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Rank #47 in Visual Arts category

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Data Stories

Updated 7 days ago

Rank #47 in Visual Arts category

Arts
Visual Arts
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A podcast on data and how it affects our lives — with Enrico Bertini and Moritz Stefaner

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A podcast on data and how it affects our lives — with Enrico Bertini and Moritz Stefaner

iTunes Ratings

399 Ratings
Average Ratings
229
162
2
2
4

Useful

By AJVirdi - May 29 2019
Read more
Great podcast practical stuff

Insightful conversations with industry pros

By rhymeswithsnake - Sep 16 2017
Read more
Great guests, thoughtful discussions, and nerdy fun.

iTunes Ratings

399 Ratings
Average Ratings
229
162
2
2
4

Useful

By AJVirdi - May 29 2019
Read more
Great podcast practical stuff

Insightful conversations with industry pros

By rhymeswithsnake - Sep 16 2017
Read more
Great guests, thoughtful discussions, and nerdy fun.
Cover image of Data Stories

Data Stories

Latest release on May 20, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 7 days ago

Rank #1: 069  |  Data Visualization Literacy with Jeremy Boy, Helen Kennedy and Andy Kirk

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We have a nice trio on the show for this episode: Jeremy Boy is a postdoctoral researcher at NYU School of Engineering, Helen Kennedy is Professor of Digital Society at University of Sheffield, and Andy Kirk is our beloved editor at visualisingdata.com.

We talk with these three experts about Data Visualization Literacy — that is, how people read data visualizations. We ask, how do we measure literacy? How do we improve it? And how do we even define literacy when we’re asking our viewers to read images?

Jeremy talks about his research on methods to measure visualization literacy, while Helen and Andy discuss their Seeing Data project, which studies how people read visualizations.

If you prefer reading to listening, you can find the transcript of our episode here. Enjoy the show!

Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik, which allows you to explore the hidden relationships within your data that lead to meaningful insights. Let your instincts lead the way to create personalized visualizations and dynamic dashboards with Qlik Sense. Download Qlik Sense for free at www.qlik.de/datastories. This week, the Qlik blog features a great post on maps and the data literacy required to read them called “Here Be Dragons.”

LINKS

Seeing Data Results:

Some research papers on data visualization literacy:

Some other interesting projects:

Related episodes

Mar 09 2016

49mins

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Rank #2: 027  |  Big Data Skepticism w/ Kate Crawford

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Here we go with another great episode. This time more on the data side. We have Kate Crawford, Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research, on the show talking about the other face of big data. That is, after all the excitement, hype, and buzz, she is the one who is asking the tough questions: Is more data always better? Is there any objective truth in it? Is big data really making us smarter?

Papers and articles from Kate

Some of Kate’s Talks

Links

Enjoy it, there’s lots of food for thoughts here!

Related episodes

Oct 17 2013

1hr 5mins

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Rank #3: 000  |  

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Hi Folks, great news … we are experimenting with a new format for Data Stories that includes … that includes … that includes … guess whaaaaaat? Video!

After having heard many many times that it’s hard to imagine how a visualization looks like when we are talking about it, we have decided to experiment with a new format.

This is for now just a pilot to see how you guys react, so we would love to hear your feedback about how you like it and how we can improve.

To be clear: we are not planning to substitute our regular podcast with this, we are trying to build a parallel channel.

Here’s the video!

https://vimeo.com/datastories/datastories-tv-00

In this pilot episode the great Gregor Aisch from the New York Times agreed to describe in detail how the amazing 3D Yield Curve Chart has been realized.

As many of you may know, 3D visualization has not a very good reputation among data visualization experts, yet Gregor and Amanda managed to create a super interesting and useful 3D chart.

Gregor shows us where the idea originated from, all the crazy details about how to create a 3D chart that people can actually read, and how to calculate optimal views and a good narrative out of it.

Enjoy the new TV show! We are looking forward to hearing from you.

P.S. A big big thank you to Gregor for accepting to shoot this video with these two totally unexperienced video editors! Thanks Gregor, that was awesome!

May 08 2015

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Rank #4: 061  |  Visualizing Your "Google Search History" with Lisa Charlotte Rost

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Hey, before we start, we ask you a favor: rate us on iTunes! This has a huge impact on how the show is ranked. To rate us on iTunes follow this link and then select “view in iTunes” (you need to have iTunes installed) and then click on “Ratings & Reviews”. You can also rate us directly from your Apple podcast player if you have one. Thanks!!!

