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Marketing Music Education with Kathleen Heuer

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Marketing Music Education is THE podcast that encourages music educators & boosters to use simple tools and tactics to increase the reach, influence and “relentlessly positive” perception of their programs. In addition to tips and tricks, I’ll also feature other topics and guests that affect the world of music education. In a world where we're all waiting for the next budget battle axe to drop, the techniques you learn here will strengthen the armor that protects the program you've worked so hard to build.

Read more

Marketing Music Education is THE podcast that encourages music educators & boosters to use simple tools and tactics to increase the reach, influence and “relentlessly positive” perception of their programs. In addition to tips and tricks, I’ll also feature other topics and guests that affect the world of music education. In a world where we're all waiting for the next budget battle axe to drop, the techniques you learn here will strengthen the armor that protects the program you've worked so hard to build.

iTunes Ratings

13 Ratings
Average Ratings
12
1
0
0
0

Applicable!

By Bdeuph - Dec 09 2016
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I'm always trying to find and learn more about promoting music in schools. Thank you for discussing important issues that are actually applicable!

Looking forward to more!

By Joe p20 - Jul 30 2014
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Great start! Already have some great takeaways for mud music groups.

iTunes Ratings

13 Ratings
Average Ratings
12
1
0
0
0

Applicable!

By Bdeuph - Dec 09 2016
Read more
I'm always trying to find and learn more about promoting music in schools. Thank you for discussing important issues that are actually applicable!

Looking forward to more!

By Joe p20 - Jul 30 2014
Read more
Great start! Already have some great takeaways for mud music groups.
Cover image of Marketing Music Education with Kathleen Heuer

Marketing Music Education with Kathleen Heuer

Latest release on Nov 08, 2016

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 5 days ago

Rank #1: Dr. John Gallagher of NYSSMA

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I first found Dr. John Gallagher and NYSSMA on Twitter a couple of years ago. They linked to something called a “Swiss cheese” press release. I clicked the link and found not only a treasure trove of templates for public relations—all tailored specifically for music education programs—but tumbled down a deep rabbit hole of online resources all designed to help you market music education right in your own community.

I’m so glad John was able to join me on the podcast! Here are a few of the topics we touch on in this episode:

  • What is a “Swiss Cheese” news release?
  • What’s the best way to advocate for your program?
  • The importance of engaging your community
  • How to get your music program covered by local news outlets
  • Lessons from failed attempts to organize a booster group
  • The legality of using students’ images to promote your music program
  • Great advice from a retired superintendent to battle burnout
  • A few “out-of-the-box” fundraiser ideas
  • The one thing that John says will improve your music program

Resources from this episode

NYSSMA Swiss cheese news releases

NYSSMA on Twitter

Email Dr. Gallagher

Why Music? PSAs for Music in Our Schools Month from NAfME

About Dr. John Gallagher

John J. Gallagher, Ed.D., is the Director of Fine Arts for the Longwood Central School District, a position he has held since 2006. He has served the New York State School Music Association (NYSSMA) as State Chairperson for Public Relations and Information since 2000; the Suffolk County Music Educators Association (SCMEA) as Commercial Membership chairperson since 2014; and the Suffolk County Chapter of the New York State Council of Administrators of Music Education (NYSCAME) as director of professional development since 2015.

He has also held positions in community and public relations for school districts handling all aspects of communication including news releases, district calendars, and newsletters.

A dedicated advocate for arts education, Dr. Gallagher joined with leaders on the state and local levels to spearhead the creation of the Long Island Scholar Artist  program, an initiative that provides media coverage to students in the five areas of the arts. Students are featured each month of the school year in Newsday and were first introduced in September 2007. In December 2008, WLIW-TV, Long Island’s local PBS station, aired a documentary on the program.

School music programs under his leadership have received the designation of being among the Best Communities for Music Education in America and have been named a Finalist in the GRAMMY Signature Schools program. Bands under his direction have been featured in such venues as Walt Disney World, the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, the Empire State Plaza and Madison Square Garden. They have received high ratings in concert performance and his marching band earned a 2002 State Championship.

Before turning to a career in music education, John was employed in the field of public relations and marketing communications. He has held positions in the field of corporate and brand marketing, healthcare communications, and has handled public relations for various performing groups.

John Gallagher created and has presented an arts advocacy clinic to various arts educators associations and educational institutions along the East Coast. His writings on the topic have been published in NYSSMA’s Magazine, School Music News. John’s doctoral research studied the role of music administrators and music educators as advocates for their school music programs. A portion of his dissertation was published to create NYSSMA’s Advocacy manual.

John holds membership in the National Association for Music Education (NAfME), NYSSMA, NYSCAME, SCMEA  and Suffolk-NYSCAME and is a NYSSMA All State Brass Adjudicator.

He holds a B.S. in Communication Arts from St. John’s University, an M.S. in Music Education from C.W. Post College, an Advanced Graduate Certificate in School District Administration from the University at Stony Brook, and an Ed.D. in Educational Administration from Dowling College.

Dr. Gallagher lives in Middle Island, NY with his wife, Danielle, and their children Amanda, Thomas, and Michael.

ALL MY CONTENT:
http://marketingmusic.education
http://kathleenheuer.com
http://brokenchordcommunications.com
http://promotingyourmusicprogram.com

SUBSCRIBE TO THE EMAIL LIST:
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MARKETING MUSIC EDUCATION podcast:
http://marketingmusic.education
http://promotingyourmusicprogram.com
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iTunes: http://marketingmusic.education/iTunes
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http://marketingmusic.education/subscribe

I’M ALL OVER THE INTERNET:
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AND http://instagram.com/mktgmusiced
AND http://instagram.com/brokenchordcommunications

The post Dr. John Gallagher of NYSSMA appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Mar 06 2016

47mins

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Rank #2: MFA Middle School Band Camp

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In this episode, I speak with Greg Scapillato and Keith Ozsvath. They’re the coordinators of the brand new MFA middle school track at the 2016 Music For All Summer Symposium.

We’ll talk about how Keith and Greg met and where their careers have taken them. We discuss the challenges they face as middle school band directors, like recruiting, retention and burnout. They also share why they saw a need for a camp like the MFA middle school camp, as well as their approach to designing the event from scratch.

To learn more, listen in. Then click here to sign up to get more information as it’s available, and check out this feature article here.

http://musicforall.org/mscamp

Band Directors Facebook Group

About this week’s guests


Keith Ozsvath
is passionate about teaching music, professional development, and integrating technology. He joined the music faculty at Rotolo Middle School in Batavia, Illinois, in 2000 and teaches the 8th Grade Band, Jazz Ensemble, and the Symphonic Band. Mr. Ozsvath is an active adjudicator and clinician in the Chicago area. He is a member of the American School Band Directors Association, National Association for Music Education, been recognized twice by “Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers” and is an Eagle Scout. He has been an Illinois Summer Youth Music conductor at the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana. Additionally, he has presented sessions at the National Middle School Association Conference, Illinois Music Educators All-State Conference, and at VanderCook College of Music. Keith currently teaches two VanderCook MECA classes: Tech Tools for the Music Educator and an online class, You Made This! Website Design & Creation for Music Educators. Mr. Ozsvath also authors a blog, www.teachingbandandmore.com, which provides practical teaching ideas for music educators.

