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Astronomy 161 - Introduction to Solar System Astronomy - Autumn 2007

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Rank #146 in Courses category

Education
Courses
Science
Natural Sciences
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Astronomy 161, Introduction to the Solar System, is the first quarter ofa 2-quarter introductory Astronomy for non-science majors taught at TheOhio State University. This podcast presents audio recordings ofProfessor Richard Pogge's lectures from his Autumn Quarter 2007 class.All of the lectures were recorded live in 1000 McPherson Laboratory onthe OSU Main Campus in Columbus, Ohio.

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Astronomy 161, Introduction to the Solar System, is the first quarter ofa 2-quarter introductory Astronomy for non-science majors taught at TheOhio State University. This podcast presents audio recordings ofProfessor Richard Pogge's lectures from his Autumn Quarter 2007 class.All of the lectures were recorded live in 1000 McPherson Laboratory onthe OSU Main Campus in Columbus, Ohio.

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54 Ratings
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Excellent

By Mike Kubo - Mar 07 2019
Read more
Truly one of the best podcasts I’ve listened to.

Amazing

By Denerian_01 - Jan 13 2014
Read more
Truly a great resource for a basic understanding of the history and power of Astronomy.

iTunes Ratings

54 Ratings
Average Ratings
49
2
1
0
2

Excellent

By Mike Kubo - Mar 07 2019
Read more
Truly one of the best podcasts I’ve listened to.

Amazing

By Denerian_01 - Jan 13 2014
Read more
Truly a great resource for a basic understanding of the history and power of Astronomy.

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Cover image of Astronomy 161 - Introduction to Solar System Astronomy - Autumn 2007

Astronomy 161 - Introduction to Solar System Astronomy - Autumn 2007

Updated 3 days ago

Read more

Astronomy 161, Introduction to the Solar System, is the first quarter ofa 2-quarter introductory Astronomy for non-science majors taught at TheOhio State University. This podcast presents audio recordings ofProfessor Richard Pogge's lectures from his Autumn Quarter 2007 class.All of the lectures were recorded live in 1000 McPherson Laboratory onthe OSU Main Campus in Columbus, Ohio.

Lecture 02: Astronomical Numbers

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What are our units of measure in astronomy? To begin our exploration of
astronomy, we first need to develop a common language for notating large
numbers, and introduce the basic units of length, mass, and time that we
will use throughout the quarter. This lecture is a quick review of
scientific notation and the metric system. For measuring the vast
distances in astronomy, we need to introduce two special units: the
Astronomical Unit for interplanetary distances, and the Light Year for
interstellar distances. We end with a discussion of mass and weight,
and the distinction drawn in physical measurements that differs (a
little) from everyday usage. Recorded 2007 Sep 20 in 1000 McPherson Lab
on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Sep 20 2007

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Lecture 05: Mapping Earth & Sky

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Where are we? Where is someplace else? And how do I get there from
here? These are questions we need to answer both on the Earth and in
the sky to assign a location to a place or celestial object on the
surface of a sphere. This lecture includes a review of angular units
and the terrestrial system of latitude and longitude on the spherical
Earth. We then define the Celestial Sphere, with its Celestial Equator
and Poles, and begin to define an analogous coordinate system on the
sky. An important wrinkle is that what part of the sky we see at any
given time depends on both where we are on the Earth, and what date/time
it is. This gives us the elements of the coordinate system we will need
to begin our exploration of motions in the sky in the next lectures.
Recorded 2007 Sep 25 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The
Ohio State University.

Sep 25 2007

Play

Lecture 06: Daily and Annual Motions

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Why do celestial objects appear to rise and set every day? How does this
depend on where you are on the Earth, or the time of year? In today's lecture
we we set the heavens into motion and review the two most basic
celestial motions. Apparent Daily Motion reflects the daily rotation of
the Earth about its axis. Apparent Annual Motion reflects the Earth's
annual orbit around the Sun. We introduce the Ecliptic, the Sun's
apparent annual path across the Celestial Sphere, and note four special
locations along the Ecliptic: the Solstices and Equinoxes. This sets
the stage for many of the topics of the rest of this section. Recorded
2007 Sep 26 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio
State University.

