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Marathon Training Academy

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Health & Fitness
Fitness
Sports
Running
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Empowering You to Run a Marathon and Change Your Life

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Empowering You to Run a Marathon and Change Your Life

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They Get Me Through

By Chrisactor1855 - Nov 05 2019
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These two get me through some really tough miles on this journey to the 26.2 finish line

You need this podcast.

By Allie7733 - Aug 21 2019
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The only running podcast I keep coming back to. Down to earth and inspiring!

iTunes Ratings

1063 Ratings
Average Ratings
966
41
19
12
25

They Get Me Through

By Chrisactor1855 - Nov 05 2019
Read more
These two get me through some really tough miles on this journey to the 26.2 finish line

You need this podcast.

By Allie7733 - Aug 21 2019
Read more
The only running podcast I keep coming back to. Down to earth and inspiring!

Listen to:

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Marathon Training Academy

Updated 9 days ago

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Empowering You to Run a Marathon and Change Your Life

How to Go From Couch to Marathon

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In this episode we tell you How to Go from Couch to Marathon, plus we talk with a runner from California who went from weighing 400 pounds to running his first marathon! And just a reminder that you can go through our A-Z system for getting marathon ready inside the Academy. Find out how to join here.

How to Go From Couch to Marathon

One of the things that attracts people to long distance running and particularly the challenge of a marathon is that we all have the desire to live up to our full potential and get the most out of life.

Running is one of those things that connects the mind, body, and spirit in a unique way. We find out what’s inside of us and at the same time connect more fully to our environment.

We’ve heard from hundreds of runners over the years who have confirmed that running a marathon changed their life for the better. But we know that there can be a lot of fear and anxiety connected with taking on a big challenge like this (or any new challenge).

It’s normal to wonder if you have what it takes and sometimes doubt that you’re taking the necessary steps to successfully reach your marathon goal.

There are definitely some common pitfalls that can derail runners from safely reaching the marathon finish line. A few of these have to do with external preparation like gear and training, but having the right mindset is equally important. Here are some essential components to successfully go from couch to marathon (or from desk to marathon, as Trevor says.)

10 Tips to Successfully Take You From Couch to Marathon

1. Pick the Right Gear

You don’t need all the gear, you just need the right gear. One of the most basic items you need in your marathon training is a good pair (or two) of running shoes.

Shoes
When it comes to finding the right pair of shoes this is not the time to get all fancy and buy the most expensive pair you can find or the ones that look the most attractive.  It’s all about comfort and fit when it comes to trainers. You should have plenty of room in the toe box and at least a half inch of space between your longest toe and the end of the shoe. I totally didn’t realize this when training for my first marathon and wore too small running shoes for the first couple of years. Who knew that your feet aren’t supposed to go numb or that your toes aren’t supposed to feel continually battered.

If you’ve never done so before, go to a specialty running store and have your feet and gait evaluated by a professional.  A pair of good fitting running shoes is going to prevent some of the possible injuries that come from the wrong shoes and greatly increase the comfort of your running.

Socks
While we’re talking about foot comfort you’ll probably find that not just any pair of socks will work for long runs. For example, cotton doesn’t breathe very well and will cause heat to build up inside your socks.  This heat combined with friction can leave you with some nasty blisters and have you hobbling around for days.  Basically you want a sock made out of technical fabrics like acrylic, polyester, bamboo, or wool blends. Some of our favorite go-to brands include Bombas, Injinji Toe socks, and Balegas (but there are many good brands).

Running clothes
When it comes to shorter runs you can usually keep it fairly simple and just wear things that are comfortable to work out in. The exception for women is getting a sports bra with maximum support. But as you continue the amount of time you run you’ll find that certain cuts, fabrics, and styles are more comfortable and others leave you swearing that you’ll never wear them for a long run again.  

I would definitely recommend slowly investing in a wardrobe of running clothes made of technical fabrics. Because if you sweat at all you’re going to be unpleasantly weighed down by cotton or things with obvious seams which can cause chaffing.  Cotton may work fine for a 3 mile run, but if you plan on doing long runs cotton is not your friend. I’m still mystified that at nearly every marathon I see at least one runner wearing a cotton shirt. 

In general you want garments that fit well, don’t have a ton of extra fabric, and don’t cause chaffing. Fabric rubbing against skin and skin rubbing other skin can cause this very uncomfortable condition known as chaffing. Use Body Glide or other anti-chafe products anywhere you may suspect that chaffing may occur. It usually only takes a few runs before you find out any potential chaffing locations.

GPS Tracking
It’s very helpful to track your distance and time (and maybe other stats) using either a GPS watch or your phone with a tracking app. If you’ve been running long enough you remember the days before GPS and the extreme focus on stats, graphs, and other metrics. When I was training for my first marathon I had a basic stop watch and drove my running routes in the car to estimate the distance. But having an app or GPS watch makes it so much easier. Some of the most popular apps include Map My Run, Run Keeper, Runtastic, Strava, Edmondo, and Nike Plus. Popular GPS watches include the Apple Watch, Garmin watches, Fitbit, TomTom and many others. They come in a variety of price points (usually associated with how many features you want).

2. Get Your Running Form Right

Running form can either make or break your experience as a long distance runner. While it’s true that no person has the exact same form due to biomechanical differences there are some general principles that can save you energy and prevent injuries.

Focus on the following:

  • Run tall. Keep your head up and eyes looking straight ahead.
  • Keep your torso up and shoulders relaxed and arms bent comfortably by sides. Hands should not cross the midline of your body. Make sure your hands stay relaxed and not clenched.
  • The body should lean slightly forward from ankles to shoulders.
  • Your landing foot should be just under the hips which is the center of gravity.
  • Focus on short quick steps and don’t over-stride.

3. Plan for Your Personal Safety

Be sure that you’re cleared for physical activity by your healthcare provider before training for a marathon. Chronic issues like heart or lung problems can need specialized attention. Also, if you experience unusual shortness of breath, arm or neck tightness especially on the left side, numbness, nausea, and a cold sweat call 911 immediately.  These are signs of a heart attack and should not be ignored. 

At some point during your running or marathon journey you’ll probably have at least one non-running acquaintance point out all the cases of people who have died while running. Another thing you’ll run into is people predicting that you’ll need a knee or hip replacement someday. The good news is that statistically runners don’t have higher rates of osteoarthritis than non runners and keeping your weight in check will make for healthier joints. Runners also have a smaller chance of heart disease and Type 2 diabetes.

Some additional safety considerations that you need to make a priority is being aware of your surroundings and being a defensive runner (don’t expect traffic to be looking out for you). We all know the stats of how many distracted drivers are on the roads so make sure you’re aware and alert of your surroundings at all times. You’d be surprised at how many runners don’t do some of these basic things.

Always run facing traffic (left side of the road in the U.S.) or on a side walk and make eye contact with drivers if possible.  Wear reflective gear and lights if you will be running in low light and don’t block out ambient sound entirely by wearing headphones/earbuds. If you choose to listen to music or other audio make sure that you can hear well.  If you’re on a path that is closed to traffic run on the right side and pass on the left. This can make sharing the path with cyclists much more easy. If you’re running with friends don’t run more than two abreast.

4. Take Time to Do Cross-Training

Incorporate strength training and other low impact exercises into your training routine from the beginning. It’s easy to just run but if you don’t build a firm foundation there’s a good chance that you will get injured. Focused cross training will help improve your overall muscle strength and allow you to become a better runner.

We highly recommend low impact activities like core training, lifting weights, cycling/spinning, rowing, swimming, yoga, Pilates, etc. These can be done on your off days from running or even on running days if you have time. As a beginning marathoner it’s best to avoid doing high impact activities every single day which can increase your chance of injury and not allow your body necessary rest and recovery.

5. Nail Down Your Fueling and Hydration

Another important aspect of being physically prepared for the marathon is dialing in your approach to fueling and hydration. This is something that you should begin experimenting with and practicing early in your training so that the only new thing you do on race day is run 26.2 miles (or 42.2km).

The challenging thing about fueling and hydration is that there isn’t a one size fits all formula for success. Many factors like your body size, gender, pace, climate, and dietary preferances will factor into your fueling and hydration requirements. Plus the way you carry your hydration and fuel during training and also on race day will need to be practiced.

Here are some general recommendations to provide a jumping off point.

Hydration:
Most runners will need between 16-28 oz of fluid per hour during exercise. There are definitely some outliers from this range but studies show that regularly consuming over 30 oz per hour puts you at significant risk of overhydration which can lead to hyponatremia (low blood sodium).

The fluids that you take in should be spaced appropriately (every 1-3 miles) because your gastro-intestinal system simply cannot process large amounts at once and that can lead to the “sloshing” feeling in your gut. For extended efforts and hot/humid conditions it’s wise to also use a balanced electrolyte (either in capsule form or dissolved in your hydration of choice). An electrolyte solution containing a balance of sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium helps ensure the healthy functioning of all body systems.

Fueling:
One amazing thing about the human body is that we have fat stores to kick in during prolonged periods of exercise or fasting. But unless you’ve trained your body to perform in a fasted state having a steady intake of carbohydrates is going to allow you to have the physical and mental energy you need to run your best.

However, the intake of too much fuel or with the wrong formula you may run into things like nausea and GI distress. Typically fewer calories per hour can be processed by runners because much of the blood supply is shuttled away from the GI system into the major muscle groups. But in general, most runners need between 120-200 calories per hour, divided in a way that keeps your energy levels stable.

Here is a video about how I fuel with Generation Ucan

6. Remember, you can’t cram for a marathon

Shortcuts undermine the process and often compromise your health. An essential part of your marathon foundation is building a solid running base. To stay injury free you will want to start your training out slowly.  There’s a tendency when you’re excited about something to start off too hard. Remember that each person gets in shape at their own rate so don’t compare yourself to others.  Make sure you find a running schedule that works for you. 

You may want to begin by running three days per week at first and not run on consecutive days to allow your body recovery periods.  Remember that your body gets stronger and adapts during periods of rest. It’s also okay to start with run/walk intervals and to stick with the run/walk method if that works for your training.

Another important tip is not to run too fast during training runs. Every run should not be attempted harder and faster. You’ll want to maintain a conversational pace as you build your endurance, especially during “easy” and long runs.

7. Always Listen to your body.

One of the best things about becoming a marathoner is that it gives you a different relationship with your body. You begin to have a new appreciation of what your body is capable of. And to fully appreciate and support your body you need to listen to it and intervene when necessary. Take care of any issues or niggles early before they turn into a bigger deal (like an injury or overtraining).

Listening to your body includes things like getting the amount of sleep that your body needs (marathoners need more sleep than the average adult), fueling your body with the foods that lead to muscle growth and decreased inflammation, taking regular days off, and rolling/icing/soaking any areas of concern. It’s also important to seek professional help early if you have a health concern. Doing so will give you the best chance of getting to the marathon finish line and more importantly being a healthy runner for life.

8. Examine your motivation

Your “why” is very important as you deal with the challenges of training. There are some “whys” that are better than others. Some of the common reasons why people take on the marathon include the following:* to challenge themselves, *lose weight, *have more energy, *get into better shape, *fulfill a bucket list item, *to better keep up with their kids, and even because of *pressure from other people. Some of these are good motivations and some may get you going but won’t be reasons to keep you going when things get tough.

9. Don’t fixate on a time goal for your first marathon

Fixating on a time goal is one of the biggest mistakes that I see new marathoners making. They get an idea of an ideal time in their minds based on other people’s first marathons or based on a shorter race time that they accomplished. Instead of setting a time goal try to focus on running strong and healthy and enjoying the experience. Don’t compare yourself to others. Yes, there are a few runners who qualify for Boston during their first marathon but that’s the exception, not the rule.

10. Don’t let fear hold you back.

Moving toward your fears is one important way to becoming a stronger and more resilient person. One thing that often holds people back from marathon training is that they don’t see themselves as a runner. We often get a specific idea in our heads about what a runner looks like. For example, everyone would agree that Shalane Flannigan who won the NYC Marathon last year and sprinter Usain Bolt, also known as the fastest man in the world, are bonafide runners. But there is no one body type that’s necessary to become a runner or marathoner. If you run, you’re a runner. It doesn’t matter how often you run, how far you run, or how fast you run.

Also Featured in This Episode

In this episode we also talk with MTA podcast fan James Lacher whose transformation is definitely one of the most impressive we’ve seen!!

“After topping 400 pounds in 2014 I had bariatric surgery in 2015 and lost over half my body weight. I started rumning 18 months ago and on Sunday I ran my first FULL MARATHON. The pics are me day of surgery and holding up the front page of the local newspaper. I was the cover story on race day. The race was a life changing experience . . . I soaked up every moment and finished in 5hr 25min . . . Thank you Angie and Trevor for all you tips and wisdom I’ve learned from listening to numerous podcast episodes.” -James

James was profiled by the San Luis Obispo Tribune here.

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MTA Virtual Half MarathonCheck out this year’s medal!

YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES!

The post How to Go From Couch to Marathon appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Sep 01 2018

1hr 12mins

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Weight Loss Tips for Marathoners

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In this podcast episode we bring you a special conversation with our nutrition coach, Natalie Mason, about how marathoners can lose weight and still maintain energy to do what they love.

And in the quick tip segment I’ll share how you can incorporate lower body strength training into your routine and never skip leg day again!

Weight Loss Tips for Marathoners

Our Guest on This Episode

Natalie Mason is a Managing Dietitian at MetPro -a company that provides concierge nutrition and fitness coaching. She has a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition & Food Science and Masters of Science in Nutrition Sciences. She’s a Registered Dietitian and Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics.

In this conversation will you hear why marathon training doesn’t automatically lead to weight loss, the most common mistakes runners make with their diet, how the principle of “contrast” through “up adjusting” and “down adjusting” leads to metabolic proficiency, and the shocking number of runners who do zero strength training.

How This Interview Came About

In late 2015 I started inexplicably gaining weight despite keeping up my marathon training schedule (I ran 10 marathons and ultras that year) and eating as healthy as I knew how. The weight continued to pile on much to my chagrin.

I finally realized that I was dealing with a hormonal imbalance -probably due to a combination of stress and other factors. I began working with a functional medicine doctor who put me on thyroid medicine for one year until my hormones balanced. Thankfully, I was able to go off all medications but the extra weight (about 35 pounds) did not budge.

I encourage people to appreciate their bodies and keep pursuing their running goals no matter what they weigh. But as a runner the extra weight does impact your joints, energy levels, and can effect your marathon times. For me it was like carrying around an extra 35 pound weight on all of my runs and in daily life.

I started working with Natalie from MetPro in November of 2018 and have lost 26 pounds at the time we recorded this podcast episode. I was initially skeptical at first but MetPro has been an amazing system for helping me reduce fat and keep my energy levels high for doing what I love . . . which is running marathons! And Natalie is a wonderful coach as you will hear in our interview.


Also Mentioned in This Episode

MetPro -Using Metabolic Profiling, MetPro analyzes your metabolism and provides you with an individualized strategy to obtain your weight or body composition goals.

NuNee -designed specifically to relieve that dreaded Runner’s Knee pain. Use code MTA10 for a 10% discount.

High Performance Lifting -Strength Training Program for Runners developed by Jason Fitzgerald.

Love Beets -ready-to-eat beet products, perfect for beet lovers and beet newbies alike! Use code MTA at checkout for 20% off online orders.

Varidesk -converts any desk into a standing desk and is designed with durable, best-in-class materials that fit in any environment or workspace.

The post Weight Loss Tips for Marathoners appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jun 12 2019

1hr 3mins

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The Marathon Fueling Episode!

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In this episode we discuss how to fuel effectively for a long run or race. Plus, we answer questions sent in from listeners about carbo loading, considerations for female athletes, and fueling for an ultra.

Marathon Fueling

We haven’t done a podcast episode focused on fueling for long distance runners in a long time. It can often be challenging to figure out what your fueling strategy is going to be, especially for your first half marathon or marathon. To complicate matters further your fueling tolerance can also change over time. Sometimes you need to go back to the drawing board and reevaluate what you’re doing. Figuring out a fueling strategy can often be quite challenging because there is no one-size fits all formula.

The Basics

Your body burns through approximately 80-100 calories per mile (or per 1.6 km) while running. The total calories will vary based on your weight, amount of muscle mass, pace/effort level, and environmental conditions. The body stores fuel in the form of glycogen and keeps around 1200-1800 calories readily available in the muscles (and a small amount in the liver). The amount of muscle glycogen will also vary based on your size, muscle mass, and how carefully you’ve trained your body to absorb carbs (like during the refueling period post-workout).

During a longer run your body will burn a combination of carbohydrates, fat, and protein. If you run hard you’ll burn mostly carbs while easier effort running taps into your fat reserves. The body can also break down muscle to convert to energy which is definitely not something we want to be sacrificing. That’s referred to as muscle catabolism.

Dozens of products to choose from at a specialty running store

Pre-run Strategy:

If you’ll be running for less than 90 minutes you don’t necessarily need any pre-run fuel. If the run is at an easy pace you may not need any fuel at all (everyone is a bit different). However, if you find your energy levels dipping during a run of 90 minutes or less, a pre-run snack can be beneficial to perform your best. Just make sure that you leave plenty of time for your body to digest the food so that you don’t have stomach issues/GI distress.

Running makes digestion challenging for the body because of the constant motion. Blood is shunted away from the gastro-intestinal (GI) system for priority use by the running muscles. This can make adequate digestion (and avoiding nausea and diarrhea) a bit of a trick. Some runners are very susceptible to “dumping syndrome” while running. Basically your body decides that the food in your stomach can’t be adequately digested and sends it on the express route through the intestines (and into a port-a-pot or nearby bathroom if you’re lucky).

Running More Than 90 Minutes

If you’ll be running for more than 90 minutes make sure that any pre-race meal that you eat is finished at least 3 hours before you start, especially if you have a sensitive stomach. This is the amount of time it takes for the blood sugar and insulin levels to return to their normal state. If you eat closer to a long run or race your body may burn through your glycogen stores more quickly and it can cause a drop in energy levels while you run.

If you choose to eat before your race or long run you’ll want to eat something high in carbohydrate with some protein but low in fiber and fat. Make sure this meal is finished approximately 3 hours before your run (especially if you struggle with GI distress). Some people have “iron guts” and can almost eat anything before and during running. Others have such touchy systems that it can be a challenge to figure out a good fueling regimen.

Running in a Fasted State

Many morning runners do their shorter runs in a “fasted” state. That means they don’t eat (maybe other than coffee) before heading out the door. It’s actually okay to start a long run or race with an empty stomach too. I know that this may seem counterintuitive and a little scary at first.

It was a hard concept for me to accept at first too. I was used to eating around 1 ½ to 2 hours before my long runs and marathons to provide the fuel I thought was necessary. I was sure that my oatmeal and a banana was a good thing. However, I couldn’t figure out why I had a constant churning in my stomach during the first few miles and then experience a blood sugar “crash” at about mile 6-7. It was a huge moment for me when I realized that my pre-race meal was to blame.

During your night of sleep the body is in fasting mode and it hangs onto its store of glycogen in the muscles. The muscle glycogen is sitting there ready to go no matter if your stomach is empty or not. The only thing that gets emptied during the night is the glycogen store in your liver. The goal of the pre-race meal is simply to top off the liver glycogen store and this can be accomplished right before the race without negatively affecting how your body burns the muscle glycogen.

My Experience

For many years now I’ve used the approach of not eating before a race or long run (who wants to get up at 3-5 am to eat anyway). It was a little scary at first heading out with an empty stomach. However, the new strategy worked! I would simply start my fueling strategy right before starting my run and then keep up with a steady fueling plan for the duration. No more churning stomach and energy crash! It’s definitely something to experiment with if your current strategy isn’t working well.

I’ve stared many marathons without eating breakfast

Since I’ve started sharing these new fueling recommendations I’ve heard from many people on this topic. Some said that they were skeptical and hesitant to not eat before a long run. However, once they’ve tried it, the response has been overwhelmingly positive. People are reporting fewer stomach problems and steadier energy.

Trouble Shooting GI Distress

  • If you’re having continued stomach issues on your long runs you can try changing to a different sports drink or fueling product. Read labels because certain sweeteners like fructose, maltodextrin, agave, and stevia can cause problems for some.
  • Another strategy to try is to make sure your pre-run meal is finished at least 3 hours before exercise.
  • You may also want to avoid dairy products because many people are lactose intolerant and don’t know it. The deficiency of the enzyme lactase can cause cramping, bloating, gas, and diarrhea.
  • A final cause of GI distress for some people is their caffeine intake so try cutting back on that A.M. dose of caffeine to see if that helps.

One thing that’s important to remember with fueling is that the goal is not to replace all the calories you burn. Your body simply cannot digest that many calories while you run. You’ll be in a calorie deficit (especially during long runs) but your body is equipped to deal with that.

So, when you’re figuring out a fueling strategy for a long run you don’t want to plan on consuming 1,000 calories if you’re running 10 miles. Men can usually take in a higher range of calories per hour while women should plan on using their body weight as a starting point. For example if you’re a 150 pound woman then try consuming 150 calories per hour while running.

What to Eat During Your Run:

Your long runs will be the time to try out various fuels and figure out your strategy. There are many different options available. Here are a few of the more popular options:

Energy Gels

  • How many will you need?

    An energy gel usually has a syrupy/gel-like consistency and provides carbohydrates to the body quickly. In the same category as gels would be most chews, GUs, blocks, chomps, sport beans, etc.. Most contain around 100 calories per serving. Gels are frequently provided at a couple of aid stations during marathons. Some people also find that the concentrated sugar in gels makes them sick to their stomach. This is because most gels have approximately a 73% concentration of sugars and the stomach isn’t equipped to deal with that effectively. You’ll notice that most gels recommend that you take it with 2-4 oz of water to reduce the concentration and help your body with absorption. The recommended use of energy gels is using one 5-10 minutes before starting a run if you’re starting out fasted and then one every 25-40 minutes thereafter (depending on your personal calorie needs). The amount of gels (or related products) you’ll need to consume depends on your metabolism, body weight, how much your system can absorb, and fitness level. The brand of energy gels you choose will be based on your personal preference and taste. If you have a sensitive stomach do some label reading to see what kind of sugars are contained in the product. If taking a whole gel at once doesn’t work for you it may be wise to take ½ at a time washed down with water from an aid station. That reduces the amount of sugar that hits your system at one time and gives it more time to absorb. If you’re planning on using the fueling products from an aid station during a race it’s wise to practice with that fuel during your long runs.

Sports Drinks

  • Sports drinks are offered at nearly every race

    Sports Drinks: Another popular method of fueling is using sports drinks. You can buy readymade drinks or powders that you mix on your own. The amount of calories per serving in your drink will depend on how much water you mix the powder with. It’s wise to follow the package directions because the osmolality of the carbohydrate solution is important in how it is assimilated into your body. If you choose to mix the powder thicker than recommended make sure you take it with water. Osmolality is basically the concentration of dissolved particles in your blood plasma. The higher the concentration of your carb source, the higher the osmolality. A product with a high osmolality will take longer to leave your stomach and intestines (during which time it’s not being made available to your muscles). Most races will provide sports drink at nearly every aid station. If you plan on taking advantage of this for your fueling it would be wise to practice with it in advance. If you choose to carry your own sports drink to fuel with make sure that you’ve practiced carrying the amount you’ll need for the race. Some people choose hand held bottles, waist packs, and hydration backpacks. Many larger marathons don’t allow hydration packs so be sure to take that into account when you’re planning your fueling.

Combination Products

  • Generation Ucan is our fuel of choice

    There are some products that contain a combination of carbohydrates and protein. Including some protein in your fuel plan helps the body avoid breaking down as much muscle during long distance efforts. A few combination products that come to mind include UCAN Performance Energy with protein, Hammer Perpetuem, UCAN snack bars, and many other energy bars. Energy bars typically have a high percentage of carbs, some protein, and minimal fat. They usually contain around 200 calories and have a more substantial consistency. Many people find that eating bars can disrupt their rhythm, require more space to carry, and may present digestion problems. You’ll also want to follow your bit of a bar with some type of fluid to help wash it down. If you choose to fuel with an energy bar of some kind be sure to take the total number of calories it contains into consideration. If it contains 200 calorie and you only need 150 calories per hour you’ll want to divide the bar and eat it in smaller portions. Eating 1/3 to 1/2 of the bar at a time also allows more time for the body to digest the calories it takes in.

“Real” Food

  • Many runners like to steer clear of more highly processed fuels and rely on real food options. Some of these may include: baked sweet potato, baked salted potatoes, rice balls, baby food pouches (applesauce, fruit sauces), nut butters, honey, maple syrup, flat pop/soda, trail mix, cheese, bacon, bananas, peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, dried fruit, candy, pretzels, etc.. A possible disadvantage of real food during running is that it often has a higher amount of fiber and fat and this many cause stomach upset. If you choose to use real food be sure to practice, practice, and practice. You don’t want to get in the middle of a race and have your stomach rebel. During races there are often “unofficial” aid stations set up with everything from beer and pretzels to pickles and candy. Unless you have an iron stomach, have practiced with these foods, or are running at a very easy pace be very careful about trying anything new on race day.


