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Education
Management

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Updated 1 day ago

Rank #18 in Management category

Business
Education
Management
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Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

Read more

Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

iTunes Ratings

769 Ratings
Average Ratings
738
14
8
2
7

A Must Have For Your Library

By MushinMers - Dec 06 2019
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What’s so enjoyable listening to Ryan Hawk conduct an interview is his unique way to dig deeper into the content, the thought provoking questions he poses to the guests and so far after each one I’ve listened to I’ve walked away with at least 3 take-aways that I can start to implement immediately. Encourage you to add it to your library and I’m confident if you shared it with a friend that’d be grateful. John M Tampa Fl

Relevant

By k15_jku - Jun 18 2019
Read more
Great information that reveals relevancy in today’s workplace. Jeepsjku

iTunes Ratings

769 Ratings
Average Ratings
738
14
8
2
7

A Must Have For Your Library

By MushinMers - Dec 06 2019
Read more
What’s so enjoyable listening to Ryan Hawk conduct an interview is his unique way to dig deeper into the content, the thought provoking questions he poses to the guests and so far after each one I’ve listened to I’ve walked away with at least 3 take-aways that I can start to implement immediately. Encourage you to add it to your library and I’m confident if you shared it with a friend that’d be grateful. John M Tampa Fl

Relevant

By k15_jku - Jun 18 2019
Read more
Great information that reveals relevancy in today’s workplace. Jeepsjku

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Cover image of The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Updated 1 day ago

Read more

Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

140: Carol Dweck - The Power Of A Growth Mindset

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Episode 140: Carol Dweck - The Power Of A Growth Mindset

Dr. Carol Dweck's work is the foundation for what it means to be a learning leader. To be in a constant state of improvement... "In a fixed mindset students believe their basic abilities, their intelligence, their talents, are just fixed traits. They have a certain amount and that's that, and then their goal becomes to look smart all the time and never look dumb. In a growth mindset students understand that their talents and abilities can be developed through effort, good teaching and persistence. They don't necessarily think everyone's the same or anyone can be Einstein, but they believe everyone can get smarter if they work at it."

Mindset is a simple idea discovered by world-renowned Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck in decades of research on achievement and success—a simple idea that makes all the difference. Teaching a growth mindset creates motivation and productivity in the worlds of business, education, and sports.

Episode 140: Carol Dweck - The Power Of A Growth Mindset

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“Growth mindset leaders want to be challenged."

In This Episode, You Will Learn:

  • Focusing on growth -- having a desire for a challenge and learning from setbacks leads to sustained excellence
  • People with a fixed mindset are afraid to find out that they aren't very smart
  • Growth mindset leaders want to be challenged
  • Fixed mindset leaders have a deep seated insecurity. They have to keep showing that they're a genius.
  • Don't declare that you have a growth mindset -- Instead figure out what triggers you into having a fixed mindset. Start there.
  • Questions to ask people in an interview to understand their mindset
  • Sharing credit or taking it all for yourself? It shows a lot about your mindset
  • When was the last time you were wrong? (It should be often)
  • "Don't praise the intelligence. Praise the process."
  • Do NOT reward children for getting straight A's
  • Taking the stairs -- Develop Grit 
  • Be aware that doing something the hard way will benefit you (and your children)
  • "I want your listeners to do something way outside of their comfort zone..."
  • Why as a young manager you need to focus on collaboration -- Ask others for help
  • Learning Leader = "I loved it. Merging of Learning and Leadership. Helping others learn. Serving them.

“I have always been deeply moved by outstanding achievement and saddened by wasted potential.”

Continue Learning:

You may also like these episodes:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 082: Dan Pink – The Science of Motivation, Legendary Writer & Ted Talk

Episode 086: Seth Godin – How To Become Indispensable & Build Your Tribe

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Did you enjoy the podcast?

If you enjoyed hearing Carol Dweck on the show, please don’t hesitate to send me a note on Twitter or email me.

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

Bio From MindsetOnline.com

Carol S. Dweck, Ph.D., is one of the world’s leading researchers in the field of motivation and is the Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor of Psychology at Stanford University. Her research has focused on why people succeed and how to foster success. She has held professorships at Columbia and Harvard Universities, has lectured all over the world, and has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Her scholarly book Self-Theories: Their Role in Motivation, Personality, and Development was named Book of the Year by the World Education Federation. Her work has been featured in such publications as The New Yorker, Time, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Boston Globe, and she has appeared on Today and 20/20.

Jul 10 2016

50mins

Play

107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

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Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Simon Sinek is a bucket list type of a guest.  He is a literally hero of mine.  His TED Talk, “How Great Leaders Inspire Action” is one of my all-time favorites.  It’s also happens to be one of the most popular TED talks of all time.  I loved learning more about Simon the person… As well as some of his newer views on leadership...  I loved how emotional Simon got at certain points in this conversation… Especially when we discussed how it takes courage for great leaders to step up and make tough decisions.  We had a fascinating conversation on this episode of The Learning Leader Show.

Simon Sinek is an unshakable optimist. He believes in a bright future and our ability to build it together. Described as “a visionary thinker with a rare intellect,” Sinek teaches leaders and organizations how to inspire people. With a bold goal to help build a world in which the vast majority of people go home every day feeling fulfilled by their work, Sinek is leading a movement to inspire people to do the things that inspire them. A trained ethnographer, he is the author of two books: the global best seller, Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action and his newest book, the New York Times and Wall Street Journal best seller, Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t.

Fascinated by the leaders and companies that make the greatest impact in their organizations and in the world, those with the capacity to inspire, he has discovered some remarkable patterns about how they think, act and communicate and the environments in which people operate at their natural best. He has devoted his life to sharing his thinking in order to help other leaders and organizations inspire action.

He is best known for popularizing the concept of Why and for the talk he gave on the subject that became the second most watched talk of all time on TED.com.

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“If You Care To See Others Succeed, That’s Why You Lead”

In This Episode, You Will Learn:

  • Having courage to stick to your values leads to sustained excellence
  • Lt. General George Flynn, USMC is a great example to follow
  • Leadership is a choice – Everyone has the capacity to lead
  • If you have a desire to see others succeed, that’s why you lead
  • Why mass layoffs never used to happen and why they do now
  • The great leaders don’t believe in headcounts… They believe in heart counts
  • Unfortunately… Bad leaders don’t have the courage to sacrifice
  • Why Gary Ridge (CEO of WD-40) is a great leader – He puts his people first
  • Learn Simon’s process for learning new things
  • How to be a great public speaker? Only talk about things that you care about and understand
  • Being a learning leader means approaching every day with the curiosity of a little kid

 “Leadership is a choice – Everyone has the capacity to lead”

Continue Learning:

You may also like these episodes:

Episode 001: How To Become A Master Connector W/ Jayson Gaignard From MasterMind Talks

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 082: Dan Pink – The Science of Motivation, Legendary Writer & Ted Talk

Episode 086: Seth Godin – How To Become Indispensable & Build Your Tribe

Did you enjoy the podcast?

If you enjoyed hearing Simon Sinek on the show, please don’t hesitate to send me a note on Twitter or email me.

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

Bio From StartWithWhy.com

Simon Sinek is an unshakable optimist. He believes in a bright future and our ability to build it together. Described as “a visionary thinker with a rare intellect,” Sinek teaches leaders and organizations how to inspire people. With a bold goal to help build a world in which the vast majority of people go home every day feeling fulfilled by their work, Sinek is leading a movement to inspire people to do the things that inspire them. A trained ethnographer, he is the author of two books: the global best seller, Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action and his newest book, the New York Times and Wall Street Journal best seller, Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t. Fascinated by the leaders and companies that make the greatest impact in their organizations and in the world, those with the capacity to inspire, he has discovered some remarkable patterns about how they think, act and communicate and the environments in which people operate at their natural best. He has devoted his life to sharing his thinking in order to help other leaders and organizations inspire action.

He is best known for popularizing the concept of Why and for the talk he gave on the subject that became the second most watched talk of all time on TED.com.

Mar 16 2016

34mins

Play

170: Simon Sinek - Why "Together Is Better"

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Episode 170: Simon Sinek - Why "Together Is Better"

Simon Sinek sparked a movement with his bestsellers START WITH WHY and LEADERS EAT LAST. His newest book, Together Is Better, will inspire more readers to ask for help, help others, and discover their own courage through a charming story about change. Simon Sinek is an optimist. He teaches leaders and organizations how to inspire people. From members of Congress to foreign ambassadors, from small businesses to corporations like Microsoft and 3M, from Hollywood to the Pentagon, he has presented his ideas about the power of why. He has written two books, Leaders Eat Last and Start With Why and is quoted frequently by national publications. He was previously a guest on The Learning Leader Show, Episode #107 which remains one of the most popular episodes in the show's history... This one is even better.

Episode 170: Simon Sinek - Why "Together Is Better"

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“Most people live their lives by accident as it happens. Fulfillment comes when we live our lives on purpose."

In This Episode, You Will Learn:

  • "We're social animals and we need each other"
  • The goal is to find ourselves in a place that we dream to go to
  • "Joy comes from relationships we form when we feel someone cares about us"
  • Why The Four Seasons Hotel in Las Vegas is incredible (the people)
    • Their employees love their jobs -- Why? Their managers constantly work to make the employees lives better
  • Why you must be a student of leadership
    • Often times someone gets promoted based on current performance, but they are rarely trained on how to lead.  Leaders must take time off to regularly train on leading others. Most don't unfortunately. "All the best leaders I know are students of leadership."
  • Execution: The leaders are responsible for the people who are responsible for the results. It's a human job. Consistency and intensity. Daily practice of little things (ie. ban phones in meetings, instead of people texting and email, they will talk)
  • Need to know what we stand for and what we are against
  • Why Jack Welch is a bad leader
  • "Jack Welch is a blight on the business world. GE needed a $300B bailout." - Simon Sinek
  • Being willing to say "I don't know." Having the courage to speak up when you don't know. Ask questions.
  • "Courage is not a deep internal fortitude. When we feel someone cares about us, we're able to make courageous decisions."
  • How Simon started his business as a consultant
  • How his TEDx Talk changed his life
  • Why successful athletes suffer from depression
  • "People come first... Winning is second." - John Wooden
  • Why you must know your "why." What you're a part of...

"Leadership: It's a human job. The daily practice of little things. Consistency and intensity."

Continue Learning:

You may also like these episodes:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 071: Nate Boyer - Green Beret, Texas Football, The NFL

Episode 073: Jay Bilas - World Class ESPN Basketball Broadcaster, Toughness, Fixing The NCAA

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Did you enjoy the podcast?

If you enjoyed hearing Simon Sinek on the show, please don’t hesitate to send me a note on Twitter or email me.

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

The Learning Leader Show is supported by Daor Design - Daor Design will help you build your brand like nobody’s business. Most of their work falls into one of four categories: Logo Design, Print Design, Web Design or Digital Marketing. They pride themselves in being a trusted, valued resource for their growing family of clients.

Oct 23 2016

56mins

Play

180: Michael Watkins - The First 90 Days: How To Ensure Success In Your New Role

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Episode 180: Michael Watkins - The First 90 Days: How To Ensure Success In Your New Role

Dr. Michael Watkins is the author of Your Next Move: The Leader’s Guide to Navigating Major Career Transitions, and the international bestseller The First 90 Days: Critical Success Strategies for New Leaders at all Levels, which The Economist called “the on-boarding bible.” With more than 750,000 copies sold in English, and translations in 27 languages, The First 90 Days has become the standard reference for leaders in transition. Recently The First 90 Days was named one of the best 100 business books of all time.

Drawing on the perfect combination of research and hand-on experience, he has spent the last two decades working with leaders – both corporate and public — as they transition to new roles, negotiate the future of their organizations, and craft their legacy as leaders.

Episode 180: Michael Watkins - The First 90 Days: How To Ensure Success In Your New Role

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“I help leaders and their teams make good career transitions."

In This Episode, You Will Learn:

  • Common themes to sustain excellence:
    • Learning Agility - Not shy about learning, and they don't expect themselves to have all the answers
    • Diversity of Experience - Multiple functions, multiple companies
    • Delicate balance between humility and ego
  • Jeff Immelt from GE is a good example
  • Confidence vs. Ego -- Desire to achieve, but cannot create echo chambers.
  • The First 90 Days -- Michael's world-wide best selling book on how to transition to a leadership role
  • The Leadership Pipeline - Another book to help make the transition from individual contributor to management. It's a completely different skill set
  • The toughest move/promotion is the very first one
  • The common traps leaders fall in to -- Relying only on what they're good at. Must broaden skills. You have to be a force multiplier.
    • Common Issues and problems leaders run in to: "Coming in with the answer. Not building lateral relationships. Engaging on the wrong side of learning."
  • Why you must re-learn how to learn
    • How is the culture different?
      • Politically
      • Technically
  • Who is the "dream team?" The five people you must meet immediately upon taking a new role
  • The importance of the boss and the role she plays in helping
  • Momentum -- Creating early wins.  Why you must make this happen
    • Look for little irritants to remove
    • Secure a win by thinking differently
  • Your first public address to the group -- Prepare, Prepare, Prepare. The first impression is vital
  • How to prepare for a management (role) interview
  • Why a "One Sheet" of your core beliefs is better than a 30-60-90 day plan

“You have to be a force multiplier. You can't be a super-rep."

Continue Learning:

You may also like these episodes:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 071: Nate Boyer - Green Beret, Texas Football, The NFL

Episode 073: Jay Bilas - World Class ESPN Basketball Broadcaster, Toughness, Fixing The NCAA

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Did you enjoy the podcast?

If you enjoyed hearing Michael Watkins on the show, please don’t hesitate to send me a note on Twitter or email me.

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

The Learning Leader Show is supported by  Mizzen and Main: Performance fabric menswear. The most comfortable/durable dress shirts you will find on the market. I personally own 22 of them. To get free shipping, use the code "ryanhawk" -- To get $50 off when you purchase three shirts, use the code "ryanhawk3" -- Thank you for your support!

Dec 12 2016

50mins

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220: Robert Greene - The Laws Of Power & Mastery

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The Learning Leader Show

Episode 220: Robert Greene - The Laws Of Power & Mastery

Robert Greene is an American author and speaker known for his books on strategy, power and seduction. He has written five international bestsellers: The 48 Laws of Power, The Art of Seduction, The 33 Strategies of War, The 50th Law and Mastery. In addition to having a strong following within the business world and a deep following in Washington, DC, Greene’s books are hailed by everyone from war historians to the biggest musicians in the industry (including Jay-Z and 50 Cent).

"Do Not Speak Unless You Can Improve Upon The Silence."

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence:
    • Self Mastery
    • Self Control -- "We are emotional animals, governed by emotions. It can get you in trouble."
    • Self Discipline
    • Flexibility -- Ability to adapt
  • Why Napoleon was successful? He had a front line obsession
  • Writing a book with 50 Cent
    • "Never let your guard down"
  • Law 4 - Always say less than necessary. "Do not speak unless you can improve upon the silence."
    • Learn the power of being quiet
    • If you're upset about an email, do not respond emotionally. Wait 24 hours and then respond with a level head
  • Law 9 - Win Through Your Actions, Never Through Argument. "Demonstrate, do not explicate."
    • Commit to action. Words are devalued
    • "Show them. Don't talk."
  • Law 10 - Infection: Avoid The Unhappy and Unlucky
    • You are the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with
    • "We absorb the energy of other people."
    • Look to "level up" your peer group at all time"
  • How to deal with a person in a power position who you do not like or respect?
    • Do not let them see you upset. Do not show them emotion (when they try to rile you up)
  • Did President Trump read The 48 Laws of Power? He appears to have used some of the laws to help get elected:
    • Law 6 - Court attention at all cost
    • Law 17 - Keep others in suspended terror. Cultivate an air of unpredictability
    • Law 27 - Play on people's need to believe to create a cult like following
  • Very common in business for an "aggressive, loud yeller" to push people around and somehow get promoted... But once they have to actually lead and manage people, they fail miserably
  • Rappers, movie stars, athletes quoting (even tattooing) The 48 Laws. How has that impacted you? Great satisfaction, but even more from "regular" people who email him and said his work helped them start a business or quit a bad job.
  • "Sometimes you don't know what you're intended to do. It pays to have an open mind." -- Robert didn't write The 48 Laws of Power until he was 38 years old
  • "The human brain does not learn unless it is excited"
  • Cesar Rodriguez -- "Trust The Process" -- You must get reps, reps, reps in order to achieve any level of excellence
    • Think long term and put in the necessary work to be great
  • Advice: "You were born with a purpose. Tap into what makes you different and unique. There is tremendous pressure to fit in. You will have success if you dig deep, be adventurous, try things out. Respect your unique-ness, something great will happen."

"The Human Brain Does Not Learn Unless It Is Excited."

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins -- How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence - The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Aug 27 2017

1hr 12mins

Play

187: Jeb Blount - How To Never Have An Empty Pipeline (Fanatical Prospecting)

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Episode 187: Jeb Blount - How To Never Have An Empty Pipeline (Fanatical Prospecting)

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

"Repetition is the mother of learning."

