farmer, to a town hit by recession in need of real, good food. Howard focused on developing a menu based in rural abundance surrounding her (e.g. blueberries, peanuts, sweet corn, okra, collards, watermelon, peaches, pecans, sweet potatoes). Devoted to her area of Eastern North Carolina, Howard began filming a documentary of the farmers behind this produce, which became the Peabody and Daytime Emmy award winning "A Chef's Life" on PBS. In her bible of a cookbook Deep Run Roots, hear the stories behind Blueberry BBQ Chicken and Pecan-Chewy Pie!

Nov 29 2016

39mins

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Episode 300: Molly Yeh, "Molly on the Range"

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, we leave the big city and find ourselves in the Upper Midwest with Molly Yeh, blogger at mynameisyeh.com, and author of cookbook "Molly on the Range". Yeh's Chinese & Jewish background began the suburbs of Chicago, but her like of ethnic fusion didn't really jive as much as Lunchables did. As a percussionist, she eventually attended Julliard, using New York City as a place to first try broccoli and Brussels sprouts. These simple foods begat to culinary exploration, combining the trends of our times with her upbringing: Schnitzel on a Steam Bun, Challah Scallion Pancake, memories of spinach pizza (her dad's way of tricking her into eating healthy) accidentally turned into Spinach Feta Rugelach by her mother. It wasn't until another move, this time to Grand Forks, North Dakota, where her husband is a 5th generation beet farmer, that she learned to love "hotdish" and "cookie salad", all while perfecting her Norwegian lefse (flatbread) as all good farmers housewives do.

Nov 22 2016

25mins

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Episode 101: Adam Perry Lang

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THE FOOD SEEN returns with a hot new episode all about BBQ! Classically trained chef turned barbecue champion, Adam Perry Lang, delivers a new set of active grilling techniques his most recent cookbook, Charred & Scruffed, forever changing the lexicon of BBQ:

Scruffing (roughing up the meat to create more surface area where seasonings and bastes can cling)

Clinching (cooking meat directly on the coals to enhance crunch)

Hot Potatoing (turning and moving the meat constantly to control heat buildup)

Cooking High to Slow (especially effective for crust development in larger cuts)

f you don’t feel like firing up your grill, you can always visit one of Adam’s restaurants. He is the founder of Daisy May’s BBQ in NYC, co-founder with Jamie Oliver of Barbecoa in London, and meat maestro at Carnevino in Las Vegas. This episode has been brought to you by Hearst Ranch.

“People talk about French technique like it’s abstract. It’s really just tremendous structure. And even with cooking barbecue, as unruly as it is, there are certain things that you need to do to stay on track.”

“The key to good barbecue, low-and-slow style, is consistency and temperature.” — Adam Perry Lang on THE FOOD SEEN

May 22 2012

43mins

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Episode 382: Where Cooking Begins with Carla Lalli Music

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Carla Lalli Music is the Food Editor across all things Bon Appétit, Healthyish, Basically, and Epicurious. This more than qualifies her to write “Where Cooking Begins: Uncomplicated Recipes to Make You a Great Cook”, but it’s less about the skill set she possesses, than the confidence she instills. As a YouTube cooking star as seen in Back-to-Back Chefs, she blindly and brazenly teaches cooks how to feel their way through the kitchen, do more with less, and equips them with 6 simple cooking techniques, from which there are dozens of dishes within reach. For each and every piece produce, pasta, grain, poultry, fish, soup and bean, Carla will bring you closer your own personal cooking greatness.

Reprinted from Where Cooking Begins: Uncomplicated Recipes To Make You a Great Cook. Copyright © 2019 by Carla Lalli Music. Photographs copyright © 2019 Gentl and Hyers. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.

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Feb 26 2019

48mins

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Episode 240: April Bloomfield

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, April Bloomfield, chef of contemporary New York classic The Spotted Pig, her restaurants that bookend the Ace Hotel, The John Dory and The Breslin, and the famed revive of the Tosca Cafe in San Francisco. In April’s second cookbook, “A Girl and Her Greens”, she celebrates vegetables seasonally, with all the adoration she has for those not-so-nasty bits oh so loved in London. Growing up in England with her nan’s Sunday roast and her mum’s garden, hear how April traded in bacon sandwiches with HP sauce and a side of frozen peas, for salad sandwiches and crushed spring peas with mint. Don’t worry, this show isn’t just for vegetarians, there’s still a bit of lardo between every slice of hasselback potatoes. From pot-roasted artichokes with white wine and capers, boiled asparagus with ramp béarnaise sauce, watercress soup with spring garlic, swiss chard cannelloni, kale polenta, and broccoli raab morning buns, you too will be eating your vegetables from the top to the tail. This program was brought to you by Bonnie Plants.



