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Signposts with Russell Moore

Updated about 1 month ago

Religion & Spirituality
Christianity
News
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Listen in as Russell Moore, president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, talks about the latest books, cultural conversations and pressing ethical questions that point us toward the kingdom of Christ.

Read more

Listen in as Russell Moore, president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, talks about the latest books, cultural conversations and pressing ethical questions that point us toward the kingdom of Christ.

iTunes Ratings

157 Ratings
Average Ratings
132
8
5
3
9

Great

By Jon3191 - Jan 08 2019
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I’m grateful for this podcast, and I always enjoy it. Thank you

thank you for pleasing God & not people

By Bjoifdstjhdtu - Apr 14 2018
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one of my favorite podcasts!

iTunes Ratings

157 Ratings
Average Ratings
132
8
5
3
9

Great

By Jon3191 - Jan 08 2019
Read more
I’m grateful for this podcast, and I always enjoy it. Thank you

thank you for pleasing God & not people

By Bjoifdstjhdtu - Apr 14 2018
Read more
one of my favorite podcasts!
Cover image of Signposts with Russell Moore

Signposts with Russell Moore

Latest release on Jul 08, 2020

Read more

Listen in as Russell Moore, president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, talks about the latest books, cultural conversations and pressing ethical questions that point us toward the kingdom of Christ.

Rank #1: Russell Moore & Tim Keller: A Conversation

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In this episode of Signposts, I sit down with Pastor Tim Keller, Chairman of Redeemer City to City and the founding pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Manhattan. We talk about his ministry, his work reaching out to an increasingly secular American culture, and spiritual formation for Christians.

Listen below, and subscribe to Signposts to get new episodes when they publish.

The post Russell Moore & Tim Keller: A Conversation appeared first on Russell Moore.

Mar 01 2019

33mins

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Rank #2: Signposts: A Conversation With Rosaria Butterfield

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In this special episode of Signposts I sit down with professor and author Rosaria Butterfield to talk about her conversion to Christ, her previous life in the LGBT community, and what Christians need to remember when reaching out to the world around them.

Listen below, and use the links to subscribe to Signposts and get new episodes automatically when they publish.

The post Signposts: A Conversation With Rosaria Butterfield appeared first on Russell Moore.

Nov 25 2016

41mins

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Rank #3: The Gospel and Social Injustice – Part 1

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Does the gospel have implications for social justice?

Is social justice a distraction from the gospel?

I have had many people ask me recently about the issue of social justice. As Christians, we are called to live as a gospel people, and in light of recent cultural conversations on this topic some have wondered about the connection between the gospel and justice.

In this episode of Signposts, I discuss this issue and consider the Bible’s instruction for Christians seeking to live faithfully in the world and in obedience to the gospel.

Listen above, and be sure to subscribe to get new episodes of Signposts as they are released.

The post The Gospel and Social Injustice – Part 1 appeared first on Russell Moore.

Sep 07 2018

33mins

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Rank #4: Signposts: Senator Ben Sasse and Russell Moore talk about how perpetual adolescence hurts the church

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In this episode of Signposts I sit down with Senator Ben Sasse of Nebraska. We talk how perpetual adolescence hurts the church and about his new book, The Vanishing American Adult: Our Coming-of-Age Crisis–and How to Rebuild a Culture of Self-Reliance.

Listen below, and subscribe to Signposts to get new episodes when they publish.

The post Signposts: Senator Ben Sasse and Russell Moore talk about how perpetual adolescence hurts the church appeared first on Russell Moore.

Jun 02 2017

22mins

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Rank #5: Signposts: Reflections On My Conversation With Andy Stanley

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At our recent ERLC national conference, I had the opportunity to sit down with pastor Andy Stanley. Andy and I have a lot of significant disagreements about ministry, but our conversation was fascinating and helped me and everyone at the conference think through some important issues.

In this episode of Signposts I reflect on my time with Andy Stanley, and how our dialogue about ministry and theology sharpened my own thinking about Scripture and the church.

Listen below, and use the links to subscribe to Signposts and get new episodes automatically when they publish.

The post Signposts: Reflections On My Conversation With Andy Stanley appeared first on Russell Moore.

Sep 02 2016

22mins

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Rank #6: A Conversation with Ben Shapiro

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In this episode of Signposts, I am joined by NYT best-selling author and political commentator, Ben Shapiro. One of the most well-known conservative commentators in the United States, Shapiro serves as editor in chief of dailywire.com. In this episode, we discuss his new book, “The Right Side of History: How Reason and Moral Purpose Made the West Great” as well as a number of other topics.

Signposts with Ben Shapiro

Be sure to subscribe to Signposts to get new episodes as they are released.

The post A Conversation with Ben Shapiro appeared first on Russell Moore.

Nov 20 2019

20mins

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Rank #7: Signposts: My Favorite Podcasts

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I’m often asked about which podcasts I listen to. With all the time I spend traveling, I listen to quite a few podcasts, and there are a few in particular that are especially helpful to me in keeping up with what’s being talked about in broader culture.

