Cover image of Overheard at National Geographic
(7499)

Rank #1 in Natural Sciences category

Science
Natural Sciences

Overheard at National Geographic

Updated about 1 month ago

Rank #1 in Natural Sciences category

Science
Natural Sciences
Read more

Smuggled dinosaur bones. Man-made glaciers. An audacious quest to find the world's southernmost tree. Each week, we'll dive into one of the curiously delightful conversations we've overheard around National Geographic's headquarters. You'll be introduced to the explorers, photographers and scientists at the edges of our big, bizarre, and beautiful world. Hosted by Peter Gwin and Amy Briggs.

Read more

Smuggled dinosaur bones. Man-made glaciers. An audacious quest to find the world's southernmost tree. Each week, we'll dive into one of the curiously delightful conversations we've overheard around National Geographic's headquarters. You'll be introduced to the explorers, photographers and scientists at the edges of our big, bizarre, and beautiful world. Hosted by Peter Gwin and Amy Briggs.

iTunes Ratings

7499 Ratings
Average Ratings
4810
935
608
545
601

Angelina

By Lyliqna - May 12 2020
Read more
Very informative. I love it!🤗

Good history👍🏽

By chiefkai - May 05 2020
Read more
What I was looking for. Little short but overall very good.

iTunes Ratings

7499 Ratings
Average Ratings
4810
935
608
545
601

Angelina

By Lyliqna - May 12 2020
Read more
Very informative. I love it!🤗

Good history👍🏽

By chiefkai - May 05 2020
Read more
What I was looking for. Little short but overall very good.
Cover image of Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

Latest release on Jun 30, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail about 1 month ago

Warning: This podcast is a series podcast

This means episodes are recommended to be heard in order from the very start. Here's the 10 best episodes of the series anyway though!

Rank #1: Humpback Hit Factory

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There's a humpback whale song sensation that's sweeping the South Pacific. We'll learn about the burgeoning study of "whale culture"-and why these super smart cetaceans may have a lot more in common with us than we'd ever imagined. For more information on this episode visit nationalgeographic.com/overheard.


Want more?

Meet National Geographic Photographer Brian Skerry, and see examples of his work beneath the waves.

Read Ellen Garland's original paper on whale song transmission, and listen to the humpback audio recordings that helped her piece this phenomenon together.

Here's the backstory behind those whale songs you heard at the top of the show, from Roger Payne's Songs of the Humpback Whale.


Also explore:

Sperm whales in the Caribbean form clans that have their own unique dialects-and thus culture.

Video: Off the coast of Argentina, seasoned killer whales hunt sea lion pups.

Whale song recordings off Hawaii have revealed a strange series of deep beats almost inaudible to humans.

An unusual number of humpback whales are dying along the U.S. East Coast, and scientists are racing to figure out why.


Got something to say? Contact us!

overheard@natgeo.com

Click here to give us feedback on Overheard: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/snoverheard

Jun 11 2019

21mins

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Rank #2: Digging Up Disaster

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How did an ancient Roman harbor end up in ruins? Scientists realized the culprit was a long-forgotten natural disaster that left tell-tale geological clues -- and possibly an eyewitness account in an ancient religious text. But solving this mystery led to a bigger question: what if it happens again? For more information on this episode visit nationalgeographic.com/overheard


Want more?

Learn about the science of tsunamis -- including why Indonesia may be due for another big one.

Could earthquakes explain some biblical stories? Scientists matched a tale of "fire and brimstone" with geological records of Israel's seismic history.

A surprise tsunami in 2018 was far worse than early-warning systems expected. Here's what we're learning about different types of earthquakes.


Also explore:

forgotten, 600-year-old tsunami explains the rise of a powerful Islamic kingdom.

More about Beverly Goodman and her work at the Charney School of Marine Sciences.

And want to learn more about the Talmud? Henry Abramson helps teach it, one page a day.

Scientists didn't know an area in Mexico was prone to big earthquakes - until they factored in centuries-old Aztec records.


Got something to say?