Post Run Fueling:

Proper fueling doesn’t stop when you’re done running. What you do in the post-run period is also very important. Make sure that you begin the refueling process with some protein and carbs within 30 minutes after your run. This is the optimum window of time that your body refills your muscles glycogen stores and starts repairing muscle. In other words, the time to carb-load is now.

You can train your muscles to store extra glycogen by faithfully refueling during this time period. Many experts recommend using a 3-1 carbohydrate to protein ratio for refueling. For women the hormone progesterone can increase muscle breakdown. Women should be getting in at least 25-30 grams of protein with our carbohydrates within 30 minutes post-long run or strength workout. There are many different types of recovery products out there to try or you can reach for “real” food options.

Nauseated After a Run?

If you feel nauseated during or after running, try to avoid consuming too many simple sugars which can cause “dumping syndrome.” Dumping syndrome is when your body can’t absorb the amount of sugars (or fats) consumed and sends them on through quickly. If you experience regular GI upset after running, try eating bland carbs like mashed potatoes, cream of wheat with maple syrup and ginger or peppermint tea sweetened with honey. Nausea post-run can also be caused by an electrolyte imbalance so adding some electrolytes to your water is essential.

You will probably be ready to eat a more substantial meal around an hour after your long run (sometimes you may not feel hungry at first or you may even be slightly nauseated if your electrolyte levels are off). Make sure the substantial meal includes a balance of complex carbs, protein, and fat. Also, focus on maintaining hydration in the hours after running. You don’t need to guzzle water the rest of the day, but make sure that you continue to drink. If it was a hot day or you sweated a lot it can be wise to add electrolytes to your water in the post-run period.

Hitting the Wall?

If you are having trouble with “bonking or hitting the wall” at some point during your run this is probably the point where your muscle stores of glycogen get used up. You need to focus on taking in more carbohydrate calories during the recovery period (to teach your muscles to carb load) and also practice fueling during the long run. Some people wait too long before beginning their fueling strategy.

If you wait until you’re feeling weak or shaky you most likely will have trouble replenishing calories to get on top of your energy needs. Remember, long runs are for practicing and you shouldn’t be doing anything new on race day (except maybe setting a distance or time PR).

Thanks for reading/listening to this episode. I hope it helps!

Nutrition for Runners

Just a heads up that we have a whole course on Nutrition for Runners created by Coach Jennifer Giles (RD) in the Academy that includes information on optimal fueling for runners.

Here’s the other lessons inside the course:

  • Power Breakfasts for Runners
  • Eat to Run or Run to Eat?
  • Nutrient Timing and Blood Sugar Regulation
  • Fueling During Runs
  • Hydration for Runners
  • Avoiding Weight Gain
  • Recovery Nutrition for Runners
  • Nutrition and Stress Fractures
  • Smoothie Making 101

This course is included with Academy membership along with our seven out courses, access to the Training Plan Vault, Podcast Vault, and our awesome online community. Join here.

Also Mentioned in This Episode

The MTA Virtual Half Marathon. Registration now open! Check out this year’s awesome medal and hat.

Generation Ucan -the revolutionary new way for runners to fuel. UCAN keeps your blood sugar stable, is gentle on your stomach, and allows your body to burn fat. Use the promo code “MTAFUEL” to save 15% off your order. Or if you’re new to UCAN, save 25% on your first order with code MTA25”.

Roar -How to Match Your Food and Fitness to Your Female Physiology for Optimum Performance, Great Health, and a Strong, Lean Body for Life by Dr. Stacy Sims

Our Upcoming RacesView our itinerary.

The post The Marathon Fueling Episode! appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Sep 12 2019

1hr

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Finding Your “WHY” as a Long Distance Runner

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Why do you run?  In this episode we talk about the importance of finding your “why” if you want be a long term runner and what listeners shared with us about what motivates them.

Plus we give you a quick run down of this year’s MTA Virtual Half Marathon.   And in the quick tip segment, Angie answers a question about how to implement treadmill running into your training. 

Finding Your WHY

When it comes to running or any other important habit that you want to implement in your life it’s important to find your “why.” In fact, finding your why is probably the most important thing you can do to create a sustainable running habit.

I know that right now we’re talking to aspiring runners, brand new runners, lifelong runners, and those somewhere in the middle.  Maybe you’re still a bit on the fence about this whole long distance running thing.  You know that it can be a key to making you healthier and happier, but some days you just don’t have the motivation to get out there and some days you find yourself just plodding along. 

All of this is totally normal.  Not everyone falls in love with running during the first steps…in fact, many very accomplished runners had a bumpy start.  Like Pete Kostelnick who we interviewed on our last episode. He didn’t always pump out 55 mile days for weeks on end.  In fact, after running his first marathon he swore he’d never do another.

Some “Whys”Are More Sticky

One way to turn an “it’s complicated” relationship with running into a full blown commitment is to find your why.  And I’m going to let you in on a little fact…some whys are more “sticky” or meaningful than others. 

My Story

When I first started to run as a teenager my whole motivation was to lose weight.  That began an on again, off again relationship with running that would last the next decade.  As soon as I started feeling too fat or out of shape I’d jump back on the running bandwagon.  But it was a means to an end.

When I started running again at the age of 27 my weight had nothing (or at least little) to do with it.  I was looking for a change in my life.  I was seeking something that I could do for myself to make myself healthier and happier.  And this time it stuck. 

Angie at her first marathon

I ran my first marathon in 2008 and haven’t looked back since.  That’s not to say that there haven’t been bumps in my running journey.  I’ve dealt with setbacks, discouragement, and many runs that just sucked.  But I’ve stuck with it because part of my identity is based on being a healthy and strong person and being a runner makes me feel both of those things.  Along with the benefit of being healthier physically running also helps me manage anxiety and depression.  I also love the way running has allowed me to explore the world. Now I’m one of those people who hopes I can run up until the day I die.

Another thing to keep in mind when thinking about your why is that it may (and probably will) change over time.  It’s important to reevaluate your WHY on a regular basis.  Some of your whys will be serious and life-changing, some will be fun and whimsical, and most people have a combination of reasons.

We asked the participants of the 2nd annual MTA Virtual Half Marathon about their why.   And here’s what they said:

Love of food/drink

“I like eating ice cream and drinking brewpub beer.”  -Kathleen

“I like to drink beer year round.”   -Stephen

Friends/running community:

“Besides my love of food? Well, it’s my running friends.  No matter how crappy my day can be I know they are there to make me laugh.” Kathleen

“Endorphins, girl time, chocolate.”  Jennifer

Races:

“I made a goal. Run 26.2 in all 50 states by the time I turn 50 (2019). Although I’m 2 states away from finishing my goal, I know I won’t stop. It keeps my head level. It’s my ME time. Oh, and it’s my bad ass feeling.”  JoAnn

“Running in the winter can be tough. I always have to sign up for another race to keep up my motivation.” Margaret

Alone time:

“I love being out in nature, having some Me Time with a podcast.”  Amanda

“Running is a huge part of who I am, and I can’t even conceive of a week without running. I run for fun, to enjoy being outside in every type of weather, to challenge my body, to focus my mind, and also to let my mind drift. Plus I love to eat chocolate.” Lynne

Supporting charity:

“I started long distance running to support a local charity. It helped to find the right charity, the right coaches, the right races, and most importantly the right running buddies. I went from a novice to half marathoner to marathoner and will hopefully keep adding on the distances. Running keeps me sane. And the MTA family keeps me motivated.”  Pamela

Because I can:

“Because I can! When I’m running, all of the “I shoulds” turn to “I cans” and then “I dids.”  Rachael

“Because I can and what keeps me going? I am the sole healthy member of an immediate family struggling with morbid obesity. I also live in the second most unhealthy state in the US and see my community struggle with health. Some in my immediate family are completely immobile because of it and I think about that when I run and feel much gratitude for my ability but also sadness and empathy knowing that they cannot do the same. I run for myself and my health but also for those who can’t and hope that I might, in even the smallest way, be an inspiration to someone in a similar circumstance, whether it be in my family or community. I want to challenge the doubts of people who fear starting an active lifestyle and think running (or walking) is not possible. I want to help others love to live healthier active lives. This is my “why” every single day.”  Jennie

To be a positive example:

“I’m a positive example for my kids to follow. It’s something my wife and I share.”  Ryan

“Running is my passion and purpose and allows me to connect with and inspire others. I enjoy running with friends and coaching kids. Reaching goals feels amazing.”  Cari

“My two kids are my why.” Kyle

“My girls, my patients, my health, and because today I can and tomorrow I might not be able to.”  Jennifer

“Started running 2 1/2 years ago for my health. Never thought I would love to run but I do! Helps me keep my head clear, de-stress, sleep better, maintain a healthy weight, and be a role model for my daughters. If their Momma can become a runner at age 45 they can do anything they set their mind to. I ran my first marathon this year.”  Hope

A way to enjoy nature/fresh air:

“I have been looking at running as an opportunity to enjoy ALL seasons rather than always sitting inside waiting for Spring to come and just feeling cooped up and inactive all winter. It has kicked seasonal blues in the butt so far this year!!”  Sara

“Because I love being outside, because it helps me with stress, and because I never feel better than after I’ve finished a run!”  Suzanne

“Fresh air and being outside – I need my outdoor time!”  Jo

Stress relief/better headspace:

“Running is like medicine for me. I’m a pastor and my job is never done. When I finish a run, I feel accomplished something and it helps me with the stress of life. A good long run is one of the few times in my week that my mind can just relax and enter into the pattern of foot-falls, breaths, and motion.” Eric

“I’m in law enforcement and running is my stress relief as well. I started running to lose weight and redirect my thoughts from stress at work.”  Joel

“Because I love it! For my mental health, it makes me happy, the feeling I get after finishing a long run or race is the best!”  Annabelle

Change or improve my health:

“Stay healthy. I also remember how good I feel afterwards.”  Valerie

“About 18 months ago I was fat and unhealthy and hated what I had become. I read a book that spurred me into action, lost 30kg. Then I started running and found my new passion. I did a 282 day running streak, found the MTA podcast along the way…I have first marathon in 7 days time. My why is that running is my new addiction…it’s better than food, better than alcohol, it’s the best way to start my day.” Simon

“I have been running for 5ish years and it’s the whole package of clearing my head of negativity, being healthy and sleeping better.”  Scott

Challenging myself/achieving goals:

“What keeps me going is the challenge and the accomplishments. Plus I feel good after I’ve done it, may it be a half, a full or an ultra. I’m trying to see if I can do a 50 miler next year. Which is definitely another challenge for me. But first, I’d like to finish my 50 states half and full by next year.” Lynne

“I just enjoy challenging myself….trying things I’m not sure I can do….and it’s something I get to do for myself that’s healthy.”  Tom

“The thought of something greater within myself waiting to be discovered.”  Andrew

More confidence:

“I love the process of working towards a goal that is challenging and something I chose for myself. I love how it puts structure into my daily life and how it affects me as a person – I’m so much more confident, independent and enthusiastic than I used to be.”  Cecilia

“Because of all my “nevers” that actually came true. I never thought I could get a doctorate, mountain bike race, have twins, have amazing family and friends, have a rewarding career/business of my own, have a heart attack at 45 and bounce back. Running certain races/distances/times/with friends is a satisfying way to keep quashing my “nevers” and continue to test my limits physically, mentally, and spiritually…on my feet and in my life as a whole.”  Jennifer

“The confidence that running gives me is my reason and my hope is to run forever!”  Tricia

“It makes me feel like a stronger person. Knowing I have the ability to win the battles with feeling tired, being cold, and being lazy. Every time you go running; that’s a win.”  Stephen

“I can’t imagine not having running in my life. My “why” is that it completes who I am. It helps with my fitness and stress and my ability to think more clearly. It provides me with the opportunity to be outside where every run is a different adventure. I love the struggle and the feeling of accomplishment after completing a 20 miler. I love the running community. It’s fun quirky and tremendously supportive. I’m 53 and I’ve only been running for 5 years and my largest regret is that I didn’t find it earlier.”  Gregory

Also Mentioned in This Episode

MetPro -a world-renowned concierge nutrition, fitness, and lifestyle coaching company. MetPro’s team of experts specialize in developing customized nutrition and training programs for high-profile athletes, executives, and celebrities. Using Metabolic Profiling, MetPro analyzes your metabolism and provides you with an individualized strategy to obtain your goals. Just visit www.metpro.co/mta to get started today.

Bombas Socks -the most comfortable socks in the history of feet. Use the code: MARATHON for 20% off your first order.

Action Heat -makes the world’s best heated clothing, like Heated Jackets, Socks, Gloves, Hats, and more.

2018 MTA Virtual Half Marathonsee photos here.

The post Finding Your “WHY” as a Long Distance Runner appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Dec 12 2018

46mins

Play

A Look at How We Are Training for Our Next Marathon

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In this episode we give you an inside look at our training for the London Marathon, what we’ve been doing and how it’s working.

This will be marathon #57 for me and I’m experimenting with higher mileage.

Plus, I’ll explain what I’m doing for strength training and what my morning routine looks like (which is quite the contrast to Trevor’s routine).

And in this episode’s quick tip we feature a listener question about rotating shoes during training.

A Look at How We Are Training for Our Next Marathon

For this episode Trevor decided to interrogate me about my training for the London Marathon which is April 28th 2019.

As you will hear on the podcast my “A” goal is to finish under 4 hours and my “B” goal is to finish as close to 4 hours as I can.

Experimenting with higher mileage
I’ve been experimenting with Hanson’s Marathon Method which calls for lower long run mileage but more running days and longer distance runs midweek. I have also been doing my long runs according to time rather than distance. For example, I’ll run for 3 hours instead of running for a set number of miles.

I ran my PR of 3:35:41 (back in 2012) and also qualified for Boston (in 2014) doing only 4 running days per week and typically my body has started to break down if I train with higher volume. But as you get older you typically get better at listening to your body and knowing when it is safe to push harder. So I’ve been increasing my volume this training cycle.

My Strength Training
I have also been doing one intense strength training session per week. Here is an example of some of the moves:

  • Lunges with weights
  • Dumbbell squats with overhead press
  • Weighted hip thrusts
  • Deadlifts
  • Back squats
  • Banded side walks

I am also doing one yoga session and two core workouts each week.

Trevor asked me how many training days I’ve missed in the last four months. If I have to miss a day I will shift my schedule around and make the missed day a rest day (since I always take one rest day per week). So, not counting the rest days, I’ve only missed three scheduled workouts in the last four months due to sickness and traveling to my cousin’s funeral. I love to workout so staying on task with my training is not hard for me.

My Morning Routine
I’m a morning person. Here is my morning routine from the time I wake up until when I start work.

  • Wake up at 6:00 am
  • 20 minutes of meditation.
  • Make a pot of green tea and oatmeal with chia seeds, coconut flakes, almond slivers, walnuts, and frozen raspberries and blueberries.
  • Make sure our older sons (age 14 and 12) get on the bus at 7:10am. Help my youngest son (age 8) with his morning routine until the school bus comes.
  • Finish my morning tea and read a non-fiction book for a few minutes.
  • Out the door to run and exercise between 8:30-10:00 (unless it’s a long run day which means I may be gone a longer period).
  • Shower, have a morning snack, and start work to get as much done as I can before the kids arrive back from school.

Always Learning Something New About Myself
One thing that I’ve discovered after 10 years of marathon training is that you still learn something about yourself whether you’re training for your first marathon build or your 57th marathon. Long distance running has a way of building up your confidence while still keeping you humble. An example of that is how we talked about avoiding chafing during the quick tip on our last episode. Two days later I got some ridiculous chafing near my collar bone from the zipper seam of a running jacket. I just had to laugh!

Learning to Stay Flexible
One challenge of running a spring marathon is that the weather you train in can often change drastically halfway through. For much of the training cycle you may be dealing with winter weather challenges and then one day spring arrives and suddenly you’re overdressed and sweating profusely.

You may have trained mostly in cold weather (or warm for our friends in the Southern Hemisphere) and then you’re presented with totally opposite conditions on race day. Sometimes the body has some difficulty switching over from conserving heat to being able to sweat and cool efficiently.

This can present a challenge if you have warm conditions on race day so it’s important to be flexible and realize that we can’t control for every outcome. For a Type A personality like myself this can be a challenge but that’s often how many situations in life are. Marathon training can teach us great lessons about being flexible and adjusting to uncertainty.

We installed an extra shelf in our hall closet just for running shoes!

Quick Tip: Rotating Shoes

Love your podcast for help and motivation in training! I was wondering if you could talk about shoes. Should you rotate different running shoes during your training, or find one shoe and stick to it? I’m not a novice runner, but training for my first marathon and I know shoes are important. Haley

Thanks for the great question! I’m sure many runners are wondering the same thing about shoes. When I was training for my first marathon I only used one pair of shoes and struggled on a number of levels. Since that time I’ve seen the value in rotating through different types of shoes in training. I definitely advise runners to have at least two different types of shoes in your rotation and there seems to be evidence to back this up.

Researchers in Luxembourg studied 264 adult recreational runners. They gathered information on training volume, injury rate, cross-training, shoe usage and other variables. Of the 264 runners, 116 were classified as single-shoe wearers: runners in this group did 91% of their mileage in the same shoe, and ran in an average of 1.3 pairs of shoes during the study. The other 148 were classified as multiple-shoe wearers: runners in this group tended to have a main shoe, which they wore for an average of 58% of their mileage, but they rotated among an average of 3.6 pairs of shoes for their training during the study.

The researchers found that the multiple-shoe wearers had a 39% lower risk of injury during the study period than the single-shoe wearers. Researchers speculate that this could be because different shoes distribute the impact forces of running differently, which lessens the strain on any given tissue. They said,

“The use of different pairs of running shoes will provide alternation in the running pattern and vary external and active forces on the lower legs during running activity. Whether the reduced [injury] risk can be ascribed to alternation of different shoe characteristics, such as midsole densities, structures or geometries cannot be determined from these results and warrants future research.”

Supporting this idea of reducing injury risk by varying tissue loads, the researchers also found that runners who reported more cross-training had a lower incidence of injury. (1)

If you keep multiple shoes in your training rotation it’s a wise idea to match them to the particular surface or type of run that you’ll be doing. For example, I tend to “retire” shoes from long runs after they hit around 250 miles because they tend to feel flat and leave my legs feeling more fatigued. Then I’ll use them only for shorter runs until they reach around the 400 mile point (the actual mileage that I retire shoes varies depending on the model).

I also like to keep a pair of trail shoes in the rotation for running in snow, trails, or gravel/dirt roads. I usually save my lightest pair of shoes for speed work and treadmill runs. Another benefit of rotating your shoes kicks in when a company changes or discontinues your favorite shoe. That can cause a panic if they’re the only type of shoe that you run in.

I used to run exclusively in Asics Nimbus until they changed the model a bit and it no longer worked for my foot. What followed was a very angsty period where I frantically tried to find my new favorite shoe. This uncomfortable period included running a marathon in a shoe that made my feet go numb.

Since that time I’ve always kept at least two different types of shoes in my line-up. Given the evidence that rotating between more than one pair of shoes can reduce your chance of injury and also prolong the life of the shoe (partly because the cushioning has a chance to rebound between uses) it also makes financial sense for the average runner.

Here are some suggestions on building up your shoe rotation:

  • Don’t wait until your current shoes are worn out before purchasing a new pair. Instead, work a new pair into the rotation midway through the mileage you usually put on your trainers so that you don’t end up with worn out and brand new shoes. We get a lot of questions from runners wondering if they should wear a brand new pair of shoes for their marathon or a worn out pair. By planning ahead you can avoid this dilemma.
  • Look for discounts on shoe models that you like and maybe pick up an extra pair if there’s a good sale. Many shoes will go on sale right after the newest model is released and they’re trying to clear their inventory of the older model. (3)
  • When it’s time to say goodbye to your trainers try to find a place to recycle your old running shoes. Our local running store has a box to put shoes that need to be recycled. Look at the 4th link under resources to see a list of organizations that recycle shoes. (4)

Here are some ways to prolong the life of your running shoes:

  • Store shoes carefully away from extreme heat and cold. Don’t pile heavy boots or gear on top of shoes which can collapse the uppers.
  • Hand wash if needed as many performance components of the shoes aren’t meant to go through a washer and dryer. Instead you can use a stiff brush to get off crusted dirt and then use baby wipes or a little soap and a damp rag to clean.
  • Dry wet shoes by taking out the insoles and lightly packing with wadded newspaper (replacing when it becomes damp). Putting them by a heater or radiator can cause damage to the shoes.
  • I’ve read that it’s not a good idea to stockpile more than 2 years worth of shoes at once as midsole life is often limited and some materials may start breaking down.
  • Give each shoe a 48 hour break between wearing to allow the foam to decompress.
  • Untie shoes between wearing them instead of jamming your foot in and out without untying.
  • Keep track of the mileage on your shoes so that you know when to rotate them out of your long run line up and use them only for shorter runs.
  • Don’t wear your running shoes for activities like mowing the lawn or doing other outdoor activities which can cause unnecessary wear and damage. Retired running shoes can often turn into walking, cross training, or yard work shoes. (2)

Sources:
(1) www.runnersworld.com/health-injuries/a20820451/study-backs-rotating-shoes-to-lower-injury-risk/
(2) www.runnersworld.com/gear/a26655055/running-shoe-care/
(3) www.running.pocketoutdoormedia.com/sole-man-quiver-running-shoes_107583
(4) www.running.pocketoutdoormedia.com/feel-good-options-for-old-shoes_90394

Also Mentioned in This Episode

Lactigo -a topical gel that improves athletic performance and recovery. LactiGo is an effective, fast-acting topical gel with menthol and carnosine that
helps people maximize their athletic performance and speed muscle recovery. Applied directly to the skin above the desired muscles for targeted relief. Get a 10% discount by using the promo code MTA.

NuNee Device -designed specifically to relieve that dreaded Runner’s Knee pain. Use code MTA20 for a 20% discount.

On Running -Swiss made trail shoes

On Running Shoes – The clean and minimalistic design as well as its sole technology gives you the sensation of running on clouds. Try a pair of On’s for yourself for 30 days and put them to the test – that means actually running in them before you decide to keep.

BioLite Headlamp 330 -ultra-thin, super bright, NO-BOUNCE headlamp that’s so comfortable, you’ll actually forget you’re wearing it. Use code MTA at checkout for 15% off.

MetPro -Using Metabolic Profiling, MetPro analyzes your metabolism and provides you with an individualized strategy to obtain your goals.

The John Muir Trust -help us plant 262 trees!

Resurrected Runner -creator of parody songs for runners.

The post A Look at How We Are Training for Our Next Marathon appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Apr 12 2019

58mins

Play

Exploring the “Pain Cave” with Courtney Dauwalter

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In this episode we speak with ultra runner Courtney Dauwalter -winner of the 2019 Ultra Trail du Mont Blanc -the most prestigious trail ultramarathon in Europe.

She has also finished first at the Tahoe 200, Western States 100, Moab 240 and many other ultras.

And in the quick tip segment you will hear about nutrition strategies for building muscle and promoting recovery.



Interview with Courtney Dauwalter

photo credit: Scott Rokis Photography

We are thrilled to get a chance to speak with Courtney Dauwalter -a runner we have admired for some time. Courtney describes herself as an “ultra runner with a love for sunshine, long inseams, and candy.”

Since 2011 Courtney has won 38 marathons and ultras according to UltraSignup, 13 of these races she was the 1st place overall finisher beating all the men!

Ultra Trail du Mont Blanc

In September she won the famous Ultra Trail du Mont Blanc, considered to be the World Cup of ultra running. Over 2,000 of the top trail runners in the world toe the start line.

This 106 miles race starts in Chamonix, France, and runs through the Alps (total elevation gain of 32,940 feet), crosses the boarder into Italy, then Switzerland, and back to Chamonix where thousands of cheering spectators and media welcome the champions.

Courtney was the first place female with a time of 24 hours, 34 minutes and 26 seconds finishing 1 hour ahead of 2nd place.

photo credit: Courtney Dauwalter, Instagram

Tahoe 200

We also talk about the 2018 Tahoe 200 which is a (you guessed it) 200 mile race around Lake Tahoe -the largest alpine lake in California. Runners must cover the distance in 100 hours (4 days). Courtney did it in 49:54:36 and was the 1st place female finisher (and course record holder). She slept a total of only 21 minutes of the nearly 50 hours of running.

To get a sense of the “pain cave” see this video by Salomon Running.