In This Episode, You Will Learn:

  • Common themes of the best sales professionals:
    • They have high Emotional Intelligence AND
    • Sales Intelligence
    • A full pipeline
  • The #1 Reason for failure is an empty pipeline
  • Ultra High Performers:
    • They prospect constantly -- driven to keep the pipeline full: it builds confidence
    • Focus on deals they can win -- they are a good judge of win probability
    • Have the luxury to choose the deals they work on
    • High EQ -- they have the ability to manage their emotions
  • Average sales people focus on a linear sales cycle... The ultra successful focus on the buying process, they shape the buying process, decision making process, and they are masters at influencing decision makers
  • You CAN move from great to ultra performer -- with work
  • Hiring process:
    • The culture must support ultra high performers
    • Using Sales Drive -- An assessment to learn if people will hunt. Must have intelligence/competitiveness, an optimism to hunt 
  • 4 Parts -- Interview process
    • 1) Intelligence - must be able to connect the dots that don't seem connectable 
    • 2) Acquired Knowledge - desire to build knowledge, growing, learning, curious
    • 3) Technology Intelligence - have to build new technology into your life
    • 4) Emotional Intelligence - management of emotions, situational awareness
  • Why the average sales person is good in an interview
  • Examples of great "Turnaround Statements"
  • A live discussion of the cold email I sent Jeb to get him on my show (really interesting part)
    • You have 2 seconds to get their attention
    • Hook in the subject line
    • 1st sentence -- talk to them, not you. Relate to them. Don't write "Hey Jeb," write "Jeb"
    • Situation -- bridge -- connect the dots, then ask
  • Social selling
    • Must have a great social profile
    • Monitor what you say
    • DO NOT tweet about politics or religion
    • Connect with people in your industry on LinkedIn

Continue Learning:

You may also like these episodes:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 071: Nate Boyer - Green Beret, Texas Football, The NFL

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence - The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Did you enjoy the podcast?

If you enjoyed hearing Jeb Blount on the show, please don’t hesitate to send me a note on Twitter or email me.

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

The Learning Leader Show is supported by FreshBooksFreshBooks is offering a 30 day, unrestricted free trial to my listeners. To claim it, just go to FreshBooks.com/Learning and enter LEARNING LEADER in the “How Did You Hear About Us?” section.

Jan 23 2017

1hr 2mins

Play

082: Daniel Pink – The Science Of Motivation, Legendary Writer & TED Talk

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Episode 082: Daniel Pink – The Science Of Motivation, Legendary Writer & TED Talk

Dan Pink is one of my all-time favorite writers and speakers.  He truly understands the importance of an intense focus on continuous improvement.  His focus and work on “Autonomy, Mastery, and Purpose” is fantastic.  We are extremely fortunate to have Dan share his knowledge with us, the loyal listeners of The Learning Leader Show. 

Dan Pink is the author of five provocative books — including three long-running New York Times bestsellers, A Whole New Mind, Drive, and To Sell is Human. Dan’s books have been translated into 34 languages and have sold more than 2 million copies worldwide.   In 2013, Thinkers 50 named him one of the top 15 business thinkers in the world. 

Dan’s TED Talk on the science of motivation is one of the 10 most-watched TED Talks of all time, with more than 19 million views. His RSA Animate video about the ideas in his book, Drive, has collected more than 14 million views.  Before venturing out on his own 18 years ago, Dan worked in several positions in politics and government, including serving from 1995 to 1997 as chief speechwriter to Vice President Al Gore.

Episode 082: Daniel Pink – The Science Of Motivation, Legendary Writer & TED Talk

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“For a sales professional, I look for: Conscientiousness, Willingness to develop expertise, and Ambiversion.”

Some Questions I Ask:

  • What are the common characteristics of high achievers?
  • What was your proves for quitting your job as a speechwriter and becoming a full time writer?
  • What was your preparation process for your legendary TED Talk?
  • What are the specific skills needed in order to remain in control of your career?
  • How does your research have an effect on the profession of sales?
  • Why do we struggle to implement and execute on what we learn from books/speeches/workshops?
  • What advice would you give to your 20 year old self?
  • What books have had the biggest influence on your life?
  • What does being a learning leader mean to you?

In This Episode, You Will Learn:

  • The critical components of sustaining excellence: Curiosity, Generosity, Hard Work
  • What it was like writing speeches for Al Gore
  • The process for starting his own business and leaving his comfort zone
  • The specific traits he looks for in a sales professional
  • His interview process to increase his odds of hiring the right people
  • The specific elements of “To Sell Is Human”
  • Focusing on one small task and doing it daily
  • Drew Brees and moving the chains… Getting first downs
  • Habit Formation and how to do it
  • Having a Growth Mindset vs. a Fixed Mindset

“Focus on moving the chains.  Can I do one small thing every single day?”

Continue Learning:

You may also like these episodes:

Episode 001: How To Become A Master Connector With Jayson Gaignard From MasterMind Talks

Episode 034: Jimmy Hatch – Shot While Searching For Bowe Bergdahl And Sky Diving With Gabby Giffords

Episode 004: How Todd Wagner (and Mark Cuban) Sold Broadcast.com To Yahoo! For $5.7 Billion

Episode 010: Shane Snow – How To Accelerate Success Using Smart Cuts

Did you enjoy the podcast?

This was a jam packed episode full of great content.  Dan Pink is leader who is constantly learning in order to help us all live a better life. Who do you know that needs to hear this?  Send them to The Learning Leader Show!

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

Bio From DanPink.com

Dan Pink is the author of five provocative books — including three long-running New York Times bestsellers, A Whole New Mind, Drive, and To Sell is Human. Dan’s books have been translated into 34 languages and have sold more than 2 million copies worldwide.   In 2013, Thinkers 50 named him one of the top 15 business thinkers in the world. 

Dan’s TED Talk on the science of motivation is one of the 10 most-watched TED Talks of all time, with more than 19 million views. His RSA Animate video about the ideas in his book, Drive, has collected more than 14 million views.  Before venturing out on his own 18 years ago, Dan worked in several positions in politics and government, including serving from 1995 to 1997 as chief speechwriter to Vice President Al Gore.

He received a BA from Northwestern University, where he was a Truman Scholar and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and a JD from Yale Law School. He has also received honorary degrees from the Pratt Institute, the Ringling College of Art and Design, and Westfield State University.

Dec 21 2015

57mins

Play

270 - Sam Jones - A Comfortable Life Is Overrated

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The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #270 - Sam Jones: A Comfortable Life Is Overrated

Sam Jones is an acclaimed photographer and director whose seminal portraits of President Obama, Sandra Bullock, George Clooney, Bob Dylan, Kristin Stewart, Robert Downey Jr, Amy Adams, Jack Nicholson, and many others have appeared on the covers of Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone, Esquire, GQ, Time, Entertainment Weekly and Men’s Journal.

In 2013 he launched Off Camera with Sam Jones on Directv’s Audience Network. Off Camera is an hour long show created out of his passion for long form conversational interviews. 

Show Notes:

  • Commonalities of sustaining excellence:
    • "They did not have a back up plan.  They had a desire to do what they loved even if it wasn't the obvious choice."
  • "A comfortable life is overrated." -- "I've always followed the things that excited me most."
  • "It almost feels like a lie when I'm doing something that doesn't excite me."
  • "I connect with this idea of listening to your gut feeling."
    • For artists, the goal is to make art
  • "No one knows you like you know you.  There is no set path for how things get done."
  • A life well lived = "Did I live up to my full potential?"
  • "I've always been curious about the questions to ask that open people up."
    • Sam started doing an interview show on camera when he was 14 years old
  • "I think my own theories through voicing my thoughts."
    • "Conversations are how I learn things... I've always been very curious."
  • Rose Byrne - "It's good to look back and see where you've come from."
  • The Jeff Daniels interview (one of my personal favorites)
    • As an interviewer, the importance of seeing their body language, how they react, "the look in their eye."
  • The interview preparation process
    • Identify possible themes of the conversation
  • As a communicator and conversationalist -- Think about how to do something better.  A form of scrutiny.  This leads to growth.
  • Two things a guest needs to have
    • Be willing
    • Be able
  • Is the guest open, honest, and self aware?  They need to be...
  • The guest needs to be able to tell a good narrative
  • "If you're going to find something true and authentic, you have to go down a path."
  • Goal = Make best environment for the human being to come out."
    • "I really want to know who this person is."
  • How to define success? "They keep letting us make more."
  • Interviewers Sam looks up to:
    • David Letterman -- He didn't adhere to strict rules.  You shouldn't have to...
    • Terry Gross -- NPR
    • Howard Stern -- Consistently done it well over time
  • Sam's upbringing:
    • "I didn't fit in at school."
    • "I always questioned social norms" -- "Why does this have to be this way?"
  • How to decide where to start an interview?
    • "That's the hardest part." -- "The best conversations are when your open to let it go anywhere."
  • Dream guests? -- Paul McCartney, Cameron Crowe
  • How to create an environment for people to articulate insecurity...
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea
  • Use the "Get To Know You Document"

"I've always questioned social norms.  Why does it have to be this way?"

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins -- How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 200: Keith Hawk & AJ Hawk -- Showing Up, Doing The Work, Earning Trust, Helping Others, Winning The Super Bowl, Celebrating #200

Episode 234: Jocko Willink -- Why Discipline Equals Freedom

Aug 12 2018

56mins

Play

216: Jim Collins - How To Go From Good To Great

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Episode 216: Jim Collins – How To Go From Good To Great

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence:
    • Never go to a meeting without writing down 5 questions prior to the meeting
    • Always follow up the meeting with at least a page of notes -- Share those with your mentor
  • What made you say yes to The Learning Leader Show after 2 1/2 years?
    • It requires intense focus to prepare
    • This is a teaching moment
    • Only say yes if it's going to be impactful. The team determined this show was the right place to do that
  • Always ask yourself -- "How can I make myself useful to the world?"
    • This was advice originally given to him by Peter Drucker
  • A great teacher can change your life in 30 seconds -- Peter Drucker did that for Jim
  • "I am constitutionally unemployable" -- Why Jim feels this about himself
  • His curiosity has led to the success and most importantly... Great questions like:
    • How to turn something into an enduring great company?
    • How someone or a company can go from Good To Great?
  • Jim most admired Peter Drucker when he was 35 years old...
    • The story of their first meeting and how Peter was the curious one... Kept peppering Jim with questions to start the conversation (much like Jim did to me to start this conversation)
    • "The ultimate zen master with bamboo stick"
  • Drucker - "It seems to me that you spend a lot of time worrying if you will survive. You probably will survive. You seem to focus a lot on the question, "how to be successful?" That is the wrong question. The right question is "How to be useful?"
  • What would it have cost Jim to not publish Good To Great after he finished the manuscript? -- More than $100m.  He had to get it out in the world.  He felt it was his responsibility to do so...
  • Another great mentor said to Jim... "When seeking an entrepreneurial path... Cut off all other options and GO."
  • "Everything is driven by by questions"
  • Can a good company become a great company? How?
  • Level 5 Leader
    • Starts with confronting the brutal facts
    • Personal humility and professional will
    • Not what, but who -- Get the right people on the bus
  • Does not happen in one fell swoop or a leap. It happens over time. Flywheel -- Create momentum
  • Understand the hedgehog concept -- An expert in one thing... Knows it very well
    • 3 Parts of the Hedgehog concept
      • Deeply passionate about it
      • Encoded for it... You're really good at it. An expert
      • Economically, you can make money from it
  • Level 5 Leaders:
    • What cause do I serve?
    • Humility to serve... It's not about them
    • Willful -- Able to make difficult decisions
  • For the best Level 5 Leaders... How do they sustain it?
    • It's easier for them because they understand their personal hedgehog -- It helps them remain renewed after many years
  • "Measured Risk" vs. "Burn The Boats"
    • Fire Bullets... Then Cannon Balls
      • For Jim, this was his first two books + his time as a professor at Stanford before he decided to leave to start his own company
  • You must navigate your path.  It doesn't mean you take unfounded risk... Fire bullets first, then cannonballs
    • "If you never fire a cannonball, you'll never make it.
  • "BHAG (Big Hairy Audacious Goal)
    • How to write a good one?
    • Take calibrated, calculated risk --
    • Have things to keep you alive even if everything goes wrong
      • Productive Paranoia
  • Validation - What are points of success you can look to?
    • Jim's wife Joann committing to winning an Ironman race... She was a consultant at the time.  She was also a runner. She tried biking and was very good at it.  Eventually she practiced, took measured risks, and won the Ironman race
  • "If you were a trial attorney and had to win the case, what evidence would you use?"
  • The Flywheel principle and putting it to use for Jeff Bezos and the Amazon team -- How could they build momentum? After Jim met with Jeff Bezos and his leadership team in 2001, Amazon executives were elated; according to several members of the team at the time, they felt that, after five years, they finally understood their own business.Most important for young leaders -- Jim's advice
  • "FIRST WHO, THEN WHAT?"
    • Who do you want to mentor you? Who do you want to mentor?
    • Who do you want to be your friends? Who do you want to work with? Who do you want to spend time with?
    • The most important question is WHO
    • You don't need to answer WHAT until you answer WHO

"The most important question is WHO. First WHO, then WHAT. Who will be your mentor? Who will be your friends? Who will you help? Who will you spend time with? You don't need to answer what until well after you've answered WHO."

Social Media:

Jim Collins is a student and teacher of leadership and what makes great companies tick. Having invested a quarter century of research into the topic, he has authored or co-authored six books that have sold in total more than ten million copies worldwide. They include: GOOD TO GREAT, the #1 bestseller, which examines why some companies and leaders make the leap to superior results, along with its companion work GOOD TO GREAT AND THE SOCIAL SECTORS; the enduring classic BUILT TO LAST, which explores how some leaders build companies that remain visionary for generations; HOW THE MIGHTY FALL, which delves into how once-great companies can self-destruct; and most recently, GREAT BY CHOICE, which is about thriving in chaos – why some do, and others don’t – and the leadership behaviors needed in a world beset by turbulence, disruption, uncertainty, and dramatic change.

Jul 30 2017

1hr 10mins

Play

074: Tim Kight – The Secret Weapon Behind Ohio State’s Success

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Episode 074: Tim Kight – The Secret Weapon Behind Ohio State’s Success

Tim Kight is an incredibly dynamic speaker. He is a great combination of extremely high intelligence mixed in with great experience around some of the best leaders in the world, including legendary UCLA basketball coach, John Wooden.  I absolutely loved this conversation with Tim.

Companies across the United States are recognizing speaker Tim Kight as a powerful voice on the performance of people and organizations. With a contagious energy, Tim provides insight into the “physics of performance.”

Tim’s ability to connect with and inspire individuals, teams, and leaders has yielded exceptional reviews from organizations throughout the country.  A dynamic speaker, Tim combines a unique background of research and practical experience to bring compelling insights to the real-world challenges of leading, managing, and winning in today’s competitive marketplace.

After briefly attending Ohio State University, Tim Kight received his undergraduate degree from UCLA and graduate degree from Princeton.  He has 25+ years of experience consulting in healthcare, banking, professional services, manufacturing, and athletics. He now lives in Columbus, OH.

Episode 074: Tim Kight – The Secret Weapon Behind Ohio State’s Success

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

“Leaders create the culture that drives the behavior that produces results.”

The Learning Leader Show

Some Questions I Ask:

  • What are the common characteristics of successful leaders?
  • What was it about John Wooden that made him so effective?
  • Why did you start Focus 3?
  • What does your company focus on?
  • What is your process for coaching and leading others?
  • How did you develop such a great working relationship with Urban Meyer
  • How do you implement and execute on the plan once it is established?
  • What is the 30 Day Above The Line Challenge?
  • What does it mean to be “Above The Line or Below The Line?”
  • What is the first thing you think of when you hear the phrase learning leader?

In This Episode, You Will Learn:

  • The importance being intentional and purposeful
  • Firsthand knowledge on what it was like to be around John Wooden when he coaches his teams
  • “Whole part whole” and “Zoom in Zoom out”
  • Urban Meyer and what specifically makes him world class
  • Why your response is what you should focus on (as opposed to the event that precedes it)
  • The importance of self-talk and attitude
  • “All behavior is driven by attitude and mindset”
  • How Ohio State handled the JT Barrett OVI situation and why their structure helped them be better prepared for the adversity
  • The importance of humility and how it leads to success

“Event + Response = Outcome” – Tim Kight

Continue Learning:

You may also like these episodes:

Episode 001: How To Become A Master Connector With Jayson Gaignard From MasterMind Talks

Episode 034: Jimmy Hatch – Shot While Searching For Bowe Bergdahl And Sky Diving With Gabby Giffords

Episode 004: How Todd Wagner (and Mark Cuban) Sold Broadcast.com To Yahoo! For $5.7 Billion

Episode 010: Shane Snow – How To Accelerate Success Using Smart Cuts

Did you enjoy the podcast?

