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Go Natural English Podcast | Listening & Speaking Lessons

Updated 6 days ago

Rank #20 in Language Learning category

Education
Language Learning
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Go Natural English helps you improve your English listening skills and fluency. The podcast will benefit intermediate to advanced learners most. Your English will benefit from language learning strategies that work, vocabulary and idioms, expressions, and phrasal verbs and how to make small talk and real conversation in American English. Learn special tips on American culture, how to listen to and speak with Americans. Join Gabby and the Go Natural English community to learn to speak American English like a fluent native!

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Go Natural English helps you improve your English listening skills and fluency. The podcast will benefit intermediate to advanced learners most. Your English will benefit from language learning strategies that work, vocabulary and idioms, expressions, and phrasal verbs and how to make small talk and real conversation in American English. Learn special tips on American culture, how to listen to and speak with Americans. Join Gabby and the Go Natural English community to learn to speak American English like a fluent native!

iTunes Ratings

149 Ratings
Average Ratings
113
18
8
5
5

Love you 😍

By Saeede' - Jul 13 2019
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Please keep going... I learned to be an English speaker not an English student!

Wow. It's amazing.

By sajadabedi - Apr 25 2019
Read more
Tow minutes of listening and I already loved . Keep it up 🙌

iTunes Ratings

149 Ratings
Average Ratings
113
18
8
5
5

Love you 😍

By Saeede' - Jul 13 2019
Read more
Please keep going... I learned to be an English speaker not an English student!

Wow. It's amazing.

By sajadabedi - Apr 25 2019
Read more
Tow minutes of listening and I already loved . Keep it up 🙌

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Cover image of Go Natural English Podcast | Listening & Speaking Lessons

Go Natural English Podcast | Listening & Speaking Lessons

Updated 6 days ago

Read more

Go Natural English helps you improve your English listening skills and fluency. The podcast will benefit intermediate to advanced learners most. Your English will benefit from language learning strategies that work, vocabulary and idioms, expressions, and phrasal verbs and how to make small talk and real conversation in American English. Learn special tips on American culture, how to listen to and speak with Americans. Join Gabby and the Go Natural English community to learn to speak American English like a fluent native!

10 Top Words for Beginners to Start Speaking English

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Episode transcript below:

Hey. How’s it going?

You know, I’ve been getting a lot of questions from Go Natural English learners like you asking me, “Where should I start?” You know, English is a big language with lots of words. So, if you want to know where to begin, in this episode, I’m going to share the top ten English nouns. These are the most popular nouns that are used the most in the English language.

So, before I forget, before I tell you the top ten nouns, I want to tell you that I have a free training on the Go Natural English website that will help you to understand how to learn English independently. So, come over to gonaturalenglish.com/7steps and I’ll be happy to share that free training with you.

So, now I’m going to check on my laptop. I have the top ten words in the English language and, actually, these are not just the top ten words in general, because that would include articles like “the” or “a”, which are actually the most common words. But I wanted to tell you the most common nouns because I think that’s more helpful. Don’t you? Okay.

So, the number ten – we’re going to countdown from ten – the number ten most common word in English is “hand”. “Hand!” Can you believe it? That’s interesting. It’s probably because there’s some idioms in English that include the word “hand”, like, “Could you give me a hand?”

Number nine is the word, “life”. “Life.” We talk about life a lot. It makes sense.

Number eight. The number eight most popular word is “world” and I know this word is quite difficult to pronounce for a lot of English language learners. So, try repeating if after me now: “world”. Okay. Very good.

Number seven is “man”. Okay.

Number six is “thing”. This is also kind of a difficult sound, the “t-h” sound, so try repeating this word after me: “thing”. Awesome!

Number five is “day”.

Four is “way”. It rhymes with “day”.

Number three is “year”.

Number two is “person”.

And the number one most popular noun in English is “time”.

So, now it’s time to end this episode. I just want to thank you for watching and, hey, if you want to learn more of the most common words and phrases in American English, I recommend that you purchase the Go Natural English audio e-book, “The 100 Most Common Phrases in American English.” You can find out more about that at gonaturalenglish.com/100. So, I’ll see you there. Come check it out. See if it will benefit you and your English fluency. I think it will!

Bye for now!

The post 10 Top Words for Beginners to Start Speaking English appeared first on Go Natural English.

Mar 04 2016

3mins

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The Go Natural English 7 Steps to English Fluency with Gabby Wallace

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I want to present seven steps that you can use as a clear simple guide for learning English. You can always come back to these steps because they will help you no matter what level or stage you're currently at in English. So if you're ready to begin then let's get started.

If you just follow the path that's been set out for you in English learning, you'll probably take traditional English classes. You'll let your teacher tell you what to learn. And then after months or even years of study, you'll realize you're not where you want to be. Maybe your teacher led you down a different path that they thought was interesting but didn't help you accomplish your goals. The seven steps to fluency help you to create your own goals and your own way of learning English. The seven steps to fluency are actually from inside the English Fluency Formula, an e-book that I wrote for you to help you learn English in just 15 minutes a day. So I'm gonna share them with you.

Normally, you'd have to buy this ebook to read them but I really want to share the seven steps at least to give you a start, and then you can decide if you'd like to get the full ebook.

 

The Seven Steps to English Fluency

Number one is think and plan. So in other words think about why you want to learn English.

What is your reason?  Then plan what you need to know in English in order to be able to do your goal through English. So why are you learning English? Is it to travel? Is it to improve your career or your business, if you're an entrepreneur? Is it perhaps just for a personal hobby, or are you taking a test? So, know your reason why. Think about what English you'll need to accomplish your goals and we're gonna make a plan to achieve them successfully.

Number two: surround yourself with English input. So for example, listen to music in English. Read books and articles in English. Set your phone and your mobile device settings in English. Surround yourself in English so that you're creating an English lifestyle and a habit of consuming English.