Up Next

Courtney will be competing for team USA in the 24 Hour World Championships in France. This format requires runners to rack up as many miles as possible on a 1 kilometer loop in 24 hours. The highest distance wins. Also competing for team USA will be Camille Herron (current world record holder), Katalin Nagy, Megan Alvarado, Gina Slaby, and Pam Smith.

Follow Courtney on social media here: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook

Also Mentioned in This Episode

The Revel Kulia Marathon in Hawaii. This will be Angie’s final marathon in her 50 state quest! Still time to sign up for the race and meet us there.

Angelo Poli, metabolism expert and founder of MetPro, joined us to answer the question, “Are there nutrition strategies for building muscle and promoting recovery?”. Since November Angie has lost 31 pounds and got her marathon time back down to Boston Qualifying level using the MetPro system. Visit www.metpro.co/mta for a free consultation call.

Shout Out!

Today I ran the Medieval Marathon in Kilkenny, Ireland. My goal was to just run and enjoy being in another country. To my surprise, I ended up getting a PR by a few minutes. I came through the finish around 4:19:15, and my previous PR was 4:21:45, and this course had 900ft more of elevation gain compared to my other PR! . . . I spent the second half of the race in the pain cave, but I couldn’t help but revel in the fact I was running in a most beautiful country. I have to give thanks once again to MTA and Coach Chris for getting me inspired and all trained up to PR even when I wasn’t having the best day! -Emily

The post Exploring the “Pain Cave” with Courtney Dauwalter appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Sep 22 2019

54mins

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Finding the Joy in Running

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In this podcast episode we discuss how to find joy in your running and training so you can stay motivated year after year. Plus we check in with a listener who just finished the Jerusalem Half Marathon -a great destination race!

Finding the Joy in Running

In 2017 I ran my first marathon and blindly followed a running friend through a rather unusual training plan. The race was tough and I searched for a better training plan for marathon #2. MTA came along and saved the day (of course!). I LOVED the training plan and although race #2 wasn’t brilliant, it was fabulous by comparison to #1. This year marathon 3 is coming up but I’m just not loving training. Work and family responsibilities are much heavier this time around and I feel tired and frustrated. I am not rolling or stretching nearly enough but when it comes time to do so and I have to choose between sitting staring vacantly out of the window or getting to work……I want to find the joy of running again – any suggestions? -Lyndi

This is such a great question because this feeling is so common, especially after going through a long cold winter. While training for your first couple of marathons it’s so new and exciting (and scary) that it often means you have more enthusiasm for training. You often feel like you’re holding on for dear life to take on such a big challenge. But, by the time the 3rd marathon comes around, it can just start to feel like hard work and it’s easy to focus on how much time is being taken up or how much energy is required.

Systems Not Goals

I’ve certainly gone through ups and downs with my training. There have been many, many days, weeks and months when I just wasn’t feeling it. Knowing that these ups and downs are normal has helped me to focus not on one specific goal but on the kind of person that I want to be. My overall goal is to be a strong and healthy runner for life and this helps me to commit to the process of training.

Then when a day/week/month comes along when it’s not exciting I remember that good habits have a compounding effect (and the same is true for bad habits). It’s not groundbreaking or sexy but the truth is that we get what we repeat. Little habits over time make a big difference (an excellent book on this topic is Atomic Habits by James Clear).

If you feel like you’ve let bad habits creep in or have lost the joy of running it might be more beneficial to focus on systems, not goals.

“You do not rise to the level of your goals, you fall to the level of your systems.” -James Clear

Putting effective systems in place leads to goal achievement because you don’t have decision fatigue every day trying to decide if you’re going to run or foam roll or strength train. When you’re able to fall in love with the process this brings greater commitment which leads to success.

Examples of Systems Versus Goals . . .

1) Training to be healthy and strong for life vs. only training for a specific race.
If you’re only training for a race it may lead you to not see the importance of certain runs or maintenance activities (or even sleep). You may make the decision to try and run through injury even though you know it won’t help you in the long term. On the other hand, training to be healthy and strong for life means that there is no end date. The good habits that you develop are compounding to make you strong and healthy now and in the future. Your identity as a runner is secure no matter the challenges you face along the way.

2) Cleaning up your house vs. having systems in place for keeping it clutter free.
Doing a blitz clean and seeing the results feels very satisfying but if you don’t change the reasons why the mess happens then it won’t be long before it returns to its untidy condition. Putting a system for order in place will give you the long term satisfaction of maintaining a clean house.

3) Changing eating patterns to reach a goal weight vs. eating to have energy and strength.
Most of us have gone on a diet to achieve a specific weight or physique. However many times the methods we used weren’t healthy or sustainable in the long term. Maybe we got close to our goal or even reached that magic weight. But the minute we started slacking off and returning to our old patterns of eating the pounds returned in full force. In contrast, when you eat to fuel your body and to have energy and strength it can change your perspective. You’re no longer satisfied with temporary results and feel skeptical with claims that you can lose 10 pounds in a week. You’re more likely to make a meal plan, shop wisely, meal prep, pack a snack, and not keep tempting foods in the house. These behavior changes can lead to sustainable change and an increased sense of mastery.

What helps bring the joy back to running differs a bit for each person. When people start getting burnt out with running it’s often a sign that they don’t have enough margin in their life. It’s easy over time to get so busy and overcommitted that running just seems like another chore to accomplish. Focusing on getting more sleep, eating healthy, starting a meditation practice, saying no more, and taking the pressure off yourself can often help you regain joy in life and running.

Wisdom From Academy Members . .

Change it up!

“Perhaps switch it up. Go for a run on a new trail. Join a local running group for in person motivation. Try running at a different time of day. Sometimes it is hard to get out of a rut. Trying something outside your comfort zone can help jump start your motor again.” Aaron

“I’ve always believed you should be feeling “Hell yes!” or terrified – if you’re not excited, why do it? Try to figure out what’s your why? My suggestions: Change something. Maybe use a different plan? If you’re running 3 times how about doing one with 4 runs instead? How about working with a coach? Or picking a race in a location you’re excited about? Maybe do a trail run? Or an ultra? Or maybe dropping to a half? For me working with a coach has really lit a fire in me and I started doing 4 runs instead of 3 and surprisingly enjoyed that more.” Farida

“The heavy miles of marathon training can feel daunting for most of us. If you’re feeling burdened by it all I’d suggest not doing a full this Spring and focus on shorter races instead.” Peter

“I was in a rut too and have switched to focusing on trail half marathons which has been perfect for me. It’s less hours of training but challenging still plus the weather is starting to become beautiful once again (unless you’re in the southern hemisphere that is). If you could find ways to incorporate work or family into some of your exercise routines that might be helpful. (Biking with the family, run commuting are a couple ideas.) Good luck!” Andrea

“Sign up for some 5K and 10K along the way.” Gretchen

Enlist Some Help!

This can include everything from finding a running partner, signing up for a race with a friend, joining a running group, and hiring a coach. We’ve heard from so many people who have been able to have breakthroughs in their running by enlisting a strong support system. One of the reasons we created the Academy was to be another source of encouragement, motivation, and practical help to runners of all abilities.

“This is also where a good coach can come in handy. They can help modify your training so that you’re not always so mentally burnt out; they can suggest best practices for cross training instead of a run-only schedule; they can come up with creative workouts that don’t focus only on mileage or speed; they can also help keep you accountable, which for many is a great motivational tool when the lure of Netflix calls on a weekend! If a coach is too much of a commitment, finding running buddies can give you a similar effect especially when it comes to accountability. When I schedule a morning speed workout at 6:00am on a Tuesday morning before the sun comes up, it’s pretty unlikely I’ll make it. However if a friend asks me to join them, I can almost guarantee I won’t miss it!” Coach Steve

Buy yourself some new running gear!

Running shoe therapy

This may be as simple as some new socks, a new pair of shoes, running sunglasses (like Goodr), Bluetooth earbuds, a new watch you’ve been eying, scheduling a massage, getting some running books (Let Your Mind Run by Deena Kastor is particularly inspiring) and new music.

Inject some fun!

Deliberately think of ways that you can add enjoyment to your running. This may include doing a costume run, a beer mile, an obstacle course race, participating in Parkrun (a free weekly timed 5k run now in 21 countries and growing), trail running, volunteering at a race, or signing up for a bucket list race. It may even mean taking the pressure off yourself to go after PR’s which take a lot of mental and physical energy. You could also give yourself the challenge of taking one or more interesting pictures during every run or thinking of three things that you’re grateful for during your run. Another positive idea would be challenging yourself to pick up a bag of trash during every run.

Focus on other exercises and activities for a while

It’s very helpful both physically and mentally to diversify your activities so that running isn’t the only sport you enjoy. This might mean taking swimming lessons if you’re not confident in the pool, dusting off your bike and doing some cycling, taking a new class at the gym, trying something like Orange Theory or a treadmill class, and working with a strength coach to dial in your weight training. It’s often been during a slump in my running that I’ve developed other interests.

After my first marathon I struggled with ITBS and started doing yoga regularly—something that is very important to me to this day. When I was going through a hormonal imbalance a couple years ago I worked with a strength coach at our local YMCA to take the focus off my lack of progress in running and to get stronger. Doing that has helped me to stay consistent and enjoy strength training to this day.

Sign up for a destination race!

In this episode you will hear one of our coaching clients named Brooke Taylor tell us about the Jerusalem Marathon. Brooke ran the half with her son at the end of a two week tour of the Holy Land. The Jerusalem Marathon is only 8 years old but brings together about 40,000 runners from many nations and has been called by Haaretz Newspaper “the most cosmopolitan event around.” You can read Brooke’s race recap here.

Every action you take is a vote for the kind of person you want to become. -James Clear


Also Mentioned in This Episode

John Muir Trust– contribute a tree to the MTA Forever Forest. We went with the idea of planting 262 trees as a nod to the marathon distance, with donations going toward our tree planting fund to create an ‘MTA Forever Forest’. “Come to the woods for here is rest. There is no repose like that of the green deep woods.” -John Muir

MetPro – Take a metabolic assessment and schedule a complimentary consultation with one of their experts by going to www.metpro.co/mta

Topo Athletic -a gimmick-free running shoe company delivering footwear solutions for healthier, more natural running patterns. A roomy toe box promotes functional foot movement and the cushioned midsoles come in a variety of thicknesses and heel elevations, so you can pick your unique level of protection and comfort.

Healthiq.com -Marathon Training Academy is sponsored by *Health IQ*, an insurance company that helps health conscious people get special rates on life insurance. Go to healthiq.com/mta to support the show and learn more.

Bombas Socks -every pair comes with arch support, a seamless toe, and a cushioned foot-bed that’s comfy but not too thick. Use our link for 20% off!

Atomic Habits by James Clear -what we are reading.

The post Finding the Joy in Running appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Mar 21 2019

56mins

Play

Run the Mile You’re In! Interview with Ryan Hall

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In this episode we speak with Ryan Hall -2x Olympian, American record holder, and author of the book Run the Mile You’re In. And in the quick tip segment, we answer a listener question about how to deal with chafing.

Interview with Ryan Hall

Ryan Hall set the U.S. record in the half marathon when he ran 59:43 at the Houston Half Marathon in 2007- the first American to break the one hour barrier. He placed 10th at the Olympic Marathon in Beijing. He’s the only American to run sub-2:05 (2:04:58 at Boston). His wife Sara is currently an elite runner and they have four adopted daughters from Ethiopia. In this episode we walk through the big themes of his new book Run the Mile You’re In.

In this interview Ryan shares . . .

  • What it means to run the mile you’re in.
  • The importance of identity and the ability to not take your failures personally.
  • How the African runners process failure.
  • Goals of the heart.
  • The comparison trap.
  • Dealing with pain.
  • Having a healthy body image.

Mental toughness isn’t something you either have or don’t have. Mental toughness starts with the belief that you are mentally tough, and it is nurtured through positive declarations.

Competing out of love results in superior strength. The next time you find yourself in a painful situation, find a way outside of yourself. Think about your love for God, your family, your friends, those you are helping. There is more strength inside of you than you can imagine when you fix your eyes on Jesus. All you have to do is stay close and stay in love, and you can endure incredible pain.

Also Mentioned in This Episode

Ryan Hall’s website: https://ryanandsarahall.com

NuNee Device -designed specifically to relieve that dreaded Runner’s Knee pain. Use code MTA20 for a 20% discount.

On Running Shoes – The clean and minimalistic design as well as its sole technology gives you the sensation of running on clouds. Try a pair of On’s for yourself for 30 days and put them to the test – that means actually running in them before you decide to keep.

BioLite Headlamp 330 -ultra-thin, super bright, NO-BOUNCE headlamp that’s so comfortable, you’ll actually forget you’re wearing it. Use code MTA at checkout for 15%

MetPro -Using Metabolic Profiling, MetPro analyzes your metabolism and provides you with an individualized strategy to obtain your goals.

The John Muir Trust -help us plant 262 trees!

Resurrected Runner -creator of parody songs for runners

The post Run the Mile You’re In! Interview with Ryan Hall appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Apr 01 2019

1hr 6mins

Play

Heart Rate Training and More with Dr. Phil Maffetone

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When it comes to heart rate training perhaps you have heard of the Maffetone Method -which is a calculation that uses 180 minus your age to find your maximum aerobic function.

The genius of heart rate training is that it trains your body’s systems to tap into its fat stores for energy instead of primarily burning sugar.

That’s why we are excited to have Dr. Maffetone on the podcast to pick his brain about the MAF Method, inflammation, and the over-fat pandemic.


Interview with Dr. Phil Maffetone

Dr. Philip Maffetone is an internationally recognized researcher, educator, clinician, and author in the field of nutrition, exercise and sports medicine, stress management, and biofeedback. He is the author of more than a 20 books, including The Big Book of Endurance Training and Racing. He is probably best known for MAF heart rate training (180 minus your age) also referred to as the Maffetone Method. He was the first person to publish a book on heart rate training back in the 1980s.
In addition to working with top athletes he is also a musician and has published articles on the effect of music on human development. And he worked as a physician to Johnny Cash, James Taylor, and The Red Hot Chili Peppers.

The MAF Method, Calculating Your Maximum Heart Rate

Dr. Phil Maffetone developed a formula for establishing the peak heart rate you should achieve during the first three months of training. One of his mantras is, “Speed up by slowing down.” To calculate your ideal training heart zone for building your aerobic base do the following:

Subtract your age from 180 to determine your maximum aerobic heart rate. For example I’m 39 years old so . . . 180-39 = 141

Then subtract 10 if you’re recovering from a major illness or hospital visit or on regular medication for a chronic condition; subtract 5 if you have not exercised before or are just beginning to rebuild your running base; 0 if you’ve been exercising regularly without interruption. If you have been training for more than two years without any of the problems listed above and have made progress in competition without injury, add 5.

This number would represent your maximum heart rate to use for aerobic training to promote fitness gains while staying mostly in the fat burning zone. A training range from this heart rate to 10 beats below would be used as the training range. (for example my range would be a heart rate of 131-141). This provides a conservative guideline for a 3 month period of base training.

He also recommends doing a maximum aerobic fitness (MAF) test once per month to track your progress. After warming up with 10 minutes of easy walking or jogging, run 1 mile at your maximum heart rate from the above calculation (ex 141) and record the time, next run a 2nd mile at the MHR and record time, finally run a 3rd mile at MHR and record. The times from each mile should progressively get a little slower. If you do this test regularly you will see how your aerobic endurance is increasing.

Some people get frustrated because they find that their normal pace is outside the training zone. But lacking a solid aerobic base could be the reason why they’re not experiencing fitness gains or struggling with overtraining syndrome.

Take-A-Ways from This Interview

People often find the topic of heart rate training confusing because there’s no one size fits all strategy. It’s not like we can promise that if you follow Dr. Maffetone’s system (or anyone else’s system) for 3 months that you’ll be able to take 2 minutes per mile off your pace. But one big take way from this conversation is that health and fitness is about more than just setting PRs. There are many factors that go into giving you the best quality of life possible and you are an experiment of one. We’d encourage you to think about a few things:

  • Measure your waist. If it’s not less than half your height consider changing how you look at training and nutrition. For example, if you’re 5’4″ (or 64 inches tall) then your waist measurement should be less than 32 inches.
  • Consider whether you need to improve the functioning of your aerobic system. Have you reached a plateau with your training? Does your body always seem to be in a state of stress, inflammation, and fatigue?
  • Find your MAF (maximum aerobic function) heart rate: https://philmaffetone.com/180-formula/
  • Perform the MAF Test- get your baseline numbers and retest on a monthly basis: https://philmaffetone.com/maf-test/

Eight Step Methodology

You can go through the 8 Step Methodology and take the associated quizzes on Dr. Maffetone’s website to consider which areas you need to work through:

  1. Carbohydrate Intolerance– Do you have excess belly fat? Do you feel fatigued regularly? Do you get hangry? Do you have hormonal imbalances?
  2. Control Inflammation– Do you have ongoing joint or muscle pain? Are you struggling with chronic injuries? Do you deal with allergies, skin, or gut issues?
  3. Vitamin D Status– Get a blood test to determine what your Vitamin D levels are. Vitamin D is essential for optimum health and fitness and deficiencies are fairly common.
  4. Folate Status– Folate is an essential B vitamin found in vegetables, meats, and legumes. It has a role in preventing cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, depression, and much more.
  5. Build the aerobic system– By training to improve your aerobic (or fat burning system) you can increase energy, improve circulation and immunity, and much more.
  6. Manage stress– We live in a fast paced world where much is often demanded of us and we also demand a lot from ourselves. It’s important to recognize areas of harmful stress in order to take steps to manage it.
  7. Build a better brain– The brain controls and manages nearly every body system. Improving the functioning of our brain will help us manage the aging process better.
  8. Healthy aging– We can’t control the fact that we will grow older. But we can learn to maintain the quality of our life and approach the future with a positive mindset.

photo credit philmaffetone.com

We recommend that you head over to Phil Maffetone’s website for more information on any of the things that we talked about on this episode.

Also Mentioned in This Episode

The Fat Adapted Eating Plan – Let us help you cut out sugar and grains.

Dr. Maffeton’s website.

Healthiq.com -Marathon Training Academy is sponsored by *Health IQ*, an insurance company that helps health conscious people get special rates on life insurance. Go to healthiq.com/mta to support the show and learn more.

Anolon Cookware -Shop Anolon’s cookware sets, baking tools, even pasta makers and culinary torches – all at Macy’s. Anolon – designed for creativity in the kitchen.

Shoutout

Dear Angie, I recently completed the Bournemouth Marathon following MTA’s intermediate
 training plan. Throughout the training I stuck to Phill Maffetone’s max heart rate (180 minus my age, which is 36). In the beginning of the race I felt a bit sluggish but when I got to 20 miles in 2:57 still monitoring my heart rate there was no wall. For the last 6.2 miles I felt more of a running flow than I’d experienced since I ran a fast half marathon in 2004. I finished with the last 3 miles at a 7:30 pace. What an experience to go slow, get to half way and have something left! I came in with a time of 3:48 which I was delighted with since I hadn’t run properly for 13 years until I came across MTA last autumn. The experience was magical and owes a tremendous amount to the wisdom, inclusive encouragement and confidence building of MTA. I did a negative split and finished really strong. My mantra ‘stay strong, stay tall, stay calm, stay positive’ (an adaption of one I’d heard on MTA) was repeated throughout the second half. Miles 20-26.2 feel like an almost sacred space. Thanks Angie and Trev, I’ve still got what it takes. Best wishes, -Tim

The post Heart Rate Training and More with Dr. Phil Maffetone appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Nov 02 2018

1hr 12mins

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Smart Pacing Strategies in the Marathon

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In this episode we discuss smart pacing strategies with Coach Steve Waldon -one of our coaches here at MTA and a 3:30 pacer at the New York City Marathon. You will hear how to establish goals, the tricks to pacing (tools and tips), how to adjust mid-race, and how to get through the tough later miles!

Smart Pacing Strategies in the Marathon with Special Guest Steve Waldon

Coach Steve Waldon is a RRCA Certified Running Coach and a 3:30 pacer at the New York City Marathon. He’s a 2:53 marathoner with over 25 marathon finishes, nine 50 mile finishes, and two 100Ks. He also completed the Atacama Desert Crossing -155 mile self-supported stage race.


Topics/Questions Covered in this Discussion

  • Common mistakes people make.
  • Choosing an appropriate pace.
  • What if you start out too fast?
  • Adjusting Mid-Race.
  • The reliability of our GPS watches.
  • What to do in the later miles?
  • What about run/walkers?
  • What does it take to become a pacer at NYC Marathon?

Also Mentioned in This Episode

NuNeeShop.com. Don’t let knee pain keep you from completing your long runs, or worse, sideline you altogether. Let NuNee help you get back to running without knee pain. Use code MTA30 for a 30% discount.

Audible.com. Right now, for a limited time, you can get 3 months of Audible for just $6.95 a month
Text MTA to 500 500.

Action Heat -makes the world’s best heated clothing, like Heated jackets, socks, gloves, hats, and more. Save 20% off your order when you go to www.actionheat.com/MTA

Pace Bands -here are some websites for finding both free and paid pace bands.

The post Smart Pacing Strategies in the Marathon appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Nov 21 2018

51mins

Play

Unraveling the Mystery of Your Metabolism

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In this podcast episode we bring you a fascinating conversation about how the body’s metabolism works and how you as a runner can lose weight and keep it off.

Unraveling the Mystery of Your Metabolism

Our guest today is Angelo Poli -an expert on the metabolism and the founder of MetPro. He has worked with NFL players, celebrities, physique models, entrepreneurs, and politicians to help them achieve body transformations. We wanted to have him on the show to pick his brain.

In this episode you will hear . . .

  • The mysteries of the body’s metabolism explained and why it is so unfair
  • What the diet industry gets wrong
  • Considerations for runners
  • Positive disruptive habits that you can start implementing now to see results in your nutritional intake.

Metabolic Profiling

We started the MetPro program the day after Thanksgiving in 2018. In the beginning I was skeptical and less than enthused about following some type of rigid eating plan, especially over the holiday season. But I knew that I owed it to myself to give it a try since nothing else had been working.

I had started gaining weight back in 2015 due to a hormonal imbalance and had put on 30 very unneeded pounds in the following two years. The weight gain was very frustrating considering my active schedule of running, yoga and strength training. The fact that I avoided sugar and most processed foods and attempted to eat healthy also didn’t result in any weight loss.

It took a couple of days to get used to the new schedule of eating and using the MetPro app. But I caught on quickly to being more intentional about my macronutrients and the timing of meals. The fantastic support and guidance from our nutritionist/coach Natalie has been so helpful as well.

I’m thrilled with the fact that I’ve shed 14 pounds in the last 6 weeks. This was certainly the only time I’ve ever lost weight during the holidays. I also have plenty of energy for my training and am feeling so much more confident about getting down to my ideal weight.

What makes weight loss so confusing is that no two people are the same. There are so many factors that influence your personal metabolic rate. Plus, your metabolic rate is a moving target, constantly adapting to your environment (as the body seeks homeostasis). Your body will adapt to whatever eating plan you’re using which is why it’s important to change your intake occasionally.

The key, Angelo says, is contrast. Once your body adjusts to your new nutritional intake the weight loss stalls. It is in the up-adjusting and down-adjusting that revs the metabolism and sheds the pounds.

To illustrate this Angelo has us imagine two women about the same size who both want to lose weight. Looking at their nutritional history, the first woman skips breakfast, has a salad for lunch, and eats barely anything for dinner. The second woman pages and pages of meals and snacks recorded in her food log. Which woman is sure to lose weight quicker? Even if they start the same diet, woman #2 would experience a more drastic contrast from what she is currently doing -resulting in quicker results.

Another important take-a-way is understanding your body type (ectomorph, endomorph, and mesomorph). This is an expression of your genetic predisposition and influences your dietary and training needs in order to reach the ideal body composition for you.

Having the support and guidance of a nutrition coach can help get your metabolism into the fat burning mode. The handy MetPro app keeps the process of tracking your weight, meals, and workouts very simple.

Also Mentioned in This Episode

MetPro – Take a metabolic assessment and schedule a complimentary consultation with one of their experts by going to www.metpro.co/mta

The Tallahassee Marathon -Run a fast course through Florida’s capital city this February 3. Plus meet special guest Meb Keflezighi! Trevor will be doing a live audience interview with Meb on Saturday February 2nd at 1:30 at the race expo. The marathon and half marathon is on February 3rd. Use code Academy for 20% off your race registration.

The Drury Hotels -more than 150 locations. Save 15% on your room with our link.

Sun Basket offers 18 weekly recipes including Paleo, Gluten-Free, Vegetarian, Vegan, Pescatarian, and more—all delivered to your door. Get $35 off your first order with our link!

The post Unraveling the Mystery of Your Metabolism appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jan 01 2019

1hr 12mins

Play

How to Use Suffering to Your Advantage as a Runner

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In this podcast episode you will learn how to use suffering to your advantage as a runner and transform fear into positive growth as we talk with ultra runner and author Akshay Nanavati.