Greg Scapillato teaches band in Northbrook District 28 (IL), conducting the Wind Ensemble and teaching lessons grades 4-8. Mr. Scapillato strives to create meaningful musical experiences for students in his care. While teaching the Beginning Band, he introduced a demonstration concert designed to improve parent investment and engagement. The NBJH Wind Ensemble, under Mr. Scapillato’s direction, has benefitted from special performance opportunities, including joint concerts with professional ensembles and service-based performances such as the local Veterans’ Day Ceremony. Mr. Scapillato also initiated a biennial alumni concert to connect students to those with a life-long love of music performance. In addition to music-related pursuits, Mr. Scapillato enjoys developing his expertise with technology and its integration to accelerate student learning. Success is not a solo adventure: Mr. Scapillato is grateful for supportive colleagues, friends, and family. He calls Arlington Heights, Illinois, home with his wife, son, and an incorrigible Golden Retriever.

The post MFA Middle School Band Camp appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Dec 16 2015

34mins

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Rank #3: More with Richard Crain of Midwest Clinic

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In this episode of the Marketing Music Education podcast, I continue my talk with Richard Crain of the Midwest Clinic. We discuss why marching band is so big in Texas and why it’s so important for band directors to continue to hone their craft, plus the biggest lessons he’s learned over the course of his teaching career.

This is the second of two episodes with Richard Crain; find the first half of our conversation here!

Richard C. Crain has recently completed a tenure as Director of Instrumental Studies at Houston Baptist University. He previously served 21 years as Director of Music for the Spring Independent School District near Houston, TX.  He also previously served as Head Band Director at Westfield HS, Spring HS, and Belton HS. His Spring HS band performed at The Midwest Clinic in Chicago in 1980 and Belton HS in the Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, CA, in 1974 and won honors in concert and marching contests in TX, LA, VA, and CO. He currently is a frequent adjudicator, clinician, and consultant throughout the U.S.; and he has been a presenter for numerous university summer band camps, music education classes, and state music conventions throughout the U.S. and in Canada. Crain retired in 2000 from Spring ISD after 44 years of service in public school music education.

Crain has served on The Midwest Clinic Board of Directors since 1992 and as a Vice President in 2004. He was elected President of the Board in 2009. He and his wife Gayle were the Festival Coordinators for the National Concert Band Festival from its debut in 1991 through 2008, and he and Gayle were inducted into the Bands of America Hall of Fame in 2005. Crain is Past President of the Texas Bandmasters Association, the Alpha Chapter of Phi Beta Mu, and the Texas Music Adjudicators Association. From 1977 through 2008, he served as International Executive Secretary of Phi Beta Mu International Bandmasters Fraternity, and he is included in the PBM Texas Bandmasters Hall of Fame. He is a member of the American Bandmasters Association and is a co-author of Band Expressions, Books I and II, published by Alfred Publications. He and his wife Gayle served as Executive Secretaries for the University Interscholastic League Region IX band, choir, and orchestra contests for over 11 years.

In December of 2007, Crain received the Medal of Honor from The Midwest Clinic in Chicago for his contributions to music education throughout the U.S. and Canada; and in 2009, the Outstanding Contribution to Bands Award was presented to Crain at the annual meeting of Phi Beta Mu International at The Midwest Clinic in Chicago. Other honors include the Music Administrator Lifetime Achievement Award from TBA in 2006, the Richard C. Crain Fine Arts Building at Spring HS dedicated in 2000, the Distinguished Faculty Award from the SHS Alumni in 2002, the Texas Bandmaster of the Year Award by TBA in 1994, and the state and national 1994 Outstanding Music Educator awards from NFIAA. In 1974, Crain was named “Man of the Year” by the Chamber of Commerce of Belton, Texas. From the 1970’s through 2007, Crain was an organizer of the services held by the Fellowship of Christian Musicians at the TBA conventions, and he is currently a Deacon and the Orchestra Director for Spring Baptist Church in Spring, TX. In February 2011, Crain received the “Outstanding Contributions to Music Education Award” from the South Central Regional Music Conference in Monroe, LA., and in December of 2011, he received the “Al and Gladys Wright” award from the Women’s Band Directors International Association. The Texas Bandmasters Association presented Crain with The Honorary Life Membership award in July of 2012. In December of 2013, Crain was inducted into the Phi Beta Mu International Bandmasters Association Hall of Fame, in Chicago, Illinois, and received the Phi Beta Mu Outstanding Contributor Award in 2011.

Richard lives in The Woodlands, TX; his wife Gayle is a resident in The Isle at Kingwood. Their three sons, successful businessmen in nearby Houston, are Scott, with wife Jennifer and children Lauren, Emily, and Joshua; Chris, with wife Melissa and children Jacob, Caroline and Emma Kate; and Steven. Richard’s wife Gayle is a former college business instructor and college administrator who has worked with him for many music education organizations for 53 years and has provided invaluable assistance throughout his career. She is an honorary member of Phi Beta Mu International. She also served on the Board of the TBA Wives Association and as President in 1977.

The post More with Richard Crain of Midwest Clinic appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Nov 18 2015

27mins

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Rank #4: Richard Crain of the Midwest Clinic

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In this episode of the Marketing Music Education podcast, I talk with Richard Crain of the Midwest Clinic. He gives us an overview of the event, including who should attend and what to expect. We discuss the importance of professional development for music educators, especially as it relates to burnout and teacher turnover. We discuss his experience with volunteers, fundraising, and what he feels the most important discipline in the entire curriculum might be (hint: it’s music!)

This is the first of two episodes with Richard Crain; be sure to tune in next time for more!

Richard C. Crain has recently completed a tenure as Director of Instrumental Studies at Houston Baptist University. He previously served 21 years as Director of Music for the Spring Independent School District near Houston, TX.  He also previously served as Head Band Director at Westfield HS, Spring HS, and Belton HS. His Spring HS band performed at The Midwest Clinic in Chicago in 1980 and Belton HS in the Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, CA, in 1974 and won honors in concert and marching contests in TX, LA, VA, and CO. He currently is a frequent adjudicator, clinician, and consultant throughout the U.S.; and he has been a presenter for numerous university summer band camps, music education classes, and state music conventions throughout the U.S. and in Canada. Crain retired in 2000 from Spring ISD after 44 years of service in public school music education.

Crain has served on The Midwest Clinic Board of Directors since 1992 and as a Vice President in 2004. He was elected President of the Board in 2009. He and his wife Gayle were the Festival Coordinators for the National Concert Band Festival from its debut in 1991 through 2008, and he and Gayle were inducted into the Bands of America Hall of Fame in 2005. Crain is Past President of the Texas Bandmasters Association, the Alpha Chapter of Phi Beta Mu, and the Texas Music Adjudicators Association. From 1977 through 2008, he served as International Executive Secretary of Phi Beta Mu International Bandmasters Fraternity, and he is included in the PBM Texas Bandmasters Hall of Fame. He is a member of the American Bandmasters Association and is a co-author of Band Expressions, Books I and II, published by Alfred Publications. He and his wife Gayle served as Executive Secretaries for the University Interscholastic League Region IX band, choir, and orchestra contests for over 11 years.

