Cover image of FedSoc Events
(60)
News
Politics

FedSoc Events

Updated 5 days ago

News
Politics
Read more

The Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies is a group of conservatives and libertarians interested in the current state of the legal order. It is founded on the principles that the state exists to preserve freedom, that the separation of governmental powers is central to our Constitution, and that it is emphatically the province and duty of the judiciary to say what the law is, not what it should be. This podcast feed contains audio files of Federalist Society panel discussions, debates, addresses, and other events related to law and public policy. Additional audio and video can be found at https://fedsoc.org/commentary.

Read more

The Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies is a group of conservatives and libertarians interested in the current state of the legal order. It is founded on the principles that the state exists to preserve freedom, that the separation of governmental powers is central to our Constitution, and that it is emphatically the province and duty of the judiciary to say what the law is, not what it should be. This podcast feed contains audio files of Federalist Society panel discussions, debates, addresses, and other events related to law and public policy. Additional audio and video can be found at https://fedsoc.org/commentary.

iTunes Ratings

60 Ratings
Average Ratings
47
7
2
1
3

It’s great

By 1Lsudokufan - May 14 2019
Read more
Though I’d like to see more states included in these events series.

Fantastic .....JW

By JMJBW - Jul 01 2017
Read more
Auto is uneven at best, some speakers are impossible to hear, please improve.

iTunes Ratings

60 Ratings
Average Ratings
47
7
2
1
3

It’s great

By 1Lsudokufan - May 14 2019
Read more
Though I’d like to see more states included in these events series.

Fantastic .....JW

By JMJBW - Jul 01 2017
Read more
Auto is uneven at best, some speakers are impossible to hear, please improve.
Cover image of FedSoc Events

FedSoc Events

Latest release on Sep 17, 2020

All 507 episodes from oldest to newest

Can the Death Penalty be Administered Constitutionally? [Archive Collection]

Podcast cover
Read more

On September 9-10, 1988, The Federalist Society hosted its second annual National Lawyers Convention at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. on "The Constitution and Federal Criminal Law." The second day of the convention commenced with a debate over whether the death penalty can be administered constitutionally.
Opponents of the death penalty, including several Supreme Court Justices, argue that, under the evolving moral standards of our society and culture, capital punishment is inherently "cruel and unusual" and therefore unconstitutional. Others argue that the framers passed the injunction against cruel and unusual punishment at the same time as language in the Fifth Amendment directly contemplating imposition of the death penalty, and that if the two could constitutionally co-exist then, they can continue to do so unless a specific amendmentis passed to change the Constitution in that regard.
Featuring:

Prof. Walter Berns, Georgetown University
Prof. Walter Dellinger, Duke University School of Law
Moderator: Judge Patrick Higginbotham, U.S. Court of Appeals, Fifth Circuit

*
As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speakers.

Sep 17 2020

1hr 7mins

Play

Nationwide Injunctions Panel

Podcast cover
Read more

On September 1-3, 2020, the Federalist Society's Wisconsin lawyers chapters hosted their annual conference via an online webinar. The second panel of the conference discussed nationwide injunctions.
What is the proper role of state attorneys general and the courts in litigation in seeking to nullify federal law? Panelists will discuss the difference in approach between Wisconsin during the Obama administration and other state's efforts during the Trump administration with a particular emphasis on the role of state AGs and the role of the courts in issuing nationwide injunctions. Are nationwide injunctions "legally and historically dubious," as Justice Thomas has described them?
Featuring:

Jeffrey Mandel, Partner & Co-chair, Stafford Rosenbaum’s Litigation Practice Group
Michael Morley, Assistant Professor, Florida State University College of Law
Misha Tseyltlin, Partner, Troutman Pepper
Moderator: Hon. Rebecca Bradley, Wisconsin Supreme Court

*
As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speakers.

Sep 17 2020

1hr 1min

Play

Advice and Consent: The Mechanics, History, and Contemporary Developments in Federal Judicial Selection and Confirmation

Podcast cover
Read more
The South Carolina Lawyers Chapter hosted an event on: "Advice and Consent: Mechanics, History, and Developments in Judicial Selection and Confirmation."
Featuring:

Mark Champoux, Partner, Davis, Graham & Stubbs; former Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General, Department of Justice, Office of Legal Policy
Prof. Brian Fitzpatrick, Professor of Law, Vanderbilt University Law School
Michael Fragoso, Chief Counsel for Nominations, Senate Judiciary Committee
Hon. Lindsey Graham , United States Senate, South Carolina
Moderator: Miles Coleman, Partner, Nelson Mullins; President, The Federalist Society's Columbia, SC Lawyers Chapter

* * * * *
As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker.

Sep 17 2020

59mins

Play

North Carolina Supreme Court Candidate Forum

Podcast cover
Read more
On September 10, 2020, The Federalist Society's Triangle and Cape Fear Lawyers Chapters hosted a Forum for the upcoming North Carolina Supreme Court elections.
Featuring:

Moderator: Donna Martinez - Vice President of Marketing and Communications, John Locke Foundation

Running for Seat 1/Chief Justice:

Chief Justice Cheri Beasley (D) - North Carolina Supreme Court, Incumbent
Justice Paul Newby (R) - North Carolina Supreme Court

Running for Seat 2:

Judge Lucy Inman (D) - North Carolina Court of Appeals
Judge Phil Berger, Jr. (R) - North Carolina Court of Appeals

Running for Seat 4:

Justice Mark Davis (D) - North Carolina Supreme Court, Incumbent
Sen. Tamara Barringer (R) - Candidate, North Carolina Supreme Court

* * * * *
As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker.