Sep 26 2007

Play

Lecture 32: The Origin of the Solar System

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How did the Solar System form? In this lecture I review the clues for
the formation of the solar system in the present-day dynamics (orbital
and rotation motions) and compositions of the planets and small bodies.
I then describe the standard accretion model for solar system formation,
whereby grains condense out of the primordial solar nebula, grains
aggregate by collisions into planetesimals, then gravity begins to work
and planetesimals grow into protoplanets. What kind of planet grows
depends on where the protoplanets form within the primordial solar
nebula: close to the Sun only rocky planets form, beyond the Frost Line
ices and volatiles can condense out allowing the growth of the gas and
ice giants. The whole process took about 100 million years, and we as
we explore the solar system in subsequent lectures, we will look for
traces of this process on the various worlds we visit. Recorded 2007
Nov 6 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State
University.

Nov 06 2007

Play

Lecture 07: The Four Seasons

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Why do we have different seasons? This lecture explores the
consequences of the tilt of the Earth's rotation axis relative to its
orbital plane combined with the apparent annual motions of the Sun
around the Ecliptic. The most important factor for determining whether
it is hot or cold at a given location at different times in the year is
"insolation": how much sunlight is spread out over the ground. This,
combined with the different length of the day throughout the year,
determines to total solar heating per day and so drives the general
weather. It has nothing to do with how far away we are from the Sun at
different times of the year. Finally, the direction of the Earth's
rotation axis slowly drifts westward, taking 26,000 years to go around
the sky. This "Precession of the Equinoxes" represents a tiny change
that is still measureable by pre-telescopic observations, and means that
at different epochs in human history there is a different North Pole
star, or none at all! Recorded 2007 Sep 27 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the
Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Sep 27 2007

Play

Lecture 34: Venus Unveiled

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Venus, the second planet from the Sun, is perpetually veiled behind
opaque clouds of sulfuric acid droplets atop a hot, heavy, carbon
dioxide atmosphere. In size and apparent composition, however, it is a
near twin-sister of the Earth. Why is it do different? In this lecture
I review the basic properties of Venus, and examine the similarties and
differences with the Earth. Recorded 2007 Nov 8 in 1000 McPherson Lab on
the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 08 2007

Play

Lecture 08: The Phases of the Moon

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What are the Phases of the Moon? This lecture introduces the Moon and
describes the monthly cycle of phases. Topics include synchronous
rotation, apogee and perigee, the cycle of phases, and the sidereal and
synodic month. Recorded 2007 Sep 28 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the
Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Sep 28 2007

Play

Lecture 37: The Gas Giants - Jupiter and Saturn

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The Gas Giants Jupiter and Saturn are the largest planets in the Solar
System. Internally they are deep, heavy Hydrogen/Helium atmospheres on
top of dense rock/ice cores without solid surfaces. What we see in our
telescopes are just the tops of the clouds. This lecture describes the
basic properties of the planets: their composition, atmospheres,
weather, and internal structures. Recorded 2007 Nov 14 in 1000
McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 14 2007

Play

Lecture 18: The Apple and the Moon - Newtonian Gravitation

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What is Gravity? Starting with the properties of falling bodies first
formulated by Galileo, Newton applied his three laws of motion to the
problem of Universal Gravitation. Newtonian Gravity is a mutually
attractive force that acts at a distance between any two massive bodies.
Its strength is proportional to the product of the two masses, and
inversely proportional to the square of the distance between their
centers. We then compare the fall of an apple on the Earth to the orbit
of the Moon, and show that the Moon is held in its orbit by the same
gravity that works on the surface of the Earth. In effect, the Moon is
perpetually "falling" around the Earth. Recorded 2007 Oct 15 in 1000
McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Oct 15 2007

Play

Lecture 27: Deep Time - The Age of the Earth

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How old is the Earth? In this lecture I review the ideas of cyclic and
linear time, and how this determines whether or not the question of the
age of the Earth is meaningful. I then review various ways people have
tried to estimate the age of the Earth, starting with historical ages
that equate human history with the physical history of Earth. We then
look at physical estimates of the Earth's age that do not make an appeal
to human history, but instead seek physical processes that play out over time
to make the estimates. This brings us to a discussion of radiometric
age dating techniques that use the radioactive decay of isotopes trapped
in minerals to identify the oldest Earth rocks and meteorites, and hence
establish a radiometric date for the formation of the Earth some
4.55+/-0.05 Billion Years ago. Recorded 2007 Oct 29 in 1000 McPherson
Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Oct 29 2007

