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The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty

Updated about 1 month ago

Education
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Ever want to know more about the world of archaeology AND have a good time learning it? This podcast explores what it's like to be a young professional in the field. There's also news and discussions on cool stuff going on at the other end of trowels all over the place. In the end, it's all about learning through life and laughter. And it's all brought to you by me, Jenny, a regular gal who really DIGS history... get it?

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Ever want to know more about the world of archaeology AND have a good time learning it? This podcast explores what it's like to be a young professional in the field. There's also news and discussions on cool stuff going on at the other end of trowels all over the place. In the end, it's all about learning through life and laughter. And it's all brought to you by me, Jenny, a regular gal who really DIGS history... get it?

iTunes Ratings

8 Ratings
Average Ratings
7
1
0
0
0

New Convert to the cast, love it!

By elsevier - Jun 09 2015
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I am so happy that this cast was recommended to me. I am working throught the past casts and I eagerly wait the next. Jenny is a master story teller that blends common occurences with her experiences and expertise in science based history. Her narative is natural and beautiful. I only wish there were more of her podcast to enjoy. One of my favorite things to do is come home after a long day of work, medicate with a kind bong rip, and listen to her cast . . . 'sans pantelones' of course!

Love this show!

By sewingmama - Apr 03 2013
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Jenny is candid, sweet, funny, and I have learned something on each show. I'm not in the Archaeology field, but I have a fan girl's love of Eygptology. However, Jenny is showing me that the world of Archaeology extends farther and wider than I ever realized. Thanks, and keep 'em coming!

iTunes Ratings

8 Ratings
Average Ratings
7
1
0
0
0

New Convert to the cast, love it!

By elsevier - Jun 09 2015
Read more
I am so happy that this cast was recommended to me. I am working throught the past casts and I eagerly wait the next. Jenny is a master story teller that blends common occurences with her experiences and expertise in science based history. Her narative is natural and beautiful. I only wish there were more of her podcast to enjoy. One of my favorite things to do is come home after a long day of work, medicate with a kind bong rip, and listen to her cast . . . 'sans pantelones' of course!

Love this show!

By sewingmama - Apr 03 2013
Read more
Jenny is candid, sweet, funny, and I have learned something on each show. I'm not in the Archaeology field, but I have a fan girl's love of Eygptology. However, Jenny is showing me that the world of Archaeology extends farther and wider than I ever realized. Thanks, and keep 'em coming!

Best weekly hand curated episodes for learning

Cover image of The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty

The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty

Latest release on Sep 08, 2016

Best weekly hand curated episodes for learning

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail about 1 month ago

Rank #1: Episode 13 “Pompeii’s Hottest Gladiator”

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Follow @strugglingarch

Welcome friends! It’s episode 13 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty “Pompeii’s Hottest Gladiator!”

In this exciting episode we talk about one of the biggest natural disasters in recorded history, the destruction of Pompeii in 79 AD. The ash tomb that has encased the city for the last 2000 years has done an incredible job of preserving every detail of life in the 1st century Roman city. We’ll discuss that fateful day as well as the long history of archaeology at the site.

Also, it’s no secret I’m a monster Game of Thrones fan, and so OF COURSE we’re going to discuss the recent Pompeii movie starring Jon Snow himself- Kit Harington!

I have some bad news to report in this week’s Shorty News segment, as once again thieves have broken into the ruins of Pompeii and stolen part of a priceless fresco. Bummer. All that and more on this weeks podcast!

Listen here, on iTunes, Stitcher, Player.fm, blubrry, and a myriad of other places! Also follow The Struggling Archaeologist Blog!

Now here are some pictures of Pompeii and the hotter than balls Kit Harington!

Just getting that one out of the way now… so yeah, say hello to Pompeii’s Hottest Gladiator…

The Ruins of Pompeii

Mar 20 2014

1hr 9mins

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Rank #2: Episode 22 “Paleo Muffins”

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Welcome to a new episode of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty!

In this episode we’re going Paleo…Paleo diet that is! There’s been a bit of controversy concerning this “lifestyle” from the anthropological community. So I thought we’d examine the concept of the diet and what it does and doesn’t have to do with the lives of our paleolithic ancestors. Also, (to be read with your best Jerry Seinfeld impression) what, is the deal, with Paleo muffins?

Here are some links you might be interested in checking out from the episode:

Thanks for listening everyone, you can always download the podcast on iTunes or at the Archaeology Podcast Network website!

Feel free to get in touch at guidetogettingdirty@gmail.com, thestrugglingarchaeologist.tumblr.com, and @strugglingarch on twitter

McNiven OUT!

Mar 03 2015

1hr 3mins

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Rank #3: Episode 12 “One Podcast to Rule them All!”