Interview with Akshay Nanavati

Akshay Nanavati is a Marine Corps veteran and ultra marathoner who has set a goal of running across every country in the world. When we spoke with him he had just finished the country of Liberia.

He’s the author of the book Fearvana -The Science of How to Turn Fear into Health, Wealth, and Happiness.

Akshay has set a goal of running from boarder to boarder across every country in the world. When we spoke to him he had just finished a 167 mile trek across Liberia.

What is Fearvana?

Fear and Nirvana (bliss) are seemingly contradictory ideas. But they are actually very complementary. Fear is an access point to bliss and ultimately enlightenment itself. It is the bliss that results from engaging our fears to pursue our own worthy struggle. Without struggle there is not growth . . . so find, live, and love your worthy struggle.

Finding Peace in Chaos

For more context, here is a short talk Akshay gave at Harvard.


Also Mentioned in This Episode

Akshay Nanavati website: https://fearvana.com

Yoga Trapeze -Yoga teacher Lucas Rockwood has come up with a unique solution called, The Yoga Trapeze. This lightweight, versatile inversion sling can hang in a doorway or from an exposed beam. It is excellent when used for yoga poses, core work, and traction (1-7 minutes upside down daily is recommended). You can try the Yoga Trapeze for 30 days for just $1 by going to YogaTrapeze.com, and if you use coupon code “marathon”, you’ll get a free instructional DVD with your order. 


Blinkist -Blinkist is the only app that condenses thousands of nonfiction books into the best key takeaways and need-to-know information. 8 Million people are using Blinkist right now and it has a massive and growing library which ranges from self-help, business, and health to history books.

Mace -When runners hit the road or trails, they shouldn’t have to worry about self-defense. You can stay focused when you carry Mace Pepper Spray, because you’ll be prepared when it counts. Mace actually invented pepper spray – and they offer tons of other self-defense products. Enter promo code MTA for 20% off your kit today.


Shoutout!

At age 62 I just completed my first marathon (Disney) in a time of 4:06:09. Couldn’t have done it without the very helpful MTA podcasts. Proud to say I just signed up as a MTA member. Now I can become even more informed! Jeff

The post How to Use Suffering to Your Advantage as a Runner appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jan 31 2019

1hr 1min

Play

Running to the Edge

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In this podcast episode we speak with Matthew Futterman, sports editor at the New York Times, about his new book Running to the Edge -A Band of Misfits and the Guru Who Unlocked the Secrets of Speed.

This interview provides an interesting overview of the last four decades of distance running, a reminder of how far we’ve come, and plenty of motivation to run to your edge!

In the quick tip segment, Angie shares a mantra for getting through the last 10k of a marathon.


Interview with Matthew Futterman

The author with Coach Bob Larson (photo credit: Matthew Futterman)

Matthew Futterman is Deputy Sports Editor at The New York Times. He has also worked for The Wall Street Journal, and The Philadelphia Inquirer. He is an active marathoner himself and lives in New York with his family. His new book is called Running to the Edge

In this interview you will hear us mention:

Coach Bob Larson -Pioneering running coach, Retired Head Track and Field Coach at UCLA, Meb Keflezighi’s coach, and co-founder of the Mammoth Track Club.

The Jamul Toads -a small underdog running team from San Diego, coached by Bob Larson, that won the AAU National Cross Country Championship in 1976.

Steve Prefontaine -an iconic American middle and long-distance runner who competed in the 1972 Olympics and ran for the Oregon Track Club. He was tragically killed in a car accident at the age of 24.

Alberto Salazar -won the NYC Marathon three times in a row from 1980-82. He also won the Boston Marathon in 1982.

Arthor Lydiard -New Zealand running coach who helped popularized the sport. A proponent of high training volume.

Coach Joe Vigil (pronounced Vee-hill) -Deana Kastor’s coach, expert on training at elevation, and helped found Mammoth Track Club.

Meb Keflezighi -the only man who has won the New York City Marathon, The Boston Marathon, and an Olympic medal.

Deana Kastor -holds the fastest marathon time (2:19:36) for a female athlete in the U.S. and winner of the Chicago Marathon, the London Marathon, and a bronze medal in the 2004 Olympic games.

Eliud Kipchoge -fastest marathoner of all time, currently ranked #1 in the world.



Also Mentioned in This Episode

The Jacob Wells 3 Bridges Marathon on Dec. 28th in Little Rock, Arkansas. Use the code MTA for $10 off your registration.

Running for Real Podcast with Tina Muir. If you like our podcast definitely check out our friend Tina Muir.

The Drury Hotel Company -where the extras are not extra. Use our link for 15% off your room.

The post Running to the Edge appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Oct 01 2019

55mins

Play

Running Outside The Comfort Zone

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In this episode we bring you an interview with Susan Lacke, author of the new book Running Outside The Comfort Zone -An Explorer’s Guide To The Edges of Running.

In the quick tip segment Angie answers a question about what to do if your training plan doesn’t have the correct number of weeks until race day.

Interview with Susan Lacke

Susan Lacke is a college professor and writer for Women’s Running, Competitor, and Triathlete. Her new book is called Running Outside the Comfort Zone -An Explorer’s Guide to the Edges of Running.

Some of the races she did in her year of running outside the comfort zone:

  • The Pony Express 50 miler in Utah
  • Empire State Building Run Up
  • Grand Canyon Rim-to-Rim
  • Across the Years 24-Hour Race
  • Caliente Bare Dare 5k (naked run)
  • Cooper’s Hill Cheese Roll in the UK
  • Midwest Wife Carrying Championship with her husband
  • The Comrades Marathon in South Africa

Also Mentioned in this Episode

Susan Lacke online: www.susanlacke.com

The Drury Hotels -Use our link to save 15% off your stay at our home away from home.

On-Running Shoes -Try a pair of On’s for yourself for 30 days and put them to the test. That means actually running in them before you decide to keep them.

MetPro.co -Nutrition concierge and coaching company to help you reach your body composition goals.

The post Running Outside The Comfort Zone appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jul 31 2019

47mins

Play

If Life is a Marathon, Here Are the Rules!

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Hey guys this is Trevor and I’m currently in Switzerland for the Jungfrau Marathon -which is a brutal but absolutely gorgeous race in the Swiss Alps.

This episode is going to be a bit unusual. You will hear a recording of a motivational talk I gave, to a group of non-runners, about what running marathons has taught me about life.

In the quick tip segment Coach Angie explains how to successfully taper for a race, because many runners go through “taper madness”. Enjoy!

If Life is a Marathon, Here Are the Rules!

I first gave this talk to a local Rotary Club luncheon when I lived in South East Missouri. The recording you will hear on this podcast episode is from the second time I gave the talk -which was to a group of young men between the ages of 16-21. It was recorded in 2016. I used to go every Tuesday night and hang out with these guys and speak to them.

You can tell by my presentation that I was trying to entertain and inspire, not necessarily inspiring them to be runners, although I did take some of them out running from time to time but to inspire them to live life more intentionally and fully. Below are the powerpoint slides that go with the talk.

New York City Marathon has over 50,000 runners and 2 million spectators

Should have worn his Nip Guards®!

Non-runners find it funny that this is a real product.

If you google “runner’s trots” you can find this photo. What’s happening below the waist is not pretty. Click here to see the full version. Yikes!

marathon sign #1

marathon sign #2

marathon sign #3

marathon sign #4

marathon sign #5

marathon sign #6

We interviewed Rhonda on the MTA podcast here

His shirt says, “50, Fat, Diabetic, Ahead of You”

We featured Derek’s story here

Harriet died in 2017 at the age of 94. She was a cancer survivor who started running marathons at age 76 and ran the fastest time for a woman over 90

Matt is the author of the book The Long Run

#Truth!

Angie at her 50 mile ultramarathon. She recapped the race here

If you think running a marathon is tough, remember there are people who do this!

We had Dr. Noakes on the on the podcast back in 2016.

The “finishing kick” shows that we don’t run our muscles to fatigue. Our body reserves energy though our brain tells us that we are too depleted to go on.

Holding down the floor after the New Orleans Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon

My audience. I had the privilege of speaking to a group of young men between the ages of 16-24 every Tuesday night. That’s me in the center (with glasses).

Thank you for listening!



Also Mentioned in This Episode

RX Bar -a protein bar made with 100% whole ingredients. Angie loves the chocolate coconut flavor. For 25% off your first order, visit RXBAR.com/MTA and enter promo code MTA at checkout.

Healthiq.com -Marathon Training Academy is sponsored by *Health IQ*, an insurance company that helps health conscious people get special rates on life insurance. Go to healthiq.com/mta to support the show and learn more.

The Jungfrau Marathon -I am currently in Switzerland and just completed this epic mountain marathon. Race recap coming soon!

The post If Life is a Marathon, Here Are the Rules! appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Sep 10 2018

43mins

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Interview with Coach Bob Larsen

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In this episode we bring you an interview with Bob Larsen -pioneering running coach, retired Head of Track and Field at UCLA, Meb Keflezighi’s coach, and co-founder of the Mammoth Track Club.

Plus Angie will tell you about a GPS watch with a super long battery life.

Interview with Coach Bob Larsen

In our last episode author Matthew Futterman told us about the “guru who unlocked the secrets of speed”. Well, we are thrilled to have an opportunity to speak with that the guru himself!

Coach Larsen was born in 1939, he’s 80 years old at the time of this recording and still runs everyday! He coached at Grossmont College and Monte Vista College where his teams won conference titles and national championships. He then became the Head Track and Field Coach at UCLA where he led athletes to a total of 20 NCAA titles.

After he retired from UCLA he and coach Joe Vigil founded the Mammoth Track Club in order to made US marathoners competitive again on at the international level. On the team was Meb Keflezighi -the only man who has won the New York City Marathon, The Boston Marathon, and an Olympic medal, and Deana Kastor -holds the fastest marathon time (2:19:36) for a female athlete in the U.S. and winner of the Chicago Marathon, the London Marathon, and a bronze medal in the 2004 Olympic games.

In 2019 he was given the Legend Coach Award by USATF -the National Governing Body for track and field, long-distance running and race walking in the United States.



Also Mentioned in This Episode

The Chirp Wheel+ is a back-pain relief device that targets muscles around your spine. Use code MTA for 15% off.

The Runner’s Toolbox -8 inexpensive items to keep at home to prevent and self-treat running injuries.

The post Interview with Coach Bob Larsen appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Oct 13 2019

52mins

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Taking Action and Setting Big Goals in Running and Life!

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The beginning of the year is definitely a great time to set aside space for self reflection, both on the year gone by and the year stretching ahead. This can help you stay the course or correct your course.

In this episode we want to offer you two simple but powerful tips for making 2019 an epic year. Plus, we are going to be sharing a lot of books with you. So get ready to channel your inner student!

Making 2019 an Epic Year

The way that you best achieve goals is going to depend on your personality and how you respond to expectations. A couple books that I highly recommend when it comes to setting goals are Better Than Before and The Four Tendencies by Gretchen Rubin. Having an understanding of what makes you tick will enable you to make the most progress in your life.

Take Daily Action

The fact is that you can set all the goals you want but to actually carry them out you have to take daily action. It’s not enough to dream that a future version of yourself is more disciplined or virtuous. The things you do today are making your future self. So start today with your goals. Maybe this is the year that you’re going to build back your running base, train for your first half marathon, your first marathon, your first ultra, train for a PR, or make changes in your eating. Whatever the goals you have to be very clear about what you want and what it will take to get there.

If it’s helpful you can enter these daily action steps on your calendar so you have constant reminders and can get the satisfaction of checking them off. Part of taking action involves getting the support you need. Most people do best when they are surrounded by an encouraging support system. Maybe that means a friend, family member, online group, journaling, or an app. The bottom line is that you don’t have to go it alone. Maybe you’ve been interested in or on the fence about Academy membership. Our goal is to have your back. To be positive, encouraging, and help you make your running goals a reality.

Set Bigger Goals

If you’ve just started to run the thought of running a marathon is going to seem overwhelming. It can even seem overwhelming even when you’re in the midst of marathon training. But as you take daily action you will grow as a person and will be able to set bigger goals. This will give you an increased sense of confidence which will lead to more growth.

Part of the process of setting bigger goals involves not being afraid to fail. Many of us fall into the perfection trap and tend to avoid committing to anything that we’re not sure we can accomplish and avoid things that might make us look foolish. But if you truly have the desire to do something, don’t let the fear of failure hold you back. Former Navy Seal Brad McLeod says this,

“Don’t be afraid to fail. Without failure you won’t know your limit. And it is impossible to win every day. You may even feel like you are regressing at times. This is where you have to fight through.”

Failure doesn’t have to have such a negative stigma. In fact, if we never failed we’d be completely perfect (and I’ve never met a perfect human). Fear is one of those tricky emotions that needs to be examined before it’s acted upon.

Finally, having a growth mindset doesn’t mean that you’re constantly dissatisfied with where you are in life or with what you’ve accomplished. It’s also not helpful to be constantly comparing yourself with other people, which is often what social media draws our attention to. Often we’re comparing our worst with someone else’s best.

Sometimes the running world can leave you with the impression that you’re not fast enough, you don’t have enough endurance, you’re not thin enough, or you’re not making progress quickly enough. I’ve thought all those things too. But feeling like you’re not enough doesn’t actually lead you into a positive space for growth. It leaves us stuck and discouraged which saps our energy.

As we continue into this year I’d encourage you to do it with the mindset that you are enough. This will lead to more progress as you take action and set bigger goals. Knowing that you are enough will give your efforts a sense of positive energy.

My Goals for 2019

  • To write a daily gratitude list.
  • Increase to 20 minutes of daily meditation.
  • Spend more one on one time with my boys.
  • Run a sub 4 marathon.
  • Run a marathon in 3 new states.
  • Consistently strength train 2-3 times per week.
  • Continue reading good books.

And speaking of books . . .

Books I Enjoyed Last Year

I read a total of 263 books in 2018 (more non-fiction than fiction which was a first for me). Here are my top 7 favorite non-fiction books from last year:

  1. Daring Greatly, How the Courage to be Vulnerable Transforms the way we Live, Love, Parent and Lead by Brene Brown (I also highly recommend her books Rising Strong, Daring Greatly, and Dare to Lead). She talks about vulnerability, whole heartedness, shame, and courage. The fear of vulnerability is at the core of many of our difficult emotions. She writes, “When we shut ourselves off from vulnerability, we distance ourselves from the experiences that bring purpose and meaning to our lives.” Her message calls us to dare greatly and strive for whole heartedness in our lives.
  2. Get Well Soon, History’s Worst Plagues and the Heroes Who Fought Them by Jennifer Wright. As a nurse I’m fascinated by the history of diseases, epidemics, and medical practices of the past. This book is a great blend of history, storytelling, some very gruesome practices, and humor.
  3. A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson. This is the autobiographical tale of Bill Bryson who after living in the UK for many years returns to the US and decides to hike the Appalachian Trail with a good friend from the past. He’s an amazing storyteller and dives into the history of the Trail along with his preparation and experiences alongside it. I just recently learned that it was made into a movie that was released in 2015.
  4. The Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown. This book tells the story of the 1936 US men’s Olympic 8 person rowing team. These were just ordinary young men after the Great Depression from poor backgrounds that were transformed into a force to be reckoned with. They went on to defeat the elite Eastern rowing clubs and compete in the 1936 Olympics in front of Adolf Hitler, defeating Germany’s Aryan team.
  5. Snoop: What Your Stuff Says About You by Sam Gossling. This is written by a psychologist who studies how people project and protect their inner selves by looking at their belongings. He can predict with uncanny accuracy so many things by looking at people’s stuff. There’s a lot of interesting research, psychology and stories packed into this book.
  6. Let Your Mind Run by Deena Kastor. Deena does an amazing job of weaving her personal story of training and growth along with inspiration for the reader. There is so much about mental toughness and mindset that can be gleaned from this book.
  7. Endure by Alex Hutchinson. This books explores the variable limits of the human body and mind where it relates to human performance, particularly long distance running.

More Books Mentioned in This Episode

Also Mentioned in This Episode

Generation UCAN, our go-to fueling source for long runs and races. Use the promo code “MTANOBONK” to save 15% off your order.

Athletic Greens -With 75 whole-food sourced ingredients, Athletic Greens is the best of the best in All-In-One whole food supplements. Get 20 FREE travel packs valued at $79 with your first purchase.

The Red Rock Canyon Marathon in Las Vegas on February 23rd 2019. Angie will be running it.

Live Event with Meb Keflezighi at the Tallahassee Marathon. On February 2nd he will be interviewing Meb before a live audience at 1:30 pm at the Doubletree Hotel (race headquarters). The event is free an open to the public. And, there is still time to sign up for the half or full marathon. Use the code ‘Academy’ to save 20% on your registration.

The post Taking Action and Setting Big Goals in Running and Life! appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jan 20 2019

48mins

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Interview with Dean Karnazes + How to Manage Hunger During Training

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In this episode we speak with Dean Karnazes. He’s an accomplished ultra runner, best-selling author, and running ambassador.

And in the quick tip segment, you will hear how to manage hunger during marathon training while still losing weight and keeping your energy levels stable!

Interview with Dean Karnazes

Dean Karnazes might be the best known ultramarathoner of all time. He’s been featured by The Today Show, 60 Minutes, The Late Show with David Letterman (watch the clip below), The History Channel . . . the list goes on. Time Magazine named him as one of the “Top 100 Most Influential People in the World”.

His book Ultramarathon Man was one of the first running books I read. His newest collaboration is the book Running for Good -101 Stories for Runners & Walkers to Get You Going! which is produced by Chicken Soup for the Soul.

From this interview . . .

Dean talks about hi 525k run through Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, and Kazakstan.
The  U.S. State Department sent him to run 525 kilometers on the ancient Silk Road through Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, and Kazakhstan.  He ran through the desert in 110°f temps with a support crew that only spoke Russian.  The reception from locals was phenomenal but it did require him to drink a courtesy bowl of fermented horse milk.   

photo credit: Dean Karnazes

Hilarious Interview on the Late Show

Breaking a rib while running in Chile.

photo credit: Dean Karnazes

photo credit: Dean Karnazes

Running near his home in the Marin Headlands.

photo credit: Dean Karnazes

Also Mentioned in This Episode

The Kaisermarathon in Söll, Austria. Trevor is running this on October 5th. Send us an email through our contact page if you know about this race or if you live in Austria.

The Hartford Marathon in Connecticut. Angie is running this on October 12th 2019. This will be her first race in Connecticut and state number 47 in her 50 state quest.

On-Running Shoes -Try a pair of On’s for yourself for 30 days and put them to the test. That means actually running in them before you decide to keep them.

Managing Hunger During Training

Angelo Poli

Angelo Poli, metabolism expert and founder of MetPro, joined us to answer the question, “How does one manage hunger during marathon training while still losing weight and keeping your energy level stable?”. This is something that many runners struggle with!

Since November Angie has lost 30 pounds and got her marathon time back down to Boston Qualifying level using the MetPro system. Visit www.metpro.co/mta for a free consultation call.

The post Interview with Dean Karnazes + How to Manage Hunger During Training appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Aug 31 2019

59mins

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Interview with Fitness Expert Ben Greenfield

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In this episode we speak with author and fitness guru Ben Greenfield and in this episode’s quick tip, Angie will answer a listener question about how to stay in marathon shape.

Interview with Ben Greenfield

Ben Greenfield has been in the health and fitness podcasting space longer than we have. He was the first influencer to reach out to us after we launched and we used to have him on the show once a year. He’s a competitive triathlete, personal trainer, biohacker, speaker, and author of the book Beyond Training. He is a walking encyclopedia of health and fitness! In this conversation we talk to Ben about transitioning to obstacle course racing, building strength, tips on breathing for runners, ways to biohacker your house, and his thoughts on screen time and screen time for kids.

Tools and Take-a-Ways

To improve at obstacle course racing you should work on:

  • Grip Strength
  • Running Efficiency
  • Lactic Acid Tolerance

Three new terms to add to your knowledge base

Products and Books Mentioned

Also Mentioned in This Episode

John Muir Trust– contribute a tree to the MTA Forever Forest. We went with the idea of planting 262 trees as a nod to the marathon distance, with donations going toward our tree planting fund to create an ‘MTA Forever Forest’. “Come to the woods for here is rest. There is no repose like that of the green deep woods.” -John Muir

London Marathon Meet Up –See details here.

Yoga Trapeze -Yoga teacher Lucas Rockwood has come up with a unique solution called, The Yoga Trapeze. This lightweight, versatile inversion sling can hang in a doorway or from an exposed beam. It is excellent when used for yoga poses, core work, and traction (1-7 minutes upside down daily is recommended). You can try the Yoga Trapeze for 30 days for just $1 by going to YogaTrapeze.com, and if you use coupon code “marathon”, you’ll get a free instructional DVD with your order. 


MetPro – Take a metabolic assessment and schedule a complimentary consultation with one of their experts by going to www.metpro.co/mta

Topo Athletic -a gimmick-free running shoe company delivering footwear solutions for healthier, more natural running patterns. A roomy toe box promotes functional foot movement and the cushioned midsoles come in a variety of thicknesses and heel elevations, so you can pick your unique level of protection and comfort.

Athletic Greens -the best of the best in All-In-One whole food supplements and the easiest way to build a healthy habit each and every morning.

Shout out to MTA Coach Steve Waldon

Whew glad that’s over! Ran the Napa Valley Marathon this morning in preparation for Boston. Wanted to keep this under 3 hours but there were 26 miles of headwinds! After 2 hours 59 minutes and 48 seconds I crossed the finish but had to dig a little deeper than I wanted. 3rd in age group so I got a bottle of champagne! Coach Steve

The post Interview with Fitness Expert Ben Greenfield appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Mar 12 2019

1hr 11mins

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Ask the Coach Episode + Road Trip Rundown!

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In this episode we bring you an Ask the Coach Episode as we answer questions about hill work, tricks to increasing speed, and what to eat before a race and more.

Plus we give you a road trip rundown of our 7,719 mile journey across America and Angie will explain how to keep your habit of running while traveling.

Ask the Coach Episode

On this episode we were joined by Coach Kristen Williamson the newest member of the MTA coaching team. Kristen is a Registered Dietitian and Road Runners Club of America certified running coach. She is a 3:29:00 Marathoner, Boston Qualifier, and has a Master of Science in Dietetics as well as a MBA.

Questions for this episode

  1. Hills! How should I be running hills? Do I run them at an easy pace? Fast pace? What level effort should I be at when I’m doing hill runs specifically, is what I’m wondering. Also, what is considered a good elevation gain? I live in Minnesota and it’s not terribly hilly. I can’t stand running on a treadmill, and I don’t mind driving a little. What sort of elevation gain would be considered effective as a hill workout? -Rachel
  2. For speed workouts which do you consider more beneficial to a marathon runner and why 1) Short sprints & short recovery 2) longer sprints with longer recover. -Dave
  3. Tricks to increasing marathon speed? -Amanda
  4. Should you make any specific changes to your diet in the week leading up to a race? I don’t want to deprive myself of well balanced calories and carbs to do well but also don’t want to go in feeling bloated or risk gi distress. -Carolyn
  5. Food for fuel: What do I need to know about calories (the unit to measure energy) versus carbohydrates (sugar broken down to release energy) versus protein (amino acids that build muscle and help body to function)? I know what they are bc my 2 year old is a Type 1 diabetic, but I’m not sure what is most important for long runs and when to eat them. -Bridgit
  6. Debunking benefits of fad diets + how to adjust lifestyle and diet for optimum performance. -Drew

Road Trip Rundown

The “camper”. Our home for 48 days.

The Numbers

  • 48 days on the road
  • 15 states
  • 5 National Parks/ Monuments/ Historical sites
  • 7,719 miles
  • 3 marathons (2 were ultras)
  • Approximately $2,560 on gas
  • 8 German restaurants
  • 2 tire blowouts on the camper

Charlevoix, Michigan


Our first stop was at the Charlevoix Marathon. Hear Angie’s race recap on episode #288.

The Black Hills, South Dakota

Devil’s Tower Monument, Wyoming

Montana



Divide 50k in Butte

Washington

Olympic National Park

The first blowout

Angie and Trevor with Coach Kristen (center)


Also mentioned in this episode

The MTA Virtual Half Marathon. Registration now open! Check out this year’s awesome medal and hat.

MetPro -Using Metabolic Profiling, MetPro analyzes your metabolism and provides you with an individualized strategy to obtain your weight or body composition goals.

NuNee -designed specifically to relieve that dreaded Runner’s Knee pain. Use code MTA15 for a 15% discount.

On-Running Shoes -Try a pair of On’s for yourself for 30 days and put them to the test. That means actually running in them before you decide to keep them.

DripDrop O.R.S. An electrolyte powder developed by a doctor to treat dehydration. Go to dripdrop.com/mta to get 20% off any purchase.