Play

Lecture 14b: Copernicus from Au2006

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Because my voice recorder malfunctioned 15 minutes into my Lecture on
Copernicus on 2007 October 9, I've added this recording of my Copernicus
lecture from Autumn Quarter 2006. It is the same basic material, but
since I generally improvise on a basic outline, there will be some
differences. Personally, I liked this year's lecture better, but this
will at least cover most of the same material. Oh well.

Oct 09 2007

Play

Lecture 36: Worlds in Comparison - The Terrestrial Planets

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Having completed our tour of the Terrestrial Planets, we want to step
back and compare their properties. In particular, we will wi review the
processes that drive the evolution of their surfaces, their interiors,
and their atmospheres. Recorded 2007 Nov 13 in 1000 McPherson Lab on
the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 13 2007

Play

Lecture 10: Telling Time

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What time is it? Telling time is the oldest practical application of
astronomy. Today's lecture is the first of a 2-part lecture on the
astronomical origins of our methods of keeping time and making
calendars. This lecture reviews the divisions of the year into the
solstices, equinoxes, and cross-quarter days, the division of the year
into months by moon phase cycles, months into weeks, and the division
of the day into hours by marking the location of the Sun in the sky
Recorded 2007 Oct 2 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus
campus of The Ohio State University.

Oct 02 2007

Play

Lecture 38: The Ice Giants - Uranus and Neptune

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The Ice Giants Uranus and Neptune are the outermost major planets of our
Solar System. Internally they small rocky cores surrounded by deep,
slushy ice mantles and shallow hydrogen atmospheres, quite unlike the
massive cores and deep metallic hydrogen mantles of Jupiter and Saturn.
This lecture describes their basic properties: the origin of their vivid
blue/green colors, their composition, structure, and weather. At the
end we'll contrast and compare their properties to those of the Gas
Giants. Recorded 2007 Nov 15 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus
campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 15 2007

Play

Lecture 22: Light the Messenger

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What is light? Most astronomical objects are too far away to measure
directly. Light is the messenger of the Universe, carrying with it
information about objects as near as the Moon and as far away as the
most distant objects in the visible Universe. In this lecture we will
review the basic properties of light, the electromagnetic spectrum, the
inverse square law of brightness, and the Dopper Effect. Recorded 2007
Oct 22 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State
University.

Oct 22 2007

Play

Lecture 30: The Moon

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What physical processes have shaped the Moon? In this lecture, I
describe the surface features of the Moon (the Maria and Highlands), how
crater density tells us the relative ages of terrains, and what we have
learned about Moon rocks returned by astronauts and robotic probes. I
will also discuss what is known about the interior of the Moon, and
review what we know about lunar history and formation. Like the Earth,
the Moon gives us a useful point of comparison with bodies elsewhere in
the Solar System. Recorded 2007 Nov 1 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the
Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 01 2007

Play

Lecture 28: Inside the Earth

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What is the interior structure of the Earth? We will start our
exploration of the Solar System with our home planet Earth. This
lecture discusses the interior structure of the Earth, introducing the
idea of differentiation, how geologists map the interior of the Earth
using seismic waves, and the origin of the Earth's magnetic field. I
describe the basic properties of the crust of the Earth, its division
into rigid tectonic plates, and describe how plate motions driven by
convection in the upper mantle have shaped the visible surface of our
planet over its dynamic history. Recorded 2007 Oct 30 in 1000 McPherson
Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Oct 30 2007

Play

Lecture 17: On the Shoulders of Giants: Isaac Newton and the Laws of Motion

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Copernicus, Kepler, Tycho, and Galileo together gave us a new way of
looking at the motions in the heavens, but they could not explain why
the planets move they way the do. It was to be the work of Isaac Newton
who was to sweep away the last vestiges of the Aristotelian view of the
world and replace it with with a new, vastly more powerful predictive
synthesis, in which all motions, in the heavens and on the Earth, obeyed
three simple, mathematical laws of motion. This lecture introduces
Newton's Three Laws of Motion and their consequences. Recorded 2007 Oct
12 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State
University.