This was a jam packed episode full of great content.  Tim Kight is a leader who leads an incredibly interesting life. Who do you know that needs to hear this?  Send them to The Learning Leader Show!

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

Bio From Focus 3

Companies across the United States are recognizing speaker Tim Kight as a powerful voice on the performance of people and organizations. With a contagious energy, Tim provides insight into the “physics of performance.”

Tim’s ability to connect with and inspire individuals, teams, and leaders has yielded exceptional reviews from organizations throughout the country.  A dynamic speaker, Tim combines a unique background of research and practical experience to bring compelling insights to the real-world challenges of leading, managing, and winning in today’s competitive marketplace.

After briefly attending Ohio State University, Tim Kight received his undergraduate degree from UCLA and graduate degree from Princeton.  He has 25+ years of experience consulting in healthcare, banking, professional services, manufacturing, and athletics. He now lives in Columbus, OH.

Nov 23 2015

52mins

Play

072: Jon Gordon - Optimistic People Win More | The Energy Bus

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Episode 072: Jon Gordon - Optimistic People Win More | The Energy Bus

Jon Gordon leads an inspirational life.  He’s had high moments and very low moments.  He openly shares some of the lowest moments of his life as well as the specific thoughts process he developed in order to go from the lowest of lows to an international superstar author and key note speaker. We are extremely fortunate to have Jon share his message with us, the loyal listeners of The Learning Leader Show. 

Jon Gordon's best-selling books and talks have inspired readers and audiences around the world. His principles have been put to the test by numerous NFL, NBA, MLB coaches and teams, Fortune 500 companies, school districts, hospitals and non-profits. He is the author of numerous books including The Wall Street Journal bestseller The Energy Bus, Soup, The No Complaining Rule, Training Camp, and The Carpenter. Jon and his tips have been featured on The Today Show, CNN, Fox and Friends and in numerous magazines and newspapers. His clients include The Atlanta Falcons, LA Clippers, Pittsburgh Pirates, Campbell Soup, Wells Fargo, Northwestern Mutual, Publix, Southwest Airlines, Bayer, West Point Academy and more.

Jon is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters in Teaching from Emory University. He and his training/consulting company are passionate about developing positive leaders, organizations and teams.

Episode 072: Jon Gordon - Optimistic People Win More | The Energy Bus

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“When I hear the phrase Learning Leader, I think YES! YES!”

Some Questions I Ask:

  • What are some common characteristics all high achievers share?
  • Why should we strive to be a craftsman instead of a carpenter?
  • What made you write “The Energy Bus?”
  • How was the main character George actually a depiction of you?
  • What mile do most people quit running in a marathon? Why?
  • What are energy vampires? How should we handle them?
  • What does being a learning leader mean to you?

In This Episode, You Will Learn:

  • The importance of vision and why it helps you achieve your goals
  • Changing your viewpoint and how to do it
  • Passion and purpose leading to happiness
  • Designing it. Why you must design it prior to building your business and the life you want
  • Life is a series of marathons and boxing matches
  • If you can see it, you can create it
  • A learning leader? YES!  I love it

 “Life is a series of marathons and boxing matches.”

Continue Learning:

You may also like these episodes:

Episode 001: How To Become A Master Connector With Jayson Gaignard From MasterMind Talks

Episode 034: Jimmy Hatch – Shot While Searching For Bowe Bergdahl And Sky Diving With Gabby Giffords

Episode 004: How Todd Wagner (and Mark Cuban) Sold Broadcast.com To Yahoo! For $5.7 Billion

Episode 010: Shane Snow – How To Accelerate Success Using Smart Cuts

Did you enjoy the podcast?

This was a jam packed episode full of great content.  Jon Gordon is a leader who is constantly learning in order to help us all live a better life. Who do you know that needs to hear this?  Send them to The Learning Leader Show!

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

Bio From JonGordon.com

Jon Gordon's best-selling books and talks have inspired readers and audiences around the world. His principles have been put to the test by numerous NFL, NBA, MLB coaches and teams, Fortune 500 companies, school districts, hospitals and non-profits. He is the author of numerous books including The Wall Street Journal bestseller The Energy Bus, Soup, The No Complaining Rule, Training Camp, and The Carpenter. Jon and his tips have been featured on The Today Show, CNN, Fox and Friends and in numerous magazines and newspapers. His clients include The Atlanta Falcons, LA Clippers, Pittsburgh Pirates, Campbell Soup, Wells Fargo, Northwestern Mutual, Publix, Southwest Airlines, Bayer, West Point Academy and more.

Jon is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters in Teaching from Emory University. He and his training/consulting company are passionate about developing positive leaders, organizations and teams.

Nov 16 2015

22mins

Play

242: Daniel Coyle - The Secret Of Highly Successful Groups (The Culture Code)

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Sustained Excellence = "They're over themselves" - They do not have an ego. They figure out the big truths, get over feelings, have clarity, vision. Great communicators - Like an athlete, they can be obsessed.  Keenly aware, active listeners, intentional with actions.

  • Why write The Culture Code?
    • Spending time around great teams and businesses, "I love the vibe, it's different." Had a desire to understand how that happens.  How to create trust"Typically we think of culture as in your DNA or not, but it's not.  "Great culture is something you can learn"The competition with Dan's two brothers growing up led to this fascination and curiosity with building great team culture"We routinely deeply underestimate our environments and the effect they have on us."
      • "As leaders, we need to create the conditions for excellence"The 3 Skills -- 1) Build Safety 2) Share Vulnerability 3) Establish Purpose
        • Build Safety - Why do a group of kindergartners do better than a group of CEOs?  The kindergartners have now agenda or care about credit.  They focus on doing the best work.  CEOs (in the study) were worried about who got credit and tearing each other down.
          • Safety is the single most important piece of foundation needed for great culture
          • Greg Popovich overdoes the "thank yous" - He regularly says thank you to the members of his team.
          • A painstaking hiring process - The single most important decision is "who's in and who's out."
            • You should script the entire first few days of a new employees time at a company -- Pixar example (20 minute mark) -- "At Pixar, we hired you because we need you to help us make our movies better."
          • John Wooden would routinely walk the locker room and pick up trash
        • Share Vulnerability - Functional notion that's so important
          • "Sharing a weakness is the best way to be strong" -- Navy SEALs example: The AAR (After Action Review)
          • The most important 4 words a leader can say, "Anybody have any ideas?"
            • Also, "I screwed up"
          • Over-communicate expectations
            • "We shoot, move, and communicate
            • "The only easy day was yesterday"
          • How to be a great listener
            • "Your goal as a listener should be to add energy." Ask questions, don't just sit there and nod.  Listen and absorb.  Help them leave higher than when you arrived.  Follow up to go deeper.  Being a great listener is a heroic skill.
            • Have "empathy and energy" as a listener -- dig in to assumptions (unearth)
          • Aim for candor, but avoid brutal honesty - good groups care about relationships, not brutality.  Candor is a better word
          • "Culture: From the Latin word cultus, which means care."
          • Great teams are made up of players who don't want to let their teammates down.
            • Greg Popovich and other great coaches disappear on purpose to let their team figure out it through tough moments.  Smart leaders create opportunities for teams to struggle and figure it out. --> "The leaders job is to make the team great without him/her."
          • Build a wall between performance review and professional development -- When you combine the two, you get neither.  Toggle, create safety so you can be more open and honest.
          • Establish Purpose
            • What's important now?  You must define that
            • Value statements aren't super useful -- "fill the windshield with a story."
            • Clear narratives guide attention
            • Name and rank your priorities

Jan 29 2018

56mins

Play

246: Patrick Lencioni - The Five Dysfunctions Of A Team

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The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Pat is the founder of The Table Group and the author of 11 books (including The Five Dysfunctions of a Team)which have sold over 5 million copies and been translated into more than 30 languages. The Wall Street Journal called him "one of the most in demand speakers in America." He has addressed millions of people at conferences and events around the world over the past 15 years. Pat has written for or been featured in numerous publications including Harvard Business Review, Inc., Fortune, Fast Company, USA Today, The Wall Street Journal and BusinessWeek.  This is the second time Pat has been a guest on The Learning Leader Show.  To listen to the first conversation we had, CLICK HERE.

Prior to founding The Table Group, Pat worked at Bain & Company, Oracle Corporation and Sybase.

Show Notes:

  • The email he received from Miami Heat coach, Erik Spolestra, after his first appearance on The Learning Leader Show
    • How he helps professional sports teams
    • Why NFL teams focus on the wrong things when deciding who to draft
      • Teddy Bridgewater vs Johnny Manziel
    • The characteristics of a great teammate:
      • Humility
      • Hunger
      • Emotional Intelligence
    • The success of Nick Foles in The Super Bowl
      • The camaraderie built by coach Doug Pederson of The Philadelphia Eagles
  • "I'm meant to work with people..."
  • The origin story - How Pat started his own business... and why?
    • Potential to work with Steve Jobs and Eric Schmidt
    • The biggest moment in the growth of his business?  Speaking at Willowcreek Church(50,000 people watched)
  • Doing a "talk" instead of thinking of it as a "keynote speech" -- "I'm just talking with the audience."
  • Why turn leadership issues into fables?
    • "We don't read books, but we read yours."  They are so interesting.  "I keep reading your books because I want to see what happens next."
  • Leaders must:
    • Have difficult conversations -- must do the hard things
  • What are the biggest mistakes a new manager makes?
    • "You cannot avoid the discomfort"
    • "Being a leader is uncomfortable"
  • The best leaders are "pushers"
    • The Steve Jobs and Jony Ive story -- "You're so vain"
  • Keys to a great culture:
    • Leaders must be intentional about behaviors they want
    • Must be brutally intolerant if people don't do it well
  • How Pat helped Southwest Airlines
    • Codify their culture -- It had never been done before
  • Working with Chic-fil-a
    • Their CEO wasn't too big to do dishes and clear the plates
    • "They gave snacks for my trip home"
  • "You don't come up with culture, you look at what's there"
  • The importance of stories
  • Pat's business: There are 45 consultants all over the world.  They are:
    • Humble
    • Hungry
    • Smart

"Being a leader is uncomfortable.  You cannot avoid the discomfort."

Social Media:

Feb 26 2018

1hr 2mins

Play

117: Tim Urban – Using Procrastination to Perform A Ted Talk & Befriend Elon Musk

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Episode 117: Tim Urban –  Using Procrastination to Perform A Ted Talk & Befriend Elon Musk

Listen carefully to both the beginning and the end of this conversation.  Tim Urban is one of the most thoughtful leaders that I have ever met.  As a listener I found Tim to be patient and thoughtful in his responses to my questions, sometimes taking a minute or so before his point came across.  Genuinely, I loved that about him.  Be prepared for an incredibly funny, yet insightful conversation on The Learning Leader Show.

Tim Urban has become one of the Internet’s most popular writers. With wry stick-figure illustrations and occasionally epic prose on everything from procrastination to artificial intelligence, Urban's blog, Wait But Why, has garnered millions of unique page views, thousands of patrons and famous fans like Elon Musk. (Bio from Ted.com)

Episode 117: Tim Urban –  Using Procrastination to Perform A Ted Talk & Befriend Elon Musk

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“Life is like a white canvas.  Most people paint in white.  White paint on white canvas.  You don’t even notice them.  The people who paint in different colors make things happen.  They lead.  You notice them.”

In This Episode, You Will Learn:

  • Doing something that makes a splash… Changing what others do, continuing to reinvent yourself leads to sustained excellence
  • Seth Godin has a great knack for constantly reinventing himself because he’s always searching and noticing
  • How writing about a number of different topics helps you learn
  • 7 Ways to be insufferable on Facebook
  • The secret (not really) to getting 4,000 people to pay you for your blog content
  • Getting invited to the main TED conference
  • The pain of coming up with a topic for his TED speech
  • The imposter syndrome… Feeling like he didn’t belong with the other TED speakers
  • The process for writing and delivering a world class TED talk
  • How Elon Musk became a fan of Tim’s work
  • Getting a phone call from Elon and discussing how they could work together
  • Humility and confidence are the qualities of great learning leaders
  • The opposite of arrogance… Having an open mind and being humble is the definition of a learning leader

 “One of the few things I feel like an expert on is procrastination.” – Tim Urban

Continue Learning:

You may also like these episodes:

Episode 001: How To Become A Master Connector W/ Jayson Gaignard From MasterMind Talks

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 082: Dan Pink – The Science of Motivation, Legendary Writer & Ted Talk

Episode 086: Seth Godin – How To Become Indispensable & Build Your Tribe

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Did you enjoy the podcast?

If you enjoyed hearing Tim Urban on the show, please don’t hesitate to send me a note on Twitter or email me.

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

Bio From Ted.com

Tim Urban has become one of the Internet’s most popular writers. With wry stick-figure illustrations and occasionally epic prose on everything from procrastination to artificial intelligence, Urban's blog, Wait But Why, has garnered millions of unique page views, thousands of patrons and famous fans like Elon Musk.

What others say:

With “Wait But Why,” Tim Urban demonstrates that complex and long-form writing can stand out in an online wilderness choked with listicles and clickbait.

“Wait But Why has captured a level of reader engagement that even the new-media giants would be envious of.” — FastCompany, 2015

Apr 20 2016

52mins

Play

006: Hal Elrod Tells You How To Be Insanely Productive Before 8:00 AM

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Episode 006: Hal Elrod Tells You How To Be Insanely Productive Before 8:00 AM

Wow! Hal is an absolute ball of energy.  He kept me on my toes this entire conversation.  Even after we stopped recording, Hal kept offering up great advice on how to improve my life as well as my podcast.  He is an incredibly giving person.  This episode was one of my favorites because I truly felt inspired throughout.  Hal is honest, open, and direct with his message.  It is fantastic and can be put into practice TODAY!

“This might sound funny, but my number 1 goal is for you to like me.”      - Hal Elrod.

Welcome to Episode 006 with the author of “The Miracle Morning,” Hal Elrod

Subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher Radio.

The Learning Leader Show

“Show me your friends and I’ll show you your future.” – John Wooden 

Some Questions I Ask:

  • Why do many people grasp the ideas you articulate intellectually and yet fail to implement them in a meaningful way?
  • How do you so effectively use story telling in your presentations?
  • Share with me your sales process… Let’s hear it.
  • How did you break the Cutco record within your first 10 days on the job?
  • What is your specific morning routine?
  • What negative self-talk have you had to overcome?
  • Do you operate out of a sense of obligation to anything or anyone?

“If you live your life like 95% of the people out there, you’ll get what they get.”  - Hal Elrod.

In This Episode, You Will Learn:

  • The essence of the Miracle Morning
  • The importance and the art of storytelling
  • How utilizing the 6 Life Savers will positively impact your life
  • How to deal with self-doubt
  • How to start every day at a level 10
  • The Power of Accountability
  • How he sold 50,000 books
  • How to execute on your plan
  • The thought process we have surrounding dreaming big

Continue Learning

You may also like these episodes:

Episode 001: How to become a master connector with Jayson Gaignard from MasterMind Talks

Episode 002: How to take over and set bigger goals with Chris Brogan

Episode 003: The incredibly interesting story of Maurice Clarett and how he built a 6 figure income after spending 4 years in prison

Episode 009: The Creative Leader’s Guide to making money by thinking outside of the Box with Jason Zook (SurfrApp)

Did you enjoy the podcast?

As I said before, Hal is an incredibly giving person. He is an absolute professional and is a phenomenal leader.  Who do you know that needs to hear this?  Send them to The Learning Leader Show!

Bio:

Hal Elrod is a #1 bestselling author, international Keynote Speaker, hall of fame business achiever, one of America’s top Success Coaches, national champion Sales Manager, record-breaking Sales Rep, ultra-marathon runner, grateful husband & proud father.

Known as “Yo Pal Hal” since hosting his first radio show at age 15, his greatest triumph came at age 20 after he was hit head on by a drunk driver and found dead at the scene…

Despite being clinically dead for six minutes, in a coma for six days, breaking 11 bones and being told he may never walk again, Hal defied the logic of doctors and the temptations to be a victim, and he bounced back to prove that ALL of us are capable of overcoming extraordinary adversity to create extraordinary results in our personal and professional lives. 

Hal has appeared on dozens of TV and radio shows across the country, and he’s been featured in numerous books, including The Education of Millionaires, the all-time bestselling Chicken Soup for the Soul series, Cutting Edge SalesThe 800-Pound Gorilla of SalesReleasing the ChainsLiving College Life In the Front Row, andThe Author’s Guide To Building An Online Platform, to name a few.

His #1 bestselling book, The Miracle Morning and his highly acclaimed #6 bestseller, Taking Life Head On!are two of the most acclaimed books on Amazon with a combined 120+ 5-star reviews.