Here we go with a new project episode! This time we talk with Lisa Charlotte Rost about her project “My Google Search History.”

Lisa is a visualization designer based in Berlin and the project is about how she collected and visualized her google search history to look into her personal data.

In the episode we discuss how she came up with the idea and all the steps she followed to realize it.

She has also a nice page on github with code that you can reuse to do the same thing with your own data!

Here is a set of pictures from her project:

This episode is sponsored by Qlik who allows you to explore hidden relationships within data that lead to insights. Check out the new blog post on the qlik blog called: “The role of multiple devices in our workspaces” by Donald Farmer. And, there is a big Qlik Sense Roadshow with over 100 events in Europe. You can download Qlik Sense for free at: www.qlik.de/datastories.

LINKS

Related episodes

Oct 12 2015

25mins

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Rank #5: 113  |  What Makes A Visualization Memorable? with Michelle Borkin

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It’s a whole new year! Consider supporting Data Stories on Patreon!

Michelle Borkin is Assistant Professor at Northeastern University where she studies the use of visualization in science research, in particular how it impacts human perception and cognition. On the show we talk about how the data viz community can better support the work of scientists, her popular research on data visualization memorability and, of course, the infamous data viz dinosaur.

LINKS

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/borkin-promo.m4v

Jan 17 2018

44mins

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Rank #6: 066  |  "I Quant NY" Finding Surprising Stories in NYC Open Data with Ben Wellington

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Happy New Year everyone, we are back!

In this episode we talk with Ben Wellington about his blog I Quant NY, where he writes about surprising facts he finds analyzing NYC open data.

Some of his stories include how he discovered that “… Software in Half of NYC Cabs Generates $5.2 Million a Year in Extra Tips,” ideas on “How to Fix NYC’s No-Cabs-At-4PM Problem” and “How NYC Open Data and Reddit Saved New Yorkers Over $55,000 a Year” by detecting fire hydrants that generate too many parking tickets.

On the show Ben talks about how he generates new ideas, how he finds and analyzes the data, and how he turns this into amazing stories for his blog. We also talk about the impact his work had on New York City and the interesting reactions some of his blog posts have generated.

Enjoy Ben and his amazing NYC data stories, and read a transcript of our interview here!

This episode of Data Stories is sponsored by Quadrigram, a web based application designed to bring data stories to life. With Quadrigram you can create and share interactive data stories without the need of any coding skills.

LINKS

Moritz’s project on place names – http://truth-and-beauty.net/experiments/ach-ingen-zell/

Our Guest Ben Wellington – https://about.me/benwellington

I Quant NY – http://iquantny.tumblr.com

Some favorite I Quant NY posts:

Tools Ben uses for I Quant NY:

Jan 15 2016

40mins

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Rank #7: 026  |  Visualization Beyond the Desktop w/ Petra Isenberg

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Hi Folks!

We are back after a relaxing summer with a brand new episode! We have Petra Isenberg, from the Aviz team at INRIA (we’ve had other guests from the same lab in the past) to talk about visualization on non-standard devices and environments. Yes, stuff like display walls, surfaces, tabletops, and people collaborating around them. It feels like the future is here and there’s a ton of potentially interesting applications for visualization!

Petra gives us hints about what works and what does not work, what the research says, what has been tried already, and what needs to be explored, etc. She also gives practical recommendations at the end about how to start doing visualization on these devices. Really cool stuff!

Take care,
Enrico & Mo.

Chapters

  • 00:00 Back from summer break
  • 02:41 Our guest today: Petra Isenberg
  • 05:59 Moving beyond the desktop
  • 11:55 New challenges in collaborative settings
  • 22:25 Interactions with very large screens
  • 38:14 Practical use and how to get started
  • 48:53 More resources

Links and papers:

Resource list from Petra

Research links:

Technology links:

Software frameworks/libraries for developing vis on surfaces:

  • Most Pixels Ever (Processing for very large wall displays – I forgot to mention this one during the podcast)
  • kivy (Python framework for developing multi-touch applications)
  • libavg (maintained by Ulrich von Zadow who has worked on several visualization + interactive surface installations)
  • ZVTM (Java toolkit for developing ZUIs, includes possibilities to run visualizations on a cluster)
  • Microsoft Surface SDK
  • (for mobile check out iOS and Android SDKs)

Sep 09 2013

58mins

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Rank #8: 105  |  Data Visualization at Twitter with Krist Wongsuphasawat

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[Help us run the show by supporting us on Patreon!]