Oct 12 2007

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Lecture 26: Telescopes

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Telescopes outfitted with modern electronic cameras and spectrographs
are astronomers' primary tools for exploring the Universe. In this
lecture I review the primary types of telescopes and the best
observatory sites to locate them, with a brief mention of radio and
space telescopes. At the end, I give a brief review of the Ohio State's
observing facilities. Recorded 2007 Oct 26 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the
Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Oct 26 2007

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Lecture 09: Eclipses of the Sun and Moon

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Among the most amazing sights in the sky, eclipses of the Sun and
Moon have long fascinated us. This lecture describes the eclipses of
the Sun and Moon, their types, and how often they occur.
Recorded 2007 Oct 1 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus
of The Ohio State University.

Oct 01 2007

Play

Astronomy 141 Podcast Teaser

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A new podcast, Astronomy 141, Life in the Universe, is available
for those interested in continuing an exploration of topics in
modern astronomy.

Dec 06 2009

Play

Lecture 46: Are We Alone? Life in the Universe

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Are we alone in the Universe? This lecture explores the question of how
we might go about finding life on planets around other stars. Rather
than talking about speculative ideas, like the Drake Equation or SETI, I
am instead taking the approach of posing it as a problem of what to look
for among the exoplanets we have been discovering in huge numbers in the
last decade. I describe the basic requirements for life, and
how life on Earth is surprisingly tough (extremophiles). I then give a
definition of the Habitable Zone around a star, and present the
Goldilocks Problem of how a planet must be neither too hot, too cold
(for liquid water) or too big or too small to be hospitable to
life. From there I then review the problem of how to go about finding
Earth-like planets (Pale Blue Dots) around other stars, and if we do
find them, what spectroscopic signatures of life, called biomarkers, we
can look for to see if they have some form of life like we understand it
on them. Recorded on 2007 Nov 30 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus
campus of The Ohio State University. This is the final lecture for
Autumn Quarter 2007.

Nov 30 2007

Play

Lecture 45: Exoplanets - Planets Around Other Stars

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Are there planets around other stars? Are there Earth-like planets
around other stars? Do any of those harbor life? Intelligent life?
We'd like to know the answers to all of these questions, and in recent
years we've made great progress towards at least answering the first.
To date, more than 260 planets have been found around more than 200
other stars, most in the interstellar neighborhood of the Sun, but a few
at great distance. This lecture reviews the search for ExoPlanets,
discussing the successful Radial Velocity, Transit, and Microlensing
techniques. What we have found so far are very suprising systems,
especially Jupiter-size or bigger planets orbiting very close (few
hundredths of an AU) from their parent stars. Recorded 2007 Nov 29 in
1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 29 2007

Play

Lecture 44: Comets

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Comets are chance visitors from the icy reaches of the outer Solar
System. In this lecture I describe the properties of comets, their
historical importance, and introduce the "dirty snowball" model of a
comet nucleus. At the end of class I created a model of a comet nucleus
from common household and office materials, unfortunately I could not
arrange for a videographer in time. Recorded 2007 Nov 28 in 1000
McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 28 2007

Play

Lecture 43: Icy Worlds of the Outer Solar System

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Beyond the orbit of Neptune lies the realm of the icy worlds, ranging in
size from Neptune's giant moon Triton and the dwarf planets Pluto and
Eris, all the way down to the nuclei of comets a few kilometers across.
This lecture discussed the icy bodies of the Trans-Neptunian regions of
the Solar System, discussing the basic properties of Triton (the best
studied such object), Pluto, Eris, and the Kuiper Belt, introducing the
dynamical families of Trans-Neptunian Objects that record in their
orbits the slow migration of Neptune outwards during the early history
of the Solar System. The Kuiper Belt is the icy analog of the main
Asteroid Belt of the inner Solar System: both are shaped by their
gravitational interaction with giant gas planets (Jupiter for the
asteroids, Neptune for the KBOs), and are composed of leftover raw
materials from the formation of their respective regions of the Solar
System. Recorded 2007 Nov 27 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus
campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 27 2007

