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Rank #55 in Visual Arts category

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Data Stories

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #55 in Visual Arts category

Arts
Visual Arts
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A podcast on data and how it affects our lives — with Enrico Bertini and Moritz Stefaner

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A podcast on data and how it affects our lives — with Enrico Bertini and Moritz Stefaner

iTunes Ratings

387 Ratings
Average Ratings
220
161
1
2
3

Useful

By AJVirdi - May 29 2019
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Great podcast practical stuff

Insightful conversations with industry pros

By rhymeswithsnake - Sep 16 2017
Read more
Great guests, thoughtful discussions, and nerdy fun.

iTunes Ratings

387 Ratings
Average Ratings
220
161
1
2
3

Useful

By AJVirdi - May 29 2019
Read more
Great podcast practical stuff

Insightful conversations with industry pros

By rhymeswithsnake - Sep 16 2017
Read more
Great guests, thoughtful discussions, and nerdy fun.

Listen to:

Cover image of Data Stories

Data Stories

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

A podcast on data and how it affects our lives — with Enrico Bertini and Moritz Stefaner

005  |  How To Learn Data Visualization (with Andy Kirk)

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Hi Folks! We love Andy so much that we decided to keep him with us for another episode (well, actually we hope somebody will eventually pay the ransom). This time we talk about “learning visualization”, which is the perfect topic for him given his experience with his training visualization courses.

We received many requests from people who wanted to know how to learn visualization in the past. So, here we are with a more than one hour long podcast with the three of us talking about it. We just hope you’ll find the time to listen to the entire episode. If not, the breakdown below can help you chunking it into a few sessions. Have fun!

Breakdown of the episode

Introductory thoughts
00:00:00 Intro, Andy Kirk (http://visualisingdata.com) is again our guest
00:01:15 Topic: How to learn visualization
00:01:56 Multidisciplinarity
00:06:31 Reports from teaching practice
00:09:21 Theory and practice – rules vs, free exploration
00:12:24 Do you need to start with a question?

Basic skills
00:15:43 What is the basic skill set to learn?
00:16:15 Visual variables
00:18:53 Statistics and data analytics
00:19:32 Gestalt laws
00:20:32 The journalistic sense – what is an interesting angle?
00:22:19 Position is everything
00:23:38 Color is difficult

Process and tools
00:25:05 Tools
00:26:18 Data types and repertoire
00:27:15 Metaphors
00:28:52 Interaction
00:31:27 The role of design
00:32:57 How to get started?

Learning options and books
00:39:46 Everybody should have a datavis course!
00:41:32 How to learn it yourself? Books, lectures, …
00:42:39 Stephen Few: Show me the numbers
00:43:20 Andy’s first book, and mo is the cinderella of datavis
00:43:52 Readings in Information Visualization: Using vision to think
00:45:09 Edward Tufte: Visual display of quantitative information
00:46:05 Ware: Information Visualization – Perception for Design
00:47:42 Misc.
00:49:23 Our scoop!
00:52:03 Google for “information visualization lecture pdf”

The craft of visualization design
00:53:43 Now that you know everything – how to do it in practice?
00:55:01 DIY vs. template-based tools
00:57:01 Do you need to learn how to program? Yes, yep, yes, yeah. Me too.
00:58:36 Tools
01:00:17 Finding data
01:02:28 Put it out there
01:04:08 The pathetic misery that is creating data visualizations

Conclusion
01:05:52 Trying to wrap it up
01:07:13 see conference – and see+
01:08:44 Trying to wrap it up – again!

Resources and Links

That’s all folks. Let us know how you like it and feel free to ask more questions if you have.

Apr 24 2012

1hr 10mins

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035  |  Visual Storytelling w/ Alberto Cairo and Robert Kosara

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Hi all,

Hot topic today! We invited Alberto Cairo and Robert Kosara to discuss the role of storytelling in visualization.  What is storytelling? Is all visualization storytelling? Should we always strive for telling a story? How does storytelling match with exploratory visualization? Should we aim more for worlds and macroscopes than stories as Moritz advocated a while back at Visualized? We went on a somewhat lengthy discussion on these topics and I think we all ended up agreeing on a lot of things and developed a much more nuanced view of storytelling. As you can see from the picture we had lots of fun (thanks Robert for taking the screenshot). Fantastic chat!

Note: Alberto had a lot more to say after the episode so he decided to publish a follow up post that clarifies some of the things he said on the show. But — spoiler alert — listen to the episode first!

P.S. Big, big thanks to Fabricio Tavares for taking care of the audio editing of this episode!

Links

Apr 16 2014

1hr 18mins

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022  |  NYT Graphics and D3 with Mike Bostock and Shan Carter

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Hi everyone,

We have graphic editors Mike Bostock and Shan Carter in this dense and long episode. It’s great to finally have someone from the New York Times!

We talk about many practical and more philosophical aspects of publishing interactive visualizations on the web. We also spend quite some time discussing the past, present and future of D3.js.