In this episode of Signposts I talk about which podcasts I frequently return to, and what makes them specifically useful to me in my life and ministry.

Listen below and use the links to subscribe to Signposts and get new episodes when they publish.

The post Signposts: My Favorite Podcasts appeared first on Russell Moore.

Sep 23 2016

15mins

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Rank #8: Signposts: How I Do My Personal Devotions

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A daily personal devotion time is something that most Christians would say is vital to their walk with Christ. But often it’s a spiritual discipline wrapped in frustration and confusion.

In this episode of Signposts I talk about my own personal methods for private devotions, and reflect on what I’ve learned about the priority of spending time in meditation and prayer.

Listen below and use the links to subscribe to Signposts and receive new episodes when they publish.

The post Signposts: How I Do My Personal Devotions appeared first on Russell Moore.

Apr 29 2016

13mins

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Rank #9: Signposts: How Should Christians Respond to the New President?

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In this special episode of Signposts, I discuss how Christians should respond to the election results and to President-elect Donald Trump. Listen to the episode below, and subscribe to Signposts to get new episodes automatically when they publish.

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Below is an edited version of the transcript. 

Donald Trump, of course, was elected last night as the 45th President of the United States. Hillary Clinton conceded in a speech just a few minutes before I’m recording this right now. There are several things we, as Christians, should be thinking about today.

The first of those is the requirement that we have to pray for and to honor our leaders. Now, many of you know, I had and have serious concerns about both of these major party candidates and I think one of the things that all of us can probably agree on across the spectrum in American life is that election 2016 was a demoralizing and some ways even traumatic thing for a lot of people. It was a divisive time, sometimes having husbands and wives and children and parents and churches and others divided from one another and so we can be glad that the election season is over. But now that it’s over, we have a responsibility to pray for and to honor our leaders.

Eight years ago, I called on Christians to honor President Obama and to pray for President Obama and one of those ways was to even in the way that we use language to refer to him as “President Obama,” not simply as “Obama” in our own households, and the same thing is true now. This will be “President Trump,” not just “Trump,” not cartoon character that we see on television, but the one who in the sovereignty of God, God has put in charge of the United States Presidency. We have a responsibility to pray for him, to pray for wisdom for him, discernment for our President, for support from his team, from his cabinet, from his family that he would make wise and just decisions. We have a responsibility to give him a chance and we have a tradition in American life where every president starts out with a blank slat, starts out with the benefit of the doubt and regardless of what’s gone on in the campaign before, regardless of what’s gone on in the years before in that person’s life or in that person’s policies, or in the person’s rhetoric, we give the new President the opportunity to lead, and I think we ought to do that now. I think that we ought to hope and pray that President Trump will turn out to be a wise and just and inclusive leader who actually brings about the unity of the American people. Let’s hope for the that and let’s pray for that.

The second thing that we ought to remember this year is that we as a church have higher priorities than politics. I think one of the things that we have seen this year is the way that politics has become a sense of transcendent identity for people across the spectrum from the left to the right in ways in which sometimes our political disagreements are more about heresy and ex-communication than they are about politics. We, though, as Christians, understand that politics is important, the decisions that we make as a country are important but not as important as the gospel of Jesus Christ, not as important as the church of Jesus Christ.

We, after all, are only temporarily citizens of this republic, the kingdom of God outlasts Mt. Rushmore and outlasts the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial and outlasts the United States of America, so we should be thankful for the blessings that we have as Americans. We should be involved and engaged as much as we can as American citizens but always as those who are not first Americans, we are first citizens of the New Jerusalem, we are first those who are brothers and sisters in Christ and heirs of the kingdom of Jesus. That means that we are not going to be utopian, we are not going to think that any election solves our problems, that any election is going to be able to have any permanent solution to anything, regardless of the outcome and we are also not going to be the people who are panicked and fearful because, no matter what happens in the culture around us, no matter what happens in the government around us, we are victors in Jesus Christ and, as a matter of fact, the Bible tells us we are more than conquers through Jesus Christ.

So we ought to be the people, whatever it is that we face in the years to come, whether those things are good and hopeful or whether those things are not so good and not so hopeful, we ought to be the people who are confident, we ought to be the people who are joyful, we ought to be the people who are modeling to the outside world what it means to be a reconciled community where there is neither male nor female, slave nor free, Jew nor Gentile, black nor white, but all in the Christ where Jesus Christ is all and in all, and in that we have a message that can say to a world that often is in a kind of Darwinian struggle with one another for who’s going to be first, who’s going to be second, and say we serve a different kind of kingdom, we are strangers in this world. We serve a kingdom where the first will be last and the last will be first and where the meek will inherit the earth and where power comes through one who is crucified in weakness and yet lives by the power of God.