In December of 2007, Crain received the Medal of Honor from The Midwest Clinic in Chicago for his contributions to music education throughout the U.S. and Canada; and in 2009, the Outstanding Contribution to Bands Award was presented to Crain at the annual meeting of Phi Beta Mu International at The Midwest Clinic in Chicago. Other honors include the Music Administrator Lifetime Achievement Award from TBA in 2006, the Richard C. Crain Fine Arts Building at Spring HS dedicated in 2000, the Distinguished Faculty Award from the SHS Alumni in 2002, the Texas Bandmaster of the Year Award by TBA in 1994, and the state and national 1994 Outstanding Music Educator awards from NFIAA. In 1974, Crain was named “Man of the Year” by the Chamber of Commerce of Belton, Texas. From the 1970’s through 2007, Crain was an organizer of the services held by the Fellowship of Christian Musicians at the TBA conventions, and he is currently a Deacon and the Orchestra Director for Spring Baptist Church in Spring, TX. In February 2011, Crain received the “Outstanding Contributions to Music Education Award” from the South Central Regional Music Conference in Monroe, LA., and in December of 2011, he received the “Al and Gladys Wright” award from the Women’s Band Directors International Association. The Texas Bandmasters Association presented Crain with The Honorary Life Membership award in July of 2012. In December of 2013, Crain was inducted into the Phi Beta Mu International Bandmasters Association Hall of Fame, in Chicago, Illinois, and received the Phi Beta Mu Outstanding Contributor Award in 2011.

Richard lives in The Woodlands, TX; his wife Gayle is a resident in The Isle at Kingwood. Their three sons, successful businessmen in nearby Houston, are Scott, with wife Jennifer and children Lauren, Emily, and Joshua; Chris, with wife Melissa and children Jacob, Caroline and Emma Kate; and Steven. Richard’s wife Gayle is a former college business instructor and college administrator who has worked with him for many music education organizations for 53 years and has provided invaluable assistance throughout his career. She is an honorary member of Phi Beta Mu International. She also served on the Board of the TBA Wives Association and as President in 1977.

The post Richard Crain of the Midwest Clinic appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Nov 16 2015

31mins

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Rank #5: Eric Martin, CEO of Music for All: Part 1

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In this episode of the Marketing Music Education podcast, I sat down with Eric Martin of Music for All. He’s one of my favorite people to talk to, and we covered a lot: enough for two episodes! Listen to the second episode here.

In this first installment, we talk about his experience as an African-American band student in a recently desegregated school, his love of the marching arts, his background as an aviation lawyer and how he got into event production. We also discuss the importance of music education and the power of music—and live events—in our society, and why Sarah Palin is a role model of his. We also touch on burnout and its effects not just on music educators, but on nonprofit staffers like those at Music for All and like the parent volunteers that power music programs like yours.

About Eric Martin

Eric Martin is president and CEO of Music for All, a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to create, provide and expand positively life-changing experiences through music for all. MFA promotes and advocates for music and arts education, and creates and produces music and music education events and programs serving 60,000 youth and 250,000 spectators annually throughout the nation.

Eric has more than 20 years of experience in special event planning and operations, in addition to 17 years of legal practice and 21 years of corporate executive management experience. Before coming to Music for All, he was the founder and sole proprietor of ELM Productions, Inc., a special events production company producing parades and festival programs and events, including the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Holiday Parade in Atlanta.

Links and Resources mentioned by Eric Martin

International Festivals & Events Association and the Pinnacle Awards

Drum Corps International

Scott McCormick of the Association of Music Parents

South Carolina church shooting

Music for All’s Strategic Plan

Music for All’s music education advocacy efforts

NAfME’s Music Education Policy Roundtable

Scott Lang’s Be Part of the Music

The post Eric Martin, CEO of Music for All: Part 1 appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Oct 28 2015

29mins

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Rank #6: Listener Survey: Fall 2015

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In this episode, I share what I learned from the recent Marketing Music Education listener survey. Plus I talk about the accident at the Foothills Invitational Marching Band Competition on October 3, 2015, at North Iredell High School near Charlotte, NC.

Links and Resources from this episode

South Iredell band returns to the field following tragedy

Driver cited in wreck that injured students at North Iredell High

Contribute to the SIHS Band Medical Fund on GoFundMe.

An Open Letter to All Boards of Education About the Power of Music and the Arts in Schools by Tony Mazzocchi of Music Parents Guide. Hear his conversation with me here.

Deputy Sheriff A.J. Mendez plays with the Poteet High School Band at the football game in D’Hanis.

The post Listener Survey: Fall 2015 appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Oct 16 2015

21mins

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Rank #7: Joe Beard: The Marching Podcast (part 2)

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Joe Beard of The Marching Podcast joins me on this show, the second in a two-part series. His podcast (which you should go download!) focuses on the marching arts within the world of Historically Black Colleges and Universities. In this episode, we talk about some of the things you learn in marching band that have nothing to do with music, circle BACK to the political brouhaha that was marriage equality in Indiana, where to find videos of awesome HBCU bands, how to get people excited about band, and why music education makes a difference even if you have no plans to continue professionally. Be sure to listen in to part one of our conversation here!

Resources & Links

The Marching Podcast
The Marching Podcast Blog the5thquarter.com Block Band Music.com HBCUDigest.com Tim Hinton at Marching Roundtable Joe’s interview with Tim Hinton on The Marching Podcast My interview with Tim Hinton at Marketing Music Education Drum Corps Planet Search Jackson State University Marching Band on YouTube Search Southern University Marching Band on YouTube Search Bethune-Cookman University Marching Wildcats Bandhead.org DaEdge1.com Duncan C. Gray, Band Director for
West Charlotte High School in Charlotte, NC
Dr. Lewis Liddell, Sr.  Dr. Michael Magruder, Band Director at Winston Salem State University Christine Ngeo Katzman of Halftime Magazine Marching Roundtable: Should DCI Leave Indiana? Kathleen Heuer on The Marching Podcast

HBCU bands on YouTube

DaEdge1 on YouTube BandTube High Definition https://www.youtube.com/user/BANDTUBEHDDOTCOM https://www.youtube.com/user/chicagomarchingbands https://www.youtube.com/user/8to5pros https://www.youtube.com/user/MarchingsportHD https://www.youtube.com/user/KillaKevProd https://www.youtube.com/user/ZymbalistiK https://www.youtube.com/user/HBCUPride https://www.youtube.com/user/SpeechlessQue https://www.youtube.com/user/garrett1216 https://www.youtube.com/user/DoubleTimeEnt Next week, I’ll be speaking with Donna Schwartz of Donna Schwartz Music and the Music Teachers’ Resource Guide podcast. Get her free practice planner here. The “Why Music?” public service announcement is produced by JDM & Associates, Frederick, MD, and made possible by the National Association for Music Education. Copyright © 2014 by NAfME, 1806 Robert Fulton Dr., Reston, VA 20191. For more information, call 800-336-3768, ext. 223.