(On a side note: apologies for starting a bit abruptly and for the weird noises. Enrico was desperately and unsuccessfully trying to find a quiet and calm spot at the CHI conference.)

Take Care,
Enrico & Mo.

P.S. Many thanks to all of you guys who sent us Twitter questions for Mike and Shan.

Episode Chapters

00:00:00 Intro
00:00:12 Our guests today: New York Times graphics editors Mike Bostocks and Shan Carter
00:01:54 About the NYT graphics department
00:06:56 Map wrangling
00:08:47 QA, evaluation, fact checking,…
00:11:23 Twitter question: Post the data set along with the graphic?
00:15:51 Exploratory or explanatory?
00:19:56 User tracking, user feedback
00:25:53 Balance of familiarity vs. new visual vocabularies
00:29:52 Workflow, on the example of the 512 paths graphic
00:38:05 Hybrid workflows between automation and manual layout
00:45:12 d3
00:45:49 History and philosophy
00:56:19 Value of examples
00:57:31 Community adoption
00:59:25 Vega
01:04:53 More d3 books or tutorials for advanced users?
01:08:15 Developer community
01:09:45 Sustainability
01:11:51 Future development
01:15:10 Enrico is back!
01:16:13 Is d3 complete?
01:18:52 When does Mike sleep?
01:19:45 Wrapping it up

Links to discussed NYT projects

Related episodes

May 09 2013

1hr 21mins

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067  |  ggplot2, R, and data toolmaking with Hadley Wickham

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We have Hadley Wickham on the show, Chief Scientist at RStudio and Adjunct Professor of Statistics at Rice University and the University of Auckland.

Hadley created a number of hugely popular libraries for the R language, including ggplot2, which is used throughout the world to analyze and present data.

On the show we talk about his creative process to develop ggplot2, its growing popularity, other libraries he has built in the R ecosystem, and strategies for creating popular software for data analysis and visualization.

Enjoy listening to Hadley Wickham, or read the transcript from our interview here!

Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik, which allows you to explore the hidden relationships within your data that lead to meaningful insights. Take part in the Open Data Challenge for a chance to win $10,000 for an app created with Qlik Sense!

LINKS

Feb 10 2016

1hr 1min

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000  |  

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Hi Folks, great news … we are experimenting with a new format for Data Stories that includes … that includes … that includes … guess whaaaaaat? Video!

After having heard many many times that it’s hard to imagine how a visualization looks like when we are talking about it, we have decided to experiment with a new format.

This is for now just a pilot to see how you guys react, so we would love to hear your feedback about how you like it and how we can improve.

To be clear: we are not planning to substitute our regular podcast with this, we are trying to build a parallel channel.

Here’s the video!

https://vimeo.com/datastories/datastories-tv-00

In this pilot episode the great Gregor Aisch from the New York Times agreed to describe in detail how the amazing 3D Yield Curve Chart has been realized.

As many of you may know, 3D visualization has not a very good reputation among data visualization experts, yet Gregor and Amanda managed to create a super interesting and useful 3D chart.

Gregor shows us where the idea originated from, all the crazy details about how to create a 3D chart that people can actually read, and how to calculate optimal views and a good narrative out of it.

Enjoy the new TV show! We are looking forward to hearing from you.

P.S. A big big thank you to Gregor for accepting to shoot this video with these two totally unexperienced video editors! Thanks Gregor, that was awesome!

May 08 2015

Play

135  |  The "Dashboard Conspiracy" with Lyn Bartram and Alper Sarikaya

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[Our podcast is fully supported by our listeners. Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thanks!]

Oh dashboards… dashboards… what are they? For some, they are just ugly examples of bad visualization design (speed dials anyone?). For others, they are a first citizen of the data visualization world that deserve to be learned, studied, and understood.

To dig into this debate, we have Lyn Bartram of Simon Fraser University and Alper Sarikaya of Microsoft Power BI on the show to talk about an exciting research project they developed. Their research seeks to build a better picture of what dashboard are and how they are used “in the wild.” The results are summarized in a paper they wrote with their colleagues from Tableau and Honeycomb.ioWhat Do We Talk About When We Talk About Dashboards?

On the show we talk about how the project got started, what they discovered by analyzing a large corpus of dashboards, and the many ramifications of their research.

Enjoy the show!

Links

  • Project page
  • Supplemental material with images of all the dashboards the team analyzed (zip)
http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/DS-135-promo.mp4

Feb 12 2019

45mins

Play

056  |  Amanda Cox on Working With R, NYT Projects, Favorite Data

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I’d give two of my left fingers for this data” – Amanda Cox on the show

We have the great Amanda Cox from the New York Times on the show this time!

Amanda is a graphic editor at NYT and she is behind many of the amazing data graphics that the New York Times has produced in recent years.

In the show we talk about her background in statistics and how she ended up at the Times. We discuss how she uses R software to collect, analyze, and visualize data, and her thoughts on other tools. We also talk about how data graphics are produced at NYT, with lots of funny stories.

Don’t miss the parts about the “what, where, when” of data and the “net joy” concept.