That ought to give us confidence, that ought to give us engagement, and that ought to give us peace, joy, love, righteousness, gentleness, patience, and self control. So let’s go forward with that kind of hope and that kind of faith and that kind of love. Let’s pray for President Trump onward.

The post Signposts: How Should Christians Respond to the New President? appeared first on Russell Moore.

Nov 09 2016

7mins

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Rank #10: A Conversation with Rosaria Butterfield

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In this episode of Signposts, I am joined by Rosaria Butterfield for a conversation about the gospel and hospitality in Christian community. A former tenured professor of English and women’s studies at Syracuse University, Rosaria converted to Christ in 1999 in what she describes as a train wreck. In this conversation, we also discuss her memoir, The Secret Thoughts of an Unlikely Convert, which chronicles that difficult journey. She is married to Kent, a Reformed Presbyterian pastor in North Carolina, and is a homeschool mother, author, and speaker. You can learn more about Rosaria here.

Signposts with Rosaria Butterfield

Be sure to subscribe to Signposts to get new episodes as they are released.

The post A Conversation with Rosaria Butterfield appeared first on Russell Moore.

Oct 02 2019

31mins

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Rank #11: Signposts: Why is church attendance declining? A conversation with Skye Jethani

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In this episode of Signposts, I sat down with Skye Jethani to talk about why church attendance is declining. From a conversation that began on Twitter, we explore changes in culture, supply and demand, and the state of the local church.

Listen below, and subscribe to Signposts to get new episodes when they publish.

The post Signposts: Why is church attendance declining? A conversation with Skye Jethani appeared first on Russell Moore.

Jun 23 2017

18mins

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Rank #12: What About The Enneagram?

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What is the Enneagram?

Should Christians use or even care about it?

I am asked about the Enneagram, and other types of personal assessments, all the time. I know that some of my listeners are skeptical of it, while others are real advocates.

In this episode of Signposts, I offer my perspective on the Enneagram and think through its benefits and drawbacks.

Listen above, and be sure to subscribe to get new episodes of Signposts as they are released.

The post What About The Enneagram? appeared first on Russell Moore.

May 18 2018

23mins

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Rank #13: Signposts: What We Miss in Our Sexual Purity Teaching

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Christians talk a lot about sexual purity. In many ways, I think the discussion amongst evangelicals is better than it has been in years past. But what are the “blind spots” of our teaching on purity, how do we bring the conversation back to the gospel?

In this episode of Signposts I talk about what evangelicals should remember in discipling one another in sexual purity, and how we can correct the areas where we’ve unintentionally mimicked the culture.

Listen below and use the links to subscribe to Signposts and automatically download episodes when they publish.

The post Signposts: What We Miss in Our Sexual Purity Teaching appeared first on Russell Moore.

May 20 2016

13mins

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Rank #14: A Conversation with Former Klansman Thomas A. Tarrants

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In this episode of Signposts, I am joined by Thomas A. Tarrants. A former klansman whose life was radically changed by the gospel, Tarrants is president emeritus of the C.S. Lewis Institute, where he served from 1998 to 2019. Prior to working at the Institute, he was co-pastor of a multi-racial church, in Washington, DC. In our conversation, we discuss his memoir, Consumed by Hate, Redeemed by Love: How a Violent Klansman Became a Champion of Racial Reconciliation.

Be sure to subscribe to Signposts to get new episodes as they are released.

The post A Conversation with Former Klansman Thomas A. Tarrants appeared first on Russell Moore.

Dec 18 2019

27mins

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Rank #15: Signposts: What Christians Should Look For in a Political Candidate

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In election seasons like the one we’re in right now, many Christians wonder what exactly makes a candidate worthy–or unworthy–of their vote. When the political climate gets as crazy as it is right now, this can be an especially urgent question.

In this episode of Signposts I talk about what Christians ought to look for, and look out for, in a political candidate, and how Christians can best weigh a candidate’s positions against their character.

Listen below, and use the links to subscribe to Signposts and receive new episodes automatically when they publish.

The post Signposts: What Christians Should Look For in a Political Candidate appeared first on Russell Moore.

Mar 04 2016

11mins

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Rank #16: Signposts: A Conversation with Jen Wilkin

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In this episode of Signposts I talk with author and speaker Jen Wilkin about the local church, men and women in ministry, and how to build a strong culture of teaching for women in the church. Listen below, and subscribe to Signposts to get new episodes when they publish.

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Below is an edited transcript of the audio

RUSSELL MOORE: I have with me today nationally known author and teacher Jen Wilkin. She’s the author of several books, including Women of the Word, None Like Him: 10 Ways God’s Different Than Us and Why That’s a Good Thing, and a book about the Sermon on the Mount. Everything I read by Jen Wilkin not only equips me better but provokes me to think and to pray. She has a column in Christianity Today and I commend the stuff she does to you, and if you’re not familiar with it, find it and you will benefit from it. Jen, thanks for being here today.

JEN WILKIN: Thanks for having me on!