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

Apr 24 2015

46mins

Play

337: Scott H. Young - How To Become An Ultra-Learner

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The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Text LEARNERS to 44222

For full show notes, go to www.LearningLeader.com

Episode #337: Scott H. Young - How To Become An Ultra Learner

Scott Young is a writer who undertakes interesting self-education projects, such as attempting to learn MIT's four-year computer science curriculum in twelve months and learning four languages in one year. Scott incorporates the latest research about the most effective learning methods and the stories of other ultralearners like himself—among them Ben Franklin, Judit Polgár, and Richard Feynman, as well as a host of others, such as little-known modern polymaths like Nigel Richards who won the World Championship of French Scrabble—without knowing French.  He is the author of the best-selling book, UltraLearning.

Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • Understand how excellence works
    • Learning, constantly thinking about the process of improving
  • Being interested in learning new things... Scott finds the mind fascinating
    • Encountering things that people have done that are jaw dropping
  • Projects:
    • Why he failed to learn French as an exchange student
      • "Simple decisions you make early on can have big consequences."
      • Because he didn't go all in and immerse himself in the language, he always reverted back to his native tongue
  • Go for inversion from the beginning.  This is why he did the "year without English."
  • "Doing the hard thing makes it easier in the long run, it accelerates skills more quickly"
  • UltraLearning - A strategy for acquiring skills and knowledge that is both self-directed and intense
  • As a manager, recognize that there are many different skills you can possess to be successful...
    • Know what you need to be good at.  Break it down to the component skills... Have a process
    • Get better at each important skill
    • Think: "What would it be like to be amazing at this?"
  • Tristan de Montebello:  He wanted to learn a new skill that was completely outside of his current skill set (he's a musician)
    • Instead of learning another instrument, he chose to become a world class public speaker
    • He started as an amateur and ended as a finalist for a public speaking championship.
      • How?  He got on stage twice a day, took improv class, and compressed the process.
      • "He made the conscious decision to become excellent."  And then executed...
  • Process for a person who has a full time job/family/mortgage:
    • This doesn't need to be a full time endeavor
    • "How are you using every minute of every day?"
    • Take on intensive bursts
    • Follow your curiosity and obsessions
    • Ramit Sethi -- "See the game being played around you"
  • Principles:
    • Spend time figuring out the best way to learn what you want to learn.  What tools and resources are available?
    • Drill, attack your weakest point.  Sometimes you shouldn't learn a skill (ex: fixing your car... Hire a mechanic instead)
    • Every complicated skill has components
    • Test to learn
      • Repeated review - read over and over
      • Free recall - read the text once, then close the book.  Try to recall what you learned.  In an experiment, free recall learners retained more.  PRACTICE remembering something.  It impacts how you process information.
  • Anders Ericsson - Deliberate practice:
    • In 40% of the cases, feedback hurt.  Task oriented feedback works best.
    • How we process feedback is most important
      • "If you're doggedly trying to be an ultra learner and sustain excellence, emotional consequences are important..."
  • Born with it vs. Ability to learn:
    • Anyone has the ability to learn anything
    • Everyone has their own abilities, their own pace.
    • Recognize your capacity to improve but don't compare to others
  • Life advice:
    • Read more books - It expands your mind
    • Meet more interesting people - Subtlety informs choices, expands group you meet
    • Go do ambitious things - bold projects
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea

Nov 04 2019

1hr 4mins

Play

044: John LeFevre - @GSElevator: This Episode Might Offend You

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Episode 044: John LeFevre - @GSElevator: This Episode Might Offend You

This episode is different from any other I’ve recorded for The Learning Leader Show.  Turney Duff describes my guest best for CNBC: “In some memoirs, the author tries to pull back the curtain to provide a glimpse into a particular time and place, but LeFevre attempts to rip the drapes right off. He gives a naked look at how business in the world of finance is conducted. LeFevre captures the "Glengarry Glen Ross"-type of attitude that some believe is required to be successful on Wall Street. He doesn't shy away from witnessing and partaking in some of the seedier antics of sharing non-public information, price-fixing, misogyny, drug use and good old-fashion cut-throat office politics.”

John LeFevre created the Goldman Sachs Elevator Twitter account (@GSElevator) as a parody of banking culture. He tweeted anonymously for years as he gained hundreds of thousands of followers with his notoriously outrageous and often offensive tweets. He was eventually revealed as the author of the account.  That Twitter account propelled him to earn a six figure book deal titled, “Straight to Hell: True Tales of Deviance, Debauchery, and Billion-Dollar Deals.”

Episode 044: John LeFevre - @GSElevator: This Episode Might Offend You

Subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher Radio.

The Learning Leader Show

“I feel an obligation to call out social injustices.” – John LeFevre

Some Questions I Ask:

  • What are the specific reasons behind your success?
  • What was your strategy behind growing the @GSElevator Twitter account?
  • What is an average “day in the life for you?”
  • When someone receives a six figure advance for a book, when exactly do you get paid?
  • Will this book become a movie?
  • Do you care if people like you? Are you okay with being polarizing?
  • What did you do with your first bonus check? ($75,000)

In This Episode, You Will Learn:

  • Why John is so transparent and has spoken up about the Wall Street culture
  • His PR strategy to grow a twitter account
  • How Tucker Max initially helped with his book deal
  • If it’s wise to give Lena Dunham a $2 million book advance
  • Crazy stories about his day to day life in NYC, London, and Hong Kong
  • Why he felt compelled to share information about illegal happenings including bankers colluding on fees
  • Why he said writing this book turned him into a feminist
  • How John has learned and grown up from his earlier days (he’s married and a Dad now)

 “Investment bankers take themselves too seriously.” – John LeFevre

Continue Learning:

You may also like these episodes:

Episode 003: The Incredibly Interesting Story Of Maurice Clarett And How He Built A 6 Figure Income After Spending 4 Years In Prison

Episode 002: How To Take Over And Set Bigger Goals With Chris Brogan

Episode 004: How Todd Wagner (and Mark Cuban) Sold Broadcast.com To Yahoo! For $5.7 Billion

Episode 010: Shane Snow – How To Accelerate Success Using Smart Cuts

Did you enjoy the podcast?

This episode was different and very interesting with the inimitable John LeFevre.  Who do you know that needs to hear this?  Send them to The Learning Leader Show!

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

From CNBC:

Turney Duff describes my guest best for CNBC: “In some memoirs, the author tries to pull back the curtain to provide a glimpse into a particular time and place, but LeFevre attempts to rip the drapes right off. He gives a naked look at how business in the world of finance is conducted. LeFevre captures the "Glengarry Glen Ross"-type of attitude that some believe is required to be successful on Wall Street. He doesn't shy away from witnessing and partaking in some of the seedier antics of sharing non-public information, price-fixing, misogyny, drug use and good old-fashion cut-throat office politics.”

John LeFevre created the Goldman Sachs Elevator Twitter account (@GSElevator) as a parody of banking culture. He tweeted anonymously for years as he gained hundreds of thousands of followers with his notoriously outrageous and often offensive tweets. He was eventually revealed as the author of the account.  That Twitter account propelled him to earn a six figure book deal titled, “Straight to Hell: True Tales of Deviance, Debauchery, and Billion-Dollar Deals.” 

Aug 10 2015

1hr 7mins

Play

086: Seth Godin – How To Become Indispensable & Build Your Tribe

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Episode 086: Seth Godin – How To Become Indispensable & Build Your Tribe

Seth Godin is a legend in the marketing and leadership world.  He truly understands the importance of “deciding to” and having an intense focus on continuous improvement.  Learning more about the most important job we (parents) will ever have is imperative to me.  Seth shares detailed, research backed evidence to how we can better lead and “cause a ruckus” as he would say.  We are extremely fortunate to have Seth share her knowledge with us, the loyal listeners of The Learning Leader Show. 

Seth Godin is the author of 18 books that have been bestsellers around the world and have been translated into more than 35 languages. He writes about the post-industrial revolution, the way ideas spread, marketing, quitting, leadership and most of all, changing everything. You might be familiar with his books Linchpin, Tribes, The Dip and Purple Cow.

In addition to his writing and speaking, Seth founded both Yoyodyne and Squidoo. His blog (which you can find by typing "seth" into Google) is one of the most popular in the world.

He was recently inducted into the Direct Marketing Hall of Fame, one of three chosen for this honor in 2013.  His newest book, What To Do When It's Your Turn, is already a bestseller.

Episode 086: Seth Godin – How To Become Indispensable & Build Your Tribe

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“If You're Not Upsetting Anyone, You're Not Changing The Status Quo."

Some Questions I Ask:

  • What are the common characteristics of leaders who have sustained excellence over time?
  • What are your thoughts on parenting and how to be a great Dad?
  • Why is school a con?
  • If you were made super intendant of a school district tomorrow, what are some of the first things you would do?
  • Should people go to college? Why or why not?
  • When initially asked to be a guest on my show, what made you respond that you would do it 9 months later?  Was it related to “The Dip?
  • Why don’t you do one on one coaching or consulting work?
  • What is a typical day in the life of Seth Godin?
  • Why should we seek out jobs where we don’t need a resume?

In This Episode, You Will Learn:

  • The importance of “deciding to” and why it’s our turn
  • School was invented by industrialist for you to be a cog
  • How we all can learn one simple idea
  • The Dip – Understanding it and how to prosper and prepare for it
  • Why we all need to change everything – And THINK about it that way
  • The importance of focusing and understanding when to say no and why
  • Why Seth will never tweet
  • The economics of podcasting and blogs

“Leading is a skill, not a gift.”

Continue Learning:

You may also like these episodes:

Episode 001: How To Become A Master Connector With Jayson Gaignard From MasterMind Talks

Episode 034: Jimmy Hatch – Shot While Searching For Bowe Bergdahl And Sky Diving With Gabby Giffords

Episode 004: How Todd Wagner (and Mark Cuban) Sold Broadcast.com To Yahoo! For $5.7 Billion

Episode 010: Shane Snow – How To Accelerate Success Using Smart Cuts

Did you enjoy the podcast?

This was a jam packed episode full of great content.  Seth Godin is leader who is constantly learning in order to help us all live a better life. Who do you know that needs to hear this?  Send them to The Learning Leader Show!

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

Bio From SethGodin.com

Seth Godin is the author of 18 books that have been bestsellers around the world and have been translated into more than 35 languages. He writes about the post-industrial revolution, the way ideas spread, marketing, quitting, leadership and most of all, changing everything. You might be familiar with his books Linchpin, Tribes, The Dip and Purple Cow.

In addition to his writing and speaking, Seth founded both Yoyodyne and Squidoo. His blog (which you can find by typing "seth" into Google) is one of the most popular in the world.

He was recently inducted into the Direct Marketing Hall of Fame, one of three chosen for this honor in 2013.

Jan 04 2016

40mins

Play

062: Jim Tressel – Coaching Ohio State: President of Youngstown State: Servant Leadership: #QuietTime

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Episode 062: Jim Tressel – Coaching Ohio State: President of Youngstown State: Servant Leadership: #QuietTime

I’ve been fortunate to know Jim Tressel since 2002 when he recruited my younger brother AJ to play football at Ohio State University.  He has always been a phenomenal example of what it means to be a servant leader.  Always calm, composed, and measured in his approach… He’s someone who I admire a great deal.  It was a thrill for me to have this in depth conversation with him.

Jim Tressel a former college football coach who served as head coach of the Youngstown State Penguins from 1986 to 2000 and the Ohio State Buckeyes from 2001 to 2010, winning five national championships between the two schools and 12 “Coach of the Year” awards during his career. He is currently the president of Youngstown State University.

Episode 062: Jim Tressel – Coaching Ohio State: President of Youngstown State: Servant Leadership: #QuietTime

Subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“It’s not where you’re coaching, but with whom you’re doing it with.”

Some Questions I Ask:

  • What are common characteristics amongst high achievers?
  • Would you consider going back to coaching football at the collegiate level?
  • What is your relationship like with Urban Meyer?
  • How could colleges better set up student athletes for success post University life?
  • How specifically do you help people follow through on their goal setting practices?
  • What is quiet time? What does it mean to you? How can quite time help everyone?
  • What occurs during the first 60 minutes of your day?
  • What does it mean to be a learning leader?

In This Episode, You Will Learn:

  • The importance of being a servant leader and what that specifically means
  • The emotions he feels as he watches Ohio State play on Saturdays
  • His identity and the importance of being an educator
  • Maurice Clarett and their relationship
  • Leadership is not a position or a ranking.  Most people have it wrong.  It’s about serving others
  • The importance of writing down what you’re grateful for everyday

“You can’t influence unless you are willing to be influenced.”

Continue Learning

You may also like these episodes:

Episode 003: The Incredibly Interesting Story Of Maurice Clarett And How He Built A 6 Figure Income After Spending 4 Years In Prison

Episode 002: How To Take Over And Set Bigger Goals With Chris Brogan

Episode 004: How Todd Wagner (and Mark Cuban) Sold Broadcast.com To Yahoo! For $5.7 Billion

Episode 010: Shane Snow – How To Accelerate Success Using Smart Cuts

Did you enjoy the podcast?

This episode was absolutely jam packed with great information on a variety of topics.  I love how open Jim Tressel is.  Who do you know that needs to hear this?  Send them to The Learning Leader Show!

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

Bio from YSU.edu

Jim Tressel became the ninth president of Youngstown State University on July 1, 2014.

A native of Northeast Ohio, Tressel graduated from Berea High School in suburban Cleveland in 1971. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Education from Baldwin-Wallace College in 1975 and a master’s degree in Education from the University of Akron in 1977. He also received honorary degrees from YSU in 2001 and Baldwin-Wallace in 2003.

He previously was executive vice president for Student Success at the University of Akron, where he was charged with restructuring and leading the efforts of a newly created division dedicated to the academic and career success of students. Tressel’s areas of responsibility included recruitment and admissions, financial aid and career services, advising and adult/transfer services, the military services center and multicultural academic programs. He spent a great deal of time in the Northeast Ohio region, emphasizing the need for top-notch higher education, innovation and collaboration.

Prior to joining the University of Akron, Tressel was head football coach at Ohio State University from 2001 to 2010, where his teams won the national championship in 2002 and seven Big Ten championships and appeared in eight BCS post-season bowl games. As head football coach at YSU from 1986 to 2000, Tressel’s teams won four Division I-AA national championships. He also was executive director of Athletics at YSU from 1994 to 2000.

Oct 12 2015

57mins

Play

336: Neil Pasricha - How To Build Resilience & Live An Intentional Life

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The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #336: Neil Pasricha: How To Build Resilience & Live An Intentional Life

Full Show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

How To Build Resilience & Live An Intentional Life

NEIL PASRICHA is the the author of six books including: The Book of Awesome, a spinning rolodex of simple pleasures based on his 100-million-hit, award-winning blog 1000 Awesome Things, The Happiness Equation, originally written as a 300-page love letter to his unborn son on how to live a happy life, Awesome Is Everywhere, an interactive introduction to guided meditation for children, and How To Get Back Up, a memoir of failure and resilience released as an Audible Original. His latest book is called You Are Awesome. His books are New York Times and #1 international bestsellers and have sold millions of copies across dozens of languages.  His first TED talk “The 3 A’s of Awesome” is ranked one of the 10 Most Inspiring of all time.

Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • They read a lot
    • They unplug regularly - "the genesis for all my best ideas."
      • "Create untouchable time" for yourself
  • The CEO of Wal-Mart -- How did he create this time?
    • He's the CEO BECAUSE he always made this part of his way of operating.
  • Neil worked in a senior level corporate role for Wal-Mart for 10 years
    • His side hustle was writing and speaking
      • He didn't quit his job until he had successfully built his side hustle for eight years!
  • Ask yourself two questions:
    • Which of these two decisions will I regret not doing more on your death bed?
    • What will you do if it fails?
  • The farmer with one horse fable: A farmer had only one horse. One day, his horse ran away. His neighbors said,“I’m so sorry. This is such bad news. You must be so upset.” The man just said,“We’ll see.” A few days later, his horse came back with twenty wild horses following. The man and his son corralled all twenty-one horses. His neighbors said, “Congratulations! This is such good news.You must be so happy!” The man just said,“We’ll see.” One of the wild horses kicked the man’s only son, breaking both his legs. His neighbors said,“I’m so sorry.This is such bad news. You must be so upset.” The man just said,“We’ll see.” The country went to war, and every able-bodied young man was drafted to fight. The war was terrible and killed every young man, but the farmer’s son was spared since his broken legs prevented him from being drafted. His neighbors said, “Congratulations! This is such good news.You must be so happy!” The man just said, “We’ll see . . .”

    What is up with this crazy farmer, right?

    Well, what’s up with this crazy farmer is that he has truly developed resilience. He has built up his resilience. He is resilient! He’s steady, he’s ready, and whatever the future brings, we all know he’s going to stare it straight in the face with eyes that scream,“Bring it on.”

    The farmer has come to understand that every skyrocketing pleasure or stomach-churning defeat defines not who he is but simply where he is.