Lots a data wisdom in this show!


This episode is sponsored by Tableau Software,  helping people connect to any kind of data, and visualize it on the fly – You can download a free trial at http://tableau.com/datastories – check the new Tableau 9!

LINKS

Jun 25 2015

1hr 8mins

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003  |  How do you evaluate visualization?

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Hi there, we made it to the third episode (a bit late though, Moritz was travelling to SXSW).

In this episode we first answer to some of the questions we received and then we move on to the main topic: how do you evaluate visualization? We have been discussing some contests in episode #2 and thought evaluation is really a key issue there.

Breakdown of the episode

[00:00] Intro
[01:34] Listener question: Terms and conditions in competitions
[03:46] Listener question: Connect research and practitioners
[07:43] Listener question: How to stay objective about your own work?
[10:23] Listener question: Do we criticize each other?
[11:15] Listener question: How to introduce business people to benefits of visualization beyond Excel?
[13:58] News: Visualizing sprint
[15:54] News: Kartograph
[19:40] SxSW Panel: Intent and Impact: How Visualization Makes a Change
[21:36] Quality criteria and evaluating information visualizations: traditional academic approach
[28:08] Evaluation beyond simple, clear-cut tasks
[33:13] Enrico admits his secret love of David MacCandless
[33:58] Andrew Vande Moere and Helen Purchase: On the role of design in information visualization
[35:00] Truth and Beauty or: “I know it when I see it”
[38:36] Data politics and importance of how the end product came about
[40:36] Tamara Munzner’s nested model for visualization evaluation and design
[44:25] Code of ethics
[45:59] Wrap up and outlook

Links and images

Research papers mentioned in the episode

Have fun and, as usual, let us know what you think!

Mar 15 2012

48mins

Play

118  |  Making Data Visual with Miriah Meyer and Danyel Fisher

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[This podcast is fully supported by our listeners. If you enjoy listening to Data Stories, consider supporting us on Patreon. And now we also accept one-time donations through Paypal: just use this linkThanks so much for your support!]

This week we have Miriah Meyer (University of Utah) and Danyel Fisher (Microsoft Research) on the show to talk about their new book Making Data Visual, which covers areas that other visualization books typically do not address: namely, how to go from formulating questions to building visualizations that solve actual problems that people have.

On the show we talk about how the book came to be; some of the concepts introduced by Miriah and Danyel in the book, such as the use of proxy tasks for data;  and how you could use it for your own projects.

Enjoy the show!

Links:

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/27fa4389-8b54-423e-9d6b-9360a3a0b8fc_27923.mp4

Apr 12 2018

33mins

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069  |  Data Visualization Literacy with Jeremy Boy, Helen Kennedy and Andy Kirk

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We have a nice trio on the show for this episode: Jeremy Boy is a postdoctoral researcher at NYU School of Engineering, Helen Kennedy is Professor of Digital Society at University of Sheffield, and Andy Kirk is our beloved editor at visualisingdata.com.

We talk with these three experts about Data Visualization Literacy — that is, how people read data visualizations. We ask, how do we measure literacy? How do we improve it? And how do we even define literacy when we’re asking our viewers to read images?

Jeremy talks about his research on methods to measure visualization literacy, while Helen and Andy discuss their Seeing Data project, which studies how people read visualizations.

If you prefer reading to listening, you can find the transcript of our episode here. Enjoy the show!

Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik, which allows you to explore the hidden relationships within your data that lead to meaningful insights. Let your instincts lead the way to create personalized visualizations and dynamic dashboards with Qlik Sense. Download Qlik Sense for free at www.qlik.de/datastories. This week, the Qlik blog features a great post on maps and the data literacy required to read them called “Here Be Dragons.”

LINKS

Seeing Data Results:

Some research papers on data visualization literacy:

Some other interesting projects:

Related episodes

Mar 09 2016

49mins

Play

113  |  What Makes A Visualization Memorable? with Michelle Borkin

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It’s a whole new year! Consider supporting Data Stories on Patreon!

Michelle Borkin is Assistant Professor at Northeastern University where she studies the use of visualization in science research, in particular how it impacts human perception and cognition. On the show we talk about how the data viz community can better support the work of scientists, her popular research on data visualization memorability and, of course, the infamous data viz dinosaur.

LINKS

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/borkin-promo.m4v

Jan 17 2018

44mins

Play

139  |  Immersive Analytics with Tim Dwyer

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[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

We have Tim Dwyer on the show to talk about Immersive Analytics, the use of virtual reality and other immersive technology to analyze and present data visually. Tim is a Professor of Data Visualisation and Immersive Analytics at Monash University in Melbourne and his research focuses on the human and technological aspect of immersive analytics. On the show we talk about what immersive analytics is, what are the major opportunities and challenges and how one gets started experimenting with it. Tim also talks about some of the specific projects he and his collaborators developed on his lab.

Links

Tim Dwyer talks about their work with visualizing 3D data and using vibro-tactile feedback.