Sep 14 2020

1hr 12mins

Play

Panel V: The Public and Private Realms: The Privatization Movement and Other Developments [Archive Collection]

Podcast cover
Read more

On October 16-17, 1987, the Federalist Society hosted a symposium in celebration of the bicentennial of the Constitution at the George Mason University School of Law. The symposium was titled "Constitutional Protections of Economic Activity: How They Promote Individual Freedom." The final panel of the symposium discussed "The Public and Private Realms: The Privatization Movement and Other Developments."
Featuring:

Prof. Kenneth S. Abraham, University of Virginia Law School
Prof. Robert C. Ellickson, Stanford Law School
Prof. George L. Priest, Yale Law School
Moderator: Prof. Leonard P. Liggio, Institute for Humane Studies at George Mason University

*
As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speakers.

Sep 11 2020

1hr 22mins

Play

Qualified Immunity, a Debate--Retain or Abolish?

Podcast cover
Read more
Created by the Supreme Court in 1967, the legal doctrine of qualified immunity shields government officials from being sued even if they violate someone’s constitutional rights, as long as they are not violating what the Court calls "clearly established law."
Proponents of qualified immunity argue that it is necessary for police officers to perform their job without the fear of being sued. Critics say that qualified immunity offers too much protection for the police and lessens their accountability.
The Federalist Society's El Paso Lawyers Chapter hosted a Zoom debate on the issue on September 1st, 2020 covering points ranging from the merits of the doctrine as it is applied today to which branch of government—the Judiciary or Congress—should change it, if at all.
Featuring:

Judd Stone, Assistant Solicitor General, Texas
Clark Neily, Vice President for Criminal Justice, CATO Institute
Moderator: Anthony Rodregous, President, El Paso Lawyers Chapter

* * * * *
As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker.

Sep 09 2020

1hr 7mins

Play

Balancing Religious Freedoms in a Pluralistic Society

Podcast cover
Read more
What should the nature of religious liberty look like in a pluralistic society? The Supreme Court has taken a renewed interest in adjudicating religious liberty cases. Recent terms have attempted to resolve issues as varied as the Bladensburg Peace Cross, the scope of the ministerial exemption, and the application of public health emergency orders to religious services. Next term, the court has been asked to reconsider its decision in Employment Division, Department of Human Resources of Oregon v. Smith, 494 U.S. 872 (1990). Does Smith need refinement?
This event hosted by the Chicago Lawyers Chapter on August 20, 2020 surveyed the recent decisions and discussed the best ways forward to protect religious liberty amidst a bevy of conflicting interests in our diverse society.
Featuring:

Prof. Stephanie H. Barclay, Associate Professor of Law, Notre Dame Law School
Prof. Vincent Phillip Muñoz, Tocqueville Associate Professor of Religion & Public Life, University of Notre Dame
Moderator: Prof. Daniel O. Conkle, Robert H. McKinney Professor of Law Emeritus and Adjunct Professor of Religious Studies, Maurer School of Law, Indiana University Bloomington
Introduction: Richard Benson, Chicago Lawyers Chapter
Introduction: Eric Wessen, Chicago Lawyers Chapter

* * * * *
As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker.

Sep 09 2020

1hr 15mins

Play

Panel IV: Federal Spending and the Deficit: Is a Constitutional Remedy Necessary? [Archive Collection]

Podcast cover
Read more

On October 16-17, 1987, the Federalist Society hosted a symposium in celebration of the bicentennial of the Constitution at the George Mason University School of Law. The symposium was titled "Constitutional Protections of Economic Activity: How They Promote Individual Freedom." The fourth panel covered "Federal Spending and the Deficit: Is a Constitutional Remedy Necessary?"
Featuring:

Prof. Kate Stith-Cabranes, Yale Law School
Prof. William Craig Stubblebine, Claremont McKenna College
Prof. Lawrence Summers, Harvard University
Moderator: Judge Douglas H. Ginsburg, U.S. Court of Appeals, D.C. Circuit

*
As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speakers.

Sep 03 2020

1hr 33mins

Play

We’re All Textualists Now? Implementing a Sound Interpretive Approach on the Trial Court and Beyond

Podcast cover
Read more

The Federalist Society's Jacksonville Lawyers Chapter held a virtual panel on August 12, 2020 to discuss some of the major questions surrounding interpretive approaches. The esteemed panelists each provided their insight on hot topics in interpretation, including originalism, textualism, severability, and stare decisis.
Featuring:

Hon. Amy Barrett, United States Court of Appeals, Seventh Circuit
Hon. Wendy Berger, United States District Court, Middle District of Florida
Hon. Paige Gillman, Florida Circuit Court, Fifteenth Circuit
Moderator: Joe Jacquot, General Counsel to Governor Ron DeSantis
Introduction: Patrick Kilbane, President, The Federalist Society Jacksonville Lawyers Chapter

*
As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speakers.

Sep 02 2020

1hr 10mins

Play

Recent Trends in the Roberts Court

Podcast cover
Read more

On August 18, 2020, the Federalist Society's Milwaukee Lawyers Chapter hosted a virtual event on "Recent Trends in the Roberts Court." Don Daugherty, Senior Counsel at the Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty, reviewed trends that have emerged in cases decided by the Court over the last four terms, including the ascendance of originalism/textualism and the Chief Justice's minimalistic approach.
Featuring:

Don Daugherty, Senior Counsel, Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty
Moderator: Matthew Fernholz, President, Milwaukee Lawyers Chapter

*
As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speakers.

Sep 02 2020

57mins

Play
Loading