“It’s quite easy to train your palate to appreciate the bitter” [7:00]

“Mushrooms have that great aroma, sometimes you just want to smother your face in them.” [10:00]

“It’s about balance. Maybe you don’t want to eat steak five times a month – maybe you just want one incredible steak once a month” [25:00]

“I’ve learned how to make potatoes delicious – and so can people who use this book!” [30:00]

April Bloomfield on The Food Seen

Jun 09 2015

33mins

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Episode 299: Levain Bakery

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On today's episode of THE FOOD SEEN, how did two competitive swimmers inspire the legend of a world famous 6-ounce chocolate chip walnut cookie? Levain Bakery was started by two early risers, Constance McDonald & Pamela Weekes were both attune to 4AM wake-ups to train for triathlons, and since 1994, they used that same drive and determination to construct such celebrated cookies, they still bring steaming lines of regulars and culinary tourists to the corner of 74th & Amsterdam (now with outposts in the Hamptons and Harlem as well). Join us at a respectable hour (3PM EST every Tuesday!) to hear how the cookie didn't crumble.

Nov 15 2016

28mins

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Episode 329: The New Paris with Lindsey Tramuta

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On today's episode of THE FOOD SEEN, how can a centuries old city be considered "new?" Well, Lindsey Tramuta, moved to Paris in 2006, and for the past decade, has been privy to its retro-renaissance, which somehow, anachronistically, brought it forward into the future. For years, her blog Lost in Cheeseland has documented a side of Paris that was developing; it's now full prospered, and her book, The New Paris, is your guide to all the best brasseries, bistros, cafes, coffee roasters and craft cocktails, that have made Paris feel anew. Ooh la la!

Oct 03 2017

38mins

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Episode 410: Toothache Magazine with Nick Muncy

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Nick Muncy is a pastry chef who’s dreams of being an artist was never lost on him. After a culinary arts degree, and stints in Healdsburg, CA, at Cyrus, under the patron saint of panettone Roy Shvartzapel, Muncy spent time with Matt Tinder at Saison, before joining Coi with Daniel Patterson, which earned him a James Beard semi-finalist nod. But Muncy had to step away from the sugar to satiate his sweet tooth, starting TOOTHACHE Magazine, for all those pastry chefs out there looking inspiration. Funnily enough, after focusing on publishing, and releasing five saccharine issues, Muncy’s back to the kitchen, now the executive pastry chef of Michelin-starred Michael Mina in San Francisco.

Photo Courtesy of Toothache Magazine

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Dec 03 2019

34mins

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Episode 409: Colson Patisserie

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, in 2006, Yonatan Israel, a Parisian-born filmmaker, opened up Colson Patisserie in Park Slope, Brooklyn, as a New York manifestation of the original establishment in Mons, Belgium, owned by family friend Hubert Colson since 1986. Baking some of best of French and Belgian pastries the city has to offer, from croissants to macarons, even liege waffles, Israel, Andrew Hackel (Director of Sales), and Natalie Abrams (head baker), turn thousands of pounds of butter and flour into the most adorable Teddy Bear financiers and chocolatiest gâteaus, all there to sate your baked good sweet tooth.

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Nov 26 2019

41mins

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Episode 408: Manresa Bread with Avery Ruzicka

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, after first meeting Chef David Kinch of Manresa in Los Gatos, CA, Avery Ruzicka was convinced to blindly move across country to work for him. While she begin in the front on the house, she eventually found her way back into bread baking, growing Manresa’s bread program. Even past the farmer’s market stalls, multiple brick and mortar locations of Manresa Bread no exist., and thousands of pounds of organic flour are milled in-house to make their naturally fermented sourdough loaves and laminated pastries. From levains to kouign amanns, and shipping to the contiguous 48 states, you too can break bread with Manresa.

Image courtesy of Aubrie Pick.