Number three: be curious be curious about what interests you and try to learn about it in English.

Number four: repeat. You need to be aware of what you're listening to and repeat the phrases and words that are interesting and useful and new to you. Repeat new words out loud with feeling with emotion and with volume as long as you're not going to disturb anyone else. Repetition and repeating them with feeling are going to help you to remember them.

Okay number five: connect. Again, to help you remember words you want to connect new words with old words that you already know or perhaps words in your own language. This is different than translation.

To connect a word doesn't mean to translate it. It means to connect it to something you already know that you can relate it to. So for example, when I was learning Japanese, I learned the word for the check. When you go to a restaurant when you ask for the check it is "o-waiso." That's one way to say it and this sounds a bit to me like an "eyesore" which means something that is not pleasant to look at. Nobody likes getting the check and knowing how much they have to pay, right? I remembered o-waiso very easily because I connected it with that idea of an eyesore because it sounds similar and there's kind of a funny meaning there. So you have to try to do this with new words in English connect them to something you already know. You can connect new words also with sounds or with songs. That's why I like to learn language a lot through music because the tune helps me to remember the words. So there's a lot of ways that you can connect words.

Next, number six: you need to use the words that you're learning. Use the new sounds, the words, the phrases, the sentences that you're learning.  Number four was repeat them. But number six is different because I want you to actually create your own sentences. You could use what you're learning by writing something or speaking out loud and use what you're learning, so you're applying it in real life.

Finally, number seven is review because reviewing is so important to keep new words fresh in your mind. So review don't be afraid to listen to the same song or to watch the same TV series or movie or read the same article or the same book over and over.

So to read these seven steps and much much more inside the English Fluency Formula, purchase your ebook today.

It's super easy and fast to purchase it and to access it in the members area of the Go Natural English Website. There are thousands of English learners who have purchased it, and who are really enjoying it. So you can read some of their opinions and comments below as well, so thanks so much for watching. I hope that these seven steps will serve you and help you in your journey to English fluency.

Jan 09 2018

12mins

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A Brazilian PhD Student Talks about Learning English for the TOEFL Test and Graduate Study

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May 02 2016

10mins

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What's the Difference Between the Prepositions... IN and ON?

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"In" is basically within, inside a container or box, maybe an enclosed space but not necessarily.

"On" is related to surfaces.

You can use "in" or "on" in the same sentence, but the meaning would change.

May 21 2019

14mins

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Why do Americans speak English so fast

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May 30 2016

5mins

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Special Project for English Fluency with Guest from Espresso English Part 4

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Nov 25 2016

5mins

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How to practice English if I don't live in an English speaking Country?

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Jun 10 2016

7mins

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Why is it so hard to lose my strong accent in English?

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Apr 29 2016

5mins

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The Ultimate Guide to Fluency in English Conversation

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4jFv88ZK5Zs

Episode transcript below:

Hello! How’s it going?

Welcome to the Ultimate Guide to Fluency in the English language.

This is without a doubt the best place to learn how to become fluent in English and what not to do,

things to avoid on your journey to fluency.

I have an extensive, exhaustive list of what to do and what not to do to become fluent in English that I

have to look down at my laptop to remember everything.

So, let’s get started with the first and possibly most important tip right away.

You need to become an independent and motivated English learner.

Without proactive action on your part, you cannot become fluent.

You cannot rely on other people to tell you what to do.

You have to be motivated on your own as an independent learner to become fluent in English.

So, this is about your mind set.

Before you even touch a textbook or watch a lesson, you need to be motivated and independent to

become fluent in English.

Next, know your goals.

What do you want to learn in English?

Do you want to know English to become a doctor?

Or do you want to know English for general conversation?

Your goal will determine what you study.

Next, change your thinking.

You have to consider yourself an English speaker from the beginning, from the get-go.

Don’t consider yourself an English learner or a student of English.

Start thinking of yourself now, from today, as an English speaker.

Next, find a conversation partner.

You need to practice whether it’s with a tutor teacher or a friend who will help you to practice.

You could find a conversation partner which means someone who wants to learn your native language

in exchange for helping you with English.

Now, there’s a lot of sites on-line where you can find an on-line conversation partner.

Or if you’re lucky enough to live in a city with a lot of English speaker, or you could find an in-person

face-to-face language exchange partner.

Next…

Next, my computer should turn back on.

Okay. Get more out of listening to English.

Don’t just focus on the meaning of the words you hear, but listen to how the words are set.

Listen carefully to pronunciation, intonation, stress, and how we use English as native speakers.

Next, don’t stress out.

If you make a mistake, just keep going.

This is so important.

Relax and enjoy your journey to fluency.

Have fun with it. Don’t stress out.

If you make a mistake, just let it go.

Next, try keeping a speaking journal.

This is a great strategy to practice and also to see your improvement over time.

You could keep your speaking journal on your smartphone or another device when you can record.

And try speaking a little bit every day recording yourself and listening to it later on to check and see

how you can improve and how you are improving.

Next, practice common sentence structures.

Learn phrases that will be useful for your conversations in English.

It could include, for example, ‘I think that’, ‘It’s interesting that’, ‘I find it’, ‘It’s better to’ and so on.

You need to review, review, review, review.

This is super important.

Don’t expect yourself remember everything the first time that you learn it.

Unless you’re some kind of superhero, it’s just not something that you should expect yourself to do, to

be able to remember everything that first time.

We have to repeat, reuse, review, reflect.

Use it and recycle it to remember it.

All right, next, we need to learn to think in English.

You have to begin to use English in every way you can, and that begins with your thoughts.

So,

Oct 07 2015

21mins

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3 Things Not to Do When Reading in English

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Mar 11 2016

6mins

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What if I understand everything in English but don't know how to respond?