RM: You know sometimes I feel guilty because I feel I’m the only one in ministry who hasn’t used the phrase “I really married up.” And I haven’t used the phrase, not because it’s not true, but because it’s always felt to me kind of condescending. I’ve never heard a woman say this about her husband, but have heard husbands say this about their wives. I can think of all kinds of times where there’s been a panel at a conference, with one woman and a group of men, and somebody will make a comment about “the rose among the thorns.” Do you think that it’s the case that often in our churches there are some subtly condescending ways of talking about women?

JW: I think it’s well-intentioned. When I hear something like that, I never think that person woke up that morning and said, “How can I keep the woman down?” I do think that we can sometimes speak in ways that intend to honor but end up sounding like overcompensating, but I do always assume it’s well intended.

RM: You know, it seems to me in many ways that women, in conservative evangelical churches, don’t seem to be as mobilized as in previous times in church history. When we think about, even when women didn’t have as high a place in society as they do now, we had women who were leading mission movements and all sorts of things. But it seems at least in my corner of the world that we don’t have as much of that anymore. If that’s the case, how can we correct it?

JW: Well I’m in your corner of the world so I would say that’s an accurate statement. Probably what’s driving that is that often in the church, in the last 20 years, we’ve adopted a sort of backlash position when it comes to talking about women. We’ve developed a sort of fear of anything that sounds or looks vaguely like feminism, and become extremely cautious about roles we’ve put women in and developed some narrow definitions of leadership and who can and should lead. So I think we’re dealing with fallout from that, and in some cases men outside the church have been more open handed toward women in leadership than those inside the church. What I’m hoping to see, and what I see happening in many places is that we’d recapture a vision for men and women partnering in ministry together. The language that the New Testament applies to the church is familial language; the church, like a family, has brothers and sisters, mothers and fathers. I would love for the church to begin to look more like a family that has both parents in the home, functioning in roles of leadership and nurturing.

RM: One thing I’ve been convinced of, all my ministry but increasingly so, is that whenever there’s a truth that God gives us, there are least two errors that we deviate toward, on either side of that truth. I think that you’re right that when it comes to biblical ideals and pictures of manhood and womanhood, on the one hand, you have the sort of feminism that erases those good, creational differences. But on the other hand, we can have a hyper complementarianism. I say this as a convinced complementarian. But we can say, “In order to make sure we don’t fall into feminism, we’re going to put all sorts of hedges and protections around so we won’t even come close to a problem.” I think you’re right about that sense of backlash, and you’ve written about this in terms of the “ghosts”, the sorts of ideas of women that can be scary to men who are in leadership in the church. What do you mean by that?

JW: Well, I’ve even heard from seminary graduates that they were told in seminary to be leery of contact with women. I grew up with four brothers, a Dad that loved me and now a husband that loves me and sees me as a peer. It was strange to encounter that attitude because I hadn’t encountered it in my relationships with men. I was used to being treated like I wasn’t a threat. I have an outspoken personality, so maybe I am perceived as “Here comes trouble.” But it was a surprise to me though because what was valued in the workplace wasn’t what was valued in the church. It’s a belief system that has been cultivated and rewarded often, that women in ministry were something to be cautious around. And it did result in many ministry structures that were built on erring on the side of caution at every turn.

And when we consistently err on the side of caution, we consistently err. We are operating from a paradigm of fear instead of one of brotherly-sisterly partnership. And fear doesn’t tend to be a good recipe for ministry. There’s been a lot of interesting stuff written on male and female relationships in ministry settings, and the fact that the more forbidden you make them, the more you heighten the tension around those relationships. And I think of it in terms of, the way we dealt with sibling relationship in my homes. If you were not getting along with a sibling, we didn’t separate you, we put you together and gave you a task to do. In the church, we tend to keep people separate, and I think in the church we’ve tended to have a greater fear of adultery than we’ve had fear of men and women not fulfilling the cultural mandate given to them.

RM: What would you say to someone who responds, “Yes, but, we have had just tremendous problems within the church, and we know there is good, created longing for marriage that the devil distorts.” So there are real dangers and many times when we’ve seen these sorts of falls, they typically happen in the context of doing ministry together that has gone awry. So how would you say, don’t err on the side of fear, but do recognize the dynamic that can be dangerous.

JW: Absolutely. If you recognize one problem, what you don’t wanna do is over-correct. We don’t want to be foolish we want to be wise. But I think one thing we’ve done is made one rule fit all relationships, when in reality relationships are different because it’s two different individuals in that relationship. So when you’re trying to gauge what is my ability to have friendships with people of the opposite sex that I’m in ministry with, you have to say first, how healthy is my marriage? And then you need to say, this person who I’m working with, how strong is their marriage and how vulnerable do they and I seem to be? You’ve got to have a great deal of honesty with yourself about how safe it is to move into even low level friendship with them, depending on who the person is.