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Nov 19 2019

43mins

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Episode 407: Maangchi

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, the magnanimous Maangchi, aka “Hammer”, née Emily Kim, is a Korean food YouTube superstar. Her personal style, and style of cooking show, has been welcomed into the homes of over 3 million subscribers and countless more Maangchi fans. Now, her second book, Maangchi's Big Book of Korean Cooking: From Everyday Meals to Celebration Cuisine, expands on recipes like banchan, the side dishes that are cornerstone to Korean cuisine, and dosirak, the traditional lunchboxes Maangchi and her family grew up eating. Whether you have an H-Mart nearby or not and wonder what to do with all the marvelously dried pantry ingredients in this book, Maangchi is here to guide you through rice cake soup for New Year’s Day (seollal), or steamed rice cakes for the Harvest Moon Festival (chuseok). Whatever the celebration, make yours Maangchi-ed!

Join Heritage Radio Network on Monday, November 11th, for a raucous feast to toast a decade of food radio. Our tenth anniversary bacchanal is a rare gathering of your favorite chefs, mixologists, storytellers, thought leaders, and culinary masterminds. We’ll salute the inductees of the newly minted HRN Hall of Fame, who embody our mission to further equity, sustainability, and deliciousness. Explore the beautiful Palm House and Yellow Magnolia Café, taste and imbibe to your heart’s content, and bid on once-in-a-lifetime experiences and tasty gifts for any budget at our silent auction. Tickets available now at heritageradionetwork.org/gala.

Photo of Maangchi / Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

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Nov 05 2019

39mins

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Episode 406: Poilâne

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, for nearly a century, at 8 Rue du Cherche-Midi in the Saint-Germain-des-Prés district of the 6th arrondissement, the surname Poilâne has been synonymous with bread and Parisian life since 1932. Pierre (Poilâne) began making his family’s signature 5-pound stone-ground wheat miche in wood-fire basement oven with a red brick facade, and since then, his son, Lionel, and now daughter Apollonia, have kept that flame alight. After decades of service, and guarded secrets, they finally share their recipes with the world in the eponymously named cookbook: Poilâne.

Join Heritage Radio Network on Monday, November 11th, for a raucous feast to toast a decade of food radio. Our tenth anniversary bacchanal is a rare gathering of your favorite chefs, mixologists, storytellers, thought leaders, and culinary masterminds. We’ll salute the inductees of the newly minted HRN Hall of Fame, who embody our mission to further equity, sustainability, and deliciousness. Explore the beautiful Palm House and Yellow Magnolia Café, taste and imbibe to your heart’s content, and bid on once-in-a-lifetime experiences and tasty gifts for any budget at our silent auction. Tickets available now at heritageradionetwork.org/gala.

Courtesy of Poilane / Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

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Oct 29 2019

34mins

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Episode 405: Binging with Babish

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, how did a character on American political drama The West Wing, inspire a cinematically shot cooking show? Well, whatever the circumstance, Andrew Rea’s Binging With Babish YouTube channel has become a marvel; with over 5 million subscribers, Rae’s recipes are recreated (or created) in admiration of his two greatest passions: the moving picture and cooking. To that effect, he’s now made a BwB cookbook, cataloging some of movies and television’s greatest culinary scenes: Timpano from Big Night, Confit Byaldi from Ratatouille, Prison Gravy from Goodfellas, Buddy’s Pasta from Elf, and of course, Fried Green Tomatoes.

Join Heritage Radio Network on Monday, November 11th, for a raucous feast to toast a decade of food radio. Our tenth anniversary bacchanal is a rare gathering of your favorite chefs, mixologists, storytellers, thought leaders, and culinary masterminds. We’ll salute the inductees of the newly minted HRN Hall of Fame, who embody our mission to further equity, sustainability, and deliciousness. Explore the beautiful Palm House and Yellow Magnolia Café, taste and imbibe to your heart’s content, and bid on once-in-a-lifetime experiences and tasty gifts for any budget at our silent auction. Tickets available now at heritageradionetwork.org/gala.

Image Excerpted from BINGING WITH BABISH: 100 Recipes Recreated from Your Favorite Movies and TV Shows © 2019 by Andrew Rea. Photography © 2019 by Evan Sung. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.

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Oct 23 2019

34mins

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Episode 404: Evan Funke, American Sfoglino

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Evan Funke wants to be the best pasta maker in America, so it’s by no mistake that his cookbook is called: American Sfoglino. Funke found his way in Bologna, Italy, apprenticing at La Vecchia Scuola Bolognese, who’s doctrine he still abides by stateside. At Felix (Trattoria) in Los Angeles, Funke’s pasta making is a study of shape; not reshaping what pasta is, but rather, refining it. Whether it’s the smallest of bellybuttons for tortellos (tortellini, balanzoni, tortelli), or the delicate purse known as cestini, Funke teaches four master doughs that pave the way for all tutti la pasta fatta in casa.