May 08 2019

50mins

Play

133  |  Year Review 2018

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[Thinking of gift-giving this holiday season? Consider a gift to Data Stories! You can join our growing community of Patreons or make a one-time donation to us on Paypal.]

Here we go! Another year has passed and lots has happened in the data visualization world. This time we decided to scramble things up again with a new annual review format: five podcasters (including ourselves!) reflecting back on year 2018. We’re lucky to be joined by Jon Schwabish from PolicyViz, Alli Torban from DataViz Today, and Cole Nussbaumer Knaflic from Storytelling with Data.

This was a long chat! But we had a lot to cover: major trends, favorite projects, new tools, and standout people, companies, studios, conferences, books, and blogs. There is a lot to learn there. Don’t miss our long list of links below!

As always, thanks for following along with us this year. And special thanks go to our supporters and to Destry and Florian for their amazing work behind the scenes.

We wish you all Happy Holidays and a Happy New Year!

Links

Major Trends

Favorite Projects

Noteworthy Tools

Standout People, Companies and Studios

Conferences

Books

Books Coming in 2019

Blogs

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Year-Review-promo.mp4

Dec 19 2018

1hr 40mins

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119  |  Color with Karen Schloss

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[This podcast is fully supported by our listeners. If you enjoy listening to Data Stories, consider supporting us on Patreon. And now we also accept one-time donations through Paypal: just use this linkThanks so much for your support!]

In this episode we have Karen Schloss on the show to talk about color. Yes, color! Karen is Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin Madison where she conducts research on the effective uses of color in visualization and everyday tasks.

Karen walks us through the intricacies of color: explaining how it works and why it is so hard to get right. We also discuss the infamous rainbow color map, the association between colors and meaning, the tools developed in her lab, and her fascinating research on coloring trash bins!

Enjoy the show…

Links

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/e54144bf-2104-4a72-8a46-88f8e2c8d6ad_34298.mp4

Apr 27 2018

54mins

Play

127  |  Storytelling with Data with Cole Nussbaumer Knaflic

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[If you enjoy listening to our show, please consider supporting us on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. Data Stories runs thanks to your financial support!]

We have Cole Nussbaumer Knaflic on the show to talk about her work in visual storytelling. Cole is an educator, blogger, freelancer and author of Storytelling with Data, a successful data visualization book about effectively presenting data through visualization.

We talk about how Cole got her start in visualization through her former job at Google, how she created her business, the story behind her book, and many of her other activities (including her great podcast!).

The episode is full of useful tips, especially for those of you who are thinking of becoming a vis-oriented business-owner or freelancer.

Enjoy the show!

Links

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Untitled-Project-Made-by-Headliner-2.mp4

Sep 26 2018

35mins

Play

084  |  Statistical Numbing with Paul Slovic

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We have Professor Paul Slovic from University of Oregon on the show to talk about “Statistical Numbing.” Professor Slovic is a renowned expert on the effect of numbers and statistics on empathy (or lack thereof). His fascinating, if not depressing, experiments have consistently shown how hard it is for statistics to elicit any sense of scale in human tragedies and how numbers can often even be detrimental if the goal is to elicit compassion and generous actions from an audience.

On the show, we talk about “Statistical Numbing” and it psychological underpinnings. Professor Slovic also describes his experiments and their implications. And we address one of the most important questions: Is there hope? Is there something we, as practitioners, can do to counteract these negative effects?

Enjoy this deeply scientific episode and let us know what you think!

This episode of Data Stories is sponsored by FreshBooks, the small business accounting software that makes your accounting tasks easy, fast and secure. FreshBooks is offering a month of free unrestricted use to all of our listeners. To claim your free month of FreshBooks, go to http://freshbooks.com/datastories and sign up for free without the use of a credit card. Note: Remember to enter “Data Stories” in the section titled “I heard about FreshBooks from…”

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Paul-Slovic-promo.mp4

LINKS

Oct 06 2016

56mins

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027  |  Big Data Skepticism w/ Kate Crawford

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Here we go with another great episode. This time more on the data side. We have Kate Crawford, Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research, on the show talking about the other face of big data. That is, after all the excitement, hype, and buzz, she is the one who is asking the tough questions: Is more data always better? Is there any objective truth in it? Is big data really making us smarter?

Papers and articles from Kate

Some of Kate’s Talks

Links

Enjoy it, there’s lots of food for thoughts here!

Related episodes

Oct 17 2013

1hr 5mins

Play

077  |  Polygraph and The Journalist Engineer Matt Daniels

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We have Matt Daniels on the show, the “journalist engineer” behind Polygraph, a blog featuring beautiful journalistic pieces based on data. If you are not familiar with the site, stop now and take a look.

Matt starts with a simple question — for example, what songs from the ’90s are still popular? — and tries to answer it through data analysis and visualization. The result is always a well-crafted web page and applications, with a mix of data analysis, interactive graphics, and explanations.

On the show we talk specifically about two projects: “The most timeless songs of all-time,” in which Matt analyzes song popularity from Spotify data, and “Film Dialogue from 2,000 screenplays, Broken Down by Gender and Age,” in which he examines movie dialogues as a way to dig deeper into gender biases in the film industry.