Great sites for finding races and running paths while traveling:

The post Ask the Coach Episode + Road Trip Rundown! appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Aug 11 2019

1hr 13mins

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Interview with Gene Dykes, 2:54:23 Marathon at Age 70

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In this episode we bring you an interview with Gene Dykes the fastest marathoner over age 70 who ran a blistering 2:54:23. Plus we take you on the ground at the Philadelphia Half Marathon in Philadelphia Pennsylvania.

Interview with Gene Dykes

In December of 2018 Gene Dykes ran a 2:54:23 marathon at the Jacksonville Marathon in Florida. This was 25 seconds faster than the previous age-group world record held by Ed Whitlock of Canada.

I had the opportunity to stay with Mr. Dykes and interview him before the Philadelphia Marathon. He ran the Liberty Bell Challenge -doing the half, 8k, and full marathon. He won his age group at each race.

The Philly Marathon was marathon number 123. He didn’t start running marathons until age 58!

Race Expo

Before the Philly Half

The Rocky Steps

MTA Meet Up

The post Interview with Gene Dykes, 2:54:23 Marathon at Age 70 appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Dec 03 2019

1hr 7mins

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Race Recap: The Manchester City Marathon

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The Manchester City Marathon in Manchester New Hampshire bills itself as the largest running event in New Hampshire.

The 13th edition of the race was held on Sunday, November 10th, 2019.

My youngest sister, Autum Haley, traveled with me to this race. It her first half marathon after having her 4th child last year.

This was my 62nd marathon in my 49th state. Only one state to go!


Race Recap: The Manchester City Marathon

The expo/bib pick up was located at the Millennium Running Store in Bedford, NH the day before the race. They also offered race day pick up the morning of the race at race headquarters in Veterans Park. This was a nice option for those who lived somewhat locally.

I got a message the night before from a MTA listener named Kathleen on Instagram that her son had eaten one of the UCAN bars she needed to fuel her first marathon. She was wondering if I had an extra she could get. I’d brought a couple extra for my sister and was happy to give her one so we arranged to meet the next morning. It was fun to be able to meet Kathleen and her sister that morning and get a quick picture.

We did a MTA Meet up at Backyard Brewery on Saturday evening and it was fun to meet Allie who lived about an hour away as well as Jane and her running team. Jane is the mother of Noelle, one of my first coaching clients. Noelle has gone on to become a trail running rock star completing three 50 milers, two 12 hour races, and recently ran her first 24 hour race (she ran over 94 miles and was the first place female)!

Race Morning:

The marathon, half, and relays started at 8:50 am and were broadcast live on TV. The 5k started at 9am and had a different course. The starting area was in front of the SNHU (Southern New Hampshire University) Arena in downtown Manchester and was very close to the hotel we were staying at.

It was wonderful to be able to wait in the warm hotel lobby until just a few minutes before the race and not have to stand outside in the cold for an extended period of time. The weather was clear and in the low 30’s at the start and there was a slight breeze which made it feel even more chilly.

I decided to wear shorts, compression socks, a short sleeve race shirt, arm sleeves, light knit gloves, my lucky hat, and my On Cloudswift shoes. I was also wearing a long sleeve throw-away shirt (which I got rid of at mile 2).

The Course:

The marathon and half marathon course were identical for the first 13 miles. At mile 13 the race returned to downtown Manchester where the half marathoners finished and the marathoners ran right by the finish line to start the second half of the course. I found the first half of the race to be quite hilly and challenging.

My watch showed a total of 1,273 feet of elevation gain for the whole marathon but I’d estimate that at least 800-900 feet of that was in the first half.

Most of the course was around the city of Manchester, through the historic mill yard district, and into the suburbs. There are several sections where the course runs along and over the Merrimack River.

  • The course did start to flatten out around mile 16 and at 16.5 we started an out and back section that went to mile 20.5 on the Piscataquog Trail. It was a dirt/gravel surface and there were some roots, rocks, and mud/ice puddles that had to be navigated around.
  • Then the course proceeded to the Goffstown Rail Trail. This is a very scenic portion of the route as it follows the Piscataquog River back to Manchester.
  • At mile 22 the run crosses the new “Trestle” bridge and continues back to the city, crossing the footbridge over the Merrimack River, and running the final miles in downtown Manchester.
  • The final mile goes by the finish area again, turns off Elm street to cross the bridge, and then returns back to Elm Street to the finish.

I found that final mile to be challenging because we were teased with the finish and then had a final overpass hill to run up which felt enormous at that point.

Aid Stations/Fueling:

Official race aid stations were located approximately every two miles and were well supported. Each one had water and sports drink and a few offered other fueling options. There were also a surprising number of unofficial aid stations like a lemonade stand, someone handing out small water bottles, a mimosa stop, a beer stop, and people handing out candy. I stuck with my fueling strategy of using Generation UCAN bars washed down with water from the aid stations. Use the code MTAMANCHESTER to save 15% on your order. For first time customers use the code MTA25.

Finish Line:

There were a good number of spectators along the final stretch and they had an announcer calling each runner’s name who crossed the finish line. The total number of marathon finishers was 360. There were 562 who finished the half marathon and also quite a few relay teams. There were 270 finishers for the 5k.

The medal was huge and featured stained glass elements behind buildings in Manchester. They also did race tracking and offered free race pictures and a finish line video. The shirt was a very nice long sleeve technical shirt.

My Experience:

I ran with a guy named Carlos for a few miles which helped pass the time. He’s also pursuing his 50 states and working up to a BQ. I ran by feel during the race and only looked at my watch at each mile split. I felt a bit tired just going into the marathon but wanted to run as strong as possible while listening to my body.

The uphills and downhills in the first half were challenging and by mile 18 my lower body felt done. It was one of those feelings that I’ve had during marathons in the past when you feel like walking, but walking doesn’t actually feel any better. Since I knew this I tried to keep my stride and gait consistent and run relaxed in spite of my fatigue. My glutes and hamstrings were particularly sore but thankfully my feet felt good.

I finished my 62nd marathon (and state #49) in 3:43:01 and was 2nd in my age group.

I got a mug and reusable drawstring bag for the AG placing. Autum was at the finish line to meet me and get some pictures. It was great to see her and find out that she had a good half marathon, finishing in 2:19. They had a nice food area with yogurt, soup, flatbread pizza, chocolate milk, and coffee. The heat sheet felt good because the temps were still cool.

We headed out later to find a post-race meal and just happened to see Kathleen, the lady who needed the UCAN bar, finish strong. Here’s what she wrote in later:

Hi Angie, Thank you so much for meeting me this morning with the UCAN bar. Here is the photo of us. What a highlight for me to get to meet you. Congratulations on a great run today! You inspire your listeners so much. I finished today, my first marathon, in 5:33:17. The miles seemed to fly by and I had a fun experience. Thanks for your great training plan that got me there. Sincerely, -Kathleen

I also heard back from Jane from the MTA meet up

Hi Angie, What a pleasure to meet you – and your sister Autumn.  Kudos to Autumn for traveling, running and being a mom and wife!  Pretty amazing!  We enjoyed our dinner with you, and the race the next day.

We did well on Sunday: Kelsey & Laxmi competed the 5K – Laxmi’s 2nd race ever!
Jen, Suzanne, Emily and I did the half marathon.  I’m pretty sure it was Emily’s 2nd fastest half. Sara did her 1st marathon at the 2017 Hartford Marathon in 5:10:01.  Last week in Manchester, using the MTA training plan, she finished in 4:35:50 !!!!  So great!!

I am on a quest to be a 50 stater for half marathons.  I have 17 completed.  Manchester was a repeat state for me – but my 32nd half! I hope that you and Trevor have continued success with MTA.  I have certainly enjoyed listening, using your training plans, doing the virtual half and especially wearing my Release the Kraken hat!!  Thanks again. -Jane


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Also Mentioned in This Episode

MTA Meet Up at the San Antonio Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon.
Trevor will be running the San Antonio Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon on December 8th. Please let us know if you will be there. A pre-race diner meet-up (Mexican food of course) is in the works. MTA Coach Athena Farias will be there too! Here is the FB event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/534288650726942/

MetPro -Angie has lost 32 pounds working with a MetPro nutrition coach. To see if MetPro is the solution you’ve been looking for, take their Metabolic Assessment and schedule a complimentary consultation with one of their experts by going to www.metpro.co/mta

Athletic Greens -Go to athleticgreens.com/mta and claim your special offer today – 20 FREE travel packs valued at $79 with your first purchase.

Generation Ucan -our go to fuel source for long runs and races. Use the code MTAMANCHESTER to save 15% on your order. For first time customers use the code MTA25 to save 25%.

Bombas Socks -Bombas socks are SOFT and built with extra cushioning, so whether you’re walking the dog, chilling at home, or doing a long run, you’ll be comfortable. Use our link to get 20% off any purchase during their big holiday sale, November 18th through December 5th.

BioLite -our go-to headlamp for running in the dark. Shorter days don’t have to mean shorter runs! Get the BioLite HeadLamp 330: an ultra-thin, no-bounce headlamp that’s so comfortable, you’ll forget you’re wearing it. Try it for 30 days and if you don’t love it — they’ll take it back. Go to BioLiteEnergy.com/mta for special offers all holiday season.

The post Race Recap: The Manchester City Marathon appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Nov 22 2019

1hr 2mins

Play

The Running Shoe Episode!

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In this episode we speak with running shoe expert Brian Metzler author of the new book Kicksology -the Hype, Science, Culture, and Cool of Running Shoes.

Plus Angie shares tips on how to get the most out of your shoes . . .

And you will hear from a runner who’s been listening to the MTA Podcast since the very beginning.



Interview with Brian Metzler

Brian Metzler has tested more than 1,500 pairs of running shoes and written for Runner’s World, Men’s Health, Outside and GearJunkie. He’s also the founding editor of Trail Runner Magazine.

His new book is called Kicksology -the Hype, Science, Culture, and Cool of Running Shoes, published by VeloPress. He lives and trains in Colorado.

In this conversation we discuss the evolution of running shoes from the over-built (heavy) sneakers of the late 80’s and 90’s to the Minimalism Movement that swept through 10 years ago giving rise to shoes like Vibrams and Newtons to the carbon plate technology of Nike Vaporfly and Next% hitting the shelves today. Plus brands like Hoka, Altra, and On-Running that stand out from the competition with their unique design concepts.

You will also hear some tips on how to choose the right shoe for you and why it is wise to have a “quiver” of shoes to rotate during training. Big thanks to all the Academy members who sent in questions!

And Thanks to Our Episode Sponsors . . .

Angie has run her last five marathons in Ons

On-Running
Speaking of running shoes, our go-to shoes right now are made by the Swiss company On-Running.

On was born in the Swiss Alps with one goal: to revolutionize the sensation of running. The entire company is based around the idea of zero-gravity running and On has quickly become the fastest growing running brand in the world.

What makes On different is its emphasis on a clean and minimalistic design as well as its sole technology which gives you the sensation of running on clouds. And they have a full range of shoes and apparel to power your full day, on and off the trail. Their shoes also come with a 30 day money back guarantee should you need to return them.


Finally a green drink that tastes good!

Athletic Greens
The Athletic Greens ultimate daily all-in-one health drink with 75 proven vitamins, minerals and whole food-sourced ingredients makes it easier for you to get comprehensive nutrition without the need for multiple pills, powders or complex routines.

Whether you’re taking steps towards a healthier lifestyle or you’re an athlete pushing for better performance, Athletic Greens takes the guesswork out of everyday good health. Jump over to athleticgreens.com/mta and claim their special offer today – 20 FREE travel packs valued at $79 with your first purchase.

Also Mentioned in This Episode

The Chirp Wheel+ back pain relief wheel. It’s designed with a 5-inch width and spinal canal that cradles your spine and gives your muscles a 4-way stretch. They can also be used to roll out other areas of your body. Get your Chirp Wheel+ 3-Pack for 15% off with code MTA.

MTA Meet Up at the San Antonio Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon.
Trevor will be running the San Antonio Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon on December 8th. Please let us know if you will be there too. A pre-race diner meet-up (Mexican food of course) is in the works. MTA Coach Athena Farias will be there too! Here is the FB event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/534288650726942/

Congrats to Academy member and long time listener Debbie Gelber (who is also featured on this episode) on finishing marathon #33 at the Authentic Athens Marathon!



The post The Running Shoe Episode! appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Nov 14 2019

1hr 9mins

Play

Live Podcast Event from the New York City Marathon

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In this bonus podcast episode you will hear the replay from our live event at the New York City Marathon. Angie spoke on a panel with fellow podcasters Tina Muir, Carrie Tollefson, and Emily Abbate about their marathon stories -the ups and downs of training.

Big thanks to all the listeners who attended and special thanks to Generation Ucan for organizing it. Enjoy!

Live Podcast Event

Carrie Tollefson, Tina Muir, Angie Spencer, Emily Abbate

Carrie Tollefson is a middle distance runner who represented the United States in the 2004 Olympics, a T.V. commentator, and host of the CTolle Run Podcast.

Tina Muir is a 2:36 marathoner who ran for Great Britain and Northern Ireland in the World Half Marathon Championships and host of the Running For Real Podcast.

Angie Spencer is a register nurse, running coach, and veteran of 61 marathons and ultras. She is co-host of the Marathon Training Academy Podcast (but you already knew that).

Emily Abbate is a NYC based freelance writer, fitness editor at SELF Magazine, certified personal trainer, and host of the Hurdle Podcast.

Generation Ucan is a nutrition and fueling company founded in 2010. Their SuperStarch® gives runners long lasting energy without spikes and crashes. Use the code MTANYC to save 15% on your order. New customers can use the code MTA25 for 25% off.

MTA Shakeout Run in Central Park

We also had the chance to meet up with listeners on Saturday (the day before the marathon) for a shakeout run in Central Park. We always love meeting new friends and connecting with listeners to the podcast! Three coaches from our team ran the marathon and were able to join us for the meet up.

MTA Coaches: Kristen, Dominique, Steven, Angie

The post Live Podcast Event from the New York City Marathon appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Nov 06 2019

1hr 7mins

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Episode #300! 🎉 Listener Voicemails

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In today’s show we celebrate reaching our 300th podcast episode by hearing from our amazing listeners! We asked runners to call in and tell us where they live, what they do for a living, and what races they have on the calendar.

Plus Angie recaps her recent marathon in Vermont -which she is calling one of her most challenging races yet.

Special Episode #300

Huge thank you to the following runners for leaving a voicemail!

  • Shira
  • Mitch Goldstein
  • Lucy
  • Annie
  • Yali
  • Marty Gardner
  • Carolyn Gallagher
  • Linda
  • Armando
  • David
  • Kelly Whetstone
  • July Meyer
  • Kathleen Miller
  • Whitney Young
  • Andy Soto
  • Matthew Lippert
  • Jen Oellerich
  • Cooper DeVito
  • Andrew Lorenzo
  • Lynne Langlois
  • Guy Reams
  • Gregory Kaether
  • Bridget
  • Victoria
  • Byran G.
  • Kevin
  • Ann
  • A.J. Cappuccio
  • Heidi Wells
  • Tamanna Singh
  • Kyle Johnson
  • Mark Goddard
  • Steven Schirm
  • Selina

Also Mentioned in This Episode

The Nor’Witch Marathon in Vermont -that time that Angie almost won a marathon.

Athletic Greens -Go to to athleticgreens.com/mta and claim your special offer today – 20 FREE travel packs valued at $79 with your first purchase.

MetPro -Angie has lost 32 pounds working with a MetPro nutrition coach. To see if MetPro is the solution you’ve been looking for, take their Metabolic Assessment and schedule a complimentary consultation with one of their experts by going to www.metpro.co/mta

The Drury Hotels – save 15% on your room with our link! 150 locations in 25 states.

The post Episode #300! 🎉 Listener Voicemails appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Nov 03 2019

1hr

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The Hartford Marathon Race Recap + How to Set Yourself up for a Personal Record

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In this episode Angie recaps the Hartford Marathon in Connecticut -her 60th marathon and fastest to date. Plus, Trevor talks about his experience at the Kaisermarathon in Austria. And in the quick tip segment you will hear how to set yourself up for a marathon PR.

Hartford Marathon Race Recap

The 26th edition of the Hartford Marathon and Half Marathon was held on Saturday, October 12, 2019. This is a non-profit race and $7.5 million was raised for charity.

This was my 47th state in my 50 State quest and my 60th marathon overall. My A goal going into this race was to break 3:30, my B goal was to PR (faster than the 3:35:41 set back at my 9th marathon in 2012), my C goal was to BQ (less than 3:40), and my D goal was to run my very best.

I’ve been visualizing breaking 3:30 for the past several months and at the expo there was this board where you could write your goal. Although I felt a bit sheepish about it I wrote “break 3:30”. Based on how well my training had gone I knew I had it in me if all the necessary factors would come together on race day.

Pre-Race:

The expo was held at the XL Center in downtown Hartford and it was a nice mid-sized expo. I got my bib, my corral seeding sticker, race shirt and bag, and then walked around. Of course I had to stop by and say hi to Katie at the UCAN booth.

Race Morning

The starting line area is right by Bushnell Park, close to the State Capitol, the Bushnell Building and the State Library & Supreme Court. I found my way to B corral which was for runners who’d posted a sub-4:00 marathon and went to the very front where the 3:30 pace group was located.

I kind of felt like a fraud being up there. But I knew if I wanted to attempt breaking 3:30 I needed to give myself every advantage. Even though I had a lot of nerves I kept telling myself that I was just excited and was prepared to give it my best.

The weather was absolutely perfect for a marathon. It started out in the low 50’s and got up to low 60’s by the time I finished. It was mostly overcast with some wind.

The Course

The marathon and half marathon courses split pretty quickly which reduced congestion. They also had a marathon relay with several relay exchange points along the course and there was a 5k that had a different course. I’d heard that the half marathon course was more scenic but the marathon was quite nice too. We ran along the Connecticut River and near Riverside Park and Great River Park for a stretch.

The half marathon had a time limit of 3 hours and the marathon time limit was 6 hours. There was an out and back section from mile 13 and the turn around just after mile 17. The course advertizes as having some rolling hills and the hills at mile 17 and mile 25 felt the most challenging.

They seemed to have reliable pace groups out on the course. I started just in front of the 3:30 pace group and my goal was to stay in front of them for as long as possible and then hang on when they passed me. They caught up to me at mile 25 and after that I stayed right on the 3:30 pacer’s shoulder before passing them in the final stretch.

Aid Stations

There were frequent aid stations along the course stocked with water, Nuun energy drink, and some with gels.

  • The race estimates that they serve 11,232 gel packs.
  • 9,400 gallons of water was served at aid stations.
  • The marathon works hard to make the event as environmentally friendly as possible. The 142,000 paper cups they use are fully compostable and 13,785 pounds of trash is diverted from landfills.
  • 29,350 volunteer hours are donated to make the races possible. The volunteers that I interacted with were all helpful and encouraging.

For my fueling I had a Generation UCAN bar with my breakfast about an hour before the race. Then I carried 2 UCAN bars and took them at intervals washed down with water from the aid stations. I also had some caffeinated chews that I used to boost my energy in the last few miles. Use the code MTAHARTFORD for 15% off your UCAN order. New customers use the code MTA25 for 25% off.

The Finish

The finish line is absolutely beautiful. The finish goes under the Veteran’s Memorial Arch and the street is lined with 500 autumn mum plants to decorate the final stretch. There are lots of cheering spectators in the last 0.2 miles making it extra exciting. This year there were 1,493 marathon finishers and 3,710 HM finishers.

Viewing the finish line the day before the race.

The post-race area is in Bushnell Park which has lovely walkways and an antique carousel. There was a ton going on post-race and a party atmosphere with a live band, beer garden, and great food area (choices included fruit cups, chips, granola, donuts, bananas, chocolate milk, bagels, and veggie rice bowls).

They also gave out a reusable water bottle, heat sheet (they estimate seven thousand are given out), and an awesome medal which has the Capitol Building and Veteran’s Arch with a stained glass look behind it. The race shirt was long-sleeve in soft cotton and another perk was free race photos and finish line video.

My Experience:

I knew my training indicated that I could have a good marathon in Hartford if everything came together. Of course 10 days before the race I started feeling really fatigued and having symptoms that indicated I was coming down with a cold (taper troubles). I did everything I could think of to feel better and finally decided that it was fall allergies bothering me. I also knew that my period was scheduled to start on marathon day which is a wild card that many of us ladies have to deal with.

There are some things you can control and others you just have to roll with.

Gratitude and Courage

Two core values that I’ve been thinking about lately are “gratitude and courage.” Each person will apply gratitude in different ways and each person will have individual ways that they can be courageous. I wanted to bring these two elements into the marathon with me.

I felt good on race morning and was cautiously optimistic about a PR. The weather was looking perfect and I knew all I could do was to go out there and give it my best.

Waking up on race morning I saw that Eliud Kipchoge ran 1:59:40 in Vienna to go sub-2:00 in the marathon and that was so inspiring. To see his smile and wise words about pursuing your dreams gave me more motivation to go out and do my best.

Keep Pushing

On my Race Ready ID (which I wear on my watch) I put the mantra “keep pushing” and that’s exactly what I did. I decided not to settle back and get comfortable on any mile but instead stay relaxed, stay grateful, and be courageous.

I focused hard on keeping my self talk positive. If I was going up a hill I’d say something like “good thing you trained on hills” or “this hill is smaller than the one’s back home.”

I specifically looked for beauty around me (which wasn’t hard considering the fall foliage in New England). If I felt my focus drifting I brought my attention back to the present and told myself to have courage.

It looks slightly different to keep pushing depending on what mile you’re in because you don’t want to push your effort too hard in the early miles. And it gets significantly harder to keep pushing as the miles increase.

I knew I’d have to keep my pace at 8:00 minute miles to break 3:30 so in the earlier miles I allowed myself to run a bit faster to make up for any later miles that might end up being slightly slower. But I didn’t obsess about my pace or splits and only looked at my watch to see my mile split when it buzzed.

Breaking 3:30

At mile 23 I knew that if I held the pace and nothing went wrong I’d be able to break 3:30. The 3:30 pacer caught up with me just before mile 25 and I knew that I’d hang on with everything I had. The last mile felt tough with the final hill but I passed the pacer and was able to accelerate in the final stretch. I knew that I could finish strong and couldn’t wait to see the 3:29 on the clock. I also felt so grateful to be running my 60th marathon and be strong and healthy.

When I crossed the finish line I felt emotional with gratitude. It was awesome to meet my goal of breaking 3:30 and set a PR. My last PR of 3:35:41 was set at my 9th marathon back in 2012. So this new PR of 6 minutes and 9 seconds was over 7 years in the making.

As far as results go I was 256/1,111 overall, 59/384 females, and 6/74 in my age group. My official time was 3:29:32.

I got to see Academy members Shira and her husband Chris along with Jo just after crossing the finish line. It was rather amusing that I was able to run strong the final stretch but when I started walking through the finisher’s area my body started seizing up. I got a foot cramp and it was hard to walk. Still, I couldn’t wipe the smile off my face.

MTA Meet Up:

Later that afternoon we had a small MTA meet up at the Hog River Brewery. This was where the Manchester Running Club was meeting as well. It was wonderful to meet Kaitlyn who was there with her family (she did the marathon relay), Jo from WI who did the HM, and Shira (and husband Chris) who did the HM. I also got to meet David who heads up the running club.

How to set yourself up for a marathon PR

1. Build a solid foundation

Don’t rush the process. If you’re looking to PR make sure that you build a solid running base first and are injury free before ramping up your training.

It’s important to focus on building a strong foundation first before demanding more out of your body. My recent marathon PR was built on the top of two solid marathon training cycles (London Marathon in April and the Charlevoix Marathon in June).

2. Love the process.

This really is another way to say “don’t forget the “boring” stuff”. Success in long distance running often comes down to what you do behind the scenes. This has been one huge key to how I’ve been able to run 60 marathons and make progress toward my time goals.

This will include things like . . .

  • Strength training. I started strength training regularly during a period of injury and strengthening my glutes (among other areas) has been key to keeping my hamstrings strong and healthy.
  • Recovery. Elements like quality sleep, massage/foam rolling, meditation, not racing too frequently, and doing easy runs truly easy can all play a big role in helping you run healthy and strong.
  • Nutrition. Fueling your body well is key to getting a lot out of yourself. Think of yourself as an athlete and feed yourself for performance. Yes, food is also meant to be enjoyed but there’s definitely a balance. This will also help you build muscle and lose fat if those are your goals. We all have our particular areas within the realm of fueling that need to be worked on.

3. Work on mindset.

Your attitude and thought process can either make or break your PR goals. If we spend time thinking about why we can’t do something then it probably won’t happen. But if we think of all the ways we can make our goals happen they’re more likely to be achieved.