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Jun 17 2016

5mins

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How to Introduce Yourself at a Party in Fluent English

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Jun 24 2016

7mins

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3 Best Ways to Start a Conversation!

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Jul 15 2016

4mins

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How to Read Faster and Better – 3 Ways to Understand and Enjoy English Reading

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yEiDxfGpxeI

Episode transcript below:

Hey! How’s it going?

I’m so excited to talk to you about reading today, because a lot of Go Natural English learners have asked me, “How can I read faster, better? How can I enjoy it more? How can reading help me learn English?”

So, I’m really excited to share some things with you because reading is an amazing way to improve all of your English skills: your reading skills, obviously; your writing skills; your speaking skills; and even your listening skills. All your English skills will benefit from reading more, because reading will improve your vocabulary a lot, and reading will help you to understand the structure or the grammar of English. You’ll see the way that we put sentences together in different ways, and you’ll see how we organize our thoughts in paragraphs and across pages and in chapters. So, it will really help you.

Not only will it help your English, but reading is really enjoyable. Well, it can be.

Listen, I remember when I was in grad school, I had to read some really boring textbooks. And I was so tired of reading by the time I got my Masters degree in teaching English as a second language, that I swore I would not read another book for an entire year after I graduated! And I didn’t! And it was a very sad time in my life, because reading is actually very pleasurable if you’re reading things that you want to read. So, I encourage you to find something that you want to read. Now, I try to read every day and my goal for the year is to read a book each week.

So, let me know what your goal is and also if you have some recommendations for good books that you like, or if you have questions about books. I’ll be happy to hear from you in the comments.

Now, when you go to read, make sure that you are putting yourself in an environment that’s good for reading. It should be a quiet, relaxing, calm environment. So, there’s a reason why people don’t read at the nightclub. Typically, they don’t read books at the nightclub or at a bar because it’s noisy, there’s a lot of social interaction, a lot of distractions. So, I don’t recommend the nightclub or bar. I recommend maybe a library or at home or in a café or something like that.

What else? Choose something that is enjoyable for you and, yeah, there’s three tips I have to help you to read faster and better, but before I share those, before I forget, I want to invite you to join the Go Natural English Seven Steps to Fluency training course. There’s seven videos and they’ll teach you more about how to become fluent in English. All you have to do is visit gonaturalenglish.com and click on the big button to sign up for the training and I’ll share that with you for free! So I hope to see you there.

Now, three ways to improve your reading, to read faster, to understand better and to enjoy it more. First of all, if you’re reading and you don’t understand a certain word, just keep going. It’s likely that you’ll understand the word through other words, through the context or later on down the page once you realize the situation. You could probably get a general idea of what the word means. And if you don’t, if you still don’t understand what the word means, then after you’re finished reading, go back – you know, after you read for thirty minutes or so – go back and check the word later. You don’t want to stop many times when you’re reading because that will interrupt your flow. So, get into the flow of your reading and just enjoy the story.

Second, use your finger to read along, to trace the line of words as you read it. That will help you to focus and it will help to keep your mind from wandering or looking at other words or thinking about other things. So, when you involve some physical aspect, like moving your finger along the page as you read, it actually keeps you more focused. So,

Jan 21 2016

5mins

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3 Lies Your English Teacher Might Have Told You!

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Jul 08 2016

4mins

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Advanced English Vocabulary Lesson - How to Memorize Long Words for Fluency

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Oct 14 2016

6mins

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Top 5 Native English Slang Words for 2016 from America

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Episode transcript below:

Hey! How’s it going, Awesome Go Natural English Learner?

In this episode, we’re going to learn the five freshest, hottest slang words for 2016. You know, vocabulary words come in and go out of use. If you’re speaking English like your textbook that was published in 1950, you probably don’t sounds like a native speaker. That’s why we have this episode and lots of other episodes from Go Natural English, as well as our courses and materials at gonaturalenglish.com. In fact, if you come to gonaturalenglish.com, I have a free training for you to get started on today. Just come to gonaturalenglish.com and you’ll see it right there.

Okay! So, let’s get to the top five slang words for 2016.

Number One is “extra”. Keep in mind, you probably already know the word “extra”, but this is a new use of the word as slang. That’s what slang is, right? It’s taking a word that we already have and using it another way. So “extra” means “trying too hard, or being over the top.” Okay? “Oh, that’s extra! That’s too much!” It’s negative. It’s not a good thing.

Number Two is “OTP”. This is an abbreviation that stands for “one true pairing”, a couple that you are emotionally invested in. Forever, Beyoncé and Jay-Z are my OTP. Who is your OTP? You can tell me in the comments.

Next: “Netflix and chill.” This phrase has been in use for a little while. What it means is – and I think it’ll continue to be in use throughout 2016 – what it means is inviting someone over to your home for a romantic encounter, but pretending you will just watch streaming movies and hang out.

Next is number Four: “snatched”. It’s used to describe something that looks really good. It’s the new “on fleek” and “on fleek” is the new “on point” and “on point” is the new “cool.” So, you just learned a lot of new slang words there.

Number Five – finally, our last one – is “hunty”. “Hunty” means your best friend, someone you always hang out with. You have a group of “hunties”.

Alright. I hope that you enjoyed our five-plus slang words. Have you heard them before? Are you using them? Tell me what you think in the comments. Subscribe to Go Natural English so that you can enjoy more episodes like this one. And come visit gonaturalenglish.com! I’ll see you there.

Bye for now!

The post Top 5 Native English Slang Words for 2016 from America appeared first on Go Natural English.

Feb 05 2016

3mins

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Native English Speaker Teacher… or a Teacher who Speaks My Language?

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zO0STkeiQRg

Episode transcript below:

Hey, awesome Go Natural English Learner! What’s up? How are you doing?