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Matt-Daniels-promo.m4v

This episode of Data Stories is sponsored by CartoDB. CartoDB is an open, powerful, and intuitive platform for discovering and predicting the key facts underlying the massive location data in our world. Whether you are a business, government agency, or simply a lover of revolutionary spatial insight technology, don’t settle for anything less than the best interactive maps around. Learn how CartoDB is shaping the world of location intelligence at cartodb.com/gallery and check out the Location Data Services mentioned in the ad.

LINKS

Matt Daniels
Matt’s Medium article “The Journalist Engineer
Project: “The largest vocabulary in Hip Hop
Project: “How music taste evolved
Project: “The most timeless songs of all-time
Project: “Film Dialogue from 2,000 screenplays, Broken Down by Gender and Age
Washington Post: “Doctors fire back at bad Yelp reviews — and reveal patients’ information online” (Collaboration between Enrico’s Lab and ProPublica)

Related episodes

Jul 01 2016

51mins

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044  |  Tamara Munzner

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Hi Folks! We have Prof. Tamara Munzner from University of British Columbia with us in this episode. Tamara is one of the most prominent figures in visualization research. She has done tons of interesting work starting from the nineties (look into her publications page) including the famous “Nested Model of Visualization Design” and her numerous design studies work, like the excellent “Overview,” a tool for journalistic investigative analysis. We also talk about her new book “Visualization Analysis and Design.” Finally a textbook teaching how to create visualization tools for analysis purposes!

Enjoy the show!

Links

Dec 22 2014

1hr 18mins

Play

080  |  Indexical Visualization with Dietmar Offenhuber

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We have Dietmar Offenhuber, Assistant Professor at Northeastern University, on the show again to talk about “Indexical Visualizations”: visualizations that reduce the gap between the recorded phenomenon and its representation.

In Dietmar’s words: “If we understand ‘data’ as a collection of symbolically encoded observations, could we think of a display that conveys information—without the symbolic encoding of data—through the object itself?

On the show we talk about strategies to define and build indexical visualizations. Dietmar provides numerous examples, including thermometers, tree rings, petri dishes, and the blinking lights in your router. He also offers tips on experimenting with this kind of visualization and connecting to the indexical vis community.

If you enjoy this episode you may also want to listen to our previous episode with Dietmar and to our “data sculptures” episode with Domestic Data Streamers.

Enjoy the show!

This episode is sponsored by TableauTableau helps people see and understand their data. Tableau 10 is the latest version of the company’s rapid fire, easy-to-use visual analytics software. It includes a completely refreshed design, mobile enhancements, new options for preparing, integrating and connecting to data and a host of new enterprise capabilities. You can find more information on the upcoming Tableau 10 here.

LINKS

Aug 10 2016

40mins

Play

151  |  Future Data Interfaces with David Sheldon-Hicks

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In this episode we talk about “future interfaces” with David Sheldon-Hicks: interfaces that are developed in futuristic movies. David is the founder and creative director of Territory Studio. They are the people behind the screen design of a lot of iconic movies such as The Martian, Blade Runner and Ex Machina.

On the show, we talk about what it takes to develop this kind of interfaces and how they interact with film directors. We also talk about interaction paradigms and classic movies from the past. David also provides a few tips on how to get started in this space. Note: they are hiring!

Enjoy the show!

[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

Films in which Territory Studio was involved (in the order of their mentioning):

The Martian (2015, Ridley Scott)
Guardians of the Galaxy (2014, James Gunn)
Blade Runner 2049 (2017, Denis Villeneuve)
Ex Machina (2015, Alex Garland)
James Bond – No Time To Die (forthcoming 2020, Cary Fukunaga)
Prometheus (2012, Ridley Scott)

Legends of the past:

Minority Report (2002, Steven Spielberg)
War Games (1983, John Badham)
Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (1977, George Lucas)

https://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/151_video.mp4

Dec 04 2019

44mins

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150  |  Highlights from IEEE VIS'19 with Tamara Munzner and Robert Kosara

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We have Tamara Munzner from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, and Robert Kosara from Tableau Research on the show to go through some of our personal highlights from the IEEE Visualization Conference 2019. We talk about some of the co-located events, some of the technical papers and major trends observed this year. Make sure to take a look at the links below, there is a lot of material! And especially the videos. There are quite a few that have been posted online this year.

Enjoy the show!

[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

LINKS:

Main IEEE VIS conference website

Events:
Infovis X Vision science

Organisers:

Visualization for Communication workshop: VisComm

BioVis@Vis workshop
Mentioned speakers: Martin Karpefors, Sean Hanlon, Erin Pleasance

Visualization in Data Science
Mentioned speakers: Been Kim, Google Brain, Andrew Gelman, Jenny Bryan

Technical Papers – The Test of Time

Jark J. van Wijk et al.: Cluster and Calendar based Visualization of Time Series Data

Tamara Munzner: A Nested Model for Visualization Design and Validation

Reflections and provocations

Miriah Meyer, Jason Dykes: Criteria for Rigor in Visualization Design Study
PaperVideo

Arvind Satyanarayan et al.: Critical Reflections on Visualization Authoring Systems

Jagoda Walny et al.: Data Changes Everything: Challenges and Opportunities in Data Visualization Design Handoff

Evanthia Dimara, Charles Perin: What is Interaction for Data Visualization?