Contact us: overheard@natgeo.com

Click here to give us feedback on Overheard: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/snoverheard

Oct 15 2019

26mins

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Rank #3: The Alien Underground

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Half a mile below the surface of the earth, in a cave too hot to explore without an ice-packed suit, NASA scientist and Nat Geo explorer Penny Boston clambers around glassy crystals that are taller than telephone poles and wider than dinner tables. But it's not The Crystal Cave's grandeur she's interested in -- it's what may be hibernating inside the crystals. Astrobiologists like Penny Boston scour the Earth's most hostile environments for microorganisms, to see if they hold clues to what life might look like on other planets - maybe even planets in our solar system. For more information on this episode, visit nationalgeographic.com/overheard


Want More?

Hear Penny Boston speak on stage about her search for extremophiles all over the world.

Inside the Cave of Crystals, Penny Boston discovered organisms that have been alive for tens of thousands of years, trapped inside the crystals.

Kevin Hand has been eager to search for life on Europa for a long time. He's been testing robots in the arctic to see if they can withstand the extreme conditions there.

Europa isn't the only planet with the potential for life. Europa isn't the only planet with the potential for life. Scientists are hunting the galaxy for other planets that are just the right size and temperature. It turns out there may be billions of them.


Also explore:

Watch President Bill Clinton give a speech about the Allan Hills meteorite - a rock from Mars that looked like it might contain fossilized life.

You can see a photo of the strange shapes in the Allan Hills meteorite and read more about why scientists thought those shapes might be signs of life.

Penny Boston is the director of the NASA Astrobiology Institute. They're working hard to study what alien life might be like.

Kevin Hand is part of a team of scientists who are building the Europa Clipper - a probe designed to search the moon orbiting Jupiter for the right conditions for life.

Europa has a huge liquid water ocean. Here's more information from Kevin Hand about why that ocean might be inhabited.


Got something to say?

Contact us! overheard@natgeo.com

Click here to give us feedback on Overheard: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/snoverheard

Oct 22 2019

27mins

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Rank #4: Evolution of a Little Liar

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Most parents see lying as a cause for worry or reprimand. But some experts suggest lying at a young age could be a welcome sign of childhood development. So what does lying tell us about human cognition? For more information on this episode visit nationalgeographic.com/overheard


Want More?

Read writer Yudhijit Bhattacharrjee's magazine story on why we lie, and what it says about us.

Watch: Why science says it's good for kids to lie.

Learn more about researcher Kang Lee's work.

Read about Charles Darwin's report on his son, Doddy.


Also explore:

Do you lie more or less than the average person? Take this quiz to find out.

Meet history's most notorious liars.

These are the best liars of the animal world.


Got something to say? Contact us!

overheard@natgeo.com

Click here to give us feedback on Overheard: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/snoverheard

Jun 18 2019

18mins

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Rank #5: Rats vs Humans: A Love Story

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Bringers of plague, schleppers of pizza slices, garbage gobblers. Rats have adapted over the millennia to survive and thrive in human company, much to our amazement and (often) disgust. But love them or hate them, our past and our future is bound up with these little hustlers. For more information on this episode visit nationalgeographic.com/overheard


Want More?

Read Emma Marris's magazine story on how rats have become a global, inescapable part of city life.

Yes, rats really can wriggle up toilets. Learn more about their "ninja" skills.

Rats can remember who's nice to them, and return the favor, reports a study on their surprisingly complex social behavior.


Also explore:

Are rats really to blame for the Medieval "black death" plagues? These scientists have a different theory.

Rats remain a popular food in Vietnam. Learn why.


Got something to say?

Contact us! overheard@natgeo.com

Click here to give us feedback on Overheard: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/snoverheard

Jun 25 2019

17mins

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Rank #6: Scuba Diving in a Pyramid

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One of National Geographic's writers was hard to pin down for a while. That's because she was in Sudan, scuba diving underneath a pyramid. We had so many questions for her-especially once she shared with us that the contents of the pyramid could fundamentally change what we understand about ancient Egypt's 25th dynasty. For more information on this episode visit nationalgeographic.com/overheard


Want more?

Read Kristin Romey's piece, and watch a video of what it's like to go scuba diving under a pyramid at Nuri.

Learn more about the Kingdom of Kush in what is now Sudan, a rival to ancient Egypt awash in gold and power.


Also explore:

Read about the mysterious void discovered in Egypt's Great Pyramid.