I get a question several times… I’ve gotten this question so many times: should I learn English with a native speaker or is it okay to learn with a non-native speaker? So, there’s a lot of pros and cons. And I realize that, depending on where you live, depending on your budget, depending on a lot of things, you might be looking at a native versus a non-native English speaking teacher. So I want to share with you my viewpoint. You know I’m a native English speaker; I’m from the United States; I’m a trained teacher. And one of the main points here is: regardless of if your teacher is a native or non-native speaker, you have to realize the difference, first of all, between a teacher and a conversation partner.

So this could be a-whole-nother episode. But a teacher is someone who is trained to teach you the English language. So this teacher knows how to explain if you have a question about a specific grammar point or how to express yourself clearly; that person knows the answer, or they know how to quickly find the answer for you. They’re trained. Whereas a conversation partner is someone who’s willing to chat with you, they’re willing to practice, but you should not go to them with specific grammar questions or things that you might learn better from a teacher who can explain to you. A conversation partner is really more beneficial for practicing the things that you learn with a teacher, or perhaps things that you learn on your own. And we know practice makes perfect, and it’s really important to do both, to learn new things and then to practice them.

But anyway, let’s talk about the question at hand: should we learn with a native English speaker, or a non-native English speaker? And I welcome your comments and your opinion, what you think, what is best for you.

But here’s what I think: Let’s start with native English speakers. So, what’s good about working with a native English speaker? Well, clearly, we have a huge repertoire of vocabulary, idioms, phrases. We’ve been using English our whole lives, right, as native speakers, and so we’ve learned English through school, through social settings, with family, through our professional lives: in many different ways, many different settings. So, a native speaker will be able to help you, especially if you’re at an advanced level and you need to learn a lot of vocabulary.

Also, a native English speaker should have near-perfect pronunciation. What is perfect pronunciation? Well, maybe there’s no such thing as “perfect” but you want to have someone who shows you a clear way to say words. There are different ways to say words, depending on where we’re from. So you could learn the perfect American pronunciation, or the perfect British pronunciation, or the perfect Australian, or the perfect Kiwi or the perfect South African – or many different countries where we speak English as the official language. So what is perfect for you? I think being able to say a word clearly so that basically anyone can understand it – that’s perfect. So, if you learn with a native speaker, they’re going to be more confident; you may be more confident in learning pronunciation from that person.

Also, it’s not just about pronunciation. It’s about rhythm; it’s about intonation; it’s about stress. Sometimes the little things, that are not so little, they really make a huge impact on your English communication skills. So, learning with a native can be really important.

And I get another question that’s related; I get this a lot: which kind of English should I learn? Should I learn British English, should I learn American English? Well, I think the best thing is to choose one and go with it. After you develop your confidence in one kind of English, one region of English,

Jan 01 2016

10mins

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3 Tips to Improve Email Writing in English

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Mar 25 2016

5mins

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What is Black Friday? Learn the Meaning and how it can benefit your English Fluency

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kl9O14qWvxo

Episode transcript below:

Hello! How are you doing? Today is Black Friday. In the United States, this is a crazy day. I have to tell you a little bit about it and how it can benefit you.

I recently came back to the United States after travelling a lot this year. And so I was here for Thanksgiving yesterday, which was lovely. I got to spend it with my family. And today is Black Friday.

What the heck is Black Friday? That’s what all my international friends are asking me, because it’s a really big deal in the United States and it’s beginning to go to other countries. I know England and in other countries too, I’m sure, they’re picking up the Black Friday sale.

So, Black Friday is a huge shopping day in the United States. It’s probably the biggest shopping day, because a lot of stores will offer their products at a special low price. So, they’ll have a lot of promotions and people get really crazy about this, because also the stores open up at early hours. Some stores even open up at midnight on Thursday, well, early Friday morning, right? So, to start off Black Friday as early as possible, it actually starts some places in the middle of the night. Crazy, right?

So, I started wondering: where did Black Friday come from? Where did the name come from? You know I love language and I’m always curious about the meaning and where our vocabulary comes from. So, I thought you might like to know, because it will also help you with your English.

So, Black Friday is always the day after Thanksgiving. Americans typically spend Thanksgiving at home with their families and then the next biggest holiday after Thanksgiving is Christmas. And so, for Christmas, we usually give gifts to each other. So, after Thanksgiving, people start to think about buying presents for their friends and family. So, the day after Thanksgiving, since often it’s a holiday, or people take the day off – Sorry, I shouldn’t say it’s a holiday. It’s not an official holiday. But most people try to take it off of work so that they can relax or go shopping. So it’s a really good time, very convenient for a lot of people, to go shopping. And so, this is the day of the year where a lot of shops will see a lot of sales, a lot of income, a lot of shoppers spending money. So, this is where Black Friday comes in.

In accounting, we have two terms: “in the red” or “in the black”. If you are “in the red”, that means your business is losing money. If you are “in the black”, that means that your business is making money. You have a good income, you have profits: that’s “in the black”. So whenever you have negative money, it’s “in the red”. Whenever you have positive money, it’s “in the black”.

And so that is one of the most popular explanations of why we call today Black Friday, because it’s the day when a lot of retailers will finally see profits. They’ll see a lot of profits; they’ll be in the black. So it’s Black Friday!

Okay, so, what’s the connection? How can it benefit you as an English learner?

Well, I started thinking about all of my English-teacher friends online. The last couple of months, I’ve been thinking about how to connect with them. You know that I’m all about connection, and especially for learning English, I believe in connecting with people through English. That should be our biggest priority, to be able to speak fluently and understand other people to connect with them. But I do that in other ways in my life, too. So you might not realize this – it’s kind of a secret, but not really a secret, we just don’t talk about it a lot – but a lot of the online English teachers are friends. So I reached out to the people who I know and who I respect, and I know that they’re doing an amazing job with their teaching online, and their products and courses. And I said, “Hey! Let’s offer something special to our English learners online for B...