Just like we spend time on physical training I’d encourage you to spend time on mental training. In some way spend time every day focusing on strengthening your mindset, finding good mantras, and meditating on and visualizing the results you want. If you don’t practice mindset it won’t magically come through for you when you need it most.

For example, I meditate for 20 minutes every morning and at the end of my session I have a series of positive affirmations that I go through. Each person’s affirmations will be unique but three of mine are,

“I am healthy, I am strong, I am a sub-3:30 marathoner.”

It feels a bit weird at first to speak of your goals as if they’ve already happened but we must remember that goals start with belief, then become thoughts, and then are put into action.

4. Enlist help and support.

If you find yourself running into the proverbial wall over and over again with your goals it’s important to seek help. We often learn and grow best in a community and we all need support at times. The kind of support you need is going to vary from runner to runner.

It may involve following through with a training plan (if you haven’t in the past), joining a local running group, finding a running partner who will challenge you, joining an online community, and getting a running coach.

  • There’s no shame in needing help. Almost a year ago I started getting help from a nutrition coach at Metpro to deal with a stubborn weight gain. This was a turning point in my health and fitness and is one of the keys to where I am today with my running.

Conclusion

To be successful in reaching challenging goals like a BQ or PR in the marathon you have to fall in love with the process. If you’re only running to get faster there will be lots of discouraging runs and races where you’ll question everything. And of course there will come a point in every person’s running that you won’t get any faster. That’s just a result of aging.

But if you fall in love with the process and start to enjoy the challenge of doing hard things then you’ll find joy in the journey and not just focus on the destination. You probably know where your weak areas are and what needs to be addressed for you to get better.

And if you’re struggling with knowing what to do or how to do it consider hiring a coach. They can help you pinpoint problem areas and map a successful way forward.


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The only states remaining in my 50 State Marathon Goal are Vermont, New Hampshire, and Hawaii.


Also Mentioned in This Episode

Live Podcast with Generation Ucan

Angie will be speaking at a live podcast event with Generation Ucan on Friday, November 1st from 6:30-8:00 at the New York Marriott Marquis. She will be on a panel with fellow podcasters Tina Muir, Carrie Tollefson, and Emily Abbate. This event is free but space is limited! Here is the link to register now.

Morning Shake Out Run with MTA

We are also hosting a short 2-mile shakeout jog/walk/chat on Saturday, Nov. 2nd at 8:00 am. See this Google doc for more info: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1iy3_jlaHyFbzR4cJx5tGHQA84omJZ_n9wDMULaZH89w/edit?usp=sharing

MetPro.co. I have lost 32 pounds working with Natalie my nutrition coach. To see if MetPro is the solution you’ve been looking for, take their Metabolic Assessment and schedule a complimentary consultation with one of their experts by going to www.metpro.co/mta

The NuNee – If knee pain has slowed you down this season, NuNee can help get you back on track. NuNee is a patented innovation designed specifically to relieve that dreaded Runner’s Knee pain. Use code MTA20 for a 20% discount.

The Chirp Wheel+ back pain relief wheel. It’s designed with a 5-inch width and spinal canal that cradles your spine and gives your muscles a 4-way stretch. Get your Chirp Wheel+ 3-Pack for 15% off with code MTA.

Trevor’s Recap and Photos of the Kaisermarathon in Austria.


The post The Hartford Marathon Race Recap + How to Set Yourself up for a Personal Record appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Oct 23 2019

1hr 28mins

Play

Interview with Coach Bob Larsen

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In this episode we bring you an interview with Bob Larsen -pioneering running coach, retired Head of Track and Field at UCLA, Meb Keflezighi’s coach, and co-founder of the Mammoth Track Club.

Plus Angie will tell you about a GPS watch with a super long battery life.

Interview with Coach Bob Larsen

In our last episode author Matthew Futterman told us about the “guru who unlocked the secrets of speed”. Well, we are thrilled to have an opportunity to speak with that the guru himself!

Coach Larsen was born in 1939, he’s 80 years old at the time of this recording and still runs everyday! He coached at Grossmont College and Monte Vista College where his teams won conference titles and national championships. He then became the Head Track and Field Coach at UCLA where he led athletes to a total of 20 NCAA titles.

After he retired from UCLA he and coach Joe Vigil founded the Mammoth Track Club in order to made US marathoners competitive again on at the international level. On the team was Meb Keflezighi -the only man who has won the New York City Marathon, The Boston Marathon, and an Olympic medal, and Deana Kastor -holds the fastest marathon time (2:19:36) for a female athlete in the U.S. and winner of the Chicago Marathon, the London Marathon, and a bronze medal in the 2004 Olympic games.

In 2019 he was given the Legend Coach Award by USATF -the National Governing Body for track and field, long-distance running and race walking in the United States.



Also Mentioned in This Episode

The Chirp Wheel+ is a back-pain relief device that targets muscles around your spine. Use code MTA for 15% off.

The Runner’s Toolbox -8 inexpensive items to keep at home to prevent and self-treat running injuries.

The post Interview with Coach Bob Larsen appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Oct 13 2019

52mins

Play

Running to the Edge

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In this podcast episode we speak with Matthew Futterman, sports editor at the New York Times, about his new book Running to the Edge -A Band of Misfits and the Guru Who Unlocked the Secrets of Speed.

This interview provides an interesting overview of the last four decades of distance running, a reminder of how far we’ve come, and plenty of motivation to run to your edge!

In the quick tip segment, Angie shares a mantra for getting through the last 10k of a marathon.


Interview with Matthew Futterman

The author with Coach Bob Larson (photo credit: Matthew Futterman)

Matthew Futterman is Deputy Sports Editor at The New York Times. He has also worked for The Wall Street Journal, and The Philadelphia Inquirer. He is an active marathoner himself and lives in New York with his family. His new book is called Running to the Edge

In this interview you will hear us mention:

Coach Bob Larson -Pioneering running coach, Retired Head Track and Field Coach at UCLA, Meb Keflezighi’s coach, and co-founder of the Mammoth Track Club.

The Jamul Toads -a small underdog running team from San Diego, coached by Bob Larson, that won the AAU National Cross Country Championship in 1976.

Steve Prefontaine -an iconic American middle and long-distance runner who competed in the 1972 Olympics and ran for the Oregon Track Club. He was tragically killed in a car accident at the age of 24.

Alberto Salazar -won the NYC Marathon three times in a row from 1980-82. He also won the Boston Marathon in 1982.

Arthor Lydiard -New Zealand running coach who helped popularized the sport. A proponent of high training volume.

Coach Joe Vigil (pronounced Vee-hill) -Deana Kastor’s coach, expert on training at elevation, and helped found Mammoth Track Club.

Meb Keflezighi -the only man who has won the New York City Marathon, The Boston Marathon, and an Olympic medal.

Deana Kastor -holds the fastest marathon time (2:19:36) for a female athlete in the U.S. and winner of the Chicago Marathon, the London Marathon, and a bronze medal in the 2004 Olympic games.

Eliud Kipchoge -fastest marathoner of all time, currently ranked #1 in the world.



Also Mentioned in This Episode

The Jacob Wells 3 Bridges Marathon on Dec. 28th in Little Rock, Arkansas. Use the code MTA for $10 off your registration.

Running for Real Podcast with Tina Muir. If you like our podcast definitely check out our friend Tina Muir.

The Drury Hotel Company -where the extras are not extra. Use our link for 15% off your room.

The post Running to the Edge appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Oct 01 2019

55mins

Play

Exploring the “Pain Cave” with Courtney Dauwalter

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In this episode we speak with ultra runner Courtney Dauwalter -winner of the 2019 Ultra Trail du Mont Blanc -the most prestigious trail ultramarathon in Europe.

She has also finished first at the Tahoe 200, Western States 100, Moab 240 and many other ultras.

And in the quick tip segment you will hear about nutrition strategies for building muscle and promoting recovery.



Interview with Courtney Dauwalter

photo credit: Scott Rokis Photography

We are thrilled to get a chance to speak with Courtney Dauwalter -a runner we have admired for some time. Courtney describes herself as an “ultra runner with a love for sunshine, long inseams, and candy.”

Since 2011 Courtney has won 38 marathons and ultras according to UltraSignup, 13 of these races she was the 1st place overall finisher beating all the men!

Ultra Trail du Mont Blanc

In September she won the famous Ultra Trail du Mont Blanc, considered to be the World Cup of ultra running. Over 2,000 of the top trail runners in the world toe the start line.

This 106 miles race starts in Chamonix, France, and runs through the Alps (total elevation gain of 32,940 feet), crosses the boarder into Italy, then Switzerland, and back to Chamonix where thousands of cheering spectators and media welcome the champions.

Courtney was the first place female with a time of 24 hours, 34 minutes and 26 seconds finishing 1 hour ahead of 2nd place.

photo credit: Courtney Dauwalter, Instagram

Tahoe 200

We also talk about the 2018 Tahoe 200 which is a (you guessed it) 200 mile race around Lake Tahoe -the largest alpine lake in California. Runners must cover the distance in 100 hours (4 days). Courtney did it in 49:54:36 and was the 1st place female finisher (and course record holder). She slept a total of only 21 minutes of the nearly 50 hours of running.

To get a sense of the “pain cave” see this video by Salomon Running.


Up Next

Courtney will be competing for team USA in the 24 Hour World Championships in France. This format requires runners to rack up as many miles as possible on a 1 kilometer loop in 24 hours. The highest distance wins. Also competing for team USA will be Camille Herron (current world record holder), Katalin Nagy, Megan Alvarado, Gina Slaby, and Pam Smith.

Follow Courtney on social media here: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook

Also Mentioned in This Episode

The Revel Kulia Marathon in Hawaii. This will be Angie’s final marathon in her 50 state quest! Still time to sign up for the race and meet us there.

Angelo Poli, metabolism expert and founder of MetPro, joined us to answer the question, “Are there nutrition strategies for building muscle and promoting recovery?”. Since November Angie has lost 31 pounds and got her marathon time back down to Boston Qualifying level using the MetPro system. Visit www.metpro.co/mta for a free consultation call.

Shout Out!

Today I ran the Medieval Marathon in Kilkenny, Ireland. My goal was to just run and enjoy being in another country. To my surprise, I ended up getting a PR by a few minutes. I came through the finish around 4:19:15, and my previous PR was 4:21:45, and this course had 900ft more of elevation gain compared to my other PR! . . . I spent the second half of the race in the pain cave, but I couldn’t help but revel in the fact I was running in a most beautiful country. I have to give thanks once again to MTA and Coach Chris for getting me inspired and all trained up to PR even when I wasn’t having the best day! -Emily

The post Exploring the “Pain Cave” with Courtney Dauwalter appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Sep 22 2019

54mins

Play

The Marathon Fueling Episode!

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In this episode we discuss how to fuel effectively for a long run or race. Plus, we answer questions sent in from listeners about carbo loading, considerations for female athletes, and fueling for an ultra.

Marathon Fueling

We haven’t done a podcast episode focused on fueling for long distance runners in a long time. It can often be challenging to figure out what your fueling strategy is going to be, especially for your first half marathon or marathon. To complicate matters further your fueling tolerance can also change over time. Sometimes you need to go back to the drawing board and reevaluate what you’re doing. Figuring out a fueling strategy can often be quite challenging because there is no one-size fits all formula.

The Basics

Your body burns through approximately 80-100 calories per mile (or per 1.6 km) while running. The total calories will vary based on your weight, amount of muscle mass, pace/effort level, and environmental conditions. The body stores fuel in the form of glycogen and keeps around 1200-1800 calories readily available in the muscles (and a small amount in the liver). The amount of muscle glycogen will also vary based on your size, muscle mass, and how carefully you’ve trained your body to absorb carbs (like during the refueling period post-workout).

During a longer run your body will burn a combination of carbohydrates, fat, and protein. If you run hard you’ll burn mostly carbs while easier effort running taps into your fat reserves. The body can also break down muscle to convert to energy which is definitely not something we want to be sacrificing. That’s referred to as muscle catabolism.

Dozens of products to choose from at a specialty running store

Pre-run Strategy:

If you’ll be running for less than 90 minutes you don’t necessarily need any pre-run fuel. If the run is at an easy pace you may not need any fuel at all (everyone is a bit different). However, if you find your energy levels dipping during a run of 90 minutes or less, a pre-run snack can be beneficial to perform your best. Just make sure that you leave plenty of time for your body to digest the food so that you don’t have stomach issues/GI distress.

Running makes digestion challenging for the body because of the constant motion. Blood is shunted away from the gastro-intestinal (GI) system for priority use by the running muscles. This can make adequate digestion (and avoiding nausea and diarrhea) a bit of a trick. Some runners are very susceptible to “dumping syndrome” while running. Basically your body decides that the food in your stomach can’t be adequately digested and sends it on the express route through the intestines (and into a port-a-pot or nearby bathroom if you’re lucky).

Running More Than 90 Minutes

If you’ll be running for more than 90 minutes make sure that any pre-race meal that you eat is finished at least 3 hours before you start, especially if you have a sensitive stomach. This is the amount of time it takes for the blood sugar and insulin levels to return to their normal state. If you eat closer to a long run or race your body may burn through your glycogen stores more quickly and it can cause a drop in energy levels while you run.

If you choose to eat before your race or long run you’ll want to eat something high in carbohydrate with some protein but low in fiber and fat. Make sure this meal is finished approximately 3 hours before your run (especially if you struggle with GI distress). Some people have “iron guts” and can almost eat anything before and during running. Others have such touchy systems that it can be a challenge to figure out a good fueling regimen.

Running in a Fasted State

Many morning runners do their shorter runs in a “fasted” state. That means they don’t eat (maybe other than coffee) before heading out the door. It’s actually okay to start a long run or race with an empty stomach too. I know that this may seem counterintuitive and a little scary at first.

It was a hard concept for me to accept at first too. I was used to eating around 1 ½ to 2 hours before my long runs and marathons to provide the fuel I thought was necessary. I was sure that my oatmeal and a banana was a good thing. However, I couldn’t figure out why I had a constant churning in my stomach during the first few miles and then experience a blood sugar “crash” at about mile 6-7. It was a huge moment for me when I realized that my pre-race meal was to blame.

During your night of sleep the body is in fasting mode and it hangs onto its store of glycogen in the muscles. The muscle glycogen is sitting there ready to go no matter if your stomach is empty or not. The only thing that gets emptied during the night is the glycogen store in your liver. The goal of the pre-race meal is simply to top off the liver glycogen store and this can be accomplished right before the race without negatively affecting how your body burns the muscle glycogen.

My Experience

For many years now I’ve used the approach of not eating before a race or long run (who wants to get up at 3-5 am to eat anyway). It was a little scary at first heading out with an empty stomach. However, the new strategy worked! I would simply start my fueling strategy right before starting my run and then keep up with a steady fueling plan for the duration. No more churning stomach and energy crash! It’s definitely something to experiment with if your current strategy isn’t working well.

I’ve stared many marathons without eating breakfast

Since I’ve started sharing these new fueling recommendations I’ve heard from many people on this topic. Some said that they were skeptical and hesitant to not eat before a long run. However, once they’ve tried it, the response has been overwhelmingly positive. People are reporting fewer stomach problems and steadier energy.

Trouble Shooting GI Distress

  • If you’re having continued stomach issues on your long runs you can try changing to a different sports drink or fueling product. Read labels because certain sweeteners like fructose, maltodextrin, agave, and stevia can cause problems for some.
  • Another strategy to try is to make sure your pre-run meal is finished at least 3 hours before exercise.
  • You may also want to avoid dairy products because many people are lactose intolerant and don’t know it. The deficiency of the enzyme lactase can cause cramping, bloating, gas, and diarrhea.
  • A final cause of GI distress for some people is their caffeine intake so try cutting back on that A.M. dose of caffeine to see if that helps.

One thing that’s important to remember with fueling is that the goal is not to replace all the calories you burn. Your body simply cannot digest that many calories while you run. You’ll be in a calorie deficit (especially during long runs) but your body is equipped to deal with that.

So, when you’re figuring out a fueling strategy for a long run you don’t want to plan on consuming 1,000 calories if you’re running 10 miles. Men can usually take in a higher range of calories per hour while women should plan on using their body weight as a starting point. For example if you’re a 150 pound woman then try consuming 150 calories per hour while running.

What to Eat During Your Run:

Your long runs will be the time to try out various fuels and figure out your strategy. There are many different options available. Here are a few of the more popular options:

Energy Gels

  • How many will you need?

    An energy gel usually has a syrupy/gel-like consistency and provides carbohydrates to the body quickly. In the same category as gels would be most chews, GUs, blocks, chomps, sport beans, etc.. Most contain around 100 calories per serving. Gels are frequently provided at a couple of aid stations during marathons. Some people also find that the concentrated sugar in gels makes them sick to their stomach. This is because most gels have approximately a 73% concentration of sugars and the stomach isn’t equipped to deal with that effectively. You’ll notice that most gels recommend that you take it with 2-4 oz of water to reduce the concentration and help your body with absorption. The recommended use of energy gels is using one 5-10 minutes before starting a run if you’re starting out fasted and then one every 25-40 minutes thereafter (depending on your personal calorie needs). The amount of gels (or related products) you’ll need to consume depends on your metabolism, body weight, how much your system can absorb, and fitness level. The brand of energy gels you choose will be based on your personal preference and taste. If you have a sensitive stomach do some label reading to see what kind of sugars are contained in the product. If taking a whole gel at once doesn’t work for you it may be wise to take ½ at a time washed down with water from an aid station. That reduces the amount of sugar that hits your system at one time and gives it more time to absorb. If you’re planning on using the fueling products from an aid station during a race it’s wise to practice with that fuel during your long runs.

Sports Drinks

  • Sports drinks are offered at nearly every race

    Sports Drinks: Another popular method of fueling is using sports drinks. You can buy readymade drinks or powders that you mix on your own. The amount of calories per serving in your drink will depend on how much water you mix the powder with. It’s wise to follow the package directions because the osmolality of the carbohydrate solution is important in how it is assimilated into your body. If you choose to mix the powder thicker than recommended make sure you take it with water. Osmolality is basically the concentration of dissolved particles in your blood plasma. The higher the concentration of your carb source, the higher the osmolality. A product with a high osmolality will take longer to leave your stomach and intestines (during which time it’s not being made available to your muscles). Most races will provide sports drink at nearly every aid station. If you plan on taking advantage of this for your fueling it would be wise to practice with it in advance. If you choose to carry your own sports drink to fuel with make sure that you’ve practiced carrying the amount you’ll need for the race. Some people choose hand held bottles, waist packs, and hydration backpacks. Many larger marathons don’t allow hydration packs so be sure to take that into account when you’re planning your fueling.

Combination Products

  • Generation Ucan is our fuel of choice

    There are some products that contain a combination of carbohydrates and protein. Including some protein in your fuel plan helps the body avoid breaking down as much muscle during long distance efforts. A few combination products that come to mind include UCAN Performance Energy with protein, Hammer Perpetuem, UCAN snack bars, and many other energy bars. Energy bars typically have a high percentage of carbs, some protein, and minimal fat. They usually contain around 200 calories and have a more substantial consistency. Many people find that eating bars can disrupt their rhythm, require more space to carry, and may present digestion problems. You’ll also want to follow your bit of a bar with some type of fluid to help wash it down. If you choose to fuel with an energy bar of some kind be sure to take the total number of calories it contains into consideration. If it contains 200 calorie and you only need 150 calories per hour you’ll want to divide the bar and eat it in smaller portions. Eating 1/3 to 1/2 of the bar at a time also allows more time for the body to digest the calories it takes in.

“Real” Food

  • Many runners like to steer clear of more highly processed fuels and rely on real food options. Some of these may include: baked sweet potato, baked salted potatoes, rice balls, baby food pouches (applesauce, fruit sauces), nut butters, honey, maple syrup, flat pop/soda, trail mix, cheese, bacon, bananas, peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, dried fruit, candy, pretzels, etc.. A possible disadvantage of real food during running is that it often has a higher amount of fiber and fat and this many cause stomach upset. If you choose to use real food be sure to practice, practice, and practice. You don’t want to get in the middle of a race and have your stomach rebel. During races there are often “unofficial” aid stations set up with everything from beer and pretzels to pickles and candy. Unless you have an iron stomach, have practiced with these foods, or are running at a very easy pace be very careful about trying anything new on race day.


Post Run Fueling:

Proper fueling doesn’t stop when you’re done running. What you do in the post-run period is also very important. Make sure that you begin the refueling process with some protein and carbs within 30 minutes after your run. This is the optimum window of time that your body refills your muscles glycogen stores and starts repairing muscle. In other words, the time to carb-load is now.

You can train your muscles to store extra glycogen by faithfully refueling during this time period. Many experts recommend using a 3-1 carbohydrate to protein ratio for refueling. For women the hormone progesterone can increase muscle breakdown. Women should be getting in at least 25-30 grams of protein with our carbohydrates within 30 minutes post-long run or strength workout. There are many different types of recovery products out there to try or you can reach for “real” food options.

Nauseated After a Run?

If you feel nauseated during or after running, try to avoid consuming too many simple sugars which can cause “dumping syndrome.” Dumping syndrome is when your body can’t absorb the amount of sugars (or fats) consumed and sends them on through quickly. If you experience regular GI upset after running, try eating bland carbs like mashed potatoes, cream of wheat with maple syrup and ginger or peppermint tea sweetened with honey. Nausea post-run can also be caused by an electrolyte imbalance so adding some electrolytes to your water is essential.

You will probably be ready to eat a more substantial meal around an hour after your long run (sometimes you may not feel hungry at first or you may even be slightly nauseated if your electrolyte levels are off). Make sure the substantial meal includes a balance of complex carbs, protein, and fat. Also, focus on maintaining hydration in the hours after running. You don’t need to guzzle water the rest of the day, but make sure that you continue to drink. If it was a hot day or you sweated a lot it can be wise to add electrolytes to your water in the post-run period.

Hitting the Wall?

If you are having trouble with “bonking or hitting the wall” at some point during your run this is probably the point where your muscle stores of glycogen get used up. You need to focus on taking in more carbohydrate calories during the recovery period (to teach your muscles to carb load) and also practice fueling during the long run. Some people wait too long before beginning their fueling strategy.

If you wait until you’re feeling weak or shaky you most likely will have trouble replenishing calories to get on top of your energy needs. Remember, long runs are for practicing and you shouldn’t be doing anything new on race day (except maybe setting a distance or time PR).

Thanks for reading/listening to this episode. I hope it helps!

Nutrition for Runners

Just a heads up that we have a whole course on Nutrition for Runners created by Coach Jennifer Giles (RD) in the Academy that includes information on optimal fueling for runners.

Here’s the other lessons inside the course:

  • Power Breakfasts for Runners
  • Eat to Run or Run to Eat?
  • Nutrient Timing and Blood Sugar Regulation
  • Fueling During Runs
  • Hydration for Runners
  • Avoiding Weight Gain
  • Recovery Nutrition for Runners
  • Nutrition and Stress Fractures
  • Smoothie Making 101

This course is included with Academy membership along with our seven out courses, access to the Training Plan Vault, Podcast Vault, and our awesome online community. Join here.

Also Mentioned in This Episode

The MTA Virtual Half Marathon. Registration now open! Check out this year’s awesome medal and hat.

Generation Ucan -the revolutionary new way for runners to fuel. UCAN keeps your blood sugar stable, is gentle on your stomach, and allows your body to burn fat. Use the promo code “MTAFUEL” to save 15% off your order. Or if you’re new to UCAN, save 25% on your first order with code MTA25”.

Roar -How to Match Your Food and Fitness to Your Female Physiology for Optimum Performance, Great Health, and a Strong, Lean Body for Life by Dr. Stacy Sims

Our Upcoming RacesView our itinerary.

The post The Marathon Fueling Episode! appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Sep 12 2019

1hr

Play

Interview with Dean Karnazes + How to Manage Hunger During Training

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In this episode we speak with Dean Karnazes. He’s an accomplished ultra runner, best-selling author, and running ambassador.

And in the quick tip segment, you will hear how to manage hunger during marathon training while still losing weight and keeping your energy levels stable!

Interview with Dean Karnazes

Dean Karnazes might be the best known ultramarathoner of all time. He’s been featured by The Today Show, 60 Minutes, The Late Show with David Letterman (watch the clip below), The History Channel . . . the list goes on. Time Magazine named him as one of the “Top 100 Most Influential People in the World”.

His book Ultramarathon Man was one of the first running books I read. His newest collaboration is the book Running for Good -101 Stories for Runners & Walkers to Get You Going! which is produced by Chicken Soup for the Soul.

From this interview . . .