Learn how illegal tomb raiders are stealing the world's history.

Watch: Ancient Egypt 101


Got something to say?

Contact us! overheard@natgeo.com

Click here to give us feedback on Overheard: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/snoverheard

Jul 02 2019

19mins

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Rank #7: The Hidden Cost of the Perfect Selfie

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What do tigers, sloths, elephants and bears have in common? They're all part of the incredibly lucrative captive wildlife tourism industry. Travelers from around the world clamor for opportunities to pose with these magnificent creatures and get that perfect selfie. This week - we look at the complicated nature of elephant tourism in Thailand. For more information on this episode, visit nationalgeographic.com/overheard


Want More?

Read Natasha's cover story on wildlife tourism to learn more about the global industry.

Learn more about Ban Ta Klang the "elephant village" at the center of Thailand's captive elephant trade.

Want to know how to approach wildlife tourism in a way that's better for animals? We've got some tips on how to make sure you're having an ethical encounter.

Why do people risk their lives for animal selfies? Natasha talked with psychologists to find out.

Learn more about Puerto Alegria - a Peruvian town on the banks of the Amazon that was once a hotbed of wildlife tourism.


Also Explore

Get some tips from National Geographic photographers on how to photograph wild animals ethically.

Learn more about Think Elephants International, the organization that Joshua Plotnik co-founded.

The advocacy group World Animal Protection studied the impact of wildlife selfies in the Amazon. Read more about what they found.


Got something to say?

Contact us! overheard@natgeo.com

Click here to give us feedback on Overheard: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/snoverheard

Oct 29 2019

27mins

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Rank #8: Cave of the Jaguar God

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Crawl into the Maya underworld, where science meets spirits, shamans, and snakes. A long-forgotten cave could shed light on one of history's most enduring questions: why did the ancient Maya collapse? For more information on this episode, visit https://www.nationalgeographic.com/podcasts/overheard


Want more?

See the incense burners, plates and grinding stones found in the Cave of the Jaguar God.

Learn how Guillermo de Anda uses ground-penetrating radar and other high-tech tools to investigate Chichen Itza.

Read about jaguars and their place as the divine feline in Mesoamerican cultures.


Also explore:

Travel inside the world's longest underwater cave system -- spanning 215 miles underneath the Yucatan Peninsula.

What can you find inside the longest underwater cave? Remains of ice age giant sloths and an ancient relative of the elephant.

Check out more of Guillermo's work through the Great Maya Aquifer Project.


Got something to say?

Contact us! overheard@natgeo.com

Click here to give us feedback on Overheard: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/snoverheard

Nov 05 2019

29mins

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Rank #9: The Harem Conspiracy

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Murder, succession, and a 18-foot scroll of papyrus that reads like an ancient Egyptian episode of Law and Order. We get the lowdown on the Judicial Papyrus of Turin. For more information on this episode visit nationalgeographic.com/overheard


Want More?

Read about the bloody coup described in the Judicial Papyrus of Turin, as well as other poignant examples of law and order in ancient Egypt.

Learn more about the Queens of Egypt exhibition at the National Geographic Museum.


Also Explore:

Explore the Book of the Dead, ancient Egypt's guide to the underworld.

See the artifacts that honor Egypt's powerful queens.

Test your knowledge of ancient Egypt.


Got something to say?

Contact us! overheard@natgeo.com

Click here to give us feedback on Overheard: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/snoverheard

Jul 16 2019

25mins

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Rank #10: Honeybee Chop Shop

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What is a honeybee chop shop, and why do they exist? Turns out the answer has everything to do with the food on our tables. We dig into the sticky business of beekeeping and commercial agriculture. For more information on this episode visit nationalgeographic.com/overheard.


Want More?

Read more about the seriously sticky problem of honeybee theft.


Also Explore:

Watch an amazing time-lapse of bees hatching.

See how honeybees are each assigned their distinct jobs.

Read about an unlikely feud between Maya beekeepers and Mennonites in Mexico.

Learn more about honeybees.

Without insects, we might all die, argues this author.


Got something to say?

Contact us! overheard@natgeo.com

Click here to give us feedback on Overheard: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/snoverheard

Jul 30 2019

22mins

Play