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VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts. With VETgirl, you can learn clinical veterinary medicine with style, passion, and efficiency! VETgirl is designed for veterinary professionals who have time poverty and are on the run. Who has time to read journals or sit through hours of lectures? Download the podcasts you want to listen to, and get clinical tips within just a few minutes of listening! We'll help get you the facts you need in a convenient way! Want more information? Go to JoinVETgirl.com.

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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The best episodes ranked using user listens.

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Canine influenza virus: Coming to your area? | VETgirl Veterinary CE Podcasts

Questions? You can always contact us via our Contact Us page.

4mins

14 Apr 2014

Rank #1

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Seizures following head trauma in dogs

Questions? You can always contact us via our Contact Us page.

5mins

2 Dec 2013

Rank #2

Similar Podcasts

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Feline medicine with Dr. Susan Little | VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

Questions? You can always contact us via our Contact Us page.

8mins

4 Jun 2014

Rank #3

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Lyme disease with Dr. Richard Goldstein | VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

Questions? You can always contact us via our Contact Us page.

8mins

26 Mar 2014

Rank #4

Most Popular Podcasts

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All you ever needed to know about ECG interpretation | Dr. Marc Kraus | VETgirl Veterinary CE Podcasts

Don't feel comfortable interpreting abnormal electrocardiograms (ECG)? Can't tell the difference between a bundle branch block from a ventricular arrhythmia? Dr. Marc Kraus, a board-certified cardiologist on faculty at Cornell University, offers a few simple clues to help differentiate ventricular versus sinus arrhythmias, how to calculate heart rate, and more!

3mins

20 Nov 2013

Rank #5

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What you need to know about food trials | Dr. Catherine Lenox | VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

In this VetGirl podcast, Dr. Catherine Lenox, DACVN discusses what you need to know about implementing a food trial in your veterinary patients or pets. So why do food trials? To rule out gastrointestinal disease or cutaneous adverse food reaction. Check out what you need to know and how long you need to food trial your patients for!

5mins

6 Oct 2014

Rank #6

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Litterbox Size Preferences in Cats | Dr. Lisa Radosta | VetGirl Veterinary CE Podcasts

In this VETgirl online veterinary continuing education podcast, Dr. Lisa Radosta, DACVB from Florida Veterinary Behavior Service discusses litterbox size preference in domestic cats. As inappropriate urination is the #1 feline behavioral disorder, help your clients by educating them on what exact size box is appropriate for the average-sized cat.

3mins

3 Aug 2015

Rank #7

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Acid-base and electrolyte abnormalities seen in dogs with GI foreign bodies | VETgirl Veterinary CE Podcasts

In today's VETgirl podcast, we review the importance of performing a venous blood gas in the vomiting patient. Why? Because when we see a hypochloremic, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, we should be ruling out an obstructive gastrointestinal (GI) foreign body. Previously, the presence of a metabolic alkalosis has been associated with a upper GI (e.g., pyloric) foreign body. Why? Because of protracted vomiting and loss of chloride, which deletes the body of an anion. In order to maintain electroneutrality, when a sodium (Na+) moves, a negatively charged anion must exchange with it. While this is typically chloride, if the body is chloride deplete, it absorbs bicarbonate (HCO3-) instead, resulting in the classic metabolic alkalosis.

6mins

27 Jul 2015

Rank #8

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Top 5 radiographic interpretation errors | Dr. Matt Winter | VetGirl Veterinary CE Podcasts

Questions? You can always contact us via our Contact Us page.

4mins

27 Nov 2013

Rank #9

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How to perform a thoracocentesis | VETgirl Veterinary CE Podcasts

In this VETgirl podcast, we discuss how to perform a thoracocentesis in the dyspneic dog or cat. If you don't commonly perform a thoracocentesis, you may not feel comfortable. However, keep in mind that thoracocentesis is easy to perform and is generally safe.

6mins

18 May 2015

Rank #10

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Lyme disease Part I: Transmission, Pathophysiology andamp; Testing| VETgirl Veterinary CE Podcasts

In this VetGirl podcast, we discuss transmission, pathophysiology and testing for Lyme disease. Lyme disease is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb). While Bb can be transmitted by urine, milk, and blood, the most common transmission is likely via tick infestation by hard-shell deer ticks (e.g., Ixodes scapularis or other related Ixodes species). Ixodes ticks have a 2-year life cycle and hatch in the spring (into larvae). A female tick lays approximately 2000 eggs. Larvae become infected with Bb when feeding on white-footed mice, which are persistently infected, but often remain unaffected or asymptomatic. The larvae molt into nymphs that feed on new hosts. While nymphs are less effective vectors than adult ticks, they can still infect their hosts within the four-day feeding period. Likewise, nymphs can become infected when feeding on an infected animal. In the fall, nymphs molt to adults, with 50% of adult ticks in the Northeast estimated to be carrying Bb. Once the tick attaches and feeds, the spirochetes (which live in the midgut of the tick) begin to migrate to the salivary gland and enter the host. Risk of infection is believed to be minimal during the first 12 hours of feeding. Typically, transmission of Bb occurs during prolonged feeding periods (typically > 48 hours).