The post Joe Beard: The Marching Podcast (part 2) appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Sep 17 2015

44mins

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Rank #8: Tim Hinton

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In this episode of Marketing Music Education, I speak with Tim Hinton. He is one of the hosts of the Marching Roundtable podcast, which I’ve listened to and enjoyed for years. Hi background as an educator is readily apparent, as he schools me about the benefits of hiring an arranger, the pitfalls of burnout, and the need to educate not just marching arts judges, but the entire marching arts community—and beyond!

About Tim Hinton

Tim Hinton is a composer and arranger, writing for concert and marching bands. He serves as a consultant for all aspects of marching shows, from show concepts to drill and color guard. Information about his music compositions, blog, and book can be found at www.timhinton.com. He received his degrees in Music Education from the University of Tennessee and Georgia State University, and he was a marching member and instructor for the Phantom Regiment Drum and Bugle Corps of Rockford, Illinois. Tim taught in the public schools for 10 years and developed a highly successful program at Dunwoody High School in Dunwoody, Georgia.

Tim is one of the hosts of the Marching Roundtable podcast, a resource for everyone involved in the marching arts. You can hear interviews with experts from the world of drum corps, marching band, winter guard, and indoor percussion at the podcast website at www.marchingroundtable.com. Tim is also one of the creators of the Marching Roundtable Judges Academy, an online course of judges training and assessment education. Each student is paired with a mentor who assists the student in learning how to judge marching contests and how to design and teach better toward these assessments. Find out more about the Judges Academy at JudgesAcademy.com.

Resources

Marching Roundtable’s interviews with David Holsinger are here and here.

You can find the Marching Roundtable episodes featuring parents here.

Tresona Multimedia

The post Tim Hinton appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Mar 20 2015

59mins

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Rank #9: Practice slowly to learn fast!

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If you want to learn something quickly, practice that thing S-L-O-W-L-Y. Because your brain is like a fresh snowdrift.

Obviously.

Listen to find out why musicians should practice slowly.

Here’s the Lifehacker article that inspired this podcast, and the piece by Dick Hensold that inspired the article.

From Daniel Coyle’s Little Book of Talent: 52 Tips for Improving Your Skills:

“…Students at the Meadowmount School of Music often practice according to an informal rule: If a passerby can recognize a song, it’s being played too fast. The point of this super-exaggerated slowness (which produces songs that resemble those of humpback whales) is to reveal small mistakes that might have gone undetected, and thus create more high-quality reaches.”

“Precision especially matters early on, because the first reps establish the pathways for the future. Neurologists call this the “sled on a snowy hill” phenomenon. The first repetitions are like the first sled tracks on fresh snow: On subsequent tries, your sled will tend to follow those grooves. “Our brains are good at building connections,” says Dr. George Bartzokis, a neurologist at UCLA. “They’re not so good at unbuilding them.” When you learn hard skills, be precise and measured. Go slowly. Make one simple move at a time, repeating and perfecting it before you move on. Pay attention to errors, and fix them, particularly at the start. Learning fundamentals only seems boring—in fact, it’s the key moment of investment. If you build the right pathway now, you’ll save yourself a lot of time and trouble down the line.”

Also check out Daniel Coyle’s The Talent Code.

And The Goonies.

And because it is too incredible not to share, I present to you “a song from The Goonies musical by Keith Doughty & Rob Dean.”

ALL MY CONTENT:

http://kathleenheuer.com http://brokenchordcommunications.com http://promotingyourmusicprogram.com http://marketingmusic.education

SUBSCRIBE TO THE EMAIL LIST:

http://kathleenheuer.com/subscribe

MARKETING MUSIC EDUCATION podcast:

http://promotingyourmusicprogram.com http://marketingmusic.education *Coming Soon!* iTunes:  http://kathleenheuer.com/iTunes Stitcher:  http://kathleenheuer.com/stitcher
http://www.facebook.com/promotingyourmusicprogram
http://twitter.com/mktgmusiced
http://instagram.com/mktgmusiced http://MarketingMusicEd.tumblr.com

I’M ALL OVER THE INTERNET:

about.mehttp://about.me/KathleenDHeuer/ twitter : http://twitter.com/kathleenheuer facebook : https://www.facebook.com/kathleen.bruzek.heuer google+ : http://plus.google.com/+KathleenHeuer/ google+ : https://plus.google.com/+Brokenchordcommunications/ tumblr : http://kathleenheuer.tumblr.com instagram : http://instagram.com/kathleenheuer AND http://instagram.com/brokenchordcommunications

The post Practice slowly to learn fast! appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Feb 19 2015

11mins

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Rank #10: Cam Stasa

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Cam Stasa is one of my favorite people on the planet. And if you’ve met her, as so many music educators have, I’d bet she’s one of yours, too.

In this conversation, we talk about:

  • her role at VanderCook College of Music in Chicago
  • how students and their families should approach applying to college
  • the unique way VanderCook prepares future music educators for the reality of today’s economy
  • the high burnout rate of music educators, and how to combat it
  • recruiting parent volunteers to save your sanity
  • the surprising fundraiser many programs are using
  • Cam’s reaction to the events of New Year’s Day

About Cam Stasa

Cam Stasa is currently the Associate Director of Admissions at VanderCook College of Music in Chicago.  She had been the Director of Participant Relations for Music for All (Bands of America) from 1989 until April 2010.

A graduate of Eastern Michigan University and Wayne State University (MI), she taught English and Communications in secondary schools prior to her arrival at MFA.  Originally hired as Director of Operations for Bands of America, her job description evolved into the “sales” director of Music for All.  Whether talking to directors by phone, or in person, Cam developed the most direct communication with music directors to encourage them to participate within the events produced throughout the year.

For over 15 years Cam has announced the Lake Park Lancer Joust, a high school marching band competition held annually on the campus of Lake Park High School in Roselle, Illinois.  She is also the announcer of the Normal West Marching Band Invitational at Illinois Wesleyan University. Cam has been the Master of Ceremonies at the Chicagoland Invitational Concert Band Festival since 2003.

On March 8, 2014, Cam was inducted into the Bands of America Hall of Fame joining the ranks of William Revelli, John Paynter, Gary Green, Greg Bimm, Alfred Watkins and others that have been recognized for their impact on Bands of America, the nation’s band activity and music education.

Resources

VanderCook College of Music

Bands of America Hall of Fame

Music for All Summer Symposium

Midwest Clinic

The Other Music Advocates: a recap of my interview with Christopher Woodside of NAfME

N.H. teacher claims Grammy Music Educator Award

GRAMMY Music Educator Award

Music in Our Schools Month (#MIOSM)

Find Marketing Music Education on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr!

A new email address for me: kathleen (at) marketingmusic (dot) education.