But as the friendships between two of the same gender, you learn over time which friendships you can trust and which you can’t trust, and I would say the same is true of male-female interaction. But again obviously, you’re going to be cautious because there can be a sexual component–though honestly there can be a sexual component in same-gender friendships as well. And secondly, we cannot live as though we exist in vacuum. There are cultural pressures around us and sub cultural pressures that dictate how we behave wisely in this relationship. Just because I could go have coffee with a person who wasn’t my spouse, in a highly  public place that wouldn’t be questioned, doesn’t mean I should do that.

RM: You know, I get a lot of books sent to me from publishers. One thing that I notice is that books geared toward men or toward generic readers, tend to be very different than the books I get that are geared toward women. And I can even just tell by looking at the cover. Maybe I’m wrong, but usually, with key exceptions including you and others, a lot of the material directed toward women is relational and has to do with one or two aspects of life, but it’s not usually geared toward theology, or Bible, for the most part. Why?

JW: Well I would argue that its a symptom of this “Men are from Mars, women are from Venus” mentality that we’ve had within the church. So if you’ve had the courage to crack open one of these book that looks like they painted the front cover with estrogen, you will look at that and say this is incomprehensible. And you’re going to draw one of two conclusions from that: you’re either going to think this is just what women want, the way they’re wired, or you may think this is all women can handle. But the command for us to love God with heart, soul, mind and and strength is not gender specific. It’s not “Hey brother, you love God with your mind and I will love God with my feelings, and these are the gifts we bring the church.”

I will stand and given an account to God for how well I have loved him with my mind. Not Dr. Moore’s mind, not Matt Chandler’s mind, not Beth Moore’s mind–my mind. I need to have a thinking faith as a woman who is a follower of Christ. And what has happened over time is that we have resourced women almost entirely at the feelings level, for the past 20 years. And so women when they are faced with a thought level challenge to their faith, it throws them into complete crisis. They’re not equipped to deal with it. Not only that, but because there’s so much polarization even within church subculture, we think we are straight ticket voters with one teacher vs another. So [according to this mentality] I have to agree with every single thing Matt Chandler says or else he’s a false teacher.

So women in particular are ill-equipped to discern what is a first level doctrine vs a second level doctrine, and to know whether it’s ok to agree with some things and disagree with others. You combine that with a tendency in women to seek consensus and to collaborate, and so anyone who critiques something that has a woman has written can be perceived to be “outside the herd.” So even within women’s circles, there is a danger to any woman who says I need to raise my voice in critique against what another woman has written. So some of the resources that are written at a level that doesn’t honor the intellectual capacity of women sort of never meets with a critique that would help us see more clearly toward other things.

RM: I think you’re about the “men are from Mars, women are from Venus” dynamic. When I look at the material that is directly oriented toward men–I think it is starting to change–but for a long time it’s been hyper warrior-spirit, hyper-competitive, which I think feeds into the sort of masculinity-as-velocity mentality that is ending up with a lot of people burned out and devastated at the middle of their lives.

When you think about the local church level–maybe someone is listening to this and belongs to a church where there just hasn’t been any emphasis on Bible teaching for and by women, what can someone do to see that change? Would you say just go find another church, or what would you say to that?

JW: I would not say go and find another church. To me that is a last resort. I would say if you are someone who feels drawn to lead something like that, you should first approach the leadership of the church and say this is something I’d like to do. Often in churches where they say everything is topical or feelings-related, the first thought is: “Let’s stop that, and do hardcore inductive Bible study all the time.” I would say that’s probably not the best response. Instead, it’s better to lay a different foundation and let the other things continue. Getting women to invest in this foundational piece of learning line by line takes time. It starts with one or two women, and then they catch fire and invite their friends, and then those women catch fire. It’s a slow boil, and that’s OK.  It needs to be seen as something you’re going to build into your church over the long term.

And it can be difficult if you’re in a church that overall does not value that kind of study. And it can also be difficult because as church structure has become more and more organic and decentralized, it’s harder and harder to find environments that are dedicated just to the learning of Scripture. So there may be some mechanical difficulty in terms of implementing that. We’re trying to create structures where this kind of learning can take place, and it’s not likely to take place in a home group setting. Home group is great community but it’s not the most structured place for a thought level engagement with the text. So I would urge women in the local church to talk to their leadership but in many cases they might get a blank stare. If that’s the case, gather some women in your home, get some good resources, and trust the Lord to make a harvest out of that.

RM: One thing I’ve noticed, whether it applies to orphan care ministry or any number of things, when you have people who come to church leadership and say “This is a deficiency, you fix it,” there’s typically not a good response. But if you come forward and say “God has laid this on our heart, and we’re not exactly sure what it’s going to look like, but will you support us as we attempt to be faithful,” there’s usually a very good response.

JW: A willingness to partner, yes.