Play

Lecture 42: Asteroids

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Asteroids are the leftover rocky materials from the formation of the
Solar System that reside primarily in a broad belt between the orbits of
Mars and Jupiter. This lecture reviews the physical and orbital
properties of Asteroids, and discusses the role of Jupiter and orbital
resonances in dynamically sculpting the Main Belt of Asteroids. Once
again, we see how the history of the dynamical evolution of our Solar
System is written in the orbits of its members. Recorded 2007 Nov 26 in
1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 26 2007

Play

Lecture 41: Planetary Rings

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All Jovian planets have rings. We are most familiar with the bright,
spectacular rings of Saturn, but the other Jovian planets have rings
systems around them. This lecture describes the different ring systems
and their properties, and discusses their origin, formation, and the
gravitational interactions - resonances, perturbations, and shepherd
moons - that govern their evolution. Recorded 2007 Nov 21 in 1000
McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 21 2007

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Lecture 40: The Saturn System

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Saturn is attended by a system of 60 known moons and bright, beautiful
rings. Today we will explore the moons of Saturn. Among the highlights
are Saturn's lone giant moon, Titan, the 2nd largest moon in the Solar
System and the only one with a heavy atmosphere. The atmosphere of
Titan is mostly nitrogen with a little methane, but the temperature and
pressure are such that methane plays the same role on Titan that water
plays on the Earth: it can be either a solid, gas, or liquid. The
Cassini and Huygens probes have recently shown that there is evidence of
liquid methane flows and mudflats, and even liquid methane lakes as big
as the Great Lakes or Caspian seas on Earth. The other moon of interest
is Enceladus. The shiniest object in the Solar System, Enceladus has
spectacular fountains - cryovolcanos - that spew water vapor from
reservoirs created in its tidally-heated interior. This ice repaves
much of the surface of Enceladus, giving it a young, shiny surface, and
builds the E ring of Saturn. Recorded 2007 Nov 20 in 1000 McPherson Lab
on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 20 2007

Play

Lecture 39: The Moons of Jupiter

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Jupiter has its own personal solar system in miniature of 63 known
moons. Most are tiny, irregular bodies that are a combination of
captured asteroids and comets, but it is the 4 largest, the giant
Galilean Moons: Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, that is of greatest
interest to us in this lecture. Each is a fascinating world of its own,
with a unique history and properties: volcanically active Io, icy Europa
which may hide an ocean of liquid water beneath the surface, the grooved
terrain of Ganymede, and frozen dirty Callisto with the most ancient
surface of the four. Recorded 2007 Nov 19 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the
Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 19 2007

Play

Lecture 38: The Ice Giants - Uranus and Neptune

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The Ice Giants Uranus and Neptune are the outermost major planets of our
Solar System. Internally they small rocky cores surrounded by deep,
slushy ice mantles and shallow hydrogen atmospheres, quite unlike the
massive cores and deep metallic hydrogen mantles of Jupiter and Saturn.
This lecture describes their basic properties: the origin of their vivid
blue/green colors, their composition, structure, and weather. At the
end we'll contrast and compare their properties to those of the Gas
Giants. Recorded 2007 Nov 15 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus
campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 15 2007

Play

Lecture 37: The Gas Giants - Jupiter and Saturn

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The Gas Giants Jupiter and Saturn are the largest planets in the Solar
System. Internally they are deep, heavy Hydrogen/Helium atmospheres on
top of dense rock/ice cores without solid surfaces. What we see in our
telescopes are just the tops of the clouds. This lecture describes the
basic properties of the planets: their composition, atmospheres,
weather, and internal structures. Recorded 2007 Nov 14 in 1000
McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 14 2007

Play

Lecture 36: Worlds in Comparison - The Terrestrial Planets

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Having completed our tour of the Terrestrial Planets, we want to step
back and compare their properties. In particular, we will wi review the
processes that drive the evolution of their surfaces, their interiors,
and their atmospheres. Recorded 2007 Nov 13 in 1000 McPherson Lab on
the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 13 2007