ALL MY CONTENT:

http://kathleenheuer.com http://brokenchordcommunications.com http://promotingyourmusicprogram.com http://marketingmusic.education

SUBSCRIBE TO THE EMAIL LIST:

http://kathleenheuer.com/subscribe

MARKETING MUSIC EDUCATION podcast:

http://promotingyourmusicprogram.com http://marketingmusic.education *Coming Soon!* iTunes:  http://kathleenheuer.com/iTunes Stitcher:  http://kathleenheuer.com/stitcher
http://www.facebook.com/promotingyourmusicprogram
http://twitter.com/mktgmusiced
http://instagram.com/mktgmusiced http://MarketingMusicEd.tumblr.com

I’M ALL OVER THE INTERNET:

about.me : http://about.me/KathleenDHeuer/ twitter : http://twitter.com/kathleenheuer facebook : https://www.facebook.com/kathleen.bruzek.heuer google+ : http://plus.google.com/+KathleenHeuer/ google+ : https://plus.google.com/+Brokenchordcommunications/ tumblr : http://kathleenheuer.tumblr.com instagram : http://instagram.com/kathleenheuer AND http://instagram.com/brokenchordcommunications

The post Cam Stasa appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Feb 04 2015

1hr 5mins

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Rank #11: Courtney Brandt: Young Adult Author

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On this episode of the Promoting Your Music Program podcast, I’m so excited to speak with  young adult novelist Courtney Brandt. You can find her books here:

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

iBooks

Courtney Brandt is the author of The Line, plus the additional novels in the series: A Fine Line, Keeping in Line, and The Line Up. Each of these  lighthearted novels was created for high school students and alumni in marching band. She released standalone novels Confessions of A Teenage Band Geek in fall 2011 and her final YA marching novel, Major Pain, in the fall of 2012.

As a former drumline member, Courtney brings a fictional voice to band geeks all over the world and is patiently waiting for Hollywood to wake up and realize her books would make great films or TV series!

Enter to win a digital Kindle copy of The Line Series: Complete Anthology!

The Line Series: Complete Anthology by Courtney Brandt

Here’s how:

  1. Log into iTunes and/or Stitcher
  2. Leave an honest star rating and short written review of the podcast. Here’s how.
  3. Take a screenshot of your review once it’s been approved and published (it can take a couple of days).
  4. Email that screenshot to me at kathleen (at) kathleenheuer.com by Monday, November 17, 2014 at 11:59 pm Eastern.

I’ll choose 5 winners randomly from those that enter and I’ll notify the winners that week!

Check out Courtney’s Marching Arts Photos Tumblr here, and while you’re at it, mine here. Find Courtney on Goodreads here.

Stay tuned next week for my conversation with author DJ Corchin of The 13th Chair!

The post Courtney Brandt: Young Adult Author appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Oct 30 2014

23mins

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Rank #12: Eugene Cantera of the Dallas School of Music

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Eugene Cantera of the Dallas School of Music:
Are You Making These Common Website Mistakes?

Eugene Cantera is a partner at the Dallas School of Music and a founding member of the dlp Music Program. He serves as the Director of Social Media for both organizations. He is a saxophonist but teaches many instruments and performs in the Dallas area in the rock and jazz genres. Eugene recently returned from an artist in residency at the Wilderness School in Adelaide, Australia where he taught and performed with several ensembles.

Eugene was kind enough to join me on this week’s podcast, where we talked about some tips & tricks to optimize your website and social media. A large percentage of the Dallas School of Music’s clientele is online, so they’ve developed some serious digital chops along the way.

The Top 10 Mistakes on Your Music Program’s Website

1. Poor Overall Aesthetic Design – Want good examples? Check out Google, Amazon, or Samsung: simple, clean, functional.

2. Marginal Functionality and Navigation – you must make it easy to get around your site in just a few clicks

3. No Optimization – let’s face it, many of you have no idea what SEO means nor do you have the time or patience to learn.  But adding relevant keywords and phrases to your site is only the beginning of the process that will help people find you.

4. Lack of or Poor Choice of Keywords – these improve the overall chances that your website will be indexed by search engines. 

5. Lack of or Poor Descriptors – meta tags are yet another device that provide information to search engines. Though they aren’t a “magical solution” they can definitely help ensure your website appears on search engine results pages.

6.Lack of or Poor Choice of Images – most music sites use outdated images or worse, those cute spinning quarter notes.  But the moms, dads and admins that you want to attract are more savvy than that. 

7. Little or hard to find Contact Info – this is our pet peeve. Your contact info should be easy to obtain in just one or two clicks!

8. No Main Message – what’s your message?  Are you fundraising?  Are you passionate about music education?  Is your site about a particular annual event or a specific band program? 

9. No Social Media – if you are not using Twitter and Facebook for starters, you are missing a chance to connect with a large and growing number of like-minded people.  If you are using social media, it should be proudly displayed on your site and you should actively solicit followers.

10. Static Content – The number of outdated sites we see is astounding. If the last update to your site was done in 2008—Houston, we have a problem. Your site should always reflect what’s currently happening in your organization and outdated info should be removed or archived.

Need help with any of this?  We specialize in custom web design and hosting for music oriented sites. Check out our program here.

Warm Regards,

Eugene Cantera, BME
Director of Marketing and Social Media
The Dallas School of Music, Inc.
972-380-8050 Ext. 212

UFO sound effect found here.

The post Eugene Cantera of the Dallas School of Music appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Oct 01 2014

42mins

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Rank #13: Band kids are the BEST.

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I’ve long had a sneaking suspicion that band kids are the best. Honestly, there’s just something extra awesome about these kids. This week, a bit more evidence crossed my desk. I make my case in this episode.

Band kids are the BEST. Here’s why:

Del Valle High School student’s wish granted

Band students save teacher’s life

What Everybody Ought to Know About Band

18 Lessons Marching Band Teaches Our Kids: A Parent’s Perspective

Two Million Reasons Why Marching Band Kids Are So Responsible

Other resources

About Tim Lautzenheiser

Music Community Answering the Call of the #BeyondTheBubblesChallenge

Bands of America Regional Championships and Grand National Championships

The National Association of Music Parents

Find the podcast on iTunes and on Stitcher. Please subscribe, and take a moment to leave me a review, rating or comment. You could be featured in an upcoming episode!

Find me online!

Facebook

Twitter

Email me anytime at kathleen@kathleenheuer.com.

The post Band kids are the BEST. appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Sep 24 2014

18mins

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Rank #14: Apple recap + Carolina kicker shoves HS band member

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In this episode, I recap the Apple live event unveiling the iPhone 6 and the Apple Watch, and discuss what impact they could have on music parents and booster organizations. Could the new Apple Pay system be used for and by music booster groups?

Check out these links for more details:

Apple event in 90 seconds via Mashable

Carolina Panthers kicker Graham Gano “moves” Marquel Ballard, the freshman trombonist for Bethune-Cookman High School

I also cover “the day the music died:” when the kicker for the Carolina Panthers decided to begin his warm up before this high school marching band had left the field.

http://ftw.usatoday.com/2014/09/graham-gano-marching-band-tampa-bay-bethune-cookman

“The players tried to take the field…the marching band refused to yield…”

It all ended well, though. The kicker called the trombone player to apologize and hooked him up with tickets to an upcoming game.