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Follow @strugglingarch

Get ready to nerd out on the best episode of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty yet! As a huge HUGE Tolkien fan I have been dying to do an episode about the historical and cultural inspirations for the Hobbit/Lord of the Rings universe.

So not ONLY will you learn more about Middle Earth, you will also be learning about the Iron/Dark Age peoples of Northern Europe whose lives and literature helped Tolkien create (in my opinion) the greatest literary canon of all time.

Plus, if you hang on ‘till the end you get to hear me REALLY dork out and recite some Elvish for you… yes, I AM that disturbingly nerdy. I mean, I have the word tattooed on my foot so…

Enjoy kids, you can listen here, on Stitcher, my tumblr blog http://thestrugglingarchaeologist.tumblr.com or iTunes

And just to make me smile…

Feb 14 2014

1hr 23mins

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Rank #4: Episode 10 “Sexy Sex with Asian Dothrakis”

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It’s episode 10 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty– “Sexy Sex with Asian Dothrakis!”

Given, those of you who share my love of Medieval era earth-like fantasy novels will get more out of this one than others- it’s still a pretty great time. We talk about genome studies revealing how surprisingly horny our ancient ancestors were, which may or may not involve a detailed Game of Thrones analogy. Then I give some advice to the newb considering how to get started with academic conferences. Number 1 priority- ignore any and all impulses to dress like Indiana Jones. Do NOT do this thing. Repeat after me: I will NOT be that guy… breathe deep, it’s going to be okay.

Subscribe to my feed! Follow @strugglingarch

Oh, and if you didn’t believe me that archaeology conferences are fun- check this out. Yeah, you try eating a pizza the size of a coffee table and not having fun.


Also, all that stuff about drinking was true. I’m not saying that some people are more successful than others at conferences because they drink delicious beers at the end of the day… but it helps.


McNiven OUT!

(Oh yeah, and check the podcast out on Tumblr and Facebook now!)

Nov 24 2013

42mins

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Rank #5: Episode 21 “The Archaeology of Alcohol: Ancient Ales Edition”

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Welcome to Episode 21 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty “The Archaeology of Alcohol: Ancient Ales Edition!”

I suggest you sit back, pop open a cold one, get a little toasty, and enjoy this generally informative fun-times podcast.

So, our ancestors have been making alcoholic concoctions for thousands of years, and thanks to science and archaeology we now have the ability to reconstruct the recipes to some of these awesome drinks. I thought it would be interesting to find out about how alcohol has evolved from its early days to what we are familiar with today, so that’s what today’s podcast is about!

I had a lot of fun recording this episode because it also gave me an excuse to drink some delicious beer, so thanks Beer Gods! In the podcast you’ll learn about:

  • How Dogfish Head collaborated with biomolecular archaeologist Patrick McGovern, director of the archaeology project for cuisine, fermented beverages and health at the University of Pennsylvania museum, to create their line of ancient ales based on reconstructed recipes from archaeological discoveries around the world!
  • A background on the origins of drinking and producing alcohol, and how drinking helped civilizations develop around the world!
  • How some monks in the Middle Ages started changing the face of ale and created some of the first modern beers. Then, how Germany regulated the crap out of it!

Finally, on a non-alcohol related front, I decided to start a book club for people who enjoy books about history, like me! Our first read is a historical fiction novel called All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr, a WWII story about a young blind French girl and a German boy whose lives intersect in the midst of the devastation of war. Get your hands on the book and give it a read, then we’ll discuss it on the social medias and youtubes! For more books I’m thinking about reading for the club, check out my goodreads bookshelf called struggling arch book club. Feel free to send me suggestions too, I’d love to hear them!

So that’s it, enjoy the episode and enjoy some great beer while listening. Here are some links from this podcast that you may want to visit-

Dogfish Head Ancient Ales

Pat McGovern’s Website

History of Trappist Monks and Beer Here and Here

Beer and the History of Civilization

The Archaeology of Alcohol Here and Here

Check out The Struggling Archaeologist on the new Archaeology Podcast Network, along with lots of other great archaeology podcasts. And, as always, follow me on twitter, tumblr, and facebook, because that’s what the cool kids do.

McNiven OUT!

Jan 19 2015

44mins

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Rank #6: Episode 17 “Great Odin’s Raven- it’s Archaeology 101!

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Hi friends, welcome to Episode 17 of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty Podcast “Great Odin’s Raven-it’s Archaeology 101!”