This week we have Krist Wongsuphasawat on Data Stories to talk about visualization projects at Twitter. Krist has a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Maryland, where he worked with Ben Shneiderman. Most recently, he has been a Data Visualization Scientist at Twitter since 2012.

On the show, Krist describes the kinds of projects that the visualization team at Twitter develops. He also walks us through a few of the most popular of these projects, including their famous visualization of Game of Thrones.

Also, don’t miss Krist’s masterpiece post “How I carefully crafted a truly terrible data visualization

Enjoy the show!

Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik. Are you missing out on meaningful relationships hidden in your data? Unlock the whole story with Qlik Sense through personalized visualizations and dynamic dashboards which you can download for free at qlik.de/datastories.

Links

Related Episodes

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/krist-promo.m4v

Sep 04 2017

46mins

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Rank #9: 049  |  Data Journalism at ProPublica w/ Scott Klein

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We are now sponsored by Qlik. You can download it for free here

Hi everyone,

In this episode we have Scott Klein from ProPublica with us. ProPublica is a nonprofit organization that does investigative journalism and Scott directs a team of data journalists and programmers to create new applications based on data and data visualization.

In the show we talk about how ProPublica works and what challenges they are confronted with. How do you pick a story? How do you develop it? How do you make sure you are not making mistakes? This are some of the questions we discuss. We also talk about tools and libraries and how to train yourself to become a data journalist.

This was a very much needed episode as we never had a proper episode on data journalism. Thanks Scott for coming on the show!

LINKS

ProPublica’s Dollars for Docs
Book: How Not To Be Wrong by Jordan Ellenberg
PDF Scraping Tool: Tabula (http://tabula.technology/)
The IPython Notebook (web-based interactive computational environment)
ProPublica’s Open Source Tools
The New School’s Program Journalism + Design
The ProPublica Nerd Blog
Knight-Mozilla Open News (community of data journalists)
NICAR-L Mailing List (National Institute for Computer-Assisted Reporting)

Feb 27 2015

1hr 8mins

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Rank #10: 084  |  Statistical Numbing with Paul Slovic

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We have Professor Paul Slovic from University of Oregon on the show to talk about “Statistical Numbing.” Professor Slovic is a renowned expert on the effect of numbers and statistics on empathy (or lack thereof). His fascinating, if not depressing, experiments have consistently shown how hard it is for statistics to elicit any sense of scale in human tragedies and how numbers can often even be detrimental if the goal is to elicit compassion and generous actions from an audience.

On the show, we talk about “Statistical Numbing” and it psychological underpinnings. Professor Slovic also describes his experiments and their implications. And we address one of the most important questions: Is there hope? Is there something we, as practitioners, can do to counteract these negative effects?

Enjoy this deeply scientific episode and let us know what you think!

This episode of Data Stories is sponsored by FreshBooks, the small business accounting software that makes your accounting tasks easy, fast and secure. FreshBooks is offering a month of free unrestricted use to all of our listeners. To claim your free month of FreshBooks, go to http://freshbooks.com/datastories and sign up for free without the use of a credit card. Note: Remember to enter “Data Stories” in the section titled “I heard about FreshBooks from…”

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Paul-Slovic-promo.mp4

LINKS

Oct 06 2016

56mins

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Rank #11: 135  |  The "Dashboard Conspiracy" with Lyn Bartram and Alper Sarikaya

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[Our podcast is fully supported by our listeners. Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thanks!]

Oh dashboards… dashboards… what are they? For some, they are just ugly examples of bad visualization design (speed dials anyone?). For others, they are a first citizen of the data visualization world that deserve to be learned, studied, and understood.

To dig into this debate, we have Lyn Bartram of Simon Fraser University and Alper Sarikaya of Microsoft Power BI on the show to talk about an exciting research project they developed. Their research seeks to build a better picture of what dashboard are and how they are used “in the wild.” The results are summarized in a paper they wrote with their colleagues from Tableau and Honeycomb.ioWhat Do We Talk About When We Talk About Dashboards?

On the show we talk about how the project got started, what they discovered by analyzing a large corpus of dashboards, and the many ramifications of their research.

Enjoy the show!

Links

  • Project page
  • Supplemental material with images of all the dashboards the team analyzed (zip)
http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/DS-135-promo.mp4

Feb 12 2019

45mins

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Rank #12: 118  |  Making Data Visual with Miriah Meyer and Danyel Fisher

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[This podcast is fully supported by our listeners. If you enjoy listening to Data Stories, consider supporting us on Patreon. And now we also accept one-time donations through Paypal: just use this linkThanks so much for your support!]