No harm, no foul.

Find the podcast on iTunes and on Stitcher. Please subscribe, and take a moment to leave me a review, rating or comment. You could be featured in an upcoming episode!

The post Apple recap + Carolina kicker shoves HS band member appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Sep 10 2014

15mins

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Rank #15: Facebook Page Post Ideas for your Music Program

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Whether you’ve been running your Facebook page for hours or years, we could all use a bit of inspiration every once in a while. So quit racking your brain for a bit, and check out some of these ideas.

Facebook Pages are considered inbound marketing (aka permission marketing, aka content marketing). That means that we have to get fans to opt in (by liking our Page) to hear our message. If all we ever do is sell, no one will want to listen to what we have to say. So we need to give people a reason to stick around. We do that by providing value.

There are three main ways we can offer value through posts on our Facebook Page.

Use your Facebook Page posts to Educate

Try posting an educational video. David Haven at JDFunCorps did a fun one teaching his viewers “All About the Mellophone.” Find existing videos to share (like the ones by Collective Cadenza), or for massive bonus points, make your own!

Answer a FAQ!

Interview and introduce a member of your program: student/staff/volunteer. It’s a great way to humanize your page, and to offer a peek behind the curtain.

Share links. Topics could include the many benefits of music ed

Share music education trivia, statistics, or facts. (Here’s a fresh source.)

Share news and announcements about your program.

Give us a peek behind the scenes (this would also work great for Instagram!): show an image per day that illustrates what you’re working on. (Austin Kleon has a whole book on this! Here’s my affiliate link: Show Your Work!: 10 Ways to Share Your Creativity and Get Discovered.) Go deep! We’d love to see the percussion closet, a band bus, or parents shopping for concession stand supplies.

Recommend someone else to follow on FB (neighboring band program, a club or team at your school.)

Use your Facebook Page posts to Entertain

You can have lots of fun with images (just make sure they’re legal to use!).

Post infographics, photos (those you’ve taken yourself and submitted photos), or new Hyperlapse videos.

Use photos to run a contest: have fans submit a caption for a photo, or post a “mystery” photo and have fans guess what it is.

Submit to a Page “takeover:” Let sections/parents/drum majors/directors “take over” your feed for the day

Post funny stuff like cartoons (Tone Deaf Comics) and witty one-liners (The 13th Chair)

Try giveaways & contests: prizes can include surplus tee shirts, choice seats at the next football game, or an opportunity to conduct at the next rehearsal.

Don’t miss Throwback Thursday and/or Flashback Friday: they especially appeal to alumni and their parents. It’s a great way to keep them engaged with your organization; someday, they could be valuable resources.

Use your Facebook Page posts to Inspire

Share inspiring stories of students’ success based on what they learned in your music program

Inspire discussion by featuring:

  • Questions
  • Polls
  • Fill in the blank

Quotes: find 30 of my favorites here.

Thank the people involved with your program and highlight their contributions:
staff, students, supporters, volunteers, and especially donors & sponsors!

Make it a regular occurrence by featuring a volunteer/student/staff member of the week or month!

Pro tip:

Tag people and pages by typing @ and then the person’s or Page’s name.

From your personal Facebook profile, you can tag other people, pages and groups. From your Page, you can only tag other pages (this is so people don’t get spammed by companies).

Other ideas for Facebook Page posts:

Share any of your existing content, like blog posts or videos.

Do “market research:” allow fans to choose between fundraiser options, tee shirt designs or concession stand offerings

Share current events and news: promote other local nonprofits, school organizations and teams

Events: create an event page for each major event on your calendar

Plan ahead for holiday and seasonal posts

Use your cover image to promote your next event/performance or fundraiser (be sure to follow Facebook’s guidelines!)

Don’t forget to only plug your program’s fundraisers or events once for every four times you share valuable content on your Facebook page!

Whether you choose to educate, entertain, or inspire with your Facebook Page posts, you’ll be sure to keep your fans coming back for more! Got another kind of post that has worked for you? Leave your own ideas in the comments!

Also, check out Seth Godin’s post here. Watch the video and read the manifesto (screen edition and  a printable edition). It’s important stuff.

Check out NAfME’s #BeyondTheBubblesChallenge here and on Twitter:

The post Facebook Page Post Ideas for your Music Program appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Sep 03 2014

20mins

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Rank #16: Reactions to News about The Ohio State University Band

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Ohio State University Band Updates (October 10, 2014):

Ohio State’s fired band director got more support

Ohio State pays at least $885 an hour for 2nd band investigation; questions remain about firms involved

Ohio State University Band Updates (August 28, 2014):

Music publishers are reportedly denying performance rights to the OSU Marching Band.

The director is still trying to get his job back.

The Newark Advocate came out with an editorial basically saying that we’d better get used to this new normal, because Title IX is NOT messing around.

OSU’s former Title IX coordinator came out saying that both the university and Mr. Waters could have handled things better. She was not involved in the probe because she left before it began, in large part because the university tied her hands so that she could not do her job effectively. Read about it here and here.

In this episode of the Promoting Your Music Program podcast, we try a new roundtable format as we discuss a recent headline from the band world: namely, the recent firing of Jonathan Waters, the director of The Ohio State University Marching Band.

Full disclosure: While I have no affiliation with The Ohio State University Marching Band, I am an alum of a Big Ten University band. I bring this story to light as a former participant and as a fan of the marching arts and because I feel that the issues contained herein merit discussion and deserve to be examined in the light of day.

I did not ask any of the parties involved to be a guest on the show. I wanted to discuss these events from our perspectives as outsiders, as former students, former directors, and now parents ourselves.

Allow me to introduce my friends Maria and Lisa:

Maria Dripps-Paulson serves as the Executive Director of the Kaneland Arts Initiative, an award-winning arts production organization through the Kaneland School District in the far, far, FAR west suburbs of Chicago. She also designs music lessons for SmartMusic, teaches private music lessons, and stays healthy as a distributor for the Shaklee Corporation. Maria was named one of the Women of Distinction in Kane County (IL) in 2013She has four children, all of them actively involved in music.

Lisa Salazar is currently Senior Event Coordinator and a Senior Adjunct Instructor at Lewis University (IL). She has more than fifteen years’ experience in the events industry, and is formerly a high school music educator. She serves on multiple university and professional boards and committees, as well as on the Board of Directors of New Life for Haiti as Director of Sustainable Capital. She has three children; her oldest has just joined high school band.

More about The Ohio State University Band

Find their website here.

Learn about their innovative use of iPads here.

Read the Ohio State University Band full investigation report here.

Check out OSU’s official feed on “band culture.”

Learn more about Title IX here.

Read the open letter from a former band member here.

Show your support for the OSU Marching Band here. #supportTBDBITL

Also? The director has asked for his job back, the OSUMB Alumni and the OSUMB squad leaders have issued statements.

Image credit: By Michael Barera (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

The post Reactions to News about The Ohio State University Band appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Aug 27 2014

34mins

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Rank #17: Seth Williams, Advocacy Coordinator for Music for All

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On today’s podcast, I sit down with Seth Williams of Music for All. Well, he WAS with Music for All when we talked, anyway—now he’s attending law school!