In this fun filled episode we tackle some of the basics of excavation, with a focus on why archaeology and geology are old friends- and how this makes us better at what we do. It’s like taking that Archaeology 101 class you never got around to in college! (Unless you actually did take that class, then it’s more of a review of things you probably already know…sorry). In this new segment “Back to Basics with Jenny” I get all lectury on your asses while I impart some sweet knowledge on you like:

  • How did our knowledge of stratification and the geological time scale come to be?
  • How does this relate to dating, fossils, and artifacts?
  • What does any of this have to do with archaeology?
  • Why is Ken Ham a jerk face?
  • What will happen to your stuff when zombies eat your face?
  • What does my imaginary dystopian future look like?
  • What do archaeologists do when we’re not fighting Nazis?

And much much more! Also, there’s a shorty news segment at the beginning of the podcast about a pretty cool new archaeological discovery- namely, THE HAMMER OF THOR! So I threw in some cool stuff about comic-book movies, norse mythology, Tom Hiddleston, ancient runes, Vikings, and Hogwarts just for fun.

That’s all, and if you were wondering what that sweet Mjöllnir (hammer of Thor) amulet looks like- here it is!


This bronze amulet dates to the 10th century and was discovered on the Danish island of Lolland. The runes on the back read “This is a hammer”

(Credit: National Museum of Denmark)


This is an actual depiction of the Norse God Thor wielding said magical hammer.

(Credit: Paramount Pictures and Marvel Studios)

Remember to follow me on tumblr, facebook, and twitter!

McNiven Out!

Jul 06 2014

52mins

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Rank #7: Episode 15 “SAA Time 2014!”

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Hello friends! It's time for episode 15 of The Struggling Archaeologist's Guide to Getting Dirty "SAA Time 2014!"

That's right, this is my reaction podcast to the Society for American Archaeology Conference in Austin, Texas. Pretty exciting stuff right?!

Well, it's informative and entertaining at least (I hope!). This is a shorter episode because I have stuck only to topics falling under the banner of conferences, career advice, my fabu 4 days in Austin, and summer plans. I would definitely listen if you are a young archaeologist interested in figuring out the academic world and planning for your future. If you're an expert in the ways of the conference, then this podcast may be a bit basic for you. Not that I'm not as delightful and thought provoking as always (you know you love it), but I won't feel bad if my more experienced listeners skip this one ;)

// !!Spoiler alert!!

THERE’S SINGING

!! End spoiler alert !!

Enjoy folks, I also hope you will check back on the website more often- as I am posting more regular blog entries now (and the crowd goes wild!) Be sure to follow The Struggling Archaeologist on twitter, tumblr, and facebook

May 08 2014

32mins

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Rank #8: Episode 11 “Volcano Cheetahs”

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Welcome back! It’s time for another exciting episode of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty, so get ready for our 11th episode “Volcano Cheetahs!”

This was a fun glimpse into the world of ancient man. Ever see that movie 10,000B.C.? Well I did, and although this tale doesn’t involve an insanely beautiful blue eyed cave girls with rockin dreds running away from scary prehistoric mega-birds, it does involve the first inklings of organized cultural practices and belief systems in the desert sands of exotic Anatolia! (But seriously, I was really excited for that movie and really what the hell was that? Did no one think about picking up a book about prehistory…like, at all?)

Our news story this week focused on new evidence that a wall mural drawn in the 7th Millenium B.C. by the residents of the famed Neolithic settlement of Çatalhöyük might actually represent a volcanic eruption from nearby Mount Hasan Dagi. Making it the first map or geographic depiction ever made! I know, pretty crazy stuff right? I’ll admit, this article was a bit science-y, but I hope I made up for it with a brilliant commentary and an in depth look at life at Çatalhöyük for the first generations of settled human beings in the region. And since the transition from hunter-gatherer tribes to settled agriculturalists was pretty much the biggest thing to ever happen to human beings in…well, ever, I thought I’d investigate another site that represents a group of people on the cusp of changing their ways forever- the fantastic Göbekli Tepe temple site in Southeastern Turkey.

(Pictures of Çatalhöyük and the Volcano/Cheetah mural © Maricio Abreu/JAI/Corbis and the Çatalhöyük research project)

The Göbekli Tepians weren’t an actual settled cultural group believe it or not, they were a conglomeration of hunter-gatherer groups that organized and built a massive temple complex  believed to have been used for death rituals by people for hundreds of miles. No one lived there, but not unlike Grecian mountain temples, all who traveled to the spot were welcome to worship and perform rituals there. This complex provided ancient humans between around 11,000-8000 b.c. with a gathering space and a platform to experiment with working together to create monumental architecture and shared spiritual and ritualistic practices. This was indeed, one small step for man, one… you know.

(Photographs of Göbekli Tepe courtesy of Vincent J. Musi for National Geographic and N. Becker, DAI)

Thanks for listening, and make sure to follow our new blog at http://thestrugglingarchaeologist.tumblr.com/

McNiven OUT!