RM: Well thank you for Jen Wilkin for being here today, and I recommend to all of you if you’re not familiar with Jen’s stuff, Google her and get it. And what I appreciate about Jen’s work is that we talked about overreaction here, and I think sometimes when someone is a pioneer and moving in directions that have been deficient for a while, one of the things that you can easily do is say “I want to be super cerebral, so I’m just going to present the omniscience of God in the most arid and abstract way.” But what Jen does is talk about the omniscience of God in a way that is applicable to every day lives as well. That’s a good model for all of us, men and women, to follow.

The post Signposts: A Conversation with Jen Wilkin appeared first on Russell Moore.

Mar 24 2017

20mins

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Rank #17: Signposts: Why I’m a Baptist

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In this episode of Signposts, I reflect on what being a Baptist has meant for my Christian life, and why I am still one today.

Listen using the links at the bottom of this page, read the transcript below, and subscribe to Signposts to get new episodes automatically when they publish.

____________

Below is an edited transcript of the audio.

In this episode I am responding to a listener who asked me the question why I am still a Baptist—specifically, is there a set of reasons why I would be committed to the Baptist expression in the church and the Baptist tradition within the church

That’s a good question. The reason it is a good question is I was somebody who was reared in a Baptist church but in a largely Roman Catholic community. My family had two distinct sides: one side of the family was evangelical and the other side of the family was Roman Catholic, so I grew up with a deep appreciation of Roman Catholics—my mother’s side of the family was Catholic and really an important part of my life and of my development, as were the people in my community who were my Catholic friends and neighbors.

In late adolescence and the early years of college I really tried to figure out where I was in terms of my identity within the church, and so I saw a lot of really ugly things that went on within Baptist churches and so there was a time were I was, as I think many people do, searching for the place where I could get beyond all of that. So I spent some time really looking into Presbyterianism and Catholicism and Methodism and Lutheranism and various other Christian denominations and one of the things I very quickly discovered was that there is no romantic way out from human depravity. All of the churches and all of the communions are made up of people who are sinners and all are going to have tensions and problems and ridiculous things that go on.

As a matter of fact, when one looks at the New Testament one of the great blessings is the revelation that church life has always been filled with these sorts of divisions and struggles, right back to the Church at Corinth, the churches in Galatia and Thessalonica and elsewhere—there is consistent rebuke that is coming to churches for the immorality or divisiveness or fighting or apathy. All of those things are present there and they are present in every single communion.

So I work with people of all different traditions, people who are other evangelical protestants in other denominations, Presbyterians and Lutherans and Bible church people and what have you, and I work with in kind of a circle beyond that with other protestants along with roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox. One of the things I find is when we are honest with one another, we all have problems, every one of us have problems in terms of our church traditions, that’s what it means to live in a fallen world. But I spent some time investigating all of those things and I ended up a convictional Baptist and not because I was assuming those things. I came back to what I believe are biblical convictions about the church. So here’s what I believe and why I still am in the Baptist tradition, and that is in no way a castigation of people who are in other traditions and other communions. I think one of the reasons why God has allowed the church to have these different voices within different denominations is precisely because of the way that those emphases remind the rest of the body of Christ about certain essential points.

Richard Mouw has a book coming out where he talks about different denominational traditions almost as monastic orders within the Roman Catholic church. What these monastic orders would do is each of them would have a particular area of emphasis that would carry that forward for the rest of the church and the same tends to be true within our denominational life. So, Lutherans as Mouw put it, have taken a monastic vow to remind the rest of the church that justification is through faith alone and not by the works of the law. Pentecostals have taken a monastic vow, in his view, to remind the rest of the church that the Holy Spirit is active and we should seek the power and the gifts of the spirit. The Presbyterian tradition has taken a monastic vow to remind the rest of the church of a rich and deep theological tradition, and the Baptist tradition has taken a monastic vow to really emphasis the necessity of personal regeneration and then how that plays out into a believers church.

And so that’s where I have ended up; I believe that this is what the Bible teaches for a number of reasons. One of them is that I believe the Bible teaches that there is no church that cannot lose its lamp stand. In the early chapters of Revelation Jesus is speaking to the churches and he is warning about the loss of that lamp stand, the loss of the presence of Jesus. So, I believe that the church will always exist and the church will always advance and the gates of Hell cannot prevail against it but no particular church is guaranteed survival, so I think that means a constant renewing of what it means to be biblical. So I’m a Baptist ultimately because of implications of the gospel itself that we, John 3, come into the kingdom of God not nation by nation or family by family, tribe by tribe, we come into the kingdom of God person by person; unless a man is born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God—that’s essential to my understanding of what it means to be a Baptist, the necessity of personal repentance and faith, the necessity of the regenerating power of the Holy Spirit upon the person.