7mins

11 Jun 2014

Rank #11

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Sewing needle foreign bodies in dogs andamp; cats| VETgirl Veterinary CE Podcasts

In today's VETgirl podcast, we review sewing needle foreign bodies in dogs and cats. Should we treat these with endoscopy, surgery or medical management?

5mins

25 May 2015

Rank #12

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FAST ultrasound in non-traumatized patients in the ER | VETgirl Veterinary CE Podcasts

In today's VETgirl online veterinary CE podcast, we interview Dr. Soren Boysen, DACVECC from the University of Calgary and Dr. Jantina McMurray on their recent publication on the use of AFAST and TFAST ultrasound in non-trauma patients presenting to the emergency services. In this prospective study, the looked at 100 dogs and cats and found that 33% had free fluid identified on presentation. In unstable or dyspneic patients, 75% had evidence of effusion. So, if you have an ultrasound machine, are you using it enough in your clinic and patients?

22mins

14 Mar 2016

Rank #13

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Treatment of Canine Leptospirosis: Part 4 | VETgirl Veterinary CE Podcasts

In this VetGirl podcast, we review treatment for canine leptospirosis, including aggressive intravenous (IV) fluid therapy, appropriate antibiotic therapy, gastrointestinal support, supportive care, and monitoring.

7mins

3 Sep 2014

Rank #14

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C-reactive protein levels in canine parvovirus | VETgirl Veterinary CE Podcasts

In this VETgirl online veterinary CE podcast, we review C-reactive protein levels and whether or not they can be useful in managing your parvovirus cases.

4mins

7 Dec 2015

Rank #15

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Hypothyroidism and DCM in Doberman Pinschers | VETgirl Veterinary CE Podcasts

In today's VETgirl online veterinary continuing education podcast, we review whether or not there is an association between hypothyroidism and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Doberman Pinschers are overrepresented among canine patients diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy (familial/genetic), as well as those diagnosed with hypothyroidism. So the question is, is there a link? This is a very controversial topic. After all, we know that thyroid hormone plays an important role in the systolic function of the myocardium and cardiac rate and rhythm via its effect on density of beta-adrenergic receptors and their sensitivity to catecholamines. A deficiency of thyroid hormone has been associated with reduced myocardial function and alterations in cardiac conduction and heart rate thus leading to the premise that the hypothyroid state may be a metabolic etiology for dilated cardiomyopathy. Studies to date have not supported that premise.

6mins

9 May 2016

Rank #16

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Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI) | VETgirl Veterinary CE Podcasts

In this VETgirl online veterinary CE podcast, we review Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI). In veterinary medicine, the use of transfusions has become more prevalent, particularly in the field of emergency and critical care. Transfusion medicine is important to help improve oxygen delivery, provide coagulation factors, and provide hemoglobin. That said, the benefits of transfusions must outweigh the risks - albeit rare - from the product itself.

5mins

9 Nov 2015

Rank #17

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ELISA Testing Food Antigens Diet Trial | VETgirl Veterinary CE Podcasts

Today's VetGirl podcast is on food trials. I'm particularly passionate about this podcast since my own pit bull just went on his first ever food trial. Not knowing anything about dermatology, I learned quite a bit from our VetGirl dermatology expert, Dr. Amy Haarstad. So, today's podcast is going to focus on food trials… and whether or not it's appropriate to use over the counter foods as dietary elimination trials!

5mins

18 Aug 2014

Rank #18

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Canine Leptospirosis | Part 2: Transmission andamp; Clinical Signs | VetGirl Veterinary CE Podcasts

In this VetGirl podcast, we review the transmission and clinical signs seen from canine leptospirosis. When it comes to leptospirosis, there are both saprophytic and pathogenic leptospires. Pathogenic leptospires are shed from renal tubules of both domestic and wild animals, and can remain viable in the soil and environment for weeks to months. That said, leptospires are inactivated by UV radiation and freezing. Infection can also occur through intact mucous membranes or abraded skin with direct or indirect exposure to urine. Rarely, leptospirosis can be transmitted via bite wound, ingestions of infected tissue (e.g., eating raw meat), or by venereal or placental transfer).

4mins

13 Aug 2014

Rank #19

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The effect of IV fluids on microcirculation | VETgirl Veterinary CE Podcasts

Parameters were measured as soon as the patient was induced, at 30 and 60 minutes afterwards, and overall. What'd this study find? Overall, this study found that those patients that received 20 mL of LRS/kg/hour had the greatest total and perfused density vessel (in those vessels that were > 20 μm in diameter, which are mostly venules and arterioles).

15mins

2 Mar 2015

Rank #20