Nov 27 2015

11mins

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How to Answer the Question “How Are You?”

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I’m sure one of the very first things you learned to say in English was, “How are you?” --> Join the waitlist for the complete English course: https://gonaturalenglish.com/prereg

People will probably ask you this question A LOT! It’s really easy to answer, but there are a few things to remember. Here’s how to feel comfortable answering this question, every time.

1. “HOW ARE YOU?” IS SIMPLY ANOTHER WAY TO SAY HELLO — HERE’S HOW TO ANSWER Most of the time, we use this question as a polite way to say hello, and you don’t need to say anything about how you are really feeling. Say one or two positive words, thank them for asking, and ask them the same question. Any of these answers will work almost all of the time:

“Great, thank you. How are you?” (very positive)

“Good, thanks, and you?” (positive – this is the most common answer)

“Fine, thanks. How are you?” (a little less positive – I’m okay)

Your answer will depend on the person who is asking, and how well you know them.

Dec 04 2019

15mins

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Expressing a Future Action: When To Use “Will” And “Going To”

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Hi everyone! Today we’ll learn about a common and confusing concept involving expressing a future action. This is about when to use WILL and GOING TO.

Both of them refer to future actions. Although in some cases they can be interchangeable, because there are multiple ways of expressing the same thing in English. However, knowing which one you think is best really just depends on what you’re trying to say.

Like I said before, you can use both WILL and GOING TO in the same sentence with no change in the meaning, but you really have to ask yourself what it is you’re really trying to say. So, you have to pay attention to the different types of situations so you can understand which of these two choices will be the best option when expressing a future action.

Learn more with the lesson on our site: https://www.gonaturalenglish.com/expressing-a-future-action-will-and-going-to/

Nov 27 2019

13mins

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Improve Your English Listening Skills: Learn How to Understand Fast English Speakers Better

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As you spend more and more time conversing in English, you’ll realize that apart from learning how to speak English the way, you also have to sharpen your listening skills.

The sharper your English listening skills are, the better you can speak and converse in English in the most natural way.

When you chat and talk to natural English speakers, you’ll come across those who speak maybe a tad too fast for you. But keep in mind that this is really common.

When you go to a restaurant or any place really busy, chances are they will all speak really fast. Don’t worry, I’ve got some tips for you so that you can understand them and catch up!

  DON’T GET OVERWHELMED

The first thing to do is to not get overwhelmed and discouraged. Just because you are having a hard time understanding fast English speakers, it does not mean you have poor listening skills. But there is definitely room for improvement.

As long as you continue to persevere in your journey to learn English, you are always on the right track.

  LEARN ABOUT SPEED, STRESS AND INTONATION

Speed

If you are a beginner at learning English, you may be saying your sentences at a much slower pace. That’s alright. But as you progress, you must be able to adapt to situations when speaking slow and speaking fast are necessary. Of course, this goes hand-in-hand with being able to improve your listening skills so that you understand the people you are conversing with.

Saying – each – word – really – slowly in conversations can make you sound robotic. If you want to sound natural and conversational, it’s important to develop the right speed when talking.

LEARN MORE! THE FULL FREE ENGLISH TIP IS HERE ON THE WEBSITE: https://www.gonaturalenglish.com/improve-your-english-listening-skills-learn-how-to-understand-fast-english-speakers-better/

Nov 20 2019

7mins

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How to Respond to the Question “What Are You Up To?”

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Your friends and people you know might ask you “What are you up to?” How do you respond to this question? You might be eating lunch, watching TV, or working. It’s a casual way saying hello and maybe starting a conversation with you. Let’s see how you can easily answer this question in a variety of situations. Read more at: https://www.gonaturalenglish.com/how-to-respond-to-the-question-what-are-you-up-to/

Lingoda Sprint Link: http://bit.ly/GoNaturalEnglishSprint

Discount Code: SPRINT22

Nov 20 2019

17mins

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“Tell me About Yourself” How to Introduce Yourself at a Job Interview “Tell me About Yourself” How to Introduce Yourself at a Job Interview

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Tell me about yourself! This is a common question that has the potential to be extremely nerve-wracking, depending on the situation. You’ll hear it at parties, on dates, and at job interviews. So, how do you introduce yourself in these situations – especially a job interview? We are going to talk about introducing yourself in a professional manner.

Learn more at: https://www.gonaturalenglish.com/tell-me-about-yourself-how-to-introduce-yourself-at-a-job-interview/

Nov 13 2019

8mins

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The Appropriate Use of the English Word: "Congratulations!"

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Today let's explore the appropriate use of the English word "Congratulations." You see, in the English language, it's not so much about knowing a word, but being able to pronounce it well or spell it correctly. You must also know the right situations to use a specific word correctly.

For this post, it's the word 'Congratulations'! I'll give you some guidelines and tips on when to use this English word correctly.

When to Use 'Congratulations'

Read more about this English tip at: https://www.gonaturalenglish.com/the-appropriate-use-of-the-english-word-congratulations/

Nov 06 2019

9mins

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17 Easy Ways to Practice English Every Day (for Free)

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Oct 15 2019

17mins

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How to Order Food in English

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In this lesson, you’ll learn how to pronounce “Chipotle,” a popular place to eat lunch in the US, learn how to order, how to ask important questions about food, and practice the pronunciation of common food items. It’s a delicious lesson!

This is not sponsored and not an ad for Chipotle, I just happen to really like them and a lot of people have asked how to pronounce it.

Learn more at: https://www.gonaturalenglish.com/how-to-order-food-in-english/ HOW TO PRONOUNCE DIFFICULT FOODS

In the video lesson (make sure to play and listen!) you’ll learn how to pronounce some tricky words in English that come from Spanish such as:

Burrito, Burrito Bowl, Tortilla, Barbacoa, Carnitas, Sofritas, Guacamole, Fajitas, Queso and more.