Visual perception and cognition
Robert Kosara: Evidence for Area as the Primary Visual Cue in Pie Charts

Jessica Hullman: Why Authors Don’t Visualize Uncertainty

Cindy Xiong et al.: Biased Average Position Estimates in Line and Bar Graphs: Underestimation, Overestimation, and Perceptual Pull

Visualisation for machine learning

The What-If Tool

Àngel Alexander Cabrera: FairVis: Visual Analytics for Discovering Intersectional Bias in Machine Learning

Yongsu Ahn: FairSight: Visual Analytics for Fairness in Decision Making

New visualisation techniques

Bryce Morrow et al.: Periphery Plots for Contextualizing Heterogeneous Time-Based Charts

Alex Bigelow: Origraph: Interactive Network Wrangling

Zipeng Liu: Aggregated Dendrograms for Visual Comparison Between Many Phylogenetic Trees

Vis in Practice

Capstone Adress by Johanna Drucker
Video

https://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/150_Video.mp4

Related episodes

Nov 20 2019

1hr 2mins

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149  |  xkcd or the art of data storytelling with web cartoons

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[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

This episode is a dream come true – we have long wanted to invite Randall Munroe to the show. Randall is the mastermind behind the xkcd webcomics which have zillions of fans around the globe. In his stick figure cartoons and hilarious mini-stories, he comments on complicated scientific issues.

Over the years, Randall has also created a number of data-heavy visualizations. Some of them tackle pressing issues such as climate change, while others mock conventions of visualization such as map projections or chart types.

On the show we talk about his latest book “How To”, his work process, and the relation of complexity and simplicity in his visualizations. Enjoy the show and please make sure to listen all the way to the end, because Randall is calling out for some internet wisdom. Can anyone help find a software tool for manipulating maps in a three-point azimuthal projection?

Links:

xkcd: A webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.
How to! Scientific advice for common real world problems 
The Money Chart
The Movie Narratives Chart 
Earth Temperature Timeline

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/149_RandallMunroe.mp4

Nov 05 2019

49mins

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148  |  Cognitive Science for Data Visualization with Lace Padilla

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[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

In this episode we have Lace Padilla on the show to talk about how cognitive science can help create better visualizations. Lace is a newly appointed Assistant Professor at Cognitive UC Merced, where she directs the SPACE Lab.

Lace’s expertise is cognitive science, and she has published numerous papers that look at data visualization under the lens of a cognitive scientist. Believe it or not this is not so common so Lace’s work is very welcome.

On the show we talk about the role of cognitive science in visualization, what cognitive models are and how they can be used for visualization design and evaluation, decision-making supported by visualization and visualization as a way to analyze and communicate weather data.

Links:

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/148_LacePad_Video.mp4

Oct 23 2019

46mins

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147  |  Iconic Climate Visuals with Ed Hawkins

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[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

We have climate scientist Ed Hawkins on the show to talk about climate visualization. Ed is the person behind the famous spiral and stripe visualizations (see the images below). On the show we talk about how he created these visualizations and what was the impetus behind them. We also talk about breaking data visualization “rules”; climate visualization work from the visualization community; making climate information more local and more personal; and how to collaborate with climate scientists (see in the links below the list of climate scientists who are active on Twitter!).

Links

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/147_Ed_Hawkins.mp4

Oct 09 2019

39mins

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146  |  Sweating the details with Nicholas Rougeux

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[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

We have digital artist Nicholas Rougeux on the show to talk about his beautiful data art projects and the processes he follows. Nicholas created numerous iconic pieces with an extraordinary attention to details, such as “Seeing Music”, where he visualizes musical scores from famous composers, “Byrne’s Euclid”, a reproduction of Oliver Byrne’s geometric illustrations of Euclid’s theorem, and “Illustrations of the Natural Orders of Plants”, a digital reproduction and restoration of Elizabeth Twining’s catalog of botanical illustrations.

On the show we talk about how he gets inspiration for his projects, details about specific projects like those mentioned above, and technical details of how he actually produces these magical pieces of art.

Enjoy the show!

Links

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/146_Video.mp4

Sep 25 2019

39mins

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145  |  FT Data Crunch with Federica Cocco and John Burn-Murdoch

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[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

We have Federica Cocco and John Burn-Murdoch on the show to talk about their new Financial Times visualization series called Data Crunch. The series features Federica and John having a data-driven conversation about some social or economic trend while aided by graphs and charts. It’s a new way of doing data visualization. It’s casual but not trivial. Also, Federica and John draw by hand all the graphs they discuss; which makes it really engaging and fun! We talk about how the series started, what it takes to produce a whole show, the strategies they use to draw the diagrams, and what they have learned in the process.