Join Heritage Radio Network on Monday, November 11th, for a raucous feast to toast a decade of food radio. Our tenth anniversary bacchanal is a rare gathering of your favorite chefs, mixologists, storytellers, thought leaders, and culinary masterminds. We’ll salute the inductees of the newly minted HRN Hall of Fame, who embody our mission to further equity, sustainability, and deliciousness. Explore the beautiful Palm House and Yellow Magnolia Café, taste and imbibe to your heart’s content, and bid on once-in-a-lifetime experiences and tasty gifts for any budget at our silent auction. Tickets available now at heritageradionetwork.org/gala.

Photos by Eric Wolfinger

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Oct 15 2019

46mins

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Episode 403: The Halal Guys

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Ahmed Abouelenein, CEO of The Halal Guys, and son of one of the co-founder, ushers in a new era of their Egyptian American entrepreneurial success story. The Halal Guys started selling chicken, beef gyros and falafels from a single street cart at 53rd & 6th Ave; now their famous white sauce is on combo platters around the world! With over 1000 employees, they’re the second-highest grossing ethnic restaurant chain behind Chipotle, and the third most reviewed eatery on Yelp. All this because Muslim cab drivers in NYC were looking for a place to buy halal food in Manhattan.

Photo Courtesy of The Halal Guys

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Oct 08 2019

30mins

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Episode 402: To Dine For with Kate Sullivan

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, longtime TV news anchor and self-proclaimed foodie, Kate Sullivan, tells us the story of creators and dreamers who have reached uncommon success through ingenuity and innovation. That said, this could be the synopsis of any newsworthy profile, but for Sullivan, the subject is focused around food. To Dine For, is a half hour show in which Sullivan joins guests like Howard Schultz of Starbucks at Mamnoon in Seattle, actress Jessica Alba, founder of The Honest Company, at Night + Market in Los Angeles, and celebrity chef/humanitarian José Andrés at Bodega 1900 in Barcelona, at their favorite restaurants, for conversation, culinary delights, and a look into what it takes to pursue and achieve the American dream. 

Photo Courtesy of To Dine For with Kate Sullivan

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Oct 01 2019

40mins

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Episode 401: Gaijin cookbook with Ivan Orkin & Chris Ying

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Ivan Orkin is a lifelong gaijin (outsider), or is he? A Long Islander with Jewish roots, found his place/people in Tokyo, became a ramen master, moved himself and his restaurant back to New York City, and still sometimes feels like a foreigner. Well, The Gaijin Cookbook, co-authored with Chris Ying, aims to address all that, and make you “Eat More Japanese”, and be “Open To Anything” in the way the Japanese really are. From teriyaki to sukiyaki, okonomiyaki to temaki parties, Orkin hopes to bring his brand of “gaijin cuisine” to prominence, from his home to yours.

Photo Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

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Sep 25 2019

44mins

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Episode 400: Miso, Tempeh, Natto & Other Tasty Ferments with Kirsten and Christopher Shockey

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN (#400 btw!) it’s been twenty years since Kirsten Shockey started fermenting, ever since her mother gave her an antique crock full of sauerkraut. Since then, Kirsten and husband Christopher, have combined vegetables, salt and time, to create a plethora of fermented pantry ingredients, harnessing the powers good bacteria, for flavor, preservation and health purposes. Now at Mellonia Farm, their 40-acre hillside homestead in Southern Oregon, the Shockeys are teaching their fermentative ways (there’s even a free e-course online, http://ferment.works/free-fermentation-ecourse) and their latest book “Miso, Tempeh, Natto & Other Tasty Grains”, focuses on those that include legumes and cereal grains, without limiting themselves to the cultures they come from. Or as the Shockeys say, it’s way more than “sticky beans and fuzzy rice”!

Image Courtesy of Ferment Works

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Sep 17 2019

38mins

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Episode 399: honeygrow with Justin Rosenberg

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Justin Rosenberg founded honeygrow with a wok and dream. Seven years after his first fully customizable stir-fry restaurant, Rosenberg has outposts in multiple major metropolitan hubs. But with dozens of locations in their home base of Philly, to Rosenberg’s hometown of New York City, how does honeygrow keep, er, growing? With fresh noodles, naturally raised meats, farmers market vegetables, all tossed in spicy garlic, sesame garlic, sweet soy five spice, and red coconut curry that is! And with passion, grit and fine-dining mentality.