Dean talks about hi 525k run through Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, and Kazakstan.
The  U.S. State Department sent him to run 525 kilometers on the ancient Silk Road through Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, and Kazakhstan.  He ran through the desert in 110°f temps with a support crew that only spoke Russian.  The reception from locals was phenomenal but it did require him to drink a courtesy bowl of fermented horse milk.   

photo credit: Dean Karnazes

Hilarious Interview on the Late Show

Breaking a rib while running in Chile.

photo credit: Dean Karnazes

photo credit: Dean Karnazes

Running near his home in the Marin Headlands.

photo credit: Dean Karnazes

Also Mentioned in This Episode

The Kaisermarathon in Söll, Austria. Trevor is running this on October 5th. Send us an email through our contact page if you know about this race or if you live in Austria.

The Hartford Marathon in Connecticut. Angie is running this on October 12th 2019. This will be her first race in Connecticut and state number 47 in her 50 state quest.

On-Running Shoes -Try a pair of On’s for yourself for 30 days and put them to the test. That means actually running in them before you decide to keep them.

Managing Hunger During Training

Angelo Poli

Angelo Poli, metabolism expert and founder of MetPro, joined us to answer the question, “How does one manage hunger during marathon training while still losing weight and keeping your energy level stable?”. This is something that many runners struggle with!

Since November Angie has lost 30 pounds and got her marathon time back down to Boston Qualifying level using the MetPro system. Visit www.metpro.co/mta for a free consultation call.

The post Interview with Dean Karnazes + How to Manage Hunger During Training appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Aug 31 2019

59mins

Play

Ask the Coach Episode (Part 2) + Books!

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In this episode we answer questions sent in by Academy members about finding time for strength training, when to stretch, how to avoid cramping at the end of a marathon, and more, as we bring you part two of our Ask the Coach Q & A.

In the quick tip segment Angie shares the top book picks from her summer reading.

Ask the Coach Episode | Part 2

On this episode we were joined by Coach Kristen Williamson the newest member of the MTA coaching team. Kristen is a Registered Dietitian and Road Runners Club of America certified running coach. She is a 3:29:00 Marathoner, Boston Qualifier, and has a Master of Science in Dietetics as well as a MBA. To learn more about our coaching team see this page.


Questions Featured:

  1. Strength training. I hear so much about the benefits of getting into the gym, but struggling with how to fit that in with 5 days of weekly running and appropriate recovery. If I go to the gym on a rest day does that compromise recovery? If it does, how can it be fit in? if you add up all the advise out there it’s like run 5 days a week, but also make sure you are taking full days off for recovery. But also make sure you are getting into the gym twice a week for strength training, but not before or after a long run or quality run. And also add in a day for cross training. Would be great if there were 11 days in the week. -Eli
  2. How do you stretch appropriately before/after a long run or race? Especially when there is a lot of standing around before you actually start running? What about stretching in cold weather vs warmer weather? What are some of the ways you stretch before and after? -Yali
  3. How to avoid muscle cramps at the end of marathons? -Hanna-Leena
  4. What’s the funniest thing that has ever happened to you on a run? -Pat


Book Picks from My Summer Reading

Non-Fiction: Running and Mindset

  • Can’t Hurt Me by David Goggins
    This book was my top pick for this summer. I read it at a time when I was gearing up for big physical challenges and I could directly see how the motivation gleaned from this book helped me perform my best. David’s narrative of his life, the things he’s overcome, and the challenges he took on are intertwined with great motivational lessons. This book will change your mindset forever. FYI- Book contains strong language.
  • You (Only Faster) by Greg McMillan
    If you’re the type of person who really likes to dive into the individual variations of running and training plans this is the book for you. He talks about how you can maximize your running potential, be a healthy runner for life, and the differences between more endurance based and speed based energy systems.
  • Running Outside the Comfort Zone by Susan Lacke
    This is a fun and relatable book that really makes you want to get outside your comfort zone and not let fear hold you back. Check out our interview with author Susan Lacke on episode #291 for more information.
  • The Long Run by Matt Long
    This is one of those running books that sat on my shelf for nearly a decade before I got around to reading it. I’m glad that I finally took the time to read it because it was very inspirational. Matt tells the story of how he went from a NYC firefighter, triathlete, and marathoner gunning for a BQ to being hit by a bus while cycling. He survived despite overwhelming odds, had multiple surgeries, and had to relearn all aspects of mobility again as well as deal with serious depression. This is one of those books where you end up feeling like any excuses you have are weak-sauce.
  • Run or Die by Kilian Jornet
    This is another book that I’ve had for a long time but finally read. It was fascinating to hear the story of how Kilian grew up and his mindset and determination to take on some of the world’s top running challenges. Impossible and give up are not in his vocabulary.
  • 14 Minutes by Alberto Salazar
    This memoir by Alberto Salazar was very interesting and provided a behind the scenes look at the way he was raised, how to turned to running, his long-time battle with career ending injury, his coaching, and the near fatal heart attack that he had at age 49. The only thing I knew about him previously was that he was head coach of the Oregon Project and what I’d read from Dick Beardsley’s book Duel in the Sun.
  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight
    An interesting book about the humble and often tenuous beginnings of the Nike Corporation. Reading about the struggles that Phil Knight went through to bring his company to success gave me a new appreciation for the tenacity it takes to succeed in the business world. It’s truly amazing that the global phenomenon we know today almost didn’t get off the ground.
  • Presence by Amy Cuddy
    This book explores the power that being present has over our emotional, mental and physical state. She talks about how the posture of our body can influence our thought process and help us take on challenges. Even two minutes of doing a power pose can increase your testosterone and decrease your cortisol levels. You feel more confident, passionate, authentic, and enthusiastic. She encourages readers to, “Fake it until you become it and that tiny tweaks can lead to big changes.”

Other Books I Enjoyed This Summer

Nonfiction
Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert
Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics by Dan Harris
Extreme Ownership by Jocko Willink & Leif Babin
Make Your Bed by William H. Mcraven
Fearless-The Undaunted Courage and Ultimate Sacrifice of Navy Seal Team Six Operator Adam Brown by Eric Blehm
Girl, Stop Apologizing by Rachel Hollis
The Lost City of the Monkey God by Douglas Preston
American Wolf by Nate Blakeslee
Maid by Stephanie Land
Them by Ben Sasse
Running the Books by Avi Steinberg
Inheritance by Dani Shapiro
Running- A Love Story by Jen A. Miller

Fiction:
The Circle by Dave Eggers
The Light We Lost by Jill Santopolo
Dark Matter by Blake Crouch
Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman
The Bonesetter’s Daughter by Amy Tan
The Inkeeper Series by Ilona Andrews

Also Mentioned in This Episode

The MTA Virtual Half Marathon. Registration now open! Check out this year’s awesome medal and hat.

The Runner’s Toolbox -8 inexpensive items to keep at home to prevent and self-treat running injuries.

Generation Ucan -the revolutionary new way for runners to fuel. UCAN keeps your blood sugar stable, is gentle on your stomach, and allows your body to burn fat. Use the promo code “MTACOACH” to save 15% off your order. Or if you’re new to UCAN, save 25% on your first order with code MTA25”.

On-Running Shoes -Try a pair of On’s for yourself for 30 days and put them to the test. That means actually running in them before you decide to keep them.

DripDrop O.R.S. An electrolyte powder developed by a doctor to treat dehydration. Go to www.dripdrop.com/mta to get 20% off any purchase.

The post Ask the Coach Episode (Part 2) + Books! appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Aug 21 2019

59mins

Play

Ask the Coach Episode + Road Trip Rundown!

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In this episode we bring you an Ask the Coach Episode as we answer questions about hill work, tricks to increasing speed, and what to eat before a race and more.

Plus we give you a road trip rundown of our 7,719 mile journey across America and Angie will explain how to keep your habit of running while traveling.

Ask the Coach Episode

On this episode we were joined by Coach Kristen Williamson the newest member of the MTA coaching team. Kristen is a Registered Dietitian and Road Runners Club of America certified running coach. She is a 3:29:00 Marathoner, Boston Qualifier, and has a Master of Science in Dietetics as well as a MBA.

Questions for this episode

  1. Hills! How should I be running hills? Do I run them at an easy pace? Fast pace? What level effort should I be at when I’m doing hill runs specifically, is what I’m wondering. Also, what is considered a good elevation gain? I live in Minnesota and it’s not terribly hilly. I can’t stand running on a treadmill, and I don’t mind driving a little. What sort of elevation gain would be considered effective as a hill workout? -Rachel
  2. For speed workouts which do you consider more beneficial to a marathon runner and why 1) Short sprints & short recovery 2) longer sprints with longer recover. -Dave
  3. Tricks to increasing marathon speed? -Amanda
  4. Should you make any specific changes to your diet in the week leading up to a race? I don’t want to deprive myself of well balanced calories and carbs to do well but also don’t want to go in feeling bloated or risk gi distress. -Carolyn
  5. Food for fuel: What do I need to know about calories (the unit to measure energy) versus carbohydrates (sugar broken down to release energy) versus protein (amino acids that build muscle and help body to function)? I know what they are bc my 2 year old is a Type 1 diabetic, but I’m not sure what is most important for long runs and when to eat them. -Bridgit
  6. Debunking benefits of fad diets + how to adjust lifestyle and diet for optimum performance. -Drew

Road Trip Rundown

The “camper”. Our home for 48 days.

The Numbers

  • 48 days on the road
  • 15 states
  • 5 National Parks/ Monuments/ Historical sites
  • 7,719 miles
  • 3 marathons (2 were ultras)
  • Approximately $2,560 on gas
  • 8 German restaurants
  • 2 tire blowouts on the camper

Charlevoix, Michigan


Our first stop was at the Charlevoix Marathon. Hear Angie’s race recap on episode #288.

The Black Hills, South Dakota

Devil’s Tower Monument, Wyoming

Montana



Divide 50k in Butte

Washington

Olympic National Park

The first blowout

Angie and Trevor with Coach Kristen (center)


Also mentioned in this episode

The MTA Virtual Half Marathon. Registration now open! Check out this year’s awesome medal and hat.

MetPro -Using Metabolic Profiling, MetPro analyzes your metabolism and provides you with an individualized strategy to obtain your weight or body composition goals.

NuNee -designed specifically to relieve that dreaded Runner’s Knee pain. Use code MTA15 for a 15% discount.

On-Running Shoes -Try a pair of On’s for yourself for 30 days and put them to the test. That means actually running in them before you decide to keep them.

DripDrop O.R.S. An electrolyte powder developed by a doctor to treat dehydration. Go to dripdrop.com/mta to get 20% off any purchase.

Great sites for finding races and running paths while traveling:

The post Ask the Coach Episode + Road Trip Rundown! appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Aug 11 2019

1hr 13mins

Play

Running Outside The Comfort Zone

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In this episode we bring you an interview with Susan Lacke, author of the new book Running Outside The Comfort Zone -An Explorer’s Guide To The Edges of Running.

In the quick tip segment Angie answers a question about what to do if your training plan doesn’t have the correct number of weeks until race day.

Interview with Susan Lacke

Susan Lacke is a college professor and writer for Women’s Running, Competitor, and Triathlete. Her new book is called Running Outside the Comfort Zone -An Explorer’s Guide to the Edges of Running.

Some of the races she did in her year of running outside the comfort zone:

  • The Pony Express 50 miler in Utah
  • Empire State Building Run Up
  • Grand Canyon Rim-to-Rim
  • Across the Years 24-Hour Race
  • Caliente Bare Dare 5k (naked run)
  • Cooper’s Hill Cheese Roll in the UK
  • Midwest Wife Carrying Championship with her husband
  • The Comrades Marathon in South Africa

Also Mentioned in this Episode

Susan Lacke online: www.susanlacke.com

The Drury Hotels -Use our link to save 15% off your stay at our home away from home.

On-Running Shoes -Try a pair of On’s for yourself for 30 days and put them to the test. That means actually running in them before you decide to keep them.

MetPro.co -Nutrition concierge and coaching company to help you reach your body composition goals.

The post Running Outside The Comfort Zone appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jul 31 2019

47mins

Play

Angie and Trevor’s 50k Sufferfest Extravaganza!

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In this episode we tell you all about our summer ultramarathon sufferfest in the mountains of South Dakota and Montana. Plus Coach Angie will explain how to effectively go from marathon to 50k.

Angie and Trevor’s 50k Sufferfest Extravaganza!

The Black Hills 50k

I choose the Black Hills 50k in Sturgis as my South Dakota race in my quest to finish a marathon or beyond in all 50 states. There were a couple of other options in the state that I’d been eying but this race was too convenient to pass up. It also landed exactly one week after my Michigan marathon.

Pre-race:
The 50k was part of multiple other distances that they offered including a 30k, 50 mile, and 100 miler. We arrived in town Thursday before the race and stayed at the Sturgis RV Park & Campground where packet pickup was taking place.

Race Morning:

The race offered busing out to the start line from the city park and the 50k bus left at 6 a.m.. It was already completely light by this time and the amount of heat for that early in the morning worried me a bit. It was a 45 minute bus ride to the start line. When we got to the 50k starting area near the aid station at Dalton Lake there were a few port-a-pots, a couple camper trailers for the volunteers, the drop bag area for the 50 and 100 milers, and the food table. The sun was feeling very hot and we had over an hour wait until the 8am start. As we waited there were several 100 milers coming through the aid station and we were able to cheer them on.

Course:
The 50k distance was a point to point course with over 95% on single track following the Centennial Trail. Marking the 100th anniversary of statehood, 1889 to 1989, the 111-mile Centennial Trail represents the diversity of South Dakota. The Trail crosses the prairie grasslands near Bear Butte State Park and climbs into the Black Hills high country, skirting lakes and streams until it reaches Wind Cave National Park near Hot Springs.

The starting elevation was 4,455 ft and there was a total of 3,891 ft of climbing.

There were five creek crossings, one which came over my knees. I always find the first creek crossing (or the first time you get your feet wet) to be a bit daunting. They had ropes strung across the crossings to hang onto since the creek bottom was a bit slippery and the water flowing fairly strong. But after that first crossing the coId water felt very refreshing to my overheated body.

Thankfully the trail shoes I was wearing, On Cloudventures, dried quickly and provided good traction and stability. I found the course to be very clearly marked and it was beautiful with views of mountains, valleys, trees, and a few cattle.

Aid Stations:
The aid stations were located approximately every 7 miles. They were well stocked with fueling supplies and the usual great ultra food offerings. They handed out collapsible cups at packet pick up to cut down on the number of disposable cups. The race email said,

“In reality, if you’re running an event like this you should probably have a liquid carrying vessel of some sort on your person. We really don’t care if it’s a collapsible cup or an empty beer can that you scavenged from the bed of your truck, but we would strongly encourage you to carry something reusable to drink out of. Just doing our part to save the planet, one cup (or beer can) at a time!”

My experience:
My strategy was to stay very conservative the first half which meant that I didn’t really pass people unless they were hiking uphill more slowly than me. I remember looking down at my watch about midway (25k) and thinking that I’d already been out there longer than my last marathon. But overall I enjoyed being out on the trail and was able to keep my headspace very positive. I kept rolling my right ankle several times which really hurt but it didn’t seem to interfere with my ability to run. I also caught my foot several times on the trail but managed to catch myself before falling. Gracefulness on the trails is apparently not my strong suit.

For gear I was using compression socks (for support and protection of the legs in tall grass/weeds), ON Cloud Ventures, Trail Toes ointment, Nathan Vapor Airess Pack, and Generation UCAN bars. Trevor and the boys met me at the final large aid station at Alkali Creek (around mile 24) and gave me a Mountain Dew which hit the spot with the jolt of caffeine and sugar.

My conservative pacing strategy paid off and I didn’t get passed by anyone in the last 8 miles and was able to make up some ground. For the final mile the course came off the trail back into town to the finish area in the City Park. I was able to pass several people and my final mile was my fastest with a 9:45 pace. My finish time was 7:41:44 for my 3rd 50k (and slowest to date). They gave out a nice finisher’s mug (and the race shirt was great as well). I was 34th out of 96 50k runners.

Finish Line:
The finish cut off for all the distances was 8 p.m. on Saturday June 29th, 2019 (the 100 milers had started the previous day).

  • The 100 miler had 41 finishers. The men’s winner was Andrew Pavek with a time of 21:47:58. The women’s winner was Lisa Walbridge with a time of 27:01:04.
  • The 50 miler had 62 finishers. The men’s winner was Devon Olson with a time of 7:50:40. The women’s winner was Christine O’Gorman with a time of 11:14:34.
  • The 50k had 96 finishers. The men’s winner was Mark Marzen with a time of 4:36:25. The women’s winner was Denise Kaelberer with a time of 6:16:44.
  • The 30k had 93 finishers. The men’s winner was Tim Fryer with a time of 2:50:38. The women’s winner was Alicia Porsch with a time of 3:18:03.
  • Shout out to MTA listener Yoko Hartland who finished in 3:36:19 and placed first in her AG.

Post race:
After finishing I felt pretty tired from all those hours in the heat. We had a nice dinner to celebrate and then hit the road the next day to continue our travels. I was pretty stiff and sore, especially through the quads, for the next three days and came away with a couple bruised toenails. I’m guessing that my body wasn’t completely recovered from the marathon a week before. Still, I thoroughly enjoyed the race and would recommend it to anyone who wants to enjoy some great trails in South Dakota.


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The Divide 50k in Butte, Montana

By Trevor
The Divide 50k took place on July 13, 2019. My build up to the race wasn’t stellar but I had good mental training after reading the book Can’t Hurt Me by David Goggins.

The race started in Thompson Park- a large land area south of Butte that connects to the Continental Divide Trail (CDT). The CDT runs from Canada to Mexico along the Continental Divide for a total of 3,100 miles.

The Course:
The course was mostly single track and kinda congested the first mile until everyone spread out. There were tiny orange flags along the course for directions and every runner received a sheet with turn-by-turn directions. I still managed to miss a turn!

We ran for a couple miles and came upon an old railroad tunnel. I knew there would be tunnels- the race recommended bringing a headlamp.

The runners ahead of me ran into the tunnel so, naturally, I followed them. We emerged from the other side and continued running . . . then I saw a group of runners backtracking toward me and I realized that something was wrong. Apparently we had all missed a turn and were not supposed to run through the tunnel but it had been like a vortex pulling us all in.

Sure enough, before the tunnel, the course went off to the left. It was marked with flags but we all missed it. It cost us about a mile of backtracking. As we were running back to find the turn we missed we kept intercepting runners and telling them the bad news. I pulled out my sheet of instructions and sure enough! It said, “Do not go through the tunnel- turn left before the tunnel”.

This illustrates how easy it is to get into a rhythm, especially on a hot day, and forget to pay attention to the course.

We eventually came to the correct tunnel which was nice and cool (temperature wise) to run through . . . and very dark, so dark you couldn’t see your feet. Another highlight of the course was a rail to trail bridge spanning a massive canyon.

We came to the first aid station at the 16k point (Pipestone Pass) where I grabbed a bag of potato chips and filled up my hydration pack. Once we got back on the trail it eventually connected to the CDT (the first time we ran on it). I was pretty much by myself for the next couple of hours. The higher I climbed the more spectacular the views.

Slogging Up the Mountain
I knew that the next aid station was at the 25k (halfway) point and ending for the 25k runners but I didn’t know at any given point what kilometer I was in. I chose to run according to feel rather than pace. On the way up and down the mountain it was endless switchbacks but the trail was smooth and very runnable. No sounds of civilization, no people, just a lone trek through the mountains. My strategy was to run the downhill sections and walk the uphill sections.

Half Way Point
When I arrived at the 25k aid station there were 4 or 5 runners hanging out (some had just finished the 25k and they were going to get a ride back to the start). It was stocked with lots of goodies -chips, candy, granola bars, drinks. I grabbed another bag of chips and filled my water up. They did have some lawn chairs and I sat down and got the rocks out of my shoes (it felt great to sit down).

The clouds started to get very dark and a thunderstorms blew in. Around that time Angie texted me and said “Are you getting any of this rain?”

After leaving the aid station I had a long slow slog back up the mountain from whence I came. It started to rain and I got out my poncho but it was superfluous and actually trapped in too much body heat.

I continued the uphill death march for another hour on very tired legs. Angie texted me again to find out how many miles I’d gone. All I knew was that I’d passed the 25k point plus 5 more miles. She texted back,

Only 18k (11 miles) to go

My right ear plugged up which happens to me when I’m out trail running. I was worried about my water situation and sucking it down like a camel. Since I couldn’t breathe through my nose I had to catch my breath after getting a drink.

I ate a frosted strawberry Pop Tart around 25 miles (don’t judge). It tasted magical. I hadn’t had one in decades.

There was a tiny stream crossing and I bent down to splash some water on my face. I could see little gold specks in the stream and it reminded me of gold panning in Juneau, Alaska. When I bent down I laid down on the ground and it felt so good. Then I thought to myself, “Angie would never allow herself to do this.”

After I got going again it seemed like every rock and tree stump looked like an inviting chair. There was one point where a tree had fallen across the trail and I had to crawl under it. Gravity felt heavy and I lingered under the tree . . . just laying back for a minute. I thought, “if this wasn’t a race I’d probably take a longer break here.”

As I was laying there a runner came up to me and said, “How’s the lactic acid treating you?” And I felt like a doofus to be laying on the ground. I hadn’t seen another runner for hours. Her name was Anna from Bozeman and she was very friendly. We ran together for a mile and then she surged ahead.

As the day warmed up I have visions of jumping into a cold lake. It was hard to make myself keep going and it was still mostly uphill. I was starting to get cramps on the inside of my thighs which I’d never felt before.

I got to the very last water stop but all that was left were five empty jugs.

This 50k hurt in the usual places that a marathon does and additionally my neck was sore from the combination of looking down and carrying my pack. With 2 miles to go a runner came upon me and he said that this was his 3rd ultra in 14 days. I asked him “why?”. He said, “Just to see if I have what it takes.”

I surged ahead and finished before him crossing the line at about 4:30 in the afternoon. The website says my time was 8:13:17:42. Plenty of room for a PR next time!

The race director congratulated me, I found a lawn chair, and dug into the nice post race snacks on offer -Pringles and a beer. I put my recovery sandals on and waited for my ride. It very satisfying feeling to have finished a 50k especially after very minimal training.

Once you get up to marathon shape it’s not that hard to maintain your endurance and jump into a 50k if you don’t care about your finishing time. If I can finish a 50k I have no doubt that you guys can too.

Also Mentioned in This Episode

MTA Beginner 50k Training Plan -designed by Coach Angie Spencer to get the beginner ready to run a 50k ultramarathon. This is a 20 week long plan that will have you running 4 days per week with interspersed cross-training. (Includes: Downloadable/Printable Training Plan, Detailed Explanation, Core Workout 1.0 & Core Workout 2.0 documents and Metric Version).

CEP Compression -Check out the latest tall compression sock from CEP! The 3.0 has an updated look, upgraded fit and feel thanks to a blend of 16 yarns. But it has the same best in class graduated compression, now just a little easier to put on. Use the code “Marathon” for 15% off from now till August 31st.

Generation Ucan -the revolutionary new way for runners to fuel. UCAN keeps your blood sugar stable, is gentle on your stomach, and allows your body to burn fat. Use the promo code “MTA50k” to save 15% off your order. Or if you’re new to UCAN, save 25% on your first order with code MTA25”.

DripDrop O.R.S. An electrolyte powder developed by a doctor to treat dehydration. Go to dripdrop.com/mta to get 20% off any purchase.

The post Angie and Trevor’s 50k Sufferfest Extravaganza! appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jul 21 2019

58mins

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Podcaster Meet Up! Joint Episode with C Tolle Run

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In this episode we bring you a special joint episode with Olympic runner and podcaster Carrie Tollefson from the C Tolle Run. And in the quick tip segment, Angie will explain how to communicate expectations with your running partner before you race together.

Podcaster Meet Up! Joint Episode with C Tolle Run

Carrie Tollefson is a middle distance runner from Minnesota. She represented the US in the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens, Greece, in the 1500 meters. She does regular media coverage for the New York Road Runners including the NYC Marathon and the NYC Half Marathon. Carrie has done commentary for the Twin Cities Marathon, Boston Marathon, and Tokyo Marathon. She hosts a weekly podcast called C Tolle Run.

It’s been fun to meet and collaborate with other podcasters through the years. We kept the agenda loose on this episode -the goal was to have a fun conversation. We ended up talking about some important topics, like pregnancy and running, time management, elite runner Gabriele “Gabe” Grunewald -a fellow Minnesota runner and friend of Carrie’s who lost her battle with cancer on June 11th. We also share our top picks for small town marathons.

Enjoy!

Also Mentioned in This Episode

The Revel Kulia Marathon in Hawaii. Angie is running this on January 18th 2020!

Soar Running -They’re giving away a SOAR Summer Training Bundle to 2 lucky winners: each bundle includes a pair of shorts or bottoms, a T-shirt or vest and a Lightweight Cap. www.soarrunning.com/mta.