You can hear some common and some not-so-common fruit drink flavors too:

Peach Pineapple Pomegranate, blackberry, clementine, grapefruit

  HOW TO ORDER FOOD IN ENGLISH

Next in the lesson, I show you how to order your food like a native. Listen for key useful phrases and questions for ordering food and making special requests such as:

Hold the —

This means to not include an item.

On the side —

This means to put an item in a separate container, not touching the main food items.

I’d like to add the —

If you want to add extra items, use this phrase.

What kind of meat is this?

“What kind of…” is the correct structure to ask about a type or variety of an item within a larger category, such as meat.

Is X vegetarian? Vegan?

Vegetarian means without meat and vegan means without any animal product including meat, dairy, eggs or honey.

Does X have gluten, dairy, meat in it?

If you want to know if a specific item has certain ingredients, use this question.

Is this extra?

In this situation, “extra” means an additional charge, or more money.

Be sure to watch the lesson video to hear these phrases and for the complete explanation. Thanks for watching!

Oct 15 2019

11mins

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What's the Difference Between the Prepositions... IN and ON?

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"In" is basically within, inside a container or box, maybe an enclosed space but not necessarily.

"On" is related to surfaces.

You can use "in" or "on" in the same sentence, but the meaning would change.

May 21 2019

14mins

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What's the difference between EACH and EVERY?

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May 18 2019

14mins

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Stop being a student and start being a speaker

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I’ve noticed that there are 2 very different ways of learning: 1 for school and 1 for real life.

They keep you from speaking English, because you aren’t required to apply it in real life in order to be rewarded.

Our whole education system, for the most part, is broken because we have been taught to memorize and not apply concepts in real life.

“Studying” English, in the traditional sense of the word, is the antithesis of speaking English.

Let’s talk about the difference between studying and learning and speaking English

“To study” means to read about it. To memorize lists of vocabulary words. It means you relegate the subject to study sessions, blocks of time when you might sit quietly at home in your room or maybe a desk at the library.

Where does this get you? Maybe it gets you a better grade in your class if you have a quiz on vocabulary or grammar.

Maybe it makes you feel better in the short-term because you don’t have to take any risks, like being embarrassed of the way you speak. It’s so nice to stay in your comfort zone of studying the way you’ve always studied, but to really speak English, you need to get out of your comfort zone.

When we are babies, we do not “study” English or our native language, yet we manage to learn to speak it! Now, studying English can accelerate your language learning, but to really speak you have to use it in the real world.

Learning English is not simply memorizing information or learning about the language, it is using it. Learning English comes from making mistakes, correcting, and moving forward.

If you want to speak English, you’d better stop focusing your time solely on memorizing and reading about it, and start doing it.

May 16 2019

17mins

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Regional Accents in American English

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See the summary and the video here: https://www.gonaturalenglish.com/regional-american-english-accents/

SUMMARY OF REGIONAL AMERICAN ENGLISH ACCENTS

There are around 160 recognized dialects of the English language, or regional accents. These terms are often used interchangeably. Even if you’re really into accents, it would probably be impossible to learn them all. Even native speakers can’t understand them all. For example, it’s very difficult for us American English speakers to understand Scottish English speakers!

Join our American English Pronunciation course to improve your accent now. (https://www.gonaturalenglish.com/pronunciation-course/)

AMERICAN ENGLISH ACCENTS: THE 4 MOST COMMON ONES

If you travel around the US, you will encounter different American English accents. In this lesson we will look at 4 of the most common accents:  Southern, New England, New York City, & Midwestern.

Remember, these are general accent regions.  Even within these regions there are smaller subdivision of accents!  Hale is from the South so this is the accent he is most familiar with. In this lesson, our English teacher Hale shares clips from American TV shows that feature the US Southern Accent:

-Designing Women

-The Help

-King of the Hill

Next, let’s look at the New England American English accent.

The most famous version is the Boston accent. In this lesson, you can see examples from the video clips:

-The Heat

-The fighter

-Good Will Hunting

New York City is not too far from New England, but the accent is a bit different. Within New York City, there are even distinctive accents in different neighborhoods (Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn). Check out the clips from:

-Rosie Perez

-Raging Bull

-Seinfeld

Finally, let’s look at the Midwest. This is often considered where “standard” American English comes from. However, there are variations from speakers in Minnesota and the Dakotas that are definitely something different. Check out the clips in the lesson from the shows and movies:

-Making a Murderer

-Drop Dead Gorgeous

-Fargo

In conclusion, if you want to develop a specific regional accent, you’ll really need to find a teacher from that region or go there to get immersed in the dialect! In general though, it’s not necessary to become an expert in a regional dialect. It’s probably more sensible to learn “standard” American English, which is the accent you hear most news reporters, journalists or other nation-wide broadcasting professionals using.

Pro Tip 1: Understand that there are four major regional dialects in the United States, each with different accents

Pro Tip 2: Learn standard American English, not just one regional accent.

Pro Tip 3: As you advance in your listening skills, if you want a challenge start watching TV shows and movies that feature regional accents.

Pro Tip 4: Improve your standard American accent using our Pronunciation course(https://www.gonaturalenglish.com/pronunciation-course/)

May 13 2019

11mins

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Don't be shy or creepy: 10 compliments in English to start a conversation with anyone

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Mar 14 2019

16mins

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10 Useful English Phrases You'll Use Over and Over - Learn to Speak like a Native

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Here are 10 Very Useful English Phrases You Need to Know
  1. Thanks so much. Please.
  2. Excuse me.
  3. I really appreciate it.
  4. Never mind.
  5. how does that sound? That sounds great.
  6. Sorry, what was that?
  7. Let me confirm...
  8. Nice to meet you.
  9. Can/could I get your...
  10. Actually...