Seth Williams is the former Advocacy Coordinator for Music for All. Seth has been involved with Music for All and its programs for nearly ten years – as a participant, volunteer, event staff, intern and full-time staffer. He recently relocated to Los Angeles, where he attends UCLA School of Law. Seth is an active advocate for music education and the arts. While at MFA, he curated advocacy content, represented Music for All in the state and national arts advocacy community and developed new advocacy and awareness initiatives for the organization.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Seth Williams:

0:52 Meet Seth!

1:25 Advocacy: Music for All’s vision

2:05 A typical day for Seth in the Music for All office

2:48 The digital tools he depends on

4:17 Advocacy isn’t just sending letters or attending rallies

5:44 The importance of new media in advocacy

6:20 The case for blogging

7:46 Proactive vs. reactive advocacy

8:19 The importance of attending school board meetings—before issues arise

10:20 How parents can make a difference on local, state and national levels

11:59 Recruiting volunteers the MFA way (and following Fran Kick’s advice!)

12:51 Volunteer burnout

13:12 Matching volunteers’ skills to tasks

13:36 Parent recognition

14:47 Seth’s alma mater

15:17 Fundraising: “Any idea is worth trying once.”

16:15 A creative fundraiser that’s successful on several levels

17:43 Seth gets the last word

Resources

Fanfare: the weekly advocacy blog post Seth curated for Music for All

Advocacy websites Seth recommends:

This is a good way to find state advocates: http://www.americansforthearts.org/by-program/networks-and-councils/state-arts-action-network

For news/articles, two of Seth’s favorites are:

Volunteering with Music for All

Patrick John Hughes Parent/Booster Award: 2014 nominations due September 15!

Seth’s alma mater: Centerville H.S. (OH)

The creative fundraiser Carmel H.S. (IN) took on

The digital tools Seth mentioned:

If you enjoyed this episode, please take a moment to subscribe in iTunes. Bonus points and a shout out if you leave an honest review there (here’s how)! Reviews make it possible to reach more people who might find this podcast helpful.

Thanks also for sharing the podcast with friends and colleagues. Be sure to like the Facebook page for updates! You can also subscribe to my email list to get updates in your inbox.

Thanks for listening!

The post Seth Williams, Advocacy Coordinator for Music for All appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Aug 13 2014

19mins

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Rank #18: Fran Kick

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Joining me on the podcast today is Fran Kick. He is a renowned author and speaker who has spent time as a band director and in clinical psychology. Fran served on the leadership staff of the Music For All Summer Symposium last month, and that’s where we sat down to talk.

Here are the highlights with Fran Kick

02:07 Leadership training for students and parents

03:20 Bring a friend!

04:02 The one thing booster groups can do TODAY to improve: have every parent attend one school board meeting

05:50 The number one excuse parents use to get out of attending school board meetings

07:10 “Relentlessly positive:” persistence pays off

08:50 The difference between 90% in music versus 90% in an academic classroom

09:24 Leadership for volunteers: appreciation is the key

10:41 “When people feel appreciated, they’re willing to give more.”

11:18 The surprising source of many Music for All volunteers

12:30 The type of person Music for All attracts

13:25 Recruiting and retention of music students

14:05 How a music student is like French pastry

15:02 Time commitment: How much is too much?

16:11 The case for releasing the students from the band room occasionally

17:09 Music students and directors need to interact with the rest of the world

18:09 The band director who was reprimanded for “mobilizing” his parents to advocate

18:49 How to virtually guarantee buy-in from administrators

21:07 How to change the culture of a school and a community

21:21 Instead of a mic drop at the end, there’s a pen drop

Here’s the bit on the band director who was reprimanded for “mobilizing” his parents to advocate for the music program:

“Faced with the prospect that Parrott Middle School’s band would be eliminated for the coming school year, Harrin helped mobilize a group of supporters to speak during a Hernando County School Board meeting in May.… But Harrin’s efforts have landed him in some hot water with Hernando High principal Leechele Booker.

“After the May 6 board meeting, Booker gave Harrin, who served as the band director for both Hernando High and Parrott this past school year, a “letter of direction,” reprimanding him for his actions.

“‘This letter of direction is being given to you for assembling a group of students and parents from (Hernando) to attend a school board meeting with the sole purpose of voicing a complaint about the assumed demise of the band program at (Parrott),’ she wrote in a May 9 letter.

“In her letter, Booker wrote that Harrin failed to follow proper procedures for lodging a complaint.

“‘Please keep in mind that you have an obligation to make reasonable precautions to distinguish between your personal views and views that negatively represent (Hernando High),’ she said.

Read the full article here.

Here’s Fran at the 2011 Music for All Summer Symposium:

Thanks for bearing with me during my learning curve while I work to improve the audio quality. It bugs me, too!

If you enjoyed this episode, please take a moment to subscribe in iTunes. Bonus points and a shout out if you leave an honest review there (here’s how)! Reviews make it possible to reach more people who might find this podcast helpful.

Thanks also for sharing the podcast with friends and colleagues. Be sure to like the Facebook page for updates! You can also subscribe to my email list to get updates in your inbox.

The post Fran Kick appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Aug 06 2014

22mins

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Rank #19: Mac Smith of the Scouts Honor documentary

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Scouts Honor: Inside a Marching Brotherhood

In this episode, Kathleen’s guest is Mac Smith, the founder of Gigantic Cranium, an independent film production outfit. Along with Tom Tollefsen, Garrick Gonzalez, John “JT” Torrijos and the other members of the team, they produced the documentary film about the Madison Scouts drum and bugle corps—Scouts Honor: Inside a Marching Brotherhood.

Mac’s family frequently brought him to movies and it was in 1977, when he watched Star Wars, that he decided that he wanted to make movies when he grew up. He experimented with video cameras and editing throughout his childhood. At 17, he attended the Summer Production Workshop at USC Film School. He studied film and also auditioned for the Madison Scouts Drum & Bugle Corps and marched for one year. He was the Music Director at the University of Iowa College radio station, KRUI, when he decided to start his career in sound editing for movies. He has worked on post production sound for over 75 films and was nominated for 10 Golden Reel Awards. Mac is grateful to his team, especially Tom Tollefsen, Director, Co-Producer for the success of their Scouts Honor movie.