Play

Lecture 35: The Deserts of Mars

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Mars is a cold desert planet with a thin, dry carbon-dioxide atmosphere.
The geology of Mars, however, shows signs of an active past, with
hot-spot volcanism, and tantalizing signs of ancient water flows. While
a cold, dead desert planet today, Mars' past may have been warmer and
wetter, with liquid water during the first third of its history. This
lecture reviews the properties of Mars, and describes the evidence for
its active past. Recorded 2007 Nov 9 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the
Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 09 2007

Play

Lecture 34: Venus Unveiled

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Venus, the second planet from the Sun, is perpetually veiled behind
opaque clouds of sulfuric acid droplets atop a hot, heavy, carbon
dioxide atmosphere. In size and apparent composition, however, it is a
near twin-sister of the Earth. Why is it do different? In this lecture
I review the basic properties of Venus, and examine the similarties and
differences with the Earth. Recorded 2007 Nov 8 in 1000 McPherson Lab on
the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 08 2007

Play

Lecture 33: Battered Mercury

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Mercury, innermost of the planets, is a hot, dead world that has been
heavily battered by impacts. In this lecture I review the properties of
Mercury, its orbit, rotation, surface, and interior structure. Recorded
2007 Nov 7 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio
State University.

Nov 07 2007

Play

Lecture 32: The Origin of the Solar System

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How did the Solar System form? In this lecture I review the clues for
the formation of the solar system in the present-day dynamics (orbital
and rotation motions) and compositions of the planets and small bodies.
I then describe the standard accretion model for solar system formation,
whereby grains condense out of the primordial solar nebula, grains
aggregate by collisions into planetesimals, then gravity begins to work
and planetesimals grow into protoplanets. What kind of planet grows
depends on where the protoplanets form within the primordial solar
nebula: close to the Sun only rocky planets form, beyond the Frost Line
ices and volatiles can condense out allowing the growth of the gas and
ice giants. The whole process took about 100 million years, and we as
we explore the solar system in subsequent lectures, we will look for
traces of this process on the various worlds we visit. Recorded 2007
Nov 6 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State
University.

Nov 06 2007

Play

Lecture 31: The Family of the Sun

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Welcome to the Solar System! We begin our exploration of the Solar
System with an overview of the planets, moons, and small bodies that
make up our home system. In this lecture I'll introduce many of the
themes that will encounter many times as we go through our detailed look
at the Solar System in the coming weeks. Recorded 2007 Nov 5 in 1000
McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 05 2007

Play

Lecture 30: The Moon

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What physical processes have shaped the Moon? In this lecture, I
describe the surface features of the Moon (the Maria and Highlands), how
crater density tells us the relative ages of terrains, and what we have
learned about Moon rocks returned by astronauts and robotic probes. I
will also discuss what is known about the interior of the Moon, and
review what we know about lunar history and formation. Like the Earth,
the Moon gives us a useful point of comparison with bodies elsewhere in
the Solar System. Recorded 2007 Nov 1 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the
Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Nov 01 2007

Play

Lecture 29: The Earth's Atmosphere

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What is the composition and structure of the Earth's atmosphere? Why is
it as warm as it is, and how did it form? Today I will describe the
composition and structure of the atmosphere, the Greenhouse Effect, the
Primordial Atmosphere, and Atmospheric Evolution. The Earth's
atmosphere is a complex, dynamic, and evolving system, and we will use
it as a point of comparison when we begin to examine other planetary
atmospheres in future lectures. Recorded 2007 Oct 31 in 1000 McPherson
Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Oct 31 2007

Play

Lecture 28: Inside the Earth

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What is the interior structure of the Earth? We will start our
exploration of the Solar System with our home planet Earth. This
lecture discusses the interior structure of the Earth, introducing the
idea of differentiation, how geologists map the interior of the Earth
using seismic waves, and the origin of the Earth's magnetic field. I
describe the basic properties of the crust of the Earth, its division
into rigid tectonic plates, and describe how plate motions driven by
convection in the upper mantle have shaped the visible surface of our
planet over its dynamic history. Recorded 2007 Oct 30 in 1000 McPherson
Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Oct 30 2007

Play