This week we have Miriah Meyer (University of Utah) and Danyel Fisher (Microsoft Research) on the show to talk about their new book Making Data Visual, which covers areas that other visualization books typically do not address: namely, how to go from formulating questions to building visualizations that solve actual problems that people have.

On the show we talk about how the book came to be; some of the concepts introduced by Miriah and Danyel in the book, such as the use of proxy tasks for data;  and how you could use it for your own projects.

Enjoy the show!

Links:

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/27fa4389-8b54-423e-9d6b-9360a3a0b8fc_27923.mp4

Apr 12 2018

33mins

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Rank #13: 134  |  Visualizing Uncertainty with Jessica Hullman and Matthew Kay

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[Our podcast is fully supported by our listeners. Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. Thanks!]

What is uncertainty? Why is it important to take it into account when designing data visualizations? And how do you actually do so? We explore these and other questions with Jessica Hullman of Northwestern University and Matthew Kay of the University of Michigan. Jessica and Matt have written many publications on the topic that help orient us to the intricate world of uncertainty, probabilities, and their relevance to data visualization.

We hope you enjoy the show!

Links

Jan 19 2019

55mins

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Rank #14: 057  |  Visualizing Human Development w/ Max Roser

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We have economist Max Roser from University of Oxford to talk about his Our World in Data project where he visualizes the social, economic, and environmental history of humanity up to the present day.

Our World in Data is a remarkable project that Max started on his own and worked on little by little in his spare time until it evolved into a full website with plenty of interesting data, presentations, and visualizations to to better understand humanity.

The nicest thing is that it provides a quite positive picture of the world and about the many ways that we are improving our conditions. Go to the website (http://ourworldindata.org/) and take a look at War and Violence, Poverty, Global Heath, Etc.

On the show we talk about how Max started his work; the process behind finding a topic, collecting, and curating the data; and producing these nice visuals that people can easily understand. We also talk about human biases, persuasion, and how Max learned to build web sites and visualizations.

Enjoy the show!


This episode is sponsored by Visualizing Well-Being, the Wikiprogress Data Visualization Contest 2015. Enter the contest to win a trip to Mexico! To find out more, visit the Wikiprogress website (www.wikiprogress.org) or the facebook page or follow @wikiprogress on twitter.

LINKS

Jul 08 2015

1hr 5mins

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Rank #15: 040  |  Narrative Visualization Research w/ Jessica Hullman

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Hey yo! We are back!

We have a very researchy kind of episode this time. Jessica Hullman is on the show to talk about her research on narrative visualization. Jessica is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Berkeley and soon to be Assistant Professor at University of Washington iSchool.

In the show we talk about lots of interesting basic visualization research issues like visualization literacy, bias and saliency, uncertainty, and some interesting automated annotation systems that Jessica has developed.

We also talk about Jessica’s background in experimental poetry!

Have fun.

Links

Sep 19 2014

1hr 2mins

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Rank #16: 034  |  Data journalism w/ Simon Rogers

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[Thanks to our audio editor Nathan Griffiths (twitter.com/njgriffiths) for taking care of this episode]

Hi everyone!

After a long while … we have a real British voice on the show again! In this episode we have the pleasure to host data journalist Simon Rogers.

Simon has been leading data journalism initiatives at The Guardian for many years and he recently moved to Twitter (with the official role of Data Editor) where he takes care of creating visual stories out of Twitter data.

In the show we talk about his past experience at The Guardian as well as the more recent and exciting developments at Twitter.

Links

Mar 24 2014

48mins

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Rank #17: 032  |  High Density Infographics and Data Drawing w/ Giorgia Lupi

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Hi folks,

We have Giorgia Lupi from Accurat on the show with us this time in our first real face-to-face episode ever — yes Moritz and Enrico in the same room!

Giorgia’s work, and generally the work done by her agency, has been super popular lately. You might have seen, for instance, their work visualizing Nobel Prizes or visualizing painters’ lives.

Giorgia kindly hosted us in the Accurat’s studio in New York where we had a nice chat on hand-crafted visualization, high-density designs, design studios, and much much more.

Here is us arguing even before starting the recording

Enjoy the show!

Links

Feb 18 2014

57mins

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Rank #18: 098  |  Data Sketches with Nadieh Bremer and Shirley Wu

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In this episode Moritz meets Nadieh Bremer and Shirley Wu for a face-to-face episode in Berlin.