Do not forget to take a look at the videos! Here is a link to the series: https://www.ft.com/ft-data-crunch.

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/145_FTDataCrunch.mp4

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Sep 11 2019

40mins

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144  |  History of Information Graphics with Sandra Rendgen

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We have art historian Sandra Rendgen on the show to talk about where data visualization comes from. Sandra published two great books on the topic, one called “The Minard System”, on the great Minard and the “History of Information Graphics” with contributions from multiple authors.

On the show we talk about graphical systems in the middle ages, the great efforts in scientific cartography in the age of discovery and the innovation spurred by statistic al thinking and associated graphical formats.

As a final note: Sandra is also now our new producer! We are very happy to have her on board. Welcome Sandra! Our former producer Destry is now busy with her baby and we are very grateful for the fantastic work she has done for the show over the years.

[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

Links

Aug 21 2019

47mins

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143  |  The Pudding with Matt Daniels

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Matt Daniels from The Pudding

[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

We have Matt Daniels on the show again (after more than 3 years!). Matt is the CEO of The Pudding, a collective of journalist-engineers that create visual essays that explain ideas debated in culture. Their pieces are incredibly engaging, somewhat witty and always stunning from the visual point of view.

Since our first interview with Matt, The Pudding has been hugely successful with visual essays being very popular and highly debated at the same time. The Pudding has also a very interesting business structure being partially financed by its readers and accepting submissions for visual pieces developed by freelancers.

On the show we talk about what the Pudding is and how it operated. We also comment on some of the most popular pieces. And finally Matt provides more details on how you can get involved with the Pudding and work with them if you want.

Links



  • The Pudding: Ali Wong. The Structure of Stand-Up Comedy



  • The Pudding: Women’s pockets are inferior

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Jul 31 2019

52mins

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142  |  Data Is Personal with Evan Peck

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[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

We have Evan Peck on the show to talk about the research he and his students recently published on “Data Is Personal”. The study consists of 42 interviews made in rural Pennsylvania to see how people from different educational backgrounds ranked a set of various data visualizations.

The study raises a lot of questions about how people perceive data visualization, our assumptions about who our readers are and how they use our work. Among many findings a recurring patters is that people read visualizations looking for something they can personally relate to.

With Evan we talk about how the project started, on what are the main findings, and what are the implications for data visualization design.

Links

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Jul 10 2019

42mins

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141  |  Sketching and Visual Thinking with Eva-Lotta Lamm

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[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

We have Eva-Lotta Lamm joining us to talk about the value of sketching and how it relates to data visualization. Eva-Lotta is a UX designer turned expert on sketching and sketchnoting: the art of summarizing talks through sketches. In the show we talk about visual thinking, sketchnoting and parallels with data visualization.

Links

Jun 19 2019

40mins

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140  |  Data Visualization Society

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[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

Have you heard of the “Data Visualization Society”? This is a new initiative started by visualization designers Amy Cesal, Mollie Pettit and Elijah Meeks. The DVS started with a simple form and a Slack channel and experienced in a few days a massive level of interest (more than 3000 people signed-up in a matter of days). On the show we talk with the founders to know more about how this happened, interesting stories about what people are doing within DVS and plans for the future. Enjoy the show!

Update: After the recording took place, DVS also launched their annual data visualization community survey. Make sure to take part (before June 15, 2019).

May 29 2019

46mins

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139  |  Immersive Analytics with Tim Dwyer

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[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

We have Tim Dwyer on the show to talk about Immersive Analytics, the use of virtual reality and other immersive technology to analyze and present data visually. Tim is a Professor of Data Visualisation and Immersive Analytics at Monash University in Melbourne and his research focuses on the human and technological aspect of immersive analytics. On the show we talk about what immersive analytics is, what are the major opportunities and challenges and how one gets started experimenting with it. Tim also talks about some of the specific projects he and his collaborators developed on his lab.

Links

Tim Dwyer talks about their work with visualizing 3D data and using vibro-tactile feedback.

May 08 2019

50mins

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138  |  Turning Data into Sound with Hannah Davis

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[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

How do you represent data with sound instead of graphical properties? Is it even possible?

It turns out that it’s not only possible, but there is an entire field — called sonification — that is dedicated to representing data with sound.

In this episode we are joined by Hannah Davis, a data visualization and sonification expert, to talk about how sonification works and how she has gone about making her own amazing sonification projects, which create musical pieces based on data. Get your ears ready! This time you are not only going to listen to our voices but also to some really interesting sounds!

P.S. We’ve actually touched upon sonification once before in Data Stories. Check out our episode with Scott Hughes on the sonification of black holes.

LINKS

Apr 18 2019

50mins

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137  |  Visualizing Earth with Cameron Beccario

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[There are no ads on Data Stories because we’re listener-supported; please consider contributing to the show! Oh…and now Data Stories is on Instagram!]