For a limited time only you're invited to my live online Master Class - The 3 Keys to English Fluency. Sign up and reserve your spot now at http://gonaturalenglish.com/keys

Feb 25 2019

14mins

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The Third Conditional in English Grammar with Examples

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How do you form the third conditional tense in English?

The third conditional requires us to construct a sentence in two parts.

We make the third conditional by using ‘if,’ the past perfect form of the verb in the first part of the sentence and then ‘would have’ and the past participle the second part of the sentence:

  • if + past perfect, …would + have + past participle

It talks about the past. It’s used to describe a situation that didn’t happen, and to imagine the result of this situation.

  • If he had studied, he would have passed the exam (but, really we know he didn’t study and therefore he didn’t pass)
  • If I hadn’t spent so much money in my 20’s, I wouldn’t have been poor in my 30’s (but I did spend a lot, and so I did become poor).
  • If we had taken the subway, we wouldn’t have missed the plane (but we did not take the subway, and we did miss the plane)
  • I wouldn’t have been tired if I had gone to bed earlier (but I was tired because I did not go to bed earlier)
  • I would have become a lawyer if I had followed my parents’ wishes (but I did not become a lawyer and did not follow my parents’ wishes)
  • He would not have felt sick if he had not eaten the questionable street food (but he did eat the questionable street food and so he felt sick)

I hope that these examples help. If you have questions, comments, or would like to try your own examples, leave a comment on the blog post at https://gonaturalenglish.com/third-conditional

Feb 11 2019

6mins

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SECOND CONDITIONAL - Quick & Clear English Grammar Explanation

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Second conditional English grammar can help you to create more complex expressions. Improve your fluency and sophistication in English!

How do you form the second conditional tense in English?

Did you know there are three uses for it?

The second conditional requires us to construct a sentence in two parts.

The second conditional uses if then the past simple tense then ‘would’ and the infinitive:

  • if + past simple, …would + infinitive

(It is considered most correct to use ‘were’ instead of ‘was’ with ‘I’ and ‘he/she/it’. However, native speakers often say ‘was.’).

The second conditional tense has three uses.

SECOND CONDITIONAL ENGLISH GRAMMAR FOR FUTURE IMPROBABILITY

First, we can use it to talk about things in the future that are probably not going to be true. It is unlikely but not entirely impossible. Maybe there is a 1% chance. For example, you want to talk about a dream you’re imagining.

  • If I won the lottery, I would buy a big house. (I probably won’t win the lottery)
  • He would travel all over the world if he were rich. (He is not rich, so he doesn’t travel the world)
  • She would pass the exam if she studied. (She does not study much, so this won’t happen)
  • If I had a million dollars, I would invest it wisely to make it last a long time!
SECOND CONDITIONAL ENGLISH GRAMMAR FOR PRESENT IMPOSSIBILITY

Second, we can use it to talk about something in the present which is impossible, because it’s not true. Let’s take a look at some examples to clarify:

  • If I had his number, I would call him. (I don’t have his number now, so it’s impossible for me to call him).
  • You would have more money if you did not spend it all on silly things.
  • If she had more free time, she would cook all her meals at home.
SECOND CONDITIONAL ENGLISH GRAMMAR FOR SUGGESTIONS AND OPINIONS

Third, we can use the second conditional to express our opinions – to give advice, suggestions and recommendations.

  • If I were you, I would not do business with that man.
  • I would study harder if I were you.
  • If I *was you, I would buy some new socks.

Remember that the correct formation of the second conditional uses “were.” However, also remember that many native speakers use “was” instead.

How is this different from the first conditional?

This kind of conditional sentence is different from the first conditional because this is a lot more unlikely.

For example (second conditional): If I had enough money, I would buy a nice house by the ocean (I’m probably not going to have this much money anytime soon, it’s just a dream, not very real for now at least)

But (first conditional): If I have enough money, I’ll buy some new shoes (It’s much more likely that I’ll have enough money to buy some shoes)

Jan 28 2019

8mins

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FIRST CONDITIONAL Tense - Quick & Clear English Grammar Tips

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THE FIRST CONDITIONAL

Would you like to make longer sentences? Using the conditional tenses can help you to express logical ideas and sound more fluent in your speaking.

So, how do you form the first conditional grammar tense in English?

This tense requires us to construct a sentence in two parts.

It is created with “if” then the present simple tense, after which comes the future simple plus the infinitive:

  • if + present simple, … will + infinitive

So, this tense is used to talk about things which might possibly happen in the future. Of course, we can’t always know what will happen in the future. However, this describes possible things, which could easily come true.

  • If it rains, I won’t go to the beach.
  • I‘ll go to the party tomorrow if I study today,
  • If I have enough money, I‘ll buy the concert tickets.
  • He will be late if traffic is bad.
  • She will fail the test if she does not study.
  • If I see her, I‘ll tell her.
FIRST VS. ZERO CONDITIONAL:

The 1st conditional describes a specific situation, whereas the zero conditional describes what happens in general.

The zero conditional is for general facts and the first conditional is for your personal life or specific cases. For example (zero conditional): if you eat too much, you gain weight (in general, people who overeat will become fat). But (1st conditional): if you eat too much, you will gain weight (specifically I’m talking about today and your situation).

First vs. Second Conditional

The first conditional describes things that I think are likely to happen in the future, whereas the second conditional talks about things that I don’t think will really happen. It’s subjective; it depends on my point of view. For example (1st conditional): If she studies harder, she’ll pass the exam (I think it’s possible she will study harder and so she’ll pass) But (second conditional): If she studied harder, she would pass the exam (I think that she won’t study harder, or it’s very unlikely, and so she won’t pass)

Jan 10 2019

5mins

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THE ZERO CONDITIONAL - QUICK & CLEAR ENGLISH GRAMMAR EXPLANATION

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Using the zero conditional English grammar tense is a good way to improve your English, make longer sentences, and speak more like a native.