  • What do most commencement speeches get wrong?
    • Do what you love only if you're willing to accept the pain to continue doing it...
    • The grind.  A lot of small losses add up.  Can you handle the pain that you will need to endure to do what you love?
  • Is it better to be a big fish in a small pond?
    • Yes.  Academic research shows it benefits you even up to 10 years after you leave the pond...
    • Don't but the $5m condo in NYC.  Continue to find places where you can purposefully win.
    • Rig the game to win.
  • "Different is better than better."
  • Add a dot-dot-dot...
    • Neil's mom: "I always just added the word yet to everything..."  It's not a NO, it's a "not yet."
    • You have to just "keep going."
  • The two minute morning routine that takes the worry out of waking up:
    • In your journal write three things:
      • I will let go of...
      • I am grateful for...
      • I will focus on...
  • Neil's goal setting:
    • Set the lowest possible goals.  Set goals that you will hit.
    • "Extrinsic goals don't work."  
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea

Oct 27 2019

1hr 12mins

Play

342: Shane Snow - The #1 Skill Of An Effective Leader (Intellectual Humility)

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The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

#342: Shane Snow - The #1 Skill Of An Effective Leader (Intellectual Humility)

Text LEARNERS to 44222

For full show notes go to www.LearningLeader.com

Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • Pattern recognition - The ability to connect ideas and people
    • Systems thinking - Connect dots, zoom out
    • The ability to continue to question yourself, a hunger to improve, a "voracious learner" (Liv Boeree)
    • Must relearn how to humble yourself
    • The #1 skill is intellectual humility -- The ability to sit between gullibility and stubbornness
  • Why are people so unwilling to change their mind?
    • "So much of our ideas are attached to our identities."
    • "You must separate your ego from intellect."
  • What is a solution (as a leader)?
    • If you're the one in power, invite people with a different perspective to the table.
    • Don't invoke identity.  Just ask for perspective.
    • Leave space to change your mind... "I could be wrong but..."
  • Strength and flexibility should not be in conflict
  • Ben Franklin idea:
    • Use idea, leave space for change, set opinion, but use phrases less defensive, only change your mind based on evidence.  Say things like:
      • "I could be wrong but..."
      • "The research suggests..."
      • "The evidence suggests..."
  • Elon Musk -- His pattern to persuade people...
    • It's purpose based leadership ("to make life multi-planetary")
    • The strength is in his vision and his purpose.  He's seen as strong by being willing to change his mind.
  • Compliance versus Committed = Cult vs Culture
    • Difference between a cult and culture:
      • Cult - Must act and think in a certain way
      • Culture - Asked to contribute your ideas in your way
  • Key part of leadership: "Understand what matters to your people."
  • Intellectual humility:
    • Respect for others' viewpoints
    • Lack of intellectual overconfidence
    • Separating your ego from your intellect
    • Being open to revising your viewpoints
    • Openness to new experiences
  • Separate feelings/thoughts from facts
  • Trying something new creates new opportunities
  • Advice:
    • Learn about intellectual humility - take Shane's assessment
    • Frame changing your mind as a strength -- reward others for doing this
    • Habits: Instead of saying "I feel" say "I think."  Words matter.
  • Separate facts from stories
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea

Order my book: WELCOME TO MANAGEMENT

Dec 09 2019

1hr 7mins

Play

341: Behind The Scenes Of The Learning Leader Show With Jay Acunzo

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The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

#341: Behind The Scenes Of The Learning Leader Show With Jay Acunzo

Full Shownotes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

Text LEARNERS to 44222

Notes:

  • SECTION ONE: Superlatives
    • Hardest interview:  -- Jim Collins.
    • Most-downloaded all-time:Show has steadily grown since it was created, so the most downloaded is a recent episode.  From this year: #310 David Epstein. He wrote Range and The Sports Gene,  Some popular ones from the past are: #300 with my dad and brother AJ, #216 Jim Collins episode is a popular one. 
    • Most referenced: the one you cite the most in conversation or your work - #78 with Kat Cole (Courage/Confidence + Curiosity/Humility) = Productive Achievers.
    • Biggest delta between what you thought they'd be like...and what they were actually like?  General Stanley McChrystal.  War hero. 4 star General.  Expected him to be super intimidating, but he was so kind, thoughtful, curious, and caring.  Followed up to ask him to write the Foreword to my book and he said yes. 
    • Hardest part of running this show?  It’s never ending.  Must always be working on it - Reaching out to guests, cold emails, preparing for each conversation, reading their books, watching everything they have online, etc.  It never stops.
    • Where have you most improved? Better conversationalist.  Understand how to ask better questions, be more thoughtful, intentional with my actions/behavior. 
    • Biggest benefits to your life...  1) The more I learn, the more I realize I don’t know…  I've become more curious. 
    • Most active listeners: who do you see popping up a lot?  - My Leadership Circle
  •  SECTION TWO: Stagnation Is The Enemy
    • We undervalue the power of consistency:  Consistency + Quality is the key to long term success.  Most people quit.  Must keep going.
    • Why start it? - I wanted to create my own Leadership PhD.  One where I get to choose the professors.  Share with others, be a multiplier… Had dinner with Founder of Broadcast.com, Todd Wagner. Publishing work is the best form of networking.  Create a reason for people to WANT to contact you.
    • The preparation process -  Read their books, watch their talks, read articles written by them and about them.  Talk to friends we have in common. Read the ACKNOWLEDGEMENT section of their books to ask questions about meaningful in their lives (this gets them to open up and feel free to speak more emotionally… Which can be great audio and REAL)
    • Given repeat ability and longevity, how do YOU stay engaged? Mental heuristics, intrinsic things that you just do/try, proactive remixes and reinventions? -- Have to be genuinely curious in the guest.  Have to enjoy the pain of preparation. What are you willing to struggle for? Because that seems to be a greater determinant of how our lives turn out (Neil Pasricha). I love the preparation process, reading/thinking of angles to take a conversation with a specific guest that I’m curious about.
    • Given that stagnation isn't just caused by US but also by the market saturating, how do you operate today compared to before? Early mover advantage wanes...and so many more podcasts about your topic specifically now exist. -- Willing to try new things (like this).  Study and understand my listeners. You’ll often hear me speak to the exact avatar of my listener.  I’m not trying to have the biggest show ever. I’m trying to be the right show for the people who email me (mid-level manager in corporate America.  Building teams, hiring/firing, qualities to look for when building a team). It helps directly with those people, but have also found niche audiences in other spaces like NCAA basketball coaches, NBA players, etc.
  •  SECTION THREE: What's next? 
    • What are you excited to do next?  Try new projects like this episode… Continue to do live shows with an audience, travel more for in person recordings (Koppelman, Roberge), and keep going.  My book.
    • Where does this show go? What other projects surround it now, vs what you want to try? - Live shows, travel for in person.  Bring on guests for my Leadership Circles (paid Mastermind groups.  My groups ask for a guest, I bring them on). Creates group teaching and a ton of value for my Leadership Circles. My book.
    • What's pissing you off about leadership in the corporate world that you'd like to explore and help solve? - Bad bosses.  I’ve worked for a few (as have we all).  I wrote about that goes through the process of being a bad boss to being a better one.  I lived it and I’ve learned so much from others. That’s what WELCOME TO MANAGEMENT is all about.

Dec 02 2019

1hr 11mins

Play

340: Liz Forkin Bohannon - How To Build Your Life Of Purpose, Passion, & Impact (Beginner's Pluck)

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The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

Text LEARNERS to 44222 to receive the first chapter of my new book, WELCOME TO MANAGEMENT for free.

Episode #340: Liz Bohannon - co-founder and co-CEO of Sseko Designs and the author of Beginner's Pluck: Build your life of purpose, passion and impact now. Liz and the Sseko story has been featured in dozens of publications including: Vogue Magazine, Redbook Magazine, O Magazine, Inc, Fortune and others. Sseko has appeared on national broadcasts including ABC's Shark Tank and Good Morning America. 

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • They do work that taps into their intrinsic motivation and they know WHY they do what they do.
      • You must drill down far to know this
    • Vulnerable -- Look at Brene Brown.  A "truth teller."
    • Shoshin - An openness with eagerness.  Have to have both.
  • Why is the "Beginner's Pluck" message resonating with so many people?
    • "I believe it, but not sure if I really do..." People (women especially) tend to doubt themselves too much.
  • "You don't need to be extraordinary to build a life making a difference."
  • "Passion is something you build... I learned it through telling an untrue story."
  • Be driven by interest, and curiosity...
  • "I'm the CEO of a for-profit fashion company."
  • "My ego wasn't super involved.  It gave me the freedom to just do it."
    • "I got so obsessed with the problem and finding a solution to it."
  • "The work of an artist is to know what's inside of you.  Be solutions agnostic."
    • "The artist creates without thinking of the audience."
    • "The entrepreneur has to think of the audience." -->  What's the actual problem this fixes?
    • Sit in the complexity of what it means to be a world changer.
    • "We live in a world that is so quick to critique... Show up, do the work."
  • How did Liz learn to run a business?
    • She took a six week crash course on basic accounting and followed her curiosity to learn each skill as she went.
      • Don't be caught in analysis paralysis
      • "The thing I had connected to me was my WHY."
      • "You don't get to know Step 7 when you're in stage 1.  That's not how it works."  Must take it a step at a time.
      • "What do I absolutely need to figure out?
        • The MVP - Minimum Viable Product -- Know that it's only Version 1.  Can iterate as you go.
  • The 4 stages of Learning:
    • Unconscious incompetent
    • Conscious incompetent
    • Conscious competent
    • Unconscious competent
  • How often am I feeling out of my league? -- You should feel this often in order to grow.

Nov 25 2019

53mins

Play

339: Robert Greifeld - Lessons Learned From A Decade Of Change As CEO Of NASDAQ

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The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

Ep: #339: Robert Greifeld - Lessons Learned From A Decade Of Change As CEO Of NASDAQ

Robert Greifeld served as the CEO of Nasdaq from 2003 to 2016. During his tenure, Bob led Nasdaq through a series of complex, innovative acquisitions that extended the company’s footprint from a single U.S. equity exchange to a global exchange and technology solutions provider, nearly quadrupling revenue, growing annual operating profits by more than 24 times and achieving a market value of over $11 billion. He is the author of a new book called: Market Mover: Lessons from a Decade of Change at Nasdaq. 

Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • "Once you achieve competency, they're on a daily battle with complacency."
    • Always looking forward - never resting on laurels
    • A mindset that: "Success in the past is no guarantee that success will happen in the future."
  • Self reflection is important for self awareness: "Being focused on the present doesn't preclude self reflection."
  • Has being rich made you happy?  "Wealth makes you more secure?"
  • How to balance family time and work time?
    • "Balance is a dangerous word.  I prefer having an integrated life instead."  "I made a rule that I did no business dinners unless I was doing the selling."
    • Make multiple short trips instead of longer ones... Only miss seeing your family for a day or two at a time
  • Bob describes the story of how he was recruited to NASDAQ and why he took the job...
    • During the interview process, he shared the five things he would do within the first 100 days:
      • Get right people on board
      • Reduce bureaucracy
      • Embrace fiscal discipline
      • Overhaul technology
      • Stop being satisfied with number 2
    • Have to have the right people on the bus
      • Bob met with many people prior to starting as the CEO of NASDAQ:  "I fired a lot of people before 8:00am on the first day I started.  I did a lot of work prior to starting to learn who was going to buy in."
      • "Good morale in a bad organization is not a good thing."
  • With promotions, live by the 80/20 rule: "We tried to promote 80% from within our organization."
    • "When interviewing people from the outside, the odds of being wrong are higher."
    • Qualities to look for in people to promote:
      • Positive attitude/energy -- "Happy campers"
      • Pure skills
      • How well do they play with others?
      • Won't tolerate prima donnas
  • How to be a great leader?
    • Must be in front of your customers
    • Stand in the shoes of your people
    • Do a lot of individual contributor work
    • "Don't be a conference room pilot" -- Don't spend all your time in meetings
  • Learned knowledge vs. Lived knowledge
    • Learned: "Don't know what's coming, you just learned it."
    • Lived: "You've sat in the seat, you can see around corners."
  • Acquisitions:
    • Geography - If location is near us, that helps
    • Industry - If it's the same industry, just smaller, that helps
  • Overall advice:
    • Never had a career path or end goal
    • Wanted to do something that energized me
      • "I'll do that job well."
    • "Don't focus on climbing the mythical career ladder."
    • "Don't take a job to just get another job."
  • Why leave NASDAQ?
    • "I like controlling my schedule."
  • The benefits of growing up with blue collar parents.  His dad worked for the Post Office, he was always upbeat and believe that life can be better.

Nov 18 2019

42mins

Play

338: Jason Fried - How To Create The Ideal Company Culture (It Doesn't Have To Be Crazy At Work)

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Episode #338: Jason Fried

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

Text LEARNERS to 44222 to learn more

Jason Fried is the founder & CEO at Basecamp. He's the co-author of Getting Real, Remote, REWORK, and It Doesn't Have To Be Crazy At Work.  Basecamp is a privately-held Chicago-based company committed to building the best web-based tools possible with the least number of features necessary. Their blog, Signal vs. Noise, is read by over 100,000 people every day. Jason believes there's real value and beauty in the basics. Elegance, respect for people's desire to simply get stuff done, and honest ease of use are the hallmarks of Basecamp products.

Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • Willingness/ability to know what's the work worth doing
      • The skill to discern what's important
    • How to develop that skill?
      • Must become a good auditor of your time.  Practice.  Look back on what you've done.  Analyze what you do? Discern what's worth it.
  • Remote work:
    • Basecamp has 56 employees in 30 cities around the world... Why remote?
      • "You don't want the best people, you want the right people."  The odds of all the right people living near your headquarters is small.
    • The business started in Chicago with three people.
      • They hired DHH to be their first programmer.  He lived in Denmark.  Then they hired someone in Utah.  "It just worked.  We didn't worry about where, just wanted to find the right people."
  • Jason never writes a business plan -- No 1, 3, or 5 year plan.  They work in six week project increments.
    • Why? "Planning is simply guessing.  Setting your course over a guess doesn't seem like a good idea.  We have an idea of where we're headed, but we work in six week chunks."
  • What Jason learned from Jeff Bezos:  "People who were right often changed their minds." --> Be willing to change your mind when better evidence presents itself.
  • The "anti-goal" mindset:
    • "(Financial) Goals are made up. There's nothing about them that's true.  They are guesses... Made up numbers."
      • "Asking if I hit the goal is the wrong question.  Asking if I enjoyed the run is the better question."
      • "One of the problems with setting goals is you are a different person when you set them than when they need to be met."  You grow, evolve, and change.
      • "Too many companies focus on numbers instead of their customers." --> That is because they have number based goals to hit.  It can ruin the customer experience (Jason had a terrible experience trying to cancel his satellite radio service)
  • Qualities Jason looks for when making hiring decisions:
    • Communicate clearly - "You must be a great writer."  Much of their communication is done in writing.  "We look at the cover letter first.  That must be good.  If that's not well written, then we do not look at the resume."
    • Quality of character - "You must be a good person.  We hire people that we want to be with.  No ego.  We like to hire people that use "we" and "us" instead of "I"
    • Must be able to give and take feedback - Need to be coachable.  "For designers, we give them a project to do in the interview process and then we provide them feedback.  If they can't handle it, we will not hire them."
  • Transition from individual contributor to leader... How to do it well?
    • "It is REALLY hard. Very few people are born being good managers."
    • "Come to terms that you can no longer do everything."
    • Advice Jason got from Tobi (CEO of Shopify) - "As the CEO, you are working on longer term strategic initiatives.  You don't get to feel the day-to-day progress that people lower in the organization feel."  Need to get comfortable with that.
  • Some of the benefits at Basecamp: Fully paid vacation every year for all employees ($5K), 3 day weekends all summer, $1K/year in continuing education outside of your job, $100/month for a massage, $100/month gym membership, $2K/year charity match, paid in the top 10% of your salary range as if you lived in San Francisco (even though no employees live in San Francisco)
    • Why do it? "It's the right thing to do.  I wanted to start a business that I wanted to work at.  We're a company that cares about service."
    • "People are not the place to save money.  They are the place to spend money."
  • "Give people their time.  A contiguous block of time every day to do their work."  Don't muddle it up with meetings in the middle of that time.
  • "I'll work hard now so I can relax later" is not the optimal way to live.  Create the habits now to enjoy it as you go.  "Later" is where intentions go to die.  "When calm starts early, calm becomes the habit."

Nov 11 2019

1hr 8mins

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337: Scott H. Young - How To Become An Ultra-Learner

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Text LEARNERS to 44222

For full show notes, go to www.LearningLeader.com

Episode #337: Scott H. Young - How To Become An Ultra Learner

Scott Young is a writer who undertakes interesting self-education projects, such as attempting to learn MIT's four-year computer science curriculum in twelve months and learning four languages in one year. Scott incorporates the latest research about the most effective learning methods and the stories of other ultralearners like himself—among them Ben Franklin, Judit Polgár, and Richard Feynman, as well as a host of others, such as little-known modern polymaths like Nigel Richards who won the World Championship of French Scrabble—without knowing French.  He is the author of the best-selling book, UltraLearning.

Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • Understand how excellence works
    • Learning, constantly thinking about the process of improving
  • Being interested in learning new things... Scott finds the mind fascinating
    • Encountering things that people have done that are jaw dropping
  • Projects:
    • Why he failed to learn French as an exchange student
      • "Simple decisions you make early on can have big consequences."
      • Because he didn't go all in and immerse himself in the language, he always reverted back to his native tongue
  • Go for inversion from the beginning.  This is why he did the "year without English."
  • "Doing the hard thing makes it easier in the long run, it accelerates skills more quickly"
  • UltraLearning - A strategy for acquiring skills and knowledge that is both self-directed and intense
  • As a manager, recognize that there are many different skills you can possess to be successful...
    • Know what you need to be good at.  Break it down to the component skills... Have a process
    • Get better at each important skill
    • Think: "What would it be like to be amazing at this?"
  • Tristan de Montebello:  He wanted to learn a new skill that was completely outside of his current skill set (he's a musician)
    • Instead of learning another instrument, he chose to become a world class public speaker
    • He started as an amateur and ended as a finalist for a public speaking championship.
      • How?  He got on stage twice a day, took improv class, and compressed the process.
      • "He made the conscious decision to become excellent."  And then executed...
  • Process for a person who has a full time job/family/mortgage:
    • This doesn't need to be a full time endeavor
    • "How are you using every minute of every day?"
    • Take on intensive bursts
    • Follow your curiosity and obsessions
    • Ramit Sethi -- "See the game being played around you"
  • Principles:
    • Spend time figuring out the best way to learn what you want to learn.  What tools and resources are available?
    • Drill, attack your weakest point.  Sometimes you shouldn't learn a skill (ex: fixing your car... Hire a mechanic instead)
    • Every complicated skill has components
    • Test to learn
      • Repeated review - read over and over
      • Free recall - read the text once, then close the book.  Try to recall what you learned.  In an experiment, free recall learners retained more.  PRACTICE remembering something.  It impacts how you process information.
  • Anders Ericsson - Deliberate practice:
    • In 40% of the cases, feedback hurt.  Task oriented feedback works best.
    • How we process feedback is most important
      • "If you're doggedly trying to be an ultra learner and sustain excellence, emotional consequences are important..."
  • Born with it vs. Ability to learn:
    • Anyone has the ability to learn anything
    • Everyone has their own abilities, their own pace.
    • Recognize your capacity to improve but don't compare to others
  • Life advice:
    • Read more books - It expands your mind
    • Meet more interesting people - Subtlety informs choices, expands group you meet
    • Go do ambitious things - bold projects
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea

Nov 04 2019

1hr 4mins

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336: Neil Pasricha - How To Build Resilience & Live An Intentional Life

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Episode #336: Neil Pasricha: How To Build Resilience & Live An Intentional Life

Full Show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

How To Build Resilience & Live An Intentional Life

NEIL PASRICHA is the the author of six books including: The Book of Awesome, a spinning rolodex of simple pleasures based on his 100-million-hit, award-winning blog 1000 Awesome Things, The Happiness Equation, originally written as a 300-page love letter to his unborn son on how to live a happy life, Awesome Is Everywhere, an interactive introduction to guided meditation for children, and How To Get Back Up, a memoir of failure and resilience released as an Audible Original. His latest book is called You Are Awesome. His books are New York Times and #1 international bestsellers and have sold millions of copies across dozens of languages.  His first TED talk “The 3 A’s of Awesome” is ranked one of the 10 Most Inspiring of all time.

Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • They read a lot
    • They unplug regularly - "the genesis for all my best ideas."
      • "Create untouchable time" for yourself
  • The CEO of Wal-Mart -- How did he create this time?
    • He's the CEO BECAUSE he always made this part of his way of operating.
  • Neil worked in a senior level corporate role for Wal-Mart for 10 years
    • His side hustle was writing and speaking
      • He didn't quit his job until he had successfully built his side hustle for eight years!
  • Ask yourself two questions:
    • Which of these two decisions will I regret not doing more on your death bed?
    • What will you do if it fails?
  • The farmer with one horse fable: A farmer had only one horse. One day, his horse ran away. His neighbors said,“I’m so sorry. This is such bad news. You must be so upset.” The man just said,“We’ll see.” A few days later, his horse came back with twenty wild horses following. The man and his son corralled all twenty-one horses. His neighbors said, “Congratulations! This is such good news.You must be so happy!” The man just said,“We’ll see.” One of the wild horses kicked the man’s only son, breaking both his legs. His neighbors said,“I’m so sorry.This is such bad news. You must be so upset.” The man just said,“We’ll see.” The country went to war, and every able-bodied young man was drafted to fight. The war was terrible and killed every young man, but the farmer’s son was spared since his broken legs prevented him from being drafted. His neighbors said, “Congratulations! This is such good news.You must be so happy!” The man just said, “We’ll see . . .”

    What is up with this crazy farmer, right?

    Well, what’s up with this crazy farmer is that he has truly developed resilience. He has built up his resilience. He is resilient! He’s steady, he’s ready, and whatever the future brings, we all know he’s going to stare it straight in the face with eyes that scream,“Bring it on.”

    The farmer has come to understand that every skyrocketing pleasure or stomach-churning defeat defines not who he is but simply where he is.

  • What do most commencement speeches get wrong?
    • Do what you love only if you're willing to accept the pain to continue doing it...
    • The grind.  A lot of small losses add up.  Can you handle the pain that you will need to endure to do what you love?
  • Is it better to be a big fish in a small pond?
    • Yes.  Academic research shows it benefits you even up to 10 years after you leave the pond...
    • Don't but the $5m condo in NYC.  Continue to find places where you can purposefully win.
    • Rig the game to win.
  • "Different is better than better."
  • Add a dot-dot-dot...
    • Neil's mom: "I always just added the word yet to everything..."  It's not a NO, it's a "not yet."
    • You have to just "keep going."
  • The two minute morning routine that takes the worry out of waking up:
    • In your journal write three things:
      • I will let go of...
      • I am grateful for...
      • I will focus on...
  • Neil's goal setting:
    • Set the lowest possible goals.  Set goals that you will hit.
    • "Extrinsic goals don't work."  
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea

Oct 27 2019

1hr 12mins

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335: Deconstructing The Art & Science Of Public Speaking With Jay Acunzo

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Text LEARNERS to 44222

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

Episode #335: Deconstructing The Art & Science Of Public Speaking With Jay Acunzo

This is another bonus episode with my friend, Jay Acunzo.  We deconstruct the art and science of public speaking in this bonus episode. "I'm trying to help you see something different that fundamentally changes your work for the better."

Notes:

  • The goal:
    • Help your audience see something different that fundamentally changes their work for the better.
    • Everything I'm doing (when speaking) is helping you get from where you're at to where you want to be.
  • How to put a talk together:
    • Prompt driven -- Anticipate the questions that will be asked and answer them.
    • The coaching of Andrew Davis for Jay... "He's been really instrumental in helping me build a speaking business
      • "The Dialog Outline" -- You break up a talk you're giving into it's component pieces making it a modular talk.
        • "You're sharing the things others need to hear at the right moment they need to hear it... So they're anticipating what comes next..."
    • Put yourself in situations to "talk out your thoughts" to generate ideas... "Learn through speaking."
  •  Process to prepare:
    • The value of rehearsal -- Is it needed?  How much?
    • Memorization vs. knowing your content cold → How to not sound like a robot, but still remember what to say?
    • Visual aids (PowerPoint, Keynote) -- "If I need the slides, I'm not ready." - Jay.  Slides should be use to reinforce the message.  You should never need to look at them.  They are there to be additive to your message for your audience.  
    • The 30 seconds before going on stage?  The optimal self talk... Interesting to hear the dramatic difference between Jay's approach and mine...
      • Get emotionally cross-faded.  "Wow, I get to do this.  This is so cool." (The words Jay says to himself the instant before he goes on stage."  And then... "Watch this." Assuring people that "I'm going to have some serious fun."
      • "Get ready... I'm about to put on a show." -- Use your excitement and confidence to serve the audience.
  • How to start a speech:  What to do and what NOT to do:
    • The first part of the speech is the shared goal - "What does everyone in the room want?"
      • "The Vanguard." - The front line you send out to begin the attack...
    • Do NOT start by saying, "I'm so excited to be here."  Of course you're excited.  Don't waste that time.  It's too important to wander into the speech.
  • Speaking Framework:
    • (Mine: story → science → practical application)
      • Story -- People remember stories
      • Science -- Empirical evidence/data to support the story
      • Application -- This is what it means for YOU
    • Storytelling -- How to become a better storyteller?  Great storytellers can rule the world...
      • Give a "feature story" -- And then reveal your hidden truth.
      • And then break it down into a methodology.
    • Engaging the audience - some speakers walk in the crowd, some ask questions regularly… The optimal ways to engage the audience
    • The element of surprise -- How to create ‘moments’ for the audience (surprise, ‘aha’ etc)?  How to ensure you are enlightening them and not just regurgitating stuff they already know...
    • The keys to Q & A and why it should never be the last thing you do on stage...
  • Film the audience to see their reaction to your message... Study that to see what hits.
  • How to add humor appropriately
  • Coaching/feedback -- The intentional actions taken to ensure improvement.  Why you should have a coach.  Who is your kitchen cabinet?
  • For corporate world mid-level managers who have to do QBR’s (quarterly business reviews) -- How can they make those more exciting?  (Most are dreadfully boring full of random stats, charts, bar graphs, etc)
  • Study the 'intentionality' of stand up comedians.  Everything you say is for a specific reason.
  • Be thoughtful and intentional with your actions.
  • Persuasive presentations have logos, ethos, and pathos (from Talk Like TED)
    • Logos - Backing up your argument with data
    • Ethos - Credibility of the speaker 
    • Pathos - Establish an emotional connection

Oct 23 2019

58mins

Play

334: Yancey Strickler - Using The Power Of Metaphors (This Could Be Our Future)

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#334 Yancey Strickler

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Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

Yancey Strickler is a writer and entrepreneur. He is the cofounder and former CEO of Kickstarter and author of This Could Be Our Future: A Manifesto for a More Generous World.Yancey has been recognized as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum and one of Fast Company’s Most Creative People. He’s spoken at the Museum of Modern Art, Sundance and Tribeca Film Festivals, Web Summit, and events around the globe. 

Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • Selflessness - "You have to get over yourself first"
    • Have strength to know what's important
    • Flexible
    • It requires more time living into the minds of other people - "Not necessarily compassion, but 'what's going on with them?'"
    • Curiosity - A desire to know more
  • Amazon thinks 'customer maximization' - thinking in the best interest of the customer
  • How to get hired for the next management role?
    • Spend 1 hour a day with your current team -- Learn from them.  What's really going on?
    • Be the "go to" person for important objectives
  • What was Day 1 as the CEO of KickStarter like?
    • "I remember the new fancy office... I needed to set proper expectations."
    • "People need to know how to make decisions"
    • "The weight I felt as a new CEO was very high"
    • The "on-me-ness was so high" - A huge responsibility that was felt
  • The skill of "sandwiching ideas" -- Using metaphors to put together different ideas
    • Japanese cuisine
      • "Hara Hachi Bu: stop eating when you’re 80% full so that you're still hungry for tomorrow."
        • We shouldn't overfull ourselves because there is always something to learn tomorrow
  • "My brain is really good at storing and making connections."
  • "As a CEO/Leader, you need to be able to speak in metaphors to bring more oxygen to the situation..."
  • How can we all do this?
    • Read --> Write it down --> Take notes of something interesting
    • "Metaphors are powerful."
  • The power of story --> science --> application
  • During his time at KickStarter, they grew from 70 employees to 155 in just a few years... What did Yancey look for in candidates?
    • Selflessness, servant mindset
    • "When they shared accomplishments, did they use 'we' or 'I'?  We like the people who use 'we'"
    • Mission driven
    • Honest
    • Not afraid to share bad news
    • "Whenever I found myself having to talk myself into something and overlook a red flag, I often found that was a mistake."
  • Why did he leave KickStarter?
    • "I got tired, it took the energy out of me.  It was my identity for a decade..."
    • Had a rough 360 review (full review of people above, beside, and below him in the organization)
    • "One morning, I got to the door to leave my house, and I could not do it.  I broke down crying to my wife and said, 'I don't want to be a CEO today.'"
  • Why writing is so beneficial:
    • Forces clarity of thought
    • "It forces you to accept rejection and just roll."
  • Why write a manifesto(the book)?
    • "I gave a talk, had it transcribed, put it online, and it went viral."
  • When deciding to work for himself:
    • "I need to treat myself as if I'm a company." -- How to properly plan and strategize as a solo entrepreneur
    • "I wrote down five options... One of them was writing a book.  I chose that option."
    • A publisher said to Yancey, "You don't need to hide. Your book is good enough without all the fancy artwork."
  • Going against the grain: "I'm challenging the dominant ethos of our time."
  • Bentoism - A balanced view of what's in our rational self-interest as inspired by the layout of a Japanese lunchbox.
    • Now me, future me, now us, future us.  The four quadrants...
    • Do you want do this in a small group with Yancey? Email me
  • How Adele did this?
    • She used an algorithm to measure how loyal a fan was.  She used that information to help them get tickets at a decent price instead of the extraordinary prices on the secondary market.
      • This is both emotional and rational.  It's possible to be done for all of us.
  • Life advice:
    • Yancey originally felt like a failure because he didn't identify with what the magazine covers were telling him: He didn't feel the urge to want to crush his competitors.  It's hard to be aware of the water you swim in...
    • Have awareness... Be curious, read a lot.
    • Have a plan... An idea of where to go.  Understand new values.
  • Use the "Get To Know You Document"
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea

Oct 20 2019

1hr 10mins

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333: Chris Savage - How To Bet On Yourself & Scale Through Creativity (The Wistia Way)

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#333: Chris Savage - How To Bet On Yourself & Scale Through Creativity

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

Chris Savage is the co-founder and CEO of Wistia, a web-based video hosting solution built for businesses. He founded the company in 2006 with the goal of helping businesses effectively market their products or services in a smarter way through video. Under Savage’s leadership and vision, Wistia has experienced 100 percent growth over the past three years, expanding the company’s client portfolio to more than 110,000 users in more than 50 countries, including companies such as HubSpot, MailChimp and Starbucks.

Text LEARNERS to 44222

Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • Voracious learners - "they celebrate learning more"
    • Crave feedback - a strong desire to improve - "They are wired to want that"
    • Patrick Campbell - "He's trying hard to learn as fast as possible"
  • Chris's process for continual improvement:
    • Placing people in his life to push him
      • "I go to them to push my thinking"
    • Block time to think - "Being busy is not a sign of success"
    • Spend time with customers and employees
  • Enjoying the process:
    • "It was stimulating and exciting.  It took us a year to get our first paying customer."
    • The business was funded by savings.  They kept their expenses very low
  • Key to a successful partnership:
    • Ensure values are aligned - "These are intrinsic"
    • Know that everything takes longer than you think
    • Have a decision making framework - Demystify the process to make big decisions
  • The product strategies/options:
    • Operational efficiency - The cheapest (No, this is not optimal)
    • Product leadership - Be different
    • Customer intimacy - This will solve customer problems
  • Their values:
    • Long term company thinking
    • Creativity
    • Presentation - An elevated experience. Aesthetics matter.
    • Simplicity
  • Hiring - "Hiring is everything."  Qualities he looks for:
    • "How are people intrinsically motivated?"
    • "Are they excited about the craft, the challenge?"
    • Give them a real-life problem to solve -- And see how they handle it/resolve it
  • Inside their process to hire a VP of People:
    • Clearly define what success is in the role
    • Do a project after the first round of interviews - "Do the job, get critiqued."
    • Build out strategy - Not a perfect plan, but have a process
    • Meet with management team, present the plan.
  • Building your network:
    • "Take the weight of your friends.  You're the average of them."
    • Be proactive who you want to be --> Look for people who challenge you.
    • Reflect on that...
    • Tactically: Make connections with people who you admire.  People like honest, sincere compliments.  Tell them WHY they inspire you
  • Financials: Raised angle round of $650K.  Then $800K.  All individual angels.  No venture.  They have $10m in revenue.
  • Crisis:
    • "We were losing this money, we weren't having fun anymore... People tried to buy us."
      • They raised debt to do a buy back... "I felt amazing."
  • Wistia:
    • Creative risk taking
    • Have to scare self - made a feature length documentary
    • Host of the Brandwagon show
    • "Take risks that scare you"
  • Growth and profitability aren't mutually exclusive - "Focus on building products and experiences that people love... Growth follows."