//

Jan 16 2014

55mins

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Rank #9: Episode 16 “Go West, Young (Wo)Man!”

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Welcome back friends! It’s another fantabulous episode of basically the best podcast that ever lived, “The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty!”

So perhaps you noticed that I disappeared from the interwebs all of last week, that’s because I was working outside the reach of modern technology (and air conditioning). I had a fun week camping and surveying in the Zuni Mountains of New Mexico, which sounded like a pretty good topic for this week’s episode. We discuss the history of pioneering logging efforts in this area, as well as what an archaeological survey is like (well, at least a Jenny-style one!).

The Zuni Mountain Railroad operated between 1890 and1930, and created a web of industrial and cultural landscapes snaking through the pine forests and hills of central New Mexico. Now a national park, the remains of the railroads and the men and women who lived hard lives in the shadow of the mountains are scattered through the area. The efforts of the Park Service will hopefully allow for the preservation of this valuable cultural heritage.

Have fun listening to the podcast, here are some of the pictures I promised from my super fun week out in the woods! Be sure to follow me at thestrugglingarchaeologist.tumblr.com  and on twitter @strugglingarch!

McNiven OUT!


My gigantic palace tent!


Remains from the Zuni Mountian Railroad, ready for surveying!


I found a fork! Forks are the best!


This rail line disappears into the ravine (a product of recent erosion)


A turn-of-the-century cabin, almost lost completely to the eroding canyon below…


A TRESTLE!!!!


My excitement over said trestle


El Morro national park


The El Morro Pueblo, perched atop the massive Cliffside…


The El Morro Kiva

The top of El Morro


Rock art from the El Morro site

That’s all folks, thanks for reading, enjoy the podcast and visit your state’s national parks this summer!

Jun 13 2014

56mins

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Rank #10: Episode 14 “Aloha State of Mind”

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Aloha friends, it’s time for another episode of The Struggling Archaeologist’s Guide to Getting Dirty! In honor of my recent trip to Hawaii I have decided to dedicate this episode to all things Aloha, and provide an interesting journey through the history of the 50th state- from it’s volcanic inception to the tragic day that will live in infamy.

I had a great time on my vacation, but I also took it as an opportunity to learn more about Polynesian culture. Since I was staying with a friend who lives in Honolulu, it was interesting to get a local’s perspective on the current state of Hawaiian culture, after 236 years of contact with the West.

In addition to geological, cultural, and political insights into Hawaii’s history, I decided to add some personal stories from my family’s connections to WWII and the events of Pearl Harbor. History should never just be about the bullet points, it’s about the human element which allows our knowledge of the events and people of the past to become a fully realized part of our own experience. Hopefully this may mean something like that to all of you.

Enjoy the podcast, if you hang in until the end you will get a surprise serenade from yours truly! Here are some pictures of important places I visited on Oahu

This is Nu’uanu Pali lookout on the Southeastern part of Oahu. In 1795 is was the scene of one of Hawaii’s bloodiest battles, when the ruler of the Big Island, Kamehameha, attacked Oahu, and his forces drove over 400 native Kalanikūpule soldiers off the cliff edge in his effort to conquer all of the major islands. He was successful, and Kamehameha became the first King of the unified Hawaiian Islands.

This is the tower and airstrip at Wheeler Field. Where my husband’s grandfather and two of the pilots under his command, George Welch and Kenneth Taylor were stationed in December 1941. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor began, Welch and Taylor took to the skies under perilous conditions and of their own initiative. They engaged in dogfights with the Japanese forces, of which they were able to shoot down 8 planes. They were two of only a handful of pilots able to get in the air and wage a counter attack on the Japanese air forces, and they did it all wearing Hawaiian shirts. Gordon, my grandfather-in-law, was on the neighboring island of Moloka’i when the attack began, and as he rushed back to the horrors of Pearl Harbor he narrowly avoided friendly anti-aircraft fire and the entire 2nd wave of Japanese attack planes and bombers.

This is Haleiwa Beach, where the airstrip that Welch and Taylor took off from that morning was located. It’s less than a ten mile drive from here to Wheeler field, and another 10 to Pearl Harbor.

The memorial at Pearl Harbor honors the over 2,400 souls lost on December 7, 1941. Ahead is where “battleship row” was located on Ford Island, and where the Arizona memorial commemorates the 1,177 men lost on the Arizona battleship and the over 900 individuals still entombed in a watery grave below her decks.

That’s me, just for something a little brighter Remember to check out my blog at www.thestrugglingarchaeologist.tumblr.com!

Apr 06 2014

47mins

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