It's HRN's annual summer fund drive, this is when we turn to our listeners and ask that you make a donation to help ensure a bright future for food radio. Help us keep broadcasting the most thought provoking, entertaining, and educational conversations happening in the world of food and beverage. Become a member today! To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we have brand new member gifts available. So snag your favorite new pizza - themed tee shirt or enamel pin today and show the world how much you love HRN, just go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate

Photo Courtesy of honeygrow

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Jul 23 2019

36mins

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Episode 398: Grove and Vine olive oil with Nicholas Coleman

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Nicholas Coleman found his love of olive oil by way of music. A serendipitous stop in Arezzo, Italy, home to Guido Monaco, the inventor of modern musical notation (you know, “Do Re Mi Fa Sol La Ti Do”), Coleman found his coda during olive tree harvest. Since, he’s been devoted to promoting and peddling the freshest olive oils around the world. The first self-proclaimed oleologist (olive oil expert), he’s sought, and sold, the gold standards in field, from Italy, to South Africa, and even Chile. Co-founder of Grove and Vine, a subscription based membership to custom extra virgin olive oils sourced around the world, Coleman still has the music in him, often carrying around his Bansuri flute (because his Carl Thompson olive wood left bass is too heavy), as if he’s the Pied Piper of Pressed Olives.

It's HRN's annual summer fund drive, this is when we turn to our listeners and ask that you make a donation to help ensure a bright future for food radio. Help us keep broadcasting the most thought provoking, entertaining, and educational conversations happening in the world of food and beverage. Become a member today! To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we have brand new member gifts available. So snag your favorite new pizza - themed tee shirt or enamel pin today and show the world how much you love HRN, just go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate

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Jul 16 2019

41mins

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Episode 397: Lazarus Lynch, Son of a Southern Chef

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Lazarus Lynch, may have started Son of a Southern Chef as a living relic to his late father’s fish fry restaurant in Queens, but it somehow morphed into a fabulous modern soul food bible. The product of Alabama roots and a Guyanese mom, Lynch is an amalgam of his upbringing, yet a character all his own! A graduate of New York City’s Food and Finance High School, Lynch took his culinary comprehension to create an awareness that reaches far past food; into fashion, music, the queer community. That said, his a strong presence on screen (Food Network’s Comfort Nation) and social media delivers a common message: #makeitgravy, which is truly all-encompassing, like Lynch himself.

It's HRN's annual summer fund drive, this is when we turn to our listeners and ask that you make a donation to help ensure a bright future for food radio. Help us keep broadcasting the most thought provoking, entertaining, and educational conversations happening in the world of food and beverage. Become a member today! To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we have brand new member gifts available. So snag your favorite new pizza - themed tee shirt or enamel pin today and show the world how much you love HRN, just go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate

Cover photo by Anisha Sisodia

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Jul 09 2019

40mins

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Episode 396: Charles Bieler's rosé road trip!

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Charles Bieler bleeds rosé. His father Philippe founded Chateau Routas in Provence, France, but it wasn’t until the late 1990s that Charles found his place in the wine world. Behind the wheel of a pink Cadillac convertible, Charles drove across America spreading the doctrine of drinking rosé, and as part of this dogma, decided to not pit Old World versus New World. Rather, Charles cultivated rosé’s unique relationship to all, regions and wine drinkers alike, and thus Bieler Family Wines was born. This year, Charles went on the 20th anniversary ride of his original #RoséRoadTrip, and though his pink caddy found its demise in Detroit, Charles still sees the world through rosé colored glasses.

It's HRN's annual summer fund drive, this is when we turn to our listeners and ask that you make a donation to help ensure a bright future for food radio. Help us keep broadcasting the most thought provoking, entertaining, and educational conversations happening in the world of food and beverage. Become a member today! To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we have brand new member gifts available. So snag your favorite new pizza - themed tee shirt or enamel pin today and show the world how much you love HRN, just go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate

Photos by James Joiner

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Jul 02 2019

47mins

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Episode 395: Chicken & Charcoal with Matt Abergel of Yardbird

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Calgary-born Matt Abergel had to wait for the short window of warm weather to barbecue in his native Canada, but wherever there was charcoal burning, there was chicken to grill. Whether kebabs out of a split in half oil drum in Israel with his aunts, or triple yellow chicken in Hong Kong as his yakitori joint, Yardbird, Abergel has always strived to serve the best parts of the bird. In his book, “Chicken and Charcoal”, there are exploding diagrams of skewered breasts, thighs, wings and tsukune (meatballs), all which can be enjoyed sitting in the most comfortable chairs (specifically designed for the restaurant); so, sit back, relax, and fire up your grills!

