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Computer Science

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This series is host to episodes created by the Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, one of the longest-established Computer Science departments in the country. The series reflects this department's world-class research and teaching by providing talks that encompass topics such as computational biology, quantum computing, computational linguistics, information systems, software verification, and software engineering.

Read more

This series is host to episodes created by the Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, one of the longest-established Computer Science departments in the country. The series reflects this department's world-class research and teaching by providing talks that encompass topics such as computational biology, quantum computing, computational linguistics, information systems, software verification, and software engineering.

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iTunes Ratings

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Average Ratings
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Cover image of Computer Science

Computer Science

Updated 7 days ago

Read more

This series is host to episodes created by the Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, one of the longest-established Computer Science departments in the country. The series reflects this department's world-class research and teaching by providing talks that encompass topics such as computational biology, quantum computing, computational linguistics, information systems, software verification, and software engineering.

Warning: This podcast has few episodes.

This means there isn't enough episodes to provide the most popular episodes. Here's the rankings of the current episodes anyway, we recommend you to revisit when there's more episodes!

Rank #1: Strachey Lecture - The Continuing Evolution of C++

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Stroustrup discusses the development and evolution of the C++, one of the most widely used programming languages ever. The development of C++ started in 1979. Since then, it has grown to be one of the most widely used programming languages ever, with an emphasis on demanding industrial uses. It was released commercially in 1985 and evolved through one informal standard (“the ARM”) and several ISO standards: C++98, C++11, C++14, and C++17. How could an underfinanced language without a corporate owner succeed like that? What are the key ideas and design principles? How did the original ideas survive almost 40 years of development and 30 years of attention from a 100+ member standards committee? What is the current state of C++ and what is likely to happen over the next few years? What are the problems we are trying to address through language evolution?

Dec 12 2017

58mins

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Rank #2: Strachey Lecture - The Once and Future Turing

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Professor Andrew Hodges author of 'Alan Turing: The Enigma' talks about Turing's work and ideas from the definition of computability, the universal machine to the prospect of Artificial Intelligence. In 1951, Christopher Strachey began his career in computing. He did so as a colleague of Alan Turing, who had inspired him with a 'Utopian' prospectus for programming. By that time, Turing had already made far-reaching and futuristic innovations, from the definition of computability and the universal machine to the prospect of Artificial Intelligence. This talk will describe the origins and impacts of these ideas, and how wartime codebreaking allowed theory to turn into practice. After 1951, Turing was no less innovative, applying computational techniques to mathematical biology. His sudden death in 1954 meant the loss of most of this work, and its rediscovery in modern times has only added to Turing's iconic status as a scientific visionary seeing far beyond his short life.
Andrew Hodges is the author of Alan Turing: The Enigma (1983), which inspired the 2014 film The Imitation Game.
The Strachey Lectures are generously supported by OxFORD Asset Management.

Nov 02 2016

1hr 7mins

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Rank #3: Strachey Lecture - Quantum Supremacy

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Dr Scott Aaronson (MIT, UT Austin) gives the 2016 Strachey lecture. In the near future, it will likely become possible to perform special-purpose quantum computations that, while not immediately useful for anything, are plausibly hard to simulate using a classical computer. These "quantum supremacy experiments" would be a scientific milestone---decisively answering quantum computing skeptics, while casting doubt on one of the foundational tenets of computer science, the Extended Church-Turing Thesis. At the same time, these experiments also raise fascinating questions for computational complexity theorists: for example, on what grounds should we believe that a given quantum system really is hard to simulate classically?

Does classical simulation become easier as a quantum system becomes noisier? and how do we verify the results of such an experiment? In this lecture, I'll discuss recent results and open problems about these questions, using three proposed "quantum supremacy experiments" as examples: BosonSampling, IQP / commuting Hamiltonians, and random quantum circuits.

Based partly on joint work with Alex Arkhipov and with Lijie Chen.

The Strachey Lectures are generously supported by OxFORD Asset Management.

Jun 14 2016

1hr 12mins

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Rank #4: Artificial Intelligence and the Future

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In this talk Demis Hassabis discuss's what is happening at the cutting edge of AI research, its future impact on fields such as science and healthcare, and how developing AI may help us better understand the human mind. Strachey Lecture 2016, generously supported by Oxford Asset Management. Dr. Demis Hassabis is the Co-Founder and CEO of DeepMind, the world’s leading General Artificial Intelligence (AI) company, which was acquired by Google in 2014 in their largest ever European acquisition. Demis will draw on his eclectic experiences as an AI researcher, neuroscientist and videogames designer to discuss what is happening at the cutting edge of AI research, its future impact on fields such as science and healthcare, and how developing AI may help us better understand the human mind.

Feb 26 2016

55mins

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Rank #5: Bidirectional Computation is Effectful

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A reconstruction (slides and voiceover) of a talk given at the Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (snapl.org/2015) in May 2015. Bidirectional transformations inherently involve state effects. Modelling them that way allows the incorporation of other effects too, such as I/O, non-determinism, and exceptions. We briefly outline the construction.

Nov 17 2015

5mins

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