Oct 13 2019

58mins

Play

332: David Brixey & Doug Meyer LIVE! - How To Build & Sustain A Great Partnership

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Ep # 332: David Brixey & Doug Meyer LIVE! - How To Build A Business From The Ground Up

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

This episode was recorded in front of 150 of our closest friends, family, and clients in Dayton, Ohio.

Doug Meyer formed Brixey & Meyer alongside Dave Brixey with a dream to give clients a different way of working with their tax professionals. In his role as Managing Director, Doug serves as a trusted business advisor to Business Owners, CEOs, CFOs and Boards of Advisors, driving value and accountability in the following strategic areas: succession & ownership planning, strategic planning, owners agreement structures, compensation planning, family business advisory & issue mediation, professional management practices, mergers & acquisition strategy, and family charter implementation.

David Brixey formed Brixey & Meyer with Doug Meyer in 2002 utilizing his insatiable entrepreneurial spirit and his financial skills gained at Ernst & Young. He is also the co-founder and Managing Director of Brixey Meyer Capital, a lower middle market private investment firm.  Since 2008, Dave has been personally involved in investing in small business to lower middle market as well as venture capital.

Brixey & Meyer is recognized as a leading provider of accounting and business advisory services in the Midwest.

Oct 06 2019

1hr 2mins

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331: Ryan Holiday - How Will You Choose To Respond? (Stillness Is The Key)

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Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

Text LEARNERS to 44222

Episode #331: Ryan Holiday - Stillness Is The Key

RYAN HOLIDAY is one of the world's foremost thinkers and writers on ancient philosophy and its place in everyday life. He is a sought-after speaker, strategist, and the author of many bestselling books including The Obstacle Is the Way; Ego Is the Enemy; and The Daily Stoic. His books have been translated into over 30 languages and sold over two million copies worldwide. He lives outside Austin, Texas, with his family. His latest book is called Stillness Is The Key.

Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence =
    • They look at the whole picture
    • They have the ability to zoom out
    • They have balance
      • Driven, skilled at what they do, but they do not run unchecked.  This creates happiness.
    • Highly disciplined
    • Temperance - Integrated into life
  • The word enough:
    • Balance - "We're definitely going to be forgotten." 
    • It's important to have the quiet time to do the work.  And you have to love doing it.
  • Michael Jordan's hall of fame speech:
    • "It's so misguided.  The problem with proving people wrong is eventually you do it.  And it's never enough.  Rather, you should choose to prove your own potential right.  Did I leave it all on the page?  Did I fulfill my own standards?"
    • I choose to prove my supporters right instead of allowing detractors to take up space in my head
  • The higher power was the logos - the path of the universe... The stoics acknowledged fate and fortune and the power these forces had over them.
    • Marcus Lattimore (RB from South Carolina and the NFL) - He said, "The career ending injury I had was the best thing that ever happened to me."
      • Decide how you will choose to respond.  Make the choice to make a positive difference in people's lives.
  • The impact of father hood has had on Ryan:
    • "You realize how powerless you are as a parent.  It's humbling and eye opening."
  • The WHO - the power of relationships
    • It's a team.  It requires balance.  Both players must flourish independently:
      • "Accomplishments are not part of the identity of the relationship I have with Sam (his wife).  She doesn't give a shit how many books I sell."
      • "I have an inner scoreboard and hold myself to those standards."
  • The value of a daily journal - The process, the ritual, the routine is helpful.
    • The act of the devotion.  Quiet time everyday, provides energy in the morning.  "A routine becomes a ritual over time."
    • Journaling one line a day for five years: It's the process of warming up, talking to self, verbalizing fears
  • Thoughtfulness - "Interrogate yourself at the end of each day." -- This is what Churchill did
  • Hitler said, "I recognized the correctness of my views."  That's not wisdom, it's insanity.  Don't do that.
  • Privately, Abraham Lincoln with racked with doubt.
  • The epidemic of ego easily mistakes for confidence and strength
  • Stillness - What we're working towards.  We need it to think clearly.  We need to rest.
    • Must be fully in the moment
  • Momento Mori - "Get in the moment"
  • Speaking routine - Wear the same clothes, workout before, listen to the same music, manage energy, funnel focus, and know that the material helps people
  • Use the "Get To Know You Document"
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea

Sep 29 2019

1hr 3mins

Play

330: Deconstructing The Art & Science Of Interviewing With Jay Acunzo

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The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

#330: Deconstructing The Art & Science Of Interviewing With Jay Acunzo

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

This is a special bonus episode focusing on deconstructing the art and science of interviewing.  You will hear learning happening in real time.  Jay Acunzo and I go a meta-level to better understand how to better improve our conversation ability, how to be better in an interview.  "Interviewing is a skill that enhances your life in a pleasant and unexpected way."  This is focused on how you can ask better questions, be more interesting and more interested, and become a better conversationalist.

Notes: 

  • The meta level of deconstructing the process of making the work is rare...
  • "I experience the most flow when it's quiet, nitty-gritty work.  Those minute are profoundly rewarding for me."
  • What makes a great interview?
  • An open loop -- Start telling the story, but wait to close the loop until later to build intrigue...
  • The difference between a narrative style show and an interview getting to know someone:
    • A story is three parts - The intent of the story: The "Joseph Campbell Heroes Journey" 1) Status Quo 2) Conflict 3) Resolution
    • Bucket of questions:
      • "Tell me about X..."
      • "How did it make you feel?"
      • The analysis and the reflection
  • Change your mindset: "You're not an interviewer, you're a dance partner."
    • "The only thing that matters is that you lead.  Everything else is little subtle moves to get people to go to where you want to go."
  • "It's not a constant march forward. Instead, think of it like a dance. There are some steps back, steps forward, steps to the side — all packaged together in one coherent experience, with lots of zig-zagging and subtle steps inside those boundaries."
  • Open ended questions: “Tell me about X” gets you story details, while “how did it feel when” gets you key moments of reflection and analysis. Both are crucial.
  • Clip #1 -- JJ Redick 
    • He says “great question” — what would make someone interviewed as often as a pro athlete say that?
    • How to prep for an interview for someone who is interviewed all the time?
      • Built a basic rapport leading up to the interview -- Discussed sports, restaurants, podcasting, interviewing.  Developed a "friend" level of communication
        • Create an environment where the guest wants it to be a great show
    • Good follow up questions: Ask for an example... Asking, "How did that make you feel?" "What's your process?" --> Then be a deep, thoughtful listener to ask a follow up.
    • Stay on the same level with your dance partner - Don't be a guest "worshiper"
    • When following up, there are a few things you can do: 1) Distill 2) Disagree 3) Ask the next question...
    • During an interview, the best question you can ask: "How did that make you feel?" It enables them to get in an emotional lane (away from canned responses)
    • Testing the levels on the microphone -- Don't waste that opportunity.  Engineer the guest, the human -- You need them to feel like we're hanging out and excited about the interview.  Make it fun.  What to ask instead: "I'm going to check your levels, do you have any pets at home?" "What would be your last meal on earth?" -- It helps people break out of their corporate drone mode.  The question is about the person, on a human plane.
    • Create a safe space for them to share their truth. "I'm not a journalist, I'm a conversationalist."
  • Clip #2 -- Adam Savage
    • How did he get on the show? Working with a PR firm to book a guest -- A great PR person like Brent Underwood only recommends guests that are a good fit for the show.
    • Ask questions that you are genuinely curious about -- I am curious about someone's process and it's always led me to a useful follow up...
    • The issue is sometimes a "process" oriented question is the guest can answer with a generality... How to wiggle out of that?
      • Look at the acknowledgement section of their book to get ideas for important people/events in their life to ask about...
    • Mental Heuristics: Tell me about, 30,000 feet, go to a specific example... The third question is "Putting them in a box:" -- "
  • From Jay: Heuristics to tell great AUDIO stories:
    • Tell me about...
    • How did you feel when (or, how did that feel?)
    • Can you give me an example?
    • (Superlatives) Best, worst, funniest, scariest, hardest, least certain, favorite, etc...
    • (Dig for emotional moments)
  • Clip #3 -- Brian Koppelman
    • How to handle nerves -- Work to get settled in.  Get through the initial conversation point...
    • Give people a genuine compliment for why you like their work -- Tell people why their work helps you
  • Hidden Gems:
    • Interplay between your intent for the work and your framework for it:
      • "My goal is to engineer an outcome, but I have an intent I don't want to become The Bachelor in Paradise."
        • Have self and situational awareness.  We carry with us good intent to serve the audience.  Don't let the framework or engineering supersede the original intent.
    • The two types of interviews: 1) The person, their story... 2) Their content
      • The best conversations are able to weave both together and smoothly bounce back and forth
      • Learn about the person AND learn about the topic that he has mastered -- Master that dance between both -- I need to give you something that is going to make you better.
  • Use the "Get To Know You Document"
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea

Sep 25 2019

1hr 14mins

Play

329: Kindra Hall - How Storytelling Can Influence Audiences & Transform Your Business

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The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Ep #329: Kindra Hall

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

Kindra Hall is President and Chief Storytelling Officer at Steller Collective, a consulting firm focused on the strategic application of storytelling to today’s communication challenges. Kindra is one of the most sought after keynote speakers trusted by global brands to deliver presentations that inspire teams and individuals to better communicate the value of their company, their products and their individuality through strategic storytelling.  Kindra is a former Director of Marketing and VP of Sales. Her much anticipated book, Stories That Stick, will be published on September 24, 2019.

Notes:

  • Why is storytelling so important?
    • It's how we learn, how we connect
    • Your team needs to know you, and like you (stories do that when you tell them well)
    • You can learn breadth/depth of a person through a story
  • A story is NOT:
    • A bullet point resume
    • A list of information
    • Stating the mission statement
    • The objective
  • A story = The small moments when mission is in a specific place and time... When something happens.
  • The four components of a story:
    • Place and time: "a moment"
    • Identifiable characters - must see people
    • Authentic emotion - Relatable to audience
    • Specific details - Draw audience in to the co-creative process
  • Opening story of her book: In Slovenia at Thanksgiving:
    • The power of the sales clerk's ability to tell a story compelled Kindra and her husband to buy
  • Why did the story work?
    • It drew you in with powerful moments and emotion
    • It had suspense - "I want to know what's going to happen..."
    • People will give you their attention when you're telling a compelling story
    • It brought them to places through vivid descriptions
  • How to better start a meet at work:
    • First, realize it's a skill you can develop
    • Take a step back, think of the higher level message -- "What's the overall theme?"
      • "When have I seen this in action?"  Why was it compelling?
  • Make a list of nouns: People in life you've had to communicate with (bosses, friends, colleagues)
    • Find moments and stories from those people... Understand the characters of the story
  • Think: "What do I want my audience to think, feel, know, and do at the end of this story?"
  • Use the "bystander story" - Stories of others that you make yours
    • Remember the goal is to create connection
    • This becomes your story... Through your eyes
  • How to handle price conversations?
    • Move from dollars and cents to value -- "They need to feel the pain of if they didn't have this thing I'm selling."
    • Our decisions are not always based on logic, they are based on ideas
  • Use the "Get To Know You Document"
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea

Sep 22 2019

56mins

Play

328: Joel Peterson - How To Build The Bonds That Make A Business Great

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The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

Text LEARNERS to 44222

#328: Joel Peterson -- Joel Peterson is the Chairman of the Board at JetBlue Airways. He has served on more than three dozen boards over the past 45 years.  Joel is also the Founding Partner and Chairman of Peterson Partners, a Salt Lake City-based investment management firm with $1 billion under management. Peterson Partners has invested in over 200 companies through 13 funds in four primary asset classes: growth-oriented private equity, venture capital, real estate, and search funds.  Since 1992, Joel Peterson has taught courses in real estate, entrepreneurship, and leadership at the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University. 

  • Sustaining excellence =
    • They are trusted, credible, and dependable -- They "build a high trust organization"
    • It doesn't happen naturally.  You must be intentional about it
  • Why is it so hard to build a trusting organization?
    • "People are weary.  Trust is critical.  You must do what you say you are going to do."
  • "Trust is not being gullible.  Trust is a hard edged concept."
  • It's three parts:
    • Character
    • Competence
    • Authority
  • How to build a culture of trust?
    • Listen -- Capture what your team is saying through 1 on 1 conversations.  Understand common values, goals, strategies
    • Reframe the dashboard -- What does winning look like? Make sure it is clearly defined.  What's the current level of trust in the organization?
  • How to run an effective meeting:
    • Have a purpose, the right people in the room, and follow up assignments.
    • Have pre-work.  It must be done.  Go through each individual member.  "Build trust by the process."
  • How to run a town-hall:
    • Listen carefully, repeat it.  FOLLOW UP and take action.
  • How to handle broken trust?
    • Fix breaches immediately. "Bad news doesn't get better with age." -- "Don't let grass grown under your feet."
  • "Trust decreases transaction costs." -- Everything is faster when there is trust.
  • "You can't do good business with bad people."
  • Interview process:
    • Understand the decision points
    • Determine roles/responsibilities as a team
    • Check references
    • The most important decisions you will make is who you hire and who you fire
  • There must be a vividly clear picture of what success is:
    • Break down the details: Who is the champion? Time frame? Budget? -- Measure all of them to ensure all involved know what success is.
    • Do a post-mortem: What went well? What didn't? Why?
  • Keep your team informed:
    • "Err on the side of over-communication."
    • "Write a partner letter every two weeks.  Keep everyone updated."
    • For JetBlue, there is a weekly meeting update -- a "State of the Union" for the 24,000 employees
  • Create a learning organization -- Foster an environment where there is a love for learning.
  • Strive for win-win negotiations
    • Each is part of a series -- Think long term
    • You must be fair in order to do many deals
    • Art of the compromise -- Don't be zero sum.  You'll build a reputation and nobody will want to work with you.
  • Embrace respectful conflict -- Create an environment where people can open disagree.  This helps people refine their ideas and make them better.
  • Advice for husbands/dads:
    • Be there as a cheerleader, not a policeman
    • Be a listener, make sure you understand
    • "Love is the most powerful force in the world."
  • Use the "Get To Know You Document"
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea

Sep 15 2019

43mins

Play

327: Marc Roberge - How To Create Fans For Life (O.A.R.)

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The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

#327: Marc Roberge

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

Marc Roberge is lead singer and rhythm guitar player for O.A.R. (Of A Revolution).  He also is their primary songwriter and has been described by his band-mates as, "Our Leader." He formed the band with his best friend (and drummer) Chris Culos for an 8th grade talent show 23 years ago in Rockville, Maryland.  I first saw him play at a college bar called "First Run" on the Miami University campus in Oxford, OH my freshman year (2000).  Since then, O.A.R. has gone on to sell out Madison Square Garden.  We recorded this episode in Austin, Texas next to the stage at Stubb's Waller Creek Amphitheater.