How do you form the zero conditional tense in English?

It requires us to construct a sentence in two parts.

We can make a zero conditional sentence with two present simple verbs — one in the ‘if clause’ and one in the ‘main clause’:

  • If / when + present simple base verb, …. present simple base verb.

You can also think of it this way:

— IF this, THEN that.

This tense is used when the result will generally always happen. So, if water reaches 100 degrees, it always boils. It’s a fact. The result of the ‘if clause’ is always the main clause.

However, we can create sentences in either order:

— If + present simple, … present simple OR

— Present simple… if + present simple.

Notice in the second example, we don’t need a comma to separate the two parts of the sentence but in the first one we do.

The ‘if’ in this conditional can usually be replaced by ‘when’ without changing the meaning.

For example: If water reaches 100 degrees, it boils. (It is always true, there can’t be a different result sometimes). If I drink milk, I feel very sick. (This is true only for me, maybe, not for everyone, but it’s still true that I’m sick every time I drink milk).

Also, here are some more examples of the zero conditional English grammar tense:

If you eat too much, you gain weight. If you go swimming, you get wet. If ice melts, it becomes water.

Register for my Complete English Course, Fluent Communication, at https://gonaturalenglish.com/course

Next episode, you will get this English tip about the first conditional to learn about the difference between the first and the zero conditionals. The first conditional is about a specific situation, but the zero conditional tense is talking in general.

Jan 07 2019

6mins

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The Go Natural English 7 Steps to English Fluency with Gabby Wallace

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I want to present seven steps that you can use as a clear simple guide for learning English. You can always come back to these steps because they will help you no matter what level or stage you're currently at in English. So if you're ready to begin then let's get started.

If you just follow the path that's been set out for you in English learning, you'll probably take traditional English classes. You'll let your teacher tell you what to learn. And then after months or even years of study, you'll realize you're not where you want to be. Maybe your teacher led you down a different path that they thought was interesting but didn't help you accomplish your goals. The seven steps to fluency help you to create your own goals and your own way of learning English. The seven steps to fluency are actually from inside the English Fluency Formula, an e-book that I wrote for you to help you learn English in just 15 minutes a day. So I'm gonna share them with you.

Normally, you'd have to buy this ebook to read them but I really want to share the seven steps at least to give you a start, and then you can decide if you'd like to get the full ebook.

 

The Seven Steps to English Fluency

Number one is think and plan. So in other words think about why you want to learn English.

What is your reason?  Then plan what you need to know in English in order to be able to do your goal through English. So why are you learning English? Is it to travel? Is it to improve your career or your business, if you're an entrepreneur? Is it perhaps just for a personal hobby, or are you taking a test? So, know your reason why. Think about what English you'll need to accomplish your goals and we're gonna make a plan to achieve them successfully.

Number two: surround yourself with English input. So for example, listen to music in English. Read books and articles in English. Set your phone and your mobile device settings in English. Surround yourself in English so that you're creating an English lifestyle and a habit of consuming English.

Number three: be curious be curious about what interests you and try to learn about it in English.

Number four: repeat. You need to be aware of what you're listening to and repeat the phrases and words that are interesting and useful and new to you. Repeat new words out loud with feeling with emotion and with volume as long as you're not going to disturb anyone else. Repetition and repeating them with feeling are going to help you to remember them.

Okay number five: connect. Again, to help you remember words you want to connect new words with old words that you already know or perhaps words in your own language. This is different than translation.

To connect a word doesn't mean to translate it. It means to connect it to something you already know that you can relate it to. So for example, when I was learning Japanese, I learned the word for the check. When you go to a restaurant when you ask for the check it is "o-waiso." That's one way to say it and this sounds a bit to me like an "eyesore" which means something that is not pleasant to look at. Nobody likes getting the check and knowing how much they have to pay, right? I remembered o-waiso very easily because I connected it with that idea of an eyesore because it sounds similar and there's kind of a funny meaning there. So you have to try to do this with new words in English connect them to something you already know. You can connect new words also with sounds or with songs. That's why I like to learn language a lot through music because the tune helps me to remember the words. So there's a lot of ways that you can connect words.

Next, number six: you need to use the words that you're learning. Use the new sounds, the words, the phrases, the sentences that you're learning.  Number four was repeat them. But number six is different because I want you to actually create your own sentences. You could use what you're learning by writing something or speaking out loud and use what you're learning, so you're applying it in real life.

Finally, number seven is review because reviewing is so important to keep new words fresh in your mind. So review don't be afraid to listen to the same song or to watch the same TV series or movie or read the same article or the same book over and over.

So to read these seven steps and much much more inside the English Fluency Formula, purchase your ebook today.

It's super easy and fast to purchase it and to access it in the members area of the Go Natural English Website. There are thousands of English learners who have purchased it, and who are really enjoying it. So you can read some of their opinions and comments below as well, so thanks so much for watching. I hope that these seven steps will serve you and help you in your journey to English fluency.

Jan 09 2018

12mins

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TOP 10 MOVIES FOR LEARNING ENGLISH

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What are the top movies for learning English? And how do you choose a good movie to help you improve English skills? Watch this video lesson to find out!

When I was learning Spanish, I watched every Spanish movie I could get my hands on, and it helped my listening skills, vocabulary and pronunciation -- a lot!

Movies can help you learn fluent English because they show you natural language and real culture. They give you something fun to talk about with an English speaking partner, too!

Top 10 Movies for Learning English: 1. Forrest Gump 2. The King's Speech 3. The Break-up 4. The Hangover 5. 500 Days of Summer 6. The Shawshank Redemption 7. Castaway 8. Toy Story 9. The Hunger Games 10. The Social Network

Have you seen any of these movies? What do you think of the list? Leave a comment at https://gonaturalenglish.com (use the search box; search for "movies" and you'll find this episode post).

Jan 02 2018

11mins

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