Now, there are all sorts of other evangelical Christian communions who believe that, but I’m a Baptist because of the way that I think that is applied to other doctrines, so, for instance, the nature of the church, what does it mean to be baptized into the body of Christ? I do think that there is a connection, just as other denominations will make a connection between baptism and circumcision, I think there is a connection there, but the connection is not a baptism that comes upon everyone who is born into a Christian family. I think instead the connection is everyone who is born into the people of God and how are we born into the people of God? It is not John chapter 1, by the will of the flesh, but by the power of the spirit. We are born into the people of God as those who experience the regenerating power of the Holy Spirit and so we mark out the boundaries of the church on the basis of who are the people who constitute those living stones, as Peter calls it, the ones who build up a temple of the Holy Spirit made of those whose hearts have been washed with the regenerating power of the spirit of God. I think that that definition of the church is biblical, it fits with the pattern of the early church and it also is based on that understanding of the gospel.

I think beyond that about the way that the church is supposed to be run, so the New Testament talks about Ephesians chapter one, for instance, Jesus as ruling over his church, He is put as head over all things over his church which is his body, the fullness of the one who is all in all, fulfills all things. That is a picture of the church, which is why we have in the New Testament letters that are sometimes delivered to leaders within the church, Timothy or Titus, for instance; sometimes letters that are written to individuals who are lay people as it were within the church, Philemon for instance is one of those. But then we have many letters that are written to entire congregations, to the church at Rome, to the church at Ephesus, to the church at Corinth, to the churches of the dispersion, and in those letters the directives that are being given are not only to the elders or the pastors or the leaders, although sometimes there is a specific word for them, but to the entire body of Christ.

So when it comes to church discipline, for instance, maintaining the boundaries of the church in 1 Corinthians 5 or the decision making that goes on in settling issues within the church in 1 Corinthians 6, that is given to the entire congregation. That’s one of the reasons why I’m a Congregationalist. Now, in that, I have to tell you I’m somebody who wanted not to be a Congregationalist because I’ve seen congregationalism go really awry and it is really easy to go awry because when one has a congregation where there is suspicion between the people and the leaders or in a congregation where there is a congregational government that is patterned after American government–highly bureaucratized and easily swayed with popular movements–you end up with a defective form of congregationalism. But I think the way that we avoid that is not by circumventional congregationalism, but by seeing the congregation as the ultimate authority under the lordship of Jesus Christ and the leadership of the Holy Spirit and also seeing the necessity of the teaching office and a leadership within the congregation that does not devolve into every decision being made by the congregation. A congregation need not make every decision in order to govern the church in the same way that as parents my wife and I have ultimate accountability for what goes on in our home, but we don’t make every decision for our children. We don’t make every decision about the things that take place in our household, but we are ultimately accountable. If you come into my house and I say to you, well, I can’t believe that my child is over there smoking weed and drinking Jack Daniels, well, ultimately I have accountability for that; a congregation has ultimate accountability for what takes place within a congregation, even if the congregation doesn’t make all of those decisions on a routine basis, it can—the congregation can ultimately.

And then I’m a Baptist because of the way I see the relationship between the church and the world. The sharp distinction that the apostle Paul makes between the outside world and the accountability on the inside in the congregation of believers who are held accountable for their belief and for their discipleship and for the way in which the outside world has not been governed by the church–I think that the Baptist principle of religious freedom that the gospel advances through spirit-empower persuasion, not through government coercion, not through cultural pressure is an important corollary of the gospel of Jesus Christ and those separate realms between the church and the world, between the church and the state. If the state attempts to do the work of the church, the state turns into something that at best the state has no competence to do, at worst, the state is becoming anti-Christ and the church when it attempts to govern the world through the state, through the power of coercion, the church becomes at best a group of people who are incompetent to do this because we have not been gifted to govern the world now as kings. As Paul says to the church at Corinth, you ask as though you’ve already become kings and you should have told me so that I could come and reign with you, he says sarcastically. And at worst, the church turns the gospel of Jesus Christ in that scenario into a political power move that is more Satanic than it is Christian.

So I think that Baptist emphasis is good and right. Now, I know that my listeners are of all sorts of denominational traditions and we can learn from one another even where we disagree and I think this is one of those things where our distinctiveness in our various communions and our various traditions isn’t something that we ought to boil away as kind of least common denominator, even though we agree, you know evangelical Christians of all sort of communions, we can come together and say we agree on the gospel of Jesus Christ, we agree on what it means to be a Christian, but let’s not evaporate those distinctions because we need them. We need them not only to make decisions about how to order our churches, be we also need them in order to sharpen one another. We really need the Lutherans to continue to stand up and say, let’s distinguish between the law and gospel, and we need the Presbyterians to continually stand up and say, yes, yes, but let’s not forget about the third use of the law, and we need the Anglicans to consistently stand up and say let’s remember the importance of worship and order, and I think we need the Baptists to continually stand up and say let’s remember how we come into the kingdom of God and that’s through the personal regenerating power of the Holy Spirit and through the witness of a church that is made up of believers.