On Running Shoes – Swiss made running shoe with sole technology that gives you the sensation of running on clouds. Head to on-running.com/mta to test On shoes or gear first hand, and experience what running on clouds feels like.

DripDrop O.R.S. An electrolyte powder developed by a doctor to treat dehydration. Go to dripdrop.com/mta to get 20% off any purchase.

Shout Out

Absolutely overjoyed on this 4th of July! Ran a 2.3 mile sprint race this morning and came in 5th place overall and 1st place in my age group with a time of 12:44. 5:40 average miles and it was a 30 second improvement from last year and I felt absolutely amazing during and after the race. I couldn’t do what I do without support from MTA and my wonderful girlfriend who supports me every training run and race. A huge shoutout to Coach Angie who had put together a great training plan for me this summer so far and got me to this race feeling fantastic! I can’t wait to see what the rest of the summer has in store for me. -Luke

The post Podcaster Meet Up! Joint Episode with C Tolle Run appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jul 11 2019

1hr 6mins

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Charlevoix Marathon Race Recap + How to Keep Pushing in a Marathon

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The first main stop on our 2019 camping trip out West (which Trevor is calling our Ultramarathon Sufferfest Extravaganza) was the beautiful Charlevoix Marathon along the shores of Lake Michigan.

This was my 58th marathon, 45th state, and 4th fastest marathon.

The day went better than I expected and I managed to squeak out a BQ and get 1st place in my age group.

Let me tell you all about it . . .


Race Recap: The Charlevoix Marathon

The 13th annual Charlevoix Marathon was held on Saturday, June 22nd, 2019. They also hosted a half marathon, 10k and 5k the same day.

Pre-race:

Packet pick up was available on Friday afternoon and early race morning. The packet pick up and race finishing area was held at Bridge Park in historic downtown Charlevoix, adjacent to the famous draw bridge. Traffic into downtown Charlevoix was very slow but once we got there getting my bib, shirt, and reusable race bag was very easy.

Angie and Trev in Charlavoix

After scoping out the race area and getting my bib we strolled around the beautiful lakefront and then headed to our campsite which was located about 15 miles away. I spent the rest of the day taking it easy and getting my race kit put together.

Race Morning:

Since the marathon start time was at 6:30am (and I like to be early) we decided that I would drive myself to the race. So, if you’re envisioning Trevor and the kids out on the course cheering me on or waiting at the finish line that didn’t happen.

Look at this tiny race bib!

There was plenty of free downtown parking on race morning. I got there around 45 minutes before the race started and had my choice of spots. There was also plenty of time to use the port-a-pots and head over to the start area. A listener named Mike who was there for the half marathon found me and we had a nice chat and got a picture. I also saw MTA member Heidi at the start. She and her sister were doing the 10k which started at 7:15 a.m.

The race had a good announcer and sound system and they solicited a volunteer from the crowd to sing the National Anthem (since their scheduled person called in sick). The weather was clear and mid-50’s at the start and the early morning light was beautiful. I lined up just behind the 3:45 pace group and waited for the starting gun. I felt excited to be there with just the right amount of pre-race anticipation.

The Course:

The start line is on Bridge Street just beyond the draw bridge which opens every 30 minutes. Lake Michigan was visible just to the left and Round Lake to the right. For the first three miles we went through some nice shady neighborhoods before winding out of town on a paved bike/walk path.

The course is an out and back so that makes it more predictable than a point to point courses. You know anything that goes up on the way out will be down on the way back and vise versa. The course is mostly flat with a few rolling hills. There was one hill in the earlier miles that I briefly walked because I didn’t want to elevate my heart rate too much at that point.

The course ventures around the local ski mountain Mount McSauba, down tree lined roads, along the lakeshore, and then the turn around point was at Little Traverse Bay. There were a couple miles of the course on a wooden bridge that was a nice change on the legs.

I can see why Runner’s World Magazine named the Charlevoix Marathon as one of the best “small town marathons” in the United States.

The course stayed nice and wide throughout and there was plenty of room to run. This felt like a big contrast from previously running the London Marathon where it was crowded the whole way. There were stretches that I wasn’t running around anyone but there were also plenty of sections where I leap frogged other runners who were around the same pace.

The course is advertized as fast and flat (unless you’re from Florida says the race info). They also advertize a high rate of BQ’s on the course. In 2018 19.6% of marathoners BQ’d and this year 16.4% BQ’d.

Aid Stations:

There weren’t many spectators out on the course so it was nice to see the friendly people at the aid stations. The aid stations were located approximately every 1.5 miles and had water and sports drink. A few locations also had extras like candy and there was even a bacon stop. Since the course was out and back the bacon stop was located at mile 3 and 23 and I didn’t feel like testing my body with it at that point. For my fueling I used Generation Ucan snack bars (one 30 minutes before) and ½ bar every 5 miles. I also took some electrolyte capsules. I was also drinking a cup of water at each aid station and dumping one on myself to stay cool in the later miles.

Use the promo code “MTABQ” to save 15% off your order. Or if you’re new to UCAN, save 25% on your first order with code MTA25”.

Finish Line:

During the marathon my mantra was “keep pushing.” This kept me from getting comfortable at a pace and slacking off (and also helped keep my mindset strong). My legs felt strong although I did have some glute soreness which I took as a good sign that they were doing their job (and not giving me hamstring pain).

I was happy to have a surge of energy to run the last mile with a 7:58 pace. I had a strong finishing kick the final 0.2 miles to cross the finish line in 3:39:25.

  • This was my 58th marathon and 45th state and 4th fastest marathon (haven’t run faster for 5 years). My split for the first half was 1:48:40 and 2nd half split was 1:51:06. Overall, I was 88/364 and the 21/168 female. In addition to squeaking out a BQ (my qualifying time is 3:40).

The finish line was located back in historic Charlevoix. There were a good number of spectators cheering runners to a strong finish.

  • The men’s winner for the marathon was Leo Foley with a time of 2:42:46.
  • The female marathon champion was Rachel Whipple with a time of 3:07:30.
  • The half marathon male champion was Will Schrantz with a time of 1:13:44
  • The female half marathon winner was Shelby Kelsh with a time of 1:23:27.
  • The marathon had a total of 364 finishers.
  • The half marathon had 719 finishers.
  • The 10k had 279 finishers.
  • And the 5k had 359 finishers.

The post race area was past the bridge in the downtown area where they’d hosted packet pickup. For food and drink options they had water, chocolate milk, licorice, fruit snacks, bananas, apples, chips, popcorn, pizza, and rice krispie bars. Runners reclined on the grass out in the sun to eat their food, wait for family members, and to participate in the post-race award ceremony.

MTA Meet Up

I drove back to our camper and was able to get a shower before we headed back to Charlevoix for the MTA meet up at The Villager Pub. It was awesome to get to meet Dan Beard from MI who ran the marathon, Heidi from MD (who was coming off an injury that prevented her from doing the marathon and walked the 10k) and her sister Wendy who walked her first 10k, and sisters Karen and Beth from MI who did the half marathon as part of their training for an upcoming marathon.

MTA Meet Up

After the race I met up with another MTA listener from the Traverse City area named Amy. She’d run and did great in the 5k and it was fun to talk with her. Since my phone died she graciously became my personal photographer. I went and checked my time and was shocked to see that I finished first in my AG (40-44). However I wasn’t able to stick around for the award ceremony because I needed to get back to Trevor and the boys. I also met up with listener Tina and her husband Mike (who was a great at cheering out on the course). Tina also finished 1st in her AG and BQ’d.

with MTA listener Tina

How to Keep Pushing in a Marathon

I mentioned that I started the marathon around the 3:45 pace group but quickly passed the group because there was too much talking and it was hard for me to focus. I guess I just wasn’t in the head space for being around a group the whole marathon (maybe because I’d basically had no privacy or alone time in the previous 5 days as we traveled with the camper). I put on an audiobook (which I find helps keep my mind engaged without the adrenaline spikes that music can provide) and listened to that until my phone died around mile 15.

My strategy going into the race was to run as strong as possible and leave it all there. That was one reason why I kept a fairly aggressive pace in the beginning.

I had just come off reading the book Can’t Hurt Me by David Goggins and that really helped me be in a good place mentally. For those who aren’t familiar with him, he came from a very rough background of poverty and abuse and went on to become a Navy Seal and general bad ass.

He’s a very extreme personality who is driven to find the limits physically and mentally (he also went through Army Ranger training, set the pull up record for 4,230 pull ups in 24 hours, has run the Badwater 135 numerous times, etc.) While I don’t endorse his way of training because he absolutely trashes his body, he shares a lot of great mindset strategies and tips. In fact he starts out the book with a solo mission that goes like this:

“Situation: You are in danger of living a life so comfortable and soft that you will die without ever realizing your true potential. Mission: To unshackle your mind. Ditch the victim’s mentality forever. Own all aspects of your life completely. Build an unbreakable foundation. Execution: Read this cover to cover. Study the techniques within, accept all ten challenges. Repeat. Repetition will callous your mind. If you do your job to the best of your ability, this will hurt. This mission is not about making yourself feel better. This mission is about being better and having a greater impact on the world. Don’t stop when you are tired. Stop when you are done.” -David Goggins

There’s a lot of language in the book but it’s also fascinating and a great way to dial in a stronger mental game.

My Training

“Please share your goals, pacing strategy, and any adjustments you made during the race.” -Peter

My goal going into this marathon was to have a strong race and finish as sub-4 as possible. I had a lot of confidence coming off the London Marathon 7 weeks ago that I could at least do that time (3:59) or better. After London I took 2-3 weeks for easy running and didn’t do any runs over 90 minutes during that time. Then I had time to do a 17 mile (2:30) long run and 20 mile (3:05) long run before doing a 3 week taper before this marathon. Both long runs were run in fairly warm conditions on a hilly course and I averaged around a 9:35 pace. So this didn’t give me a lot of information on how my body would do on a flatter marathon course. I’d lost about 6 more pounds since the London Marathon so I knew this would also be a factor in my favor.

Are you still using the Hanson’s Marathon Training Method? -Debbie

When we did the episode about how we were training for the London Marathon I mentioned that I was loosely basing my training off the Hanson’s Training Method. So, I need to clarify that I never strictly followed this method. But I did take some features and incorporate them into my training. That would include running more days per week, going into my long run with my legs somewhat fatigued, and capping my longest run at 3 hours.

Since the London Marathon I’ve been doing most of my shorter training runs on the treadmill because my allergies have been so bad. I also find that it’s easier to keep my pace slower for easy runs on the TM because there isn’t the variation in terrain. I’ve been keeping up my schedule of core and lower body strength training, getting regular massage, and getting lots of sleep.

My Pacing Strategy

I can’t say that I had much of a pacing strategy going in to the Charlevoix Marathon. I wanted to keep my effort level fairly steady in the first 20 miles so that it was challenging but not exhausting. From experience I know that I can usually muster a few strong finishing miles so I had the mental confidence going in that I can be strong after mile 20.

One of my go-to mantras is “I’m stronger after mile 20.” I’ve also heard some coaches say that the first half of a marathon is through mile 20 and the second half is the final 10k. I started just behind the 3:45 pacing group thinking that it would be a nice stretch goal. However, like I mentioned, I decided early on to pass that group because it felt too wearing to listen to the constant chatter. I figured at some point that I might end up seeing them again.

I tried to take advantage of certain features of the course like opening up my pace a bit on downhill sections. A couple times I glanced down to see my pace, saw it was pretty fast for the early miles, did a body scan (breathing, muscles, etc), and hoped I wouldn’t regret that pace later. I think every marathoner worries occasionally about a fast first half coming back to bite them. I’ve certainly blown up plenty of times later in a marathon. But I knew that my energy felt solid and the cool morning was working to my advantage so I wanted to capitalize on that as much as possible too.

Mentally I tried to maintain a balance of being focused but not obsessing over the little things. It’s a temptation during a marathon to fall back to the pace of least resistance and I was determined to fight that. My mantra every time I felt any negativity or doubt creep in was “you’re okay, stay hard.” I also kept telling myself, “keep pushing.”

I was able to reel in a couple runners who had gotten ahead of me during the race and that felt good. It’s okay to let a bit of competition creep in as long as you’re careful to keep the big picture in mind. Most of us aren’t racing for 1st place so it’s important to not let your ego get the better of you by racing people mid-race.

Around mile 20 I was trying to do some calculations in my head and figured that if I could keep sub-9:00 miles to the finish I would finish around 3:40. But math is hard during a marathon so I didn’t obsess over my pace and just kept pushing. With 3 miles left I realized that I had a good chance of finishing sub 3:40 which would be a BQ if I kept up my pace. But I never allow myself to get overconfident until I’ve actually crossed the finish line.

with MTA listener Mike

At mile 24 MTA listener Mike unexpectedly showed up to run the last couple miles with me. One thought I had was “I can’t let him see me whimp out in the last couple of miles.” Despite pushing hard up a final hill I still had enough in me to have a good finishing kick for the last 0.2 miles. It was almost unbelievable to look down and see sub 3:40 on my watch. I got the biggest post-marathon high feeling so happy and grateful for such a strong marathon. When I got over to the timing table and saw my official time of 3:39:25 along with the news that I was first in my age group it was icing on the cake.


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Also Mentioned in This Episode

CEP Compression -Check out the latest tall compression sock from CEP, the 3.0 with an updated look, upgraded fit and feel thanks to a blend of 16 yarns, with the same best in class graduated compression, now just a little easier to put on. Use the code “Marathon” for 15% off from now till August 31st.

Generation Ucan -the revolutionary new way for runners to fuel. UCAN keeps your blood sugar stable and allows your body to burn fat. Use the promo code “MTABQ” to save 15% off your order. Or if you’re new to UCAN, save 25% on your first order with code MTA25”.

MetPro -Using Metabolic Profiling, MetPro analyzes your metabolism and provides you with an personal nutrition coach and individualized strategy to obtain your weight or body composition goals.

DripDrop O.R.S. An electrolyte powder developed by a doctor to treat dehydration. Go to dripdrop.com/mta to get 20% off any purchase.

VARIDESK -the world’s leading standing desk solution, converting any desk into a standing desk so you can maintain a healthy active lifestyle in the office or at home.

Love Beets – Love Beets offers fun flavors and simple beet products for beet lovers and beet newbies alike! Use code MTA at checkout for 20% off online orders or look for their products in retail stores nationwide.

The post Charlevoix Marathon Race Recap + How to Keep Pushing in a Marathon appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jul 01 2019

50mins

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Marathon Success Story with Dr. Jon Lepley

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In this episode we bring you a marathon success story with Academy member Jon Lepley who after a life-long struggle with addiction decided to run a marathon at the age of 40 and well . . . you will just have to hear what happened next!

And in the quick tip segment, Angie will explain how to intelligently gauge your response to training so you know if what you’re doing is working.


Marathon Success Story with Dr. Jon Lepley

Jon Lepley is a long time listener to the podcast and Academy member from Lancaster, Pennsylvania. He is the Medical Director at Eagleville Hospital -a large inpatient drug and alcohol treatment facility with a long legacy of treating underserved and stigmatized people. Before this he was the doctor at the Philadelphia Jail where he started an addiction treatment program that has now been studied by other correctional systems around the country. Last year alone he was able to treat 1200 people entering the Philadelphia jail addicted to heroin.

This interview was inspired by an email that Jon sent us back in April. His story is a powerful illustration of how running can help turn one’s life around.

Here is the email.

Hi Trevor and Angie,

I’ve been meaning to reach out for a few months now. I didn’t really make time to contribute to your episode 262 last year, and I just wanted to make sure you were aware of the role your podcast played in my life these past few years.

I spent many years of my life addicted to various drugs and alcohol. There’s no real cause for that, it’s just how I’m put together. I had been able to achieve a lot of things despite these addictions…finishing college, getting in to medical school, becoming a doctor, getting married…or perhaps partly because of it. Most of these endeavors were largely undertaken in an attempt to “fix” myself. However, by age 30, my use of drugs and alcohol was simply not sustainable. I found myself in a ton of debt and out of work and in a psychiatric hospital…just lucky to be alive.

I did receive addiction treatment at age 30, and a second chance at a career. I figured out how to go through life without using drugs and alcohol for the sake of retaining a medical license, but I definitely did not figure out how to be content in life. In the years that followed, I found myself on a downward spiral of different sorts. By age 37 I had totally lost my way and reached even lower depths without the aid of addictive substances. From a career standpoint, I decided to quit my job and work nearly 90 miles from my home as a doctor in the Philadelphia Jail system. Truth be told, I just wanted to hide from the world. A relatively massive big city jail system seemed like a good place to do that.

It was in that bleak setting that I found your podcast. I just turned 40 years old and was working as a jail doctor 90 miles from my family. In some ways, I did thrive in that jail environment. I learned how to be a good doctor and how to genuinely care for people while setting healthy boundaries. But a familiar boredom was setting in and I aspired to nothing in particular. The idea of running a marathon at age 40 popped in to my head, and gave me a spark. I clung to that as something to give me purpose.

From July until November of 2015, I probably listened to every one of your back podcasts as I joined MTA and committed to running a marathon. To this day, whenever I hear the opening of your podcast, it still reminds me of that time almost 4 years ago. So many mornings of getting up before dawn, and strapping lights on to my knuckles, and (no matter how tired I felt) running whatever number of miles were on the training plan that day.

I can see now that I was on a path back then. I didn’t believe in God back then, but he definitely put me on that starting line of the marathon that day. To this day, after years of being involved in MTA and running many marathons and half marathons, I still have never run so many miles as I did in the 3 months preparing for that first marathon. These days, I seemingly am always injuring something anytime I exceed 20 miles per week. But not back then. Not before that first marathon. I ran hundreds of miles…hundreds of thousands of individual steps…without so much as a twisted ankle or pulled muscle in 2015.

After all of those miles, the importance of that marathon seemed to dwarf everything else that was going on in my life. I was filled with fear and that fear functioned as a form of anesthesia on race day. I felt good for the first 10 miles and so I ran way too fast. By mile 13, fear was only taking me so far and I realized that I felt way more tired than I should feel for only being half way done. At mile 18, everything fell apart. I felt tired and defeated and certain that I could not finish. I still remember how badly I felt in that moment, knowing that I worked so hard and that I was about to fail anyway despite all of it. Not knowing how else to cope, I simply started to find reasons to be grateful.

Everything about that day changed for me once I decided to just be grateful. I suddenly saw things as they really were. I could see how unimportant being able to run 26.2 miles on that particular day really was in the grand scheme of things. Truly important things in life came in to focus. I was able to see how far I had come as an athlete and a human being. I could see how much I loved my job at the jail, and that I was a father to an amazing daughter, and that people who cared about me would be waiting for me at the Finish Line. I found myself able to keep pushing forward, always finding some reason to be grateful as a way to cope with my fatigue and pain. I was a different person from the one who started when I crossed the Finish Line that day.

It wasn’t sheer guts and determination that got me through those last 8 miles. For me, it was gratitude. Gratitude is definitely a theme in all of your podcasts and it’s surely no coincidence that it’s what got me to the finish line that day.

The success in my career and my marriage that followed after that first marathon are also no coincidence. I learned so many things from that process that I couldn’t possibly fit it all in one email. I have since started one of the largest medication assisted treatment programs in the country at the Philadelphia jail. I was able to treat over 1,200 people entering the Philadelphia jail addicted to heroin last year alone. In January of this year, I left that job on good terms in order to take a job as Medical Director at Eagleville Hospital, which is a large inpatient drug and alcohol treatment facility with a long legacy of treating underserved and stigmatized people. Eagleville Hospital is much closer to my home and allows me to see my family every day (whether they like it or not).

So thank you for coming in to my life with your podcast and with Marathon Training Academy. You truly helped me to change my life.

Jon Lepley, DO

Also Mentioned in This Episode

Soar Running -They’re giving away a SOAR Summer Training Bundle to 2 lucky winners: each bundle includes a pair of shorts or bottoms, a T-shirt or vest and a Lightweight Cap. Simply head over to www.soarrunning.com/mta to enter and for your chance to win.

VARIDESK -the world’s leading standing desk solution, converting any desk into a standing desk so you can maintain a healthy active lifestyle in the office or at home.

Love Beets -offers ready-to-eat beet products, perfect for beet lovers and beet newbies alike! Find their products at most major retailers nationwide, like Kroger, Whole Foods, Costco, and more. Check out lovebeets.com and use code MTA at checkout for 20% off online orders.

The Runner’s Toolbox for injury prevention. Eight inexpensive items to keep at home.

The post Marathon Success Story with Dr. Jon Lepley appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jun 22 2019

1hr 12mins

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Weight Loss Tips for Marathoners

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In this podcast episode we bring you a special conversation with our nutrition coach, Natalie Mason, about how marathoners can lose weight and still maintain energy to do what they love.

And in the quick tip segment I’ll share how you can incorporate lower body strength training into your routine and never skip leg day again!

Weight Loss Tips for Marathoners

Our Guest on This Episode

Natalie Mason is a Managing Dietitian at MetPro -a company that provides concierge nutrition and fitness coaching. She has a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition & Food Science and Masters of Science in Nutrition Sciences. She’s a Registered Dietitian and Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics.

In this conversation will you hear why marathon training doesn’t automatically lead to weight loss, the most common mistakes runners make with their diet, how the principle of “contrast” through “up adjusting” and “down adjusting” leads to metabolic proficiency, and the shocking number of runners who do zero strength training.

How This Interview Came About

In late 2015 I started inexplicably gaining weight despite keeping up my marathon training schedule (I ran 10 marathons and ultras that year) and eating as healthy as I knew how. The weight continued to pile on much to my chagrin.

I finally realized that I was dealing with a hormonal imbalance -probably due to a combination of stress and other factors. I began working with a functional medicine doctor who put me on thyroid medicine for one year until my hormones balanced. Thankfully, I was able to go off all medications but the extra weight (about 35 pounds) did not budge.

I encourage people to appreciate their bodies and keep pursuing their running goals no matter what they weigh. But as a runner the extra weight does impact your joints, energy levels, and can effect your marathon times. For me it was like carrying around an extra 35 pound weight on all of my runs and in daily life.

I started working with Natalie from MetPro in November of 2018 and have lost 26 pounds at the time we recorded this podcast episode. I was initially skeptical at first but MetPro has been an amazing system for helping me reduce fat and keep my energy levels high for doing what I love . . . which is running marathons! And Natalie is a wonderful coach as you will hear in our interview.


Also Mentioned in This Episode

MetPro -Using Metabolic Profiling, MetPro analyzes your metabolism and provides you with an individualized strategy to obtain your weight or body composition goals.

NuNee -designed specifically to relieve that dreaded Runner’s Knee pain. Use code MTA10 for a 10% discount.

High Performance Lifting -Strength Training Program for Runners developed by Jason Fitzgerald.

Love Beets -ready-to-eat beet products, perfect for beet lovers and beet newbies alike! Use code MTA at checkout for 20% off online orders.

Varidesk -converts any desk into a standing desk and is designed with durable, best-in-class materials that fit in any environment or workspace.

The post Weight Loss Tips for Marathoners appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jun 12 2019

1hr 3mins

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Run And Become: Interview with Sanjay Rawal

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In this episode we bring you a fascinating conversation with runner and filmmaker Sanjay Rawal about indigenous running cultures around the world, running as an act of meditation, and the world’s longest certified footrace –The Self-Transcendence 3100 Mile Race in New York City!

Interview with Sanjay Rawal

Sanjay Rawal worked in the human rights and international development sectors for 15 years in over 40 countries before focusing his love for photography and storytelling onto filmmaking. A lifelong runner, Sanjay was happy to lose the pounds he gained eating Mexican food in farmworker towns and take on a project about running. His new film, 3100: Run and Become, opened in theaters in Fall 2018. He has had a daily meditation practice for 27 years and was a middle-distance runner in high-school and college and currently runs an average of 50 miles per week.


Navajo runner

“Marathon Monks” of Japan

African Bushman subsistence hunters

Ashprihanal Aalto from Finland holds the course record at the 3100

The Self-Transcendence 3100 Mile Race will start on June 16th 2019. Eight runners have entered the race this year including Ashprihanal for the 15th time.

Also Mentioned in This Episode

Link to the movie website: 3100 Run and Become

Link to the race: The Self-Transcendence 3100

Races we are signed up for this summer: view our itinerary page.

NuNee -designed specifically to relieve that dreaded Runner’s Knee pain. Use code MTA10 for a 10% discount.

MetPro -Using Metabolic Profiling, MetPro analyzes your metabolism and provides you with an individualized strategy to obtain your weight or body composition goals.

Tigerbalm Active -a non-sticky gel with a cool-to-warm sensation that helps with muscle fatigue and recovery. Pick up Tiger Balm Active today at your local CVS or Rite Aid store

Varidesk -converts any desk into a standing desk and is designed with durable, best-in-class materials that fit in any environment or workspace.

The post Run And Become: Interview with Sanjay Rawal appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jun 01 2019

1hr 14mins

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