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Jun 18 2019

49mins

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Episode 394: Chloe's Fruit

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, motherhood may have been mother of invention for Chloe Epstein, a lifelong froyo fanatic, and former Assistant District Attorney. It was Epstein’s sweet tooth that lead her to conceive Chloe’s Fruit, a frozen treat company focusing on real fruit blended with nothing more than water and cane sugar. Her signature pops are in over 13,000 stores around the nation, with core flavors like banana, mango, and strawberry that aren’t just for kids anymore. Enjoy a cold-pressed coffee collaboration with La Colombe, or a dairy-free dark chocolate, and see what it means to chill out with Chloe’s Fruit!

It's HRN's annual summer fund drive, this is when we turn to our listeners and ask that you make a donation to help ensure a bright future for food radio. Help us keep broadcasting the most thought provoking, entertaining, and educational conversations happening in the world of food and beverage. Become a member today! To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we have brand new member gifts available. So snag your favorite new pizza - themed tee shirt or enamel pin today and show the world how much you love HRN, just go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate

Photo Courtesy of Chloe's Fruit

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Jun 11 2019

40mins

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Episode 393: Chadwick Boyd's biscuits

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, the grandson of a preacher man, Chadwick Boyd was raised on Southern fare: fried chicken biscuits, coconut custards, lemon meringue pie … It was in his blood to host, holding his first dinner party at 10 years old, cooking Steak Diane, twice-baked potatoes and peas for mama out of the Betty Crocker’s Cookbook for Boys and Girls. Since then, Boyd’s had lobster for New Year’s Eve dinner on the set of Dead Poet’s Society, cooked alongside Dolly Parton, been seen on the big screen in over 15,000 movie screens around country for his series “Reel Food”, and now works as a food & lifestyle brand strategist. That said, he’s still all about those biscuits; hosting an International Biscuit Festival in Knoxville, TN for over 20K attendees, coordinating a traveling “Biscuit Time” event series with chef and television personality Carla Hall, and continues to use food as a medium for storytelling throughout his life.

It's HRN's annual summer fund drive, this is when we turn to our listeners and ask that you make a donation to help ensure a bright future for food radio.
Help us keep broadcasting the most thought provoking, entertaining, and educational conversations happening in the world of food and beverage. Become a member today! To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we have brand new member gifts available. So snag your favorite new pizza - themed tee shirt or enamel pin today and show the world how much you love HRN, just go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate

Photo by Jack Robert

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Jun 04 2019

34mins

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Episode 392: Piatti with Stacy Adimando

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Stacy Adimando, Saveur magazine’s EIC, began and her pursuit of the most perfect antipasti as a way to find fullness in family, but during a solo trip to the most southwestern tip of Italy’s boot, she met her grandfather’s cousins, their kids, grandkids … and bonded over plates after plates of so-called appetizers. These dishes inspired her book, “Piatti: Plates and Platters for Sharing, Inspired by Italy”; whether we’re talking about her Grandma Stella’s Broccolini Frittata, or Nanny’s Veal Braciolini (taught to Adimando by her 100-year-old Great-Uncle Joe), these family recipes are the best parts of her Italian-American upbringing, and is proud to bring them to your families’ tables too.

Photo Courtesy of Chronicle Books

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May 28 2019

44mins

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Episode 391: David Keck, Goodnight Hospitality

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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, David Keck, an opera singer turned sommelier, has an affinity for hospitality and honky tonk. At his flagship Houston haunt, Goodnight Charlie’s (part of his restaurant group: Goodnight Hospitality), Keck’s created a variety show of sorts, complete with live music, dancing, an unparalleled wine cellar, and a long list of tacos loaded with chochinita pibil and hot chicken. But how did his love of the Loire find home in the Lone Star State?

Photo Courtesy of Goodnight Hospitality

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May 21 2019

28mins

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