Nadieh and Shirley recently paired up to create Data Sketches, a twelve-month collaboration. Each month they choose a topic and develop a visualization on their theme.

One nice aspect of the project is that they keep track of their entire development process, including the steps they followed to prepare the data, sketch the ideas, and create the final visualizations.

On the show we talk about the organization of the projects, some favorite visualizations from the year, the partnership between the collaborators, and how they balance Data Sketches with their freelancing work.

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/data-sketches-promo.m4v

We’re collecting listener questions, ideas, and suggestions about Data Stories for our upcoming 100th episode. Leave us a message at +1-413-650-2713 and we may just feature your voice in the podcast!

Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik. Are you missing out on meaningful relationships hidden in your data? Unlock the whole story with Qlik Sense through personalized visualizations and dynamic dashboards which you can download for free at qlik.de/datastories.

Help us fund Data Stories by donating on Patreon! We’re counting on you to switch to a crowdfunding model. Please visit our Patreon page for more details!

May 17 2017

43mins

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Rank #19: 103  |  Explorable Explanations with Nicky Case

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[If you enjoy our show, please consider supporting us on Patreon! For the price of one or two lattes per episode, which we publish every two weeks, you can help make sure that Data Stories keeps getting made!]

This week we have Nicky Case on the show to talk about “explorable explanations,” interactive simulations that help people understand complex ideas.

Nicky has developed a whole set of projects over the years, including the popular “Parable Of The Polygons,” which describes how small biases can lead to segregation, and “To Build A Better Ballot,” which demonstrates the impact of various types of voting ballots.

On the show we talk about both of these projects in detail, the definition of explorable explanations, how simulation and interaction might play a role in visualization, and the future of this kind of project.

Enjoy the show!

Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik. Are you missing out on meaningful relationships hidden in your data? Unlock the whole story with Qlik Sense through personalized visualizations and dynamic dashboards which you can download for free at qlik.de/datastories.

Links

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Nicky-Case-promo.m4v

Aug 03 2017

1hr 3mins

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Rank #20: 152  |  Year in Review 2019

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Hi everyone! We are once again at the end of a whole year. After having “end of the year episodes” with other podcasters, going around the world, and chatting with Andy and Robert, we decided to try something different this time: we asked a group of data visualization professionals to send us an audio snippet summarizing what happened in specific areas of the field over the last year. The result is a great multifaceted collage of stories and personalities. See below who we have interviewed and what they talked about.

Happy New Year! Thanks so much for listening to the show. We’ll see you in 2020 with a whole set of great new episodes!

[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

Links:


Alberto Cairo on Data literacy

Amelia Wattenberger on Learning data visualization from a newcomer’s perspective

  • Data visualization society
  • Figma (UI design tool)
  • Lots of free tutorials and ways to get started in data viz
    • Amelia’s bird’s eye view of the library
  • Challenge: awareness about where data comes from!
    • The erroneousness of considering data as “facts”
    • Show how data can be biased or misconstrued

Andy Kirk on Data tools

David Bauer on Data Journalism

Elijah Meeks on Data viz within the industry 

  • Data visualization hitting the mainstream
  • First datavis president / Trump interested in the actual chart
  • Michelle Rial / beyond coffee table books / “Data Humanism”
  • Giorgia Lupi and her fashion line
  • Data vis no longer only a supplemental skill
    • DVS has 10000 members!
    • Tableau and Looker acquisition
    • Technical maturity of viz
  • No longer see the development of many new types of visualizations, we are more optimizing what we have
  • Not only limited to technical people

Jen Christiansen on Science communication

Jessica Hullman on Viz research

Lauren Klein on Data ethics

Book: Data Feminism, by Catherine d’Ignazio and Lauren F. Klein 

Maarten Lambrecht on Xenographics

  • Some of the charts in the xenographics collection pop up in the wild
  • Unsolved issue: data visualisation in education, both at lower as in higher levels of education
  • Tools: RAWGraphs

Maral Pourkazemi on Diversity and inclusion

  • Gender diversity in the field (women in the field lead a lot!)
  • More empowered. Taken more into consideration.

Mitchell Whitelaw on Viz localism

Paolo Ciuccarelli on Visualization & design

  • Interest in design as a discipline
  • Shift towards the human
  • Automating design
  • Data literacy
  • Tools: Raw Graphs (fundraising for v2.0)

Thomas Dahm on Data viz conferences

https://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/DS_Year2019.mp4

Dec 19 2019

1hr 49mins

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