Today we are joined by Cameron Beccario who created the immensely impressive Earth visualization — a beautiful, geeky, mesmerizing look at the small blue marble we call home. On the show Cameron tells us all about the story behind the project, its evolution, and its reception — plus, at the end, we have a bonus chat about the state of data visualization in Japan.

Enjoy the show!

Links

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=obsw9qiBnjo
Cameron describes what happens when you make a data viz image that’s just too cool.

Mar 28 2019

36mins

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136  |  Simulated Dendrochronology of U.S. Immigration with Pedro Cruz and John Wihbey

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[There are no ads on Data Stories because we’re listener-supported; please consider contributing to the show! Oh…and now Data Stories is on Instagram!]

We have Pedro Cruz and John Wihbey on the show to talk about their beautiful project, the Simulated Dendrochronology of U.S. Immigration. There are many ways that immigration can be represented visually, but Pedro and John came up with a very compelling one: they use the metaphor of tree rings to show how migration patterns of people to the United States have changed over time. The final piece is utterly beautiful and evocative: we are the product of many layers of immigration.

On the show we talk about how they came up with this idea, the implementation of the visualization, the attempts they tried before producing the final version, and the role of metaphors in visualization. Make sure you take a closer look at the visualization before listening!

And enjoy the show!

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Mar 07 2019

39mins

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135  |  The "Dashboard Conspiracy" with Lyn Bartram and Alper Sarikaya

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[Our podcast is fully supported by our listeners. Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thanks!]

Oh dashboards… dashboards… what are they? For some, they are just ugly examples of bad visualization design (speed dials anyone?). For others, they are a first citizen of the data visualization world that deserve to be learned, studied, and understood.

To dig into this debate, we have Lyn Bartram of Simon Fraser University and Alper Sarikaya of Microsoft Power BI on the show to talk about an exciting research project they developed. Their research seeks to build a better picture of what dashboard are and how they are used “in the wild.” The results are summarized in a paper they wrote with their colleagues from Tableau and Honeycomb.ioWhat Do We Talk About When We Talk About Dashboards?

On the show we talk about how the project got started, what they discovered by analyzing a large corpus of dashboards, and the many ramifications of their research.

Enjoy the show!

Links

  • Project page
  • Supplemental material with images of all the dashboards the team analyzed (zip)
http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/DS-135-promo.mp4

Feb 12 2019

45mins

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134  |  Visualizing Uncertainty with Jessica Hullman and Matthew Kay

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[Our podcast is fully supported by our listeners. Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. Thanks!]

What is uncertainty? Why is it important to take it into account when designing data visualizations? And how do you actually do so? We explore these and other questions with Jessica Hullman of Northwestern University and Matthew Kay of the University of Michigan. Jessica and Matt have written many publications on the topic that help orient us to the intricate world of uncertainty, probabilities, and their relevance to data visualization.

We hope you enjoy the show!

Links

Jan 19 2019

55mins

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133  |  Year Review 2018

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[Thinking of gift-giving this holiday season? Consider a gift to Data Stories! You can join our growing community of Patreons or make a one-time donation to us on Paypal.]

Here we go! Another year has passed and lots has happened in the data visualization world. This time we decided to scramble things up again with a new annual review format: five podcasters (including ourselves!) reflecting back on year 2018. We’re lucky to be joined by Jon Schwabish from PolicyViz, Alli Torban from DataViz Today, and Cole Nussbaumer Knaflic from Storytelling with Data.

This was a long chat! But we had a lot to cover: major trends, favorite projects, new tools, and standout people, companies, studios, conferences, books, and blogs. There is a lot to learn there. Don’t miss our long list of links below!

As always, thanks for following along with us this year. And special thanks go to our supporters and to Destry and Florian for their amazing work behind the scenes.

We wish you all Happy Holidays and a Happy New Year!

Links

Major Trends

Favorite Projects

Noteworthy Tools

Standout People, Companies and Studios

Conferences

Books

Books Coming in 2019

Blogs

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Year-Review-promo.mp4

Dec 19 2018

1hr 40mins

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132  |  A New Generation of DataViz Tools

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[Thinking of gift-giving this holiday season? Consider a gift to Data Stories! You can join our growing community of Patreons or make a one-time donation to us on Paypal.]

We have data visualization freelancer and old friend-of-the-podcast Andy Kirk with us to talk about a new generation of data viz tools. You may not have noticed yet, but there are a quite a few nice new tools in development — and they all seem to have one thing in common: granting more artistic freedom to users while requiring less programming.

On the show we start by talking about the precursors to this generation of tools, such as Lyra and Data Driven Guides. We then pivot to the latest developments including CharticulatorAdobe’s Data Illustrator, and Lincoln.

What do these tools make possible that is still impossible or not so easy to do with the existing tools? What are their more exciting features? How do they differ in the way that they work? Why are we observing this trend now? And are they ultimately going to become real products? We ponder these and other questions on the show with Andy.

Enjoy listening!

Links

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/DS-132-promo-Made-by-Headliner.mp4

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Dec 06 2018

46mins

Play