  • Mac talks about his life in the Bay Area with his wife Ashley, his son Admiral, and daughter Maven.
  • Mac Smith’s experience in connecting with some people in Drum Corps Activity specifically Madison Scouts which starred in the movie Scouts Honor
  • Mac’s purpose for making the movie
  • Gigantic Cranium projects
  • His efforts at marketing their work via the social media
  • What Mac had learned in being independent in social media-based crowdfunding
  • Mac’s advice for new music and independent film producers
  • Criteria for selection of members of the Drum Corps
  • Other details about his work

Movie website: www.scoutshonormovie.com

Gigantic Cranium website: http://www.giganticcranium.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MadisonScoutsMovie/

http://kathleenheuer.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/MME-promo-mac-smith-sound.mp4

About Mac Smith

Mac Smith (documentary filmmaker and sound designer) was born into a family of tuba players in Omaha, Nebraska. His parents and older siblings exposed him to films that were a bit mature for his age, and a wide variety of musical styles. Films that stand out from his early childhood are “Murder By Death”, “Monty Python and the Holy Grail”, and “The Blues Brothers”. It was on that fateful day when his parents took him to see “Star Wars” in the theater in 1977 that changed it all. After that viewing, Mac knew that he wanted to make movies when he grew up. Mac experimented with video cameras, and picture editing throughout his childhood. He went off to Los Angeles at age 17 to take the Summer Production Workshop at USC Film School, and then made his home in Iowa City at the University of Iowa. Mac marched in the sousaphone section of the Hawkeye Marching Band, and studied film at Iowa. During his time in Iowa City, Mac decided to audition for the Madison Scouts drum & bugle corps in Madison, Wisconsin. He marched as a contra player for only one year due to age eligibility in 1995.

The lightbulb really went off for Mac when he got his hands on early digital audio editing software while he was the Music Director at the University of Iowa college radio station, KRUI. This is where sound and picture came together in his mind. The decision was made to start his career in sound editing for movies. Within a year of moving to Northern California, he found his way into the movie industry. Mac has worked on post production sound for over 75 films (“Dawn of the Planet of the Apes,” “The Birth of a Nation,” “Toy Story 3,” “Tron Legacy,” “Rango”) and has been nominated for 10 Golden Reel awards (Motion Picture Sound Editing).

In 2011, Mac and Tom Tollefsen started developing the concept of a documentary film that focuses on the drum corps activity that they wanted to direct and produce. The film, “Scouts Honor: Inside a Marching Brotherhood” screened at four film festivals from 2014 to 2015 and took home 3 awards. Through the “Theatrical on Demand” company Gathr, “Scouts Honor” screened in nearly 30 theaters around the USA in 2015 and 2016. In June, the film was released on DVD and Bluray and now it’s coming out on iTunes on November 8th.

Mac enjoys living in the Bay Area with his wife Ashley, his son Admiral, and daughter Maven.

The post Mac Smith of the Scouts Honor documentary appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Nov 08 2016

57mins

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Rank #20: United States Army Field Band

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On this episode of the Marketing Music Education podcast, I speak with Colonel Jim R. Keene, Master Sergeant Jason Stephens, and Staff Sergeant Heidi Ackerman of The United States Army Field Band. We discuss the group’s mission, where they fit in among the Army’s many other music ensembles, handling stress and burnout, and much more. In particular, we talk about their use of social media (especially live streaming) to achieve their goals, and how YOU can use it to achieve your music program’s goals!

Colonel Jim R. Keene

Colonel Jim R. Keene became the Commander of The United States Army Field Band in January 2015. Prior to this assignment, he served as Commander of the United States Military Academy Band at West Point, New York; Commandant of the Army School of Music at Norfolk, Virginia; and at The United States Army Band “Pershing’s Own” in Washington, DC, the U.S. Army Europe Band and Chorus in Heidelberg, Germany, and the Army Ground Forces Band in Atlanta, Georgia.

COL Keene has led numerous performances for international military and civilian leaders, dignitaries, and heads of state. During his time as Commander of the United States Military Academy Band at West Point, he led performances for the 125th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty, co-directed the music for A&E’s and the National Park Service’s “A New Birth of Freedom” special for the 150th commemoration of the Battle of Gettysburg, and a one-hour music special holiday production by the West Point Band aired on Fox News, “A West Point Holiday.” COL Keene led The U.S. Army Chorus in performances at the interments of former Presidents Ronald Reagan in Simi Valley, California, and Gerald R. Ford in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He has performed for seven U.S. presidents, at the 1996 Summer Olympic and Para-Olympic Games in Atlanta, the dedication of the National WWII Memorial, the one-year anniversary of 9/11 at the Pentagon, the “Kennedy Center Honors,” and the Military District of Washington’s production, “Spirit of America.” He has worked with the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra and Chorus and the National Symphony Orchestra, and has conducted the Dallas Wind Symphony, the Boston Pops Orchestra, and the New York Philharmonic.

Prior to joining the Army, COL Keene served as Assistant Conductor of the Southern Methodist University (SMU) Symphony, Orchestra Conductor at the SMU International Conservatory Summer Festival in Taos, New Mexico, and Music Director of the Albuquerque Civic Light Opera. He holds a Master of Music degree in Orchestral Conducting from the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University and a Bachelor of Music degree in Piano Performance from the University of New Mexico. He is a violinist, fiddler, pianist, accompanist, and songwriter, and is a native of Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Master Sergeant Jason Stephens

Master Sergeant Jason Stephens earned a Master of Arts degree from Florida State University and a Bachelor of Music Education degree from the University of South Florida. He served in the 392nd Army Band. MSG Stephens has worked as a middle school band director, tuba player for Walt Disney World, and adjunct professor of Tuba at Troy State University. He currently serves as the Educational Activities Coordinator for The U.S. Army Field Band.

Staff Sergeant Heidi Ackerman

Staff Sergeant Heidi Ackerman received a Master of Music degree from Arizona State University and a Bachelor of Music Education degree from Northwestern College in Orange City, Iowa. She debuted with the Phoenix Symphony in 2011 singing Mendelssohn’s “Elijah” and enjoyed three seasons as a professional chorister with Arizona Opera. Before joining The U.S. Army Field Band, SSG Ackerman sang with the Cantos de Taos at the Taos Opera Institute, conducted church and community choirs, taught junior high music, and sang professionally throughout the greater Phoenix area.

Links & resources mentioned in this episode with the United States Army Field Band

armyfieldband.com

http://www.flickr.com/photos/tusafb

http://www.youtube.com/USArmyFieldBand

http://www.facebook.com/FieldBand

http://www.facebook.com/jazzambassadors

http://www.facebook.com/armyrockband

http://twitter.com/fieldband

http://twitter.com/armyrockband

http://twitter.com/jazzambassadors

http://www.music.army.mil/

U.S. Army All-American Bowl

Military Band Funding

“If we really had a manning crisis, from my perspective, we would really tell people to put down the tuba and pick up a wrench or a gun.”
— Rep. Martha McSally, R-Ariz.

Articles

Congresswoman to Air Force: Put down the tuba, pick up a gun

Congresswoman calls for cuts to military music. by Anne Midgette

Politico: Gov’t Bands Face Chopping Block by College Marching

The Pentagon’s battle of the bands by Ellen Mitchell
Music in the military is a storied tradition, but some lawmakers say $437 million in yearly spending is too much.

U.S. HOUSE New National March: “The Stars and Stripes ForNever” by Daniel W. Boothe

NAfME Opposes McSally Amendment to Cut Military Band Funding

Petitions

Continue Military Bands Funding via We the People

Continue Military Bands Funding via Change.org

TAKE ACTION NOW

ACTION ALERT: Here’s What You Can Do To Help Defeat The Destruction Of Military Bands

The post United States Army Field Band appeared first on Kathleen Heuer.

Jul 08 2016

58mins

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