Notes:

  • The importance of persistence and why
  • Our 20-year history – Watch them playing at First Run in Oxford, OH – The journey from small college bars to selling out Madison Square Garden
  • Chose Ohio State because they have the most bars in a small area – Earned the Buckeye National Scholarship
  • “Money was not part of the equation at the beginning.  We just needed enough to keep the van gassed up.”
  • The primary reason why you’re so happy it goes well is so you get to keep doing it.
  • Two initial goals: Finish college and build the band. – The band started in 8th grade for a talent show.
  • “We wanted to get on the road, scrape our knee, and build to sustain. It was never about money; it was about gaining ground.  Moving forward, progressing.”
  • The first word to describe Marc from other members of the band: “Leader.” – What it means to be a leader of creative people…
  • The stages of Marc’s leadership: 1st Stage: Driven completely by the vision of wanting to make music out wandering the world.  “I wanted to make these songs because they made me feel good.  I wanted to be out with my friends and empower each other.” 2nd Stage: “It becomes our vision.” – “You may no longer provide the best leadership, so you need to empower people in your camp to lead.  In order to be in the drier seat, you have to know what other people’s superpowers are so each one can flourish.  3rd Stage: Chris (the drummer) – He nudged the group forward to a rebirth.  Became motivated to get back in the driver seat and now he had amazing co-pilots who had their own creative genius.  “Realize the powers of those around you and harness that. That was the afterburners for us.  It’s built out of mutual respect and admiration for each other.”  “Being a leader has to show that things aren’t always going to go great.  You must maintain, be composed, don’t flail your arms around.  Move forward.”
  • Respectful disagreement:  How to decide which song to open with at Madison Square Garden… How to make decisions through disagreement?  “I know when I’m wrong, I know when I’m right too.  Good ideas… It’s a self-filtering system.  You have to listen, be open to others.  In that moment, it was perfect.”
  • “A part of leadership is knowing when you’re wrong and when the other idea is better and move on.”
  • “When one of your heroes is standing next to you and says, “I really like this,” that impacts you.  “I was wrong and wasn’t thinking of the big picture. It was selfish.”
  • How to handle people who don’t like your work? Story: Opening for Dave Matthews Band at The Gorge – The entire front row turned their back in protest of the opening act.  “I get angry.  My new goal was to get them to turn around.  It’s a lesson: You can either get hurt or say, “I get to play my songs at the Gorge.  Eventually they will respect us.”
  • Giving a TED Talk: Authenticity – Being real, true to yourself.  “Everything I’ve created has stemmed from a few nostalgic pin-pointed childhood memories. I’ve tried to build my whole life to tell those stories of what we can do when we’re together.”  Fans for Life: “We were living a life we’ve dreamt of.”
  • The resistance of chasing approval of others – “That theme is rooted in unabashedly telling a story about where you come from.  Sticking to the same morals we were instilled with since growing up.”  “I’m not seeking approval because we aren’t adjusting music to fit in, we play what makes us feel good.”
  • Chasing your curiosity and obsessions with great rigor – How to create a life to do that?  “My dream is we’ve built something that allows us something time to create.  Keep working on live shows to continue to play them.  We love them.  If you don’t play 5 nights a week, it won’t be there for you.  You have to get the reps.
  • Sustained excellence:  Commonalities: 1) Drive 2) Social – Able to work a room, communicate well with others. 3) Willingness to fail – “If you aren’t willing to jump off that edge, you don’t deserve to get it.”
  • Song writing process: “Each song has a different method for me.” “There are moments when I’m walking down the street in NYC and it comes to me.  I’ll run to the studio and quickly record it.  There are so many different styles, but it all has to come from being inspired.”
  • The creative process:  Working with Greg Wattenberg to be a sounding board and offer honest feedback.  “We’ve never changed what we’re doing.  We’ve only built upon it and have always focused on our story.”
  • “People get so confused, they want everything, they want a boat, a house, so much.  We just want to keep going.”
  • Celebrating the 25th anniversary of the band.  “We want to celebrate the fact of a few buddies being together for that time.”
  • “Tell your story.  Don’t be afraid to tell your story.”
  • How to not get complacent and conservative after success?  For fear of failure?  “We take risks every year.  We book a year in advance and we book some locations that we know might not work.  We maintain pressure at all times.” “You have to take calculated risks and create things that may make you a little uncomfortable at first... To move the art form forward.”
  • Gratitude – The importance of John Lampley being added to the band.  “John Lampley is magic.  He brought joy in the room.  His life gratitude, how he looks at opportunity of everything: meals, being alive, we just exercised in the truck and he keeps talking about how good he feels.”  It’s about being grateful for what you have and what you get to do on a daily basis.
  • Practicing all day long – Love the craft.  Loving the process of working on it.  “This is what we do, this is how we operate.”  The mindset of daily improvement. “We feel very lucky to be doing this.  You better earn it and keep it.” Don’t pay attention to what others are doing, Focus on improving your craft.
  • “What they really like about your group is how it makes them feel?
  • General life advice: 46:45 – 47:27 (HERO) “Find something that you truly feel connected to… there’s energy in this world that will tell you when you’re in the right spot. And then work. A lot of people want to be famous, how you going to get there. And then grind.”  Bring joy to yourself and others is life.
  • “Be willing to play anywhere.  Just keep going.” – It’s all about getting the reps. “What you love, go love it.  You might be broke for a while, but you’ll be fulfilled.  It will fill you up.”
  • “Everyone carries around a bucket.  You can fill it up or empty it.”
  • “Find what you love and chase it down.”
  • Preshow ritual: “What is going through your mind the 90 seconds before you go on stage?” – “We have a group huddle.” – “Remember when we were in the basement and we said, one day we’re going to do this.  Remember how happy we were.  We’re here.  Go be a Rockstar.”
  • The feedback received from fans/listeners – That’s the juice that fuels you.
  • Use the "Get To Know You Document"
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea

Sep 08 2019

1hr 4mins

Play

326: Jason Zook - Why You Should Own Your Weird

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The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

#326: Jason Zook

TEXT: LEARNERS to 44222

For full shownotes, go to www.LearningLeader.com

Jason Zook is an unconventional entrepreneur. Tired of living a life that felt prescribed to him by society, Jason used his out-of-the-box thinking and ingenuity to create multiple profitable Internet-based businesses.  His most-notable business was IWearYourShirt, a company that generated over $1,000,000 by wearing sponsored t-shirts to promote over 1,600 businesses on social media from 2008-2013 before "influencer" was a mainstream term. If that wasn't weird enough, from 2012 and 2013, Jason auctioned off his last name to the highest bidders and made nearly $100,000 doing it. Jason's second book is titled "Own Your Weird." Jason has been featured by The Today Show, CBS Evening News, USA Today, and The New York Times.

Notes: 

  • The importance of reviewing previous work... And why it should embarrass you.  That is growth.
    • "Don't compare your starting line to someone else's finish line."  We all started somewhere.  It is a progression.
    • It's important to understand context.
  • Leaders who sustain excellence =
    • They test all of their assumptions on a regular basis
      • They don't accept things as they are... Always trying something new
    • They are extremely curious
    • Have an experimenters mindset
    • They are validated internally -- They don't seek the validation externally.  They are fulfilled from the inside.
  • How to create a mindset to not worry about hitting a best-seller list?
    • Set a low goal (getting the book published) and a high goal (selling 10K copies).  Understand that there is so much out of your control and celebrate hitting the goals that are within your control (writing and publishing the book).  You can't control how many people choose to buy it.
    • The emails received from fans/listeners are the fuel that keeps you going.  The feedback from people you're positively impacting.
  • Properly define success for yourself:
    • You spend a third of your life working.  Make it count.
    • Figure out a way to be see as excellent, out of the box thinker
  • Have a mindset of, "How can I make this better?"
  • Present your plan to your boss/leaders in the company: "Here's my plan, here is how we will do it..."
    • Be proactive.  Make your boss's life easier.  Help them succeed.
  • Rejection:  "When someone says no to you, it doesn't mean you're a bad person.  It's not a reflection of who you are as a person."
    • Understand that "No" means "not yet" most of the time.
  • "Choose Adventure"
    • Not wanting to live the same life that others have lived
    • Example: Moving to a sweet house in Southern California with another couple
  • Challenge assumptions:
    • You don't have to do it the way it's always been done
    • Experiment -- Test --> Reflect, analyze.  Understand what worked, what didn't, and why?
  • Working to live, not living to work
    • How do you schedule your days?
      • Start with living
    • Define what really fills you up --> Prioritize that first.  Put it on your calendar first.
  • Every six months, sit down and prioritize what's important to you.
    • Constraints can be a powerful force.  Parkinson's Law.
  • Set your "enough goals."  -->  "Getting to this number will be enough."
    • "There's always more.  What about enough?"
    • "We don't need to grow our business for growth's sake."
    • "$33,000/month is our enough goal." -- "It's clearly defined.  It's right for us."
  • The process of writing a book live -- Jason learned a lot about himself writing while others were watching.
  • The end of the podcast club:  Email us (Ryan@LearningLeader.com) -- When was the last time you truly showed up as yourself?

Sep 01 2019

1hr 5mins

Play

325: Ron Ullery - Demanding Excellence, Delayed Gratification, Winning Titles

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The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

#325: Ron Ullery

Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com

Be part of "Mindful Monday" - Text LEARNERS to 44222

Coach Ron Ullery began his football coaching career at Centerville High School in 1977.  He was the Offensive Coordinator (and play-caller) for my four years as the quarterback for Centerville (1996,1997,1998,1999).  He was promoted to Head Coach in 2000.  In his 14 years as head coach, he compiled a 107-45 record. Eight of his teams advanced to the Division 1 (big school) postseason.  He is currently the Offensive Line coach at Springboro High School.  This episode was recorded in front of the Springboro football team, coaches, and administrative staff.  He's coached high school football for 43 years.

Notes:

  • Leaders who sustain excellence =
    • Understanding how hard it is to be excellent
    • Knowing there are multiple ways to lead (militaristic, fear driven, soft spoken, calm)
    • Must be organized -- Have to set a plan to direct people.  How are we going to get where we want to go?
    • Must have a tremendous work ethic -- Ask the people you're leading to work extremely hard and you must be willing to work even harder
    • Have extremely high expectations, unwilling to ever waiver -- They don't lower expectations to feel good
    • Must have humility -- Can't be all about you
  • A great coach can make a player feel invincible:
    • A great coach sees another level in you.  A level above where you think you can go.  And they push you to go there...
    • Doing things you never dreamed you could possibly do makes you think it's possible.
    • "We are in a era where mediocrity and average is okay."
      • "If you want to, you can lay in bed all day, have your iPad here, your TV with 250 stations, your phone, you can doordash leave your door unlocked...  you never have to do anything."
    • We need to strive to be elite and excellent
  • Being grateful for the hard work -- What it leads to...
  • X & O's are not the most important part of football:
    • "Young people will live up to your expectations or down to your expectations almost all the time."
    • "It's our job to place the level of those expectations."
    • The elite performers hit the level of expectations set and then keep going.
  • The confidence a coach gives his/her players by exhibiting an incredible work ethic:
    • "It has everything to do with making sure I'm prepared.  I want to control what I can control.  I don't want to be the weak link."
    • "To prepare, I need to be in a quiet place.  I became a morning guy in college.  I was majoring in Math.  It was tough."
  • Delayed gratification -- Voluntary hardship:
    • The ability to delay gratification is a super power
    • "Instant gratification is what everyone wants now." -- Foresight: People have less foresight now than they used to.  They have instant access to everything they want at all times
  • "If you are unsuccessful, look in the mirror.  The competition is not real stiff.  If you have some foresight and a strong work ethic, you can do whatever you want. Most people don't have that foresight."
  • The difference between winning teams and losing teams
    • Winning teams: The players were empowered, had ownership. and they (the players) held each other accountable.
    • "You can coach them as hard as you want and they will respond as long as they know you care about them."
      • "It's a lot harder when you care."
  • Why stay as a high school coach?
    • "I love the high school atmosphere.  I love the age, I love everything about high school. I love the challenge.  You take whatever comes in the doors.  There's no recruiting.  You do the best you can with what you're given.  I love everything about these guys."
    • "In my 43 years of coaching, I've never felt like I've had a job."
  • Why offensive line?
    • "It was the biggest learning off-season of my career."
    • "Offensive linemen is by far the hardest position to succeed at.  It's also the most impactful of winning games."
    • "They are the least athletic players on the field by far.  They do the most important job, yet they are the least athletic."
    • "It's a tremendous challenge.  And I love challenges.  I love seeing them succeed."
  • How to earn respect:
    • Must exhibit leadership, mental toughness, and discipline -- "You can't ask anything of anyone else if you're not willing and already doing it yourself."
    • You have to care and it has to show how much you care about people.  You have to do more than other people.
  • Advice to his son Brent Ullery (head coach of Centerville High School):
    • "You have to formulate things you believe in.  You have to have strong beliefs.  Formulate your beliefs not based on what you did when you played, but base them on what you've learned from all of your experiences.  Don't let the outside noise influence you."
  • Framework for continuous improvement and ability adapt:
    • "Listen and learn.  I'm a better learner today than any year of my life.  When I started out coaching I thought I knew everything.  Then I realized I knew nothing."
    • Learning talks with Coach Gregg every morning -- "I would meet him every morning and we would talk about everything.  Some about football, but more about people.  He was a master about human nature and motivating young people."
    • The main idea with continual learning is "you've never arrived."
    • "You've never arrived, you're always becoming."
  • How to effectively lead peers/friends:
    • As a leader, it becomes your responsibility to lift others up and expect more of them -- Sometimes when you have to make difficult choices to prioritize leadership over friendship
    • The moment that Kirk Herbstreit became a leader (he was a quarterback at Centerville High School)
  • It's much easier to follow.  But far less fulfilling.  You have to make the choice to lead daily.
  • The sacrifices made to be accountable to teammates -- Doing everything within your power to maximize your ability
  • Laying the foundation for future generations
  • Having the willingness to go get what you want -- Don't let anything get in your way
  • Use the "Get To Know You Document"
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea

Aug 25 2019

1hr 5mins

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324: Charles Fishman - How To Create A Culture Of Learning From Failure

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The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Full Show Notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

#324: Charles Fishman

Charles Fishman is the acclaimed author of One Giant LeapA Curious Mind (with Brian Grazer), The Wal-Mart Effect, and The Big Thirst. He is a three-time winner of the Gerald Loeb Award, the most prestigious prize in business journalism.

Notes: 

  • Leaders who sustain excellence =
    • They insist on excellence. "The work needs to be as good as it can be."
    • Getting to the moon was the largest project in the history of civilization
    • Clarity of the mission - Everyone must know the goal
    • Must keep people motivated
    • Standards must be clear - And the reasoning behind each action (intentional)
  • President Kennedy was frustrated with how the U.S. was doing versus the Russians in space.  He needed to make a bold statement.  When it was made, the administration felt there was a 50/50 shot that it could happen.
    • It was important to announce broad goal and the reason behind it
  • "Take the stairs" - Think of it as a blessing. "I get to do this."
    • Not because it is easy, but because it is hard.
    • "A master stroke of leadership because it was a stretch goal, but it wasn't insanity."  It must be balanced.
  • There are tapes of JFK talking scientific discovery where it was obvious he had little understanding of it.  -->  It's important to have people you have confidence in leading areas where you're lacking knowledge.
    • "If JFK wasn't assassinated, we may not have gone to the moon.  He was starting to get cold feet about the cost."
  • The space program created a culture of learning from failure:
    • "Every single failure had to be investigated, understood, and resolved."
    • "No Random Failures" was the motto.
    • "Every failure is a gift." -- There were 14,000 recorded failures in testing.
  • Collaboration -- How to keep so many people aligned?  There were 400,000 people from 20,000 companies working on the Apollo missions!
    • NASA's management style:
      • Clearly defined roles - What are your solutions to the problems?
      • Gave assignments and qualities that needed to be met
  • NASA had a culture where they brought everyone together for in person meetings.  "Every minute of a mission would be walked through."
    • There was transparency and decisions got made.
    • Get people together in person and do something important.  This built camaraderie among the dispirit teams.
  • Bill Tindall -- A mission planning genius on space navigation.  He was also gracious, self-effacing, and had a great sense of humor.
    • Bill respected what others had done, had respect for the mission.  He had the confidence to be calm.  A different person who used a different manner would have been a disaster working with the leaders at MIT.
    • People have to be persuaded to follow you.
  • Both Gene Kranz and Bill Tindall were unafraid to hear input.  They were confident enough to find the right answer (wherever it came from).
  • We are entering the most exciting time in space travel (Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos)

Aug 18 2019

1hr 5mins

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323: Ian Leslie - The Desire To Know & Why Your Future Depends On It

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The Learning Leader Show with Ryan Hawk

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

Text LEARNERS to 44222

#322: Ian Leslie

Ian Leslie is a London-based journalist and author of critically acclaimed books about human behavior. He is currently writing a new book on “productive disagreement”, which will be published in 2020. Ian also created, wrote and performed in the BBC radio comedy Before They Were Famous.

Notes: 

  • Leaders who sustain excellence =
    • Have the ability to think about their own thinking -- Step outside and reflect
    • Know that you'll say "I don't know" frequently
    • Breadth -- A range of interests
    • Interested in building knowledge and an awareness that it might not pay off (and being ok with that)
  • Ian built his life around curiosity -- He was a strategist for ad agencies.  He needed to deeply understand his clients.  That is a job built on curiosity.
    • "I am a curiosity driven writer."
  • Children are born curious... "People are born with habits/knowledge to survive."  And then they stop.  There's no evolutionary impulse to keep going.
    • It becomes a conscious choice to cognitive resources and time
  • The two types of curiosity
    • Diversive: Hunger for new information.  It comes from an information gap.  Agatha Christie understands how to create an information gap to keep you turning the page
    • Epistemic: Desire to acquire knowledge/build/assimilate into networks in your brain.  It requires discipline.  It's engendered.  It's diversive curiosity grown up.
  • "There is a rising premium on people with a high need for cognition."  NFC (need for cognition) is a scientific measure of intellectual curiosity
  • "Taking action.  Doing... is a form of learning.  They are intertwined."
  • Reflecting on own habits -- use self as a lab experiment... Then talk with others.
  • Empathically curious -- Being curious about what's inside of other person's head.  How they think and feel.
  • "You're going to be come a better communicator being a better listener."
  • Atul Gawande -- Ask the unscripted question.  Make a human connection.
  • Have 10% of your brain switched on to "Am I talking too much?"
  • How to have productive disagreements:
    • Don't avoid it
    • Have disagreements we both can live with
    • "You'll have more productive disagreement if you're curious about the other person."
  • People who have a higher level of scientific curiosity... They don't rush to judgement.  Think, "Oh, I wonder why I think that?"
  • "Nobody has trained us in how to disagree with each other."
  • "You have this choice in judgement and curiosity."
  • Life/Career advice: "Be interested in everything.  Go deep in one area."
    • Have core people in your life and foster the weak ties.
  • Everyone is born curious. But only some retain the habits of exploring, learning and discovering as they grow older. Which side of the “curiosity divide” are you on?

Aug 11 2019

50mins

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