Now, none of those traditions have ever lived up to their ideals and as a Baptist, I will tell you we often don’t live up to our ideals. The idea of a believer’s church has often been eclipsed in places where Baptists are the majority in a culture, that’s one of the reasons why we see the kind of cultural nominal Christianity that we have had for so long in the Bible Belt is because there has been a cultural pressure, not a state enforced pressure, but a cultural pressure to conform to a Baptist subculture, so if you are twelve years old and you haven’t been baptized, there is a sense of “What’s going on with your parents?” instead of highlighting what it means individual by individual to experience personal faith and repentance and for the church to be made up only of professing believers. That’s an emphasis I think we not only need to hold on to within the Baptist tradition, I think it is something our brothers and sisters in other traditions need us to emphasize, even when they don’t completely agree with us.

The post Signposts: Why I’m a Baptist appeared first on Russell Moore.

Oct 07 2016

16mins

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Rank #18: How I Write

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In this episode of Signposts, I talk about my approach to writing. From keeping track of ideas, to writing books and articles, this podcast offers you a look at the whole process. You can find the full transcript and links to subscribe below.

Transcript

We’re about to take a little break here in the summer here on Signposts. I’m going to take a few weeks as I’m writing a book to really concentrate and give my attention to this book. As I was thinking about that, one of my colleagues said, “You should talk about on Signposts how it is that you write.” And I have to be honest, I’m really reluctant to do that because I said “Nobody cares how I write, first of all, and second of all I certainly don’t commend to anybody else my particular way of writing.” But he said, “There may be some people who can benefit from that as they’re thinking about how to write for themselves.” And maybe so.

Because you are probably going to be called upon to write something at some point in your life. It may not be that you’re a writer, but you may have to write a loved one’s obituary. Or you may have to write a letter to a child or a family member. All of us are going to have to put down on paper or on the screen our thoughts at some point. Some people just do it much more extensively than other people do it.

So here’s kind of the process I go through. And again, I don’t commend it to anybody at all. This is just the way that I work. What I wish I could say to you is that I sit down and make out an elaborate outline, and then have note cards in front of me, and I go through each of note cards. That’s not how I work. What I have to do is spend a lot of time, first of all, reading in whatever area I’m going to be writing in, and then a lot of time just processing that. So just thinking. A lot of the most important writing time for me actually is not in front of the screen, it’s walking in the woods. Because that’s when I’m thinking through “Okay but what about this, and what about that, what about this idea, and what about that idea,” and sort of churning as I’m thinking through this. And for me, exercising – especially sort of meandering free exercising – is what helps to put all of that together for me.

I also like to keep with me a little notebook because there will always be those moments where something will just flash. I’ll be reading in Scripture devotionally and something will hit me – “I haven’t considered that, that’s important for whatever this thing is I’m writing.” Or I may be sitting in a wedding somewhere and something hits me. So I want to have something that I can quickly jot something down about whatever it is that I’m thinking. Then just continue to churn and continue to think about these things. Then when I sit down to write what I typically want to do is to spend some time balancing writing what’s down on the page, usually these days in my study at home, with sort of pacing around the floor. So if you watched me – I would never want any one watching me. I have a couple of friends who will sit there and write while they’ve got people around them. That would be disastrous for me, because I just jump up and pace around the room, sit down and write a little bit more, jump up and pace around the room some more. It’s a really sort of neurotic thing to watch that I wouldn’t want anybody to see.

But as I’m writing things down, I have to have huge periods of solitude interrupted by short bursts of community. So what I need to do is to talk about what it is that I’m writing about, not all the way through, but in certain little bursts. So I’ll gather a group of friends together and just say “Hey, this is what I’m thinking about. Does this make sense?” Or I’ll call my friend David Prince on the phone and say “Hey, what do you think about…” and just start talking about what it is that I’m writing. Or my wife and I might go for a walk and I might talk to her about what I’m thinking through. That helps me to break out a little bit of the solitude in order to test out ideas. But I have to have this solitude.

So, often when I was at Southern Seminary I would drive down to Gethsemane Abbey in Kentucky, the place where Thomas Merton was a monk, and I would go there because I could just wander in the woods completely silent and quiet there. I could think things through, and then I could come back into the Abbey and write down the sorts of outlines of things that I thought about. I may be there all day and then get in the car and drive back and I’ve got the time driving also then. So usually it is better for me, it’s better time spent if I would take however long it took to drive to Gethsemane Abby, all day there, and however much time it took to come back. Even if I didn’t put anything on the page that whole day, that’s not a day lost because it’s all then uploading. And then I come home and I’m able to write.

It’s also true for me that I can’t write little dribbling out amounts in any sort of continuous way. So if I’m writing a book, I just can’t write a paragraph on a plane and then another paragraph in between meetings. I’ve got to write continuously and the flow of thought really can’t be broken away or interrupted. Now, you may be different. And it may be that the way that you write is best in terms of just planning out “I’m going to write a paragraph every morning” or whatever. If so, good for you. I wish I could do that but that’s not the way that I operate. That’s not the way that I do things.

That’s different when I’m writing a book from when I’m writing a short article like a blog post or something. In that case, what I need is a dose of adrenaline. So what I need is for something to either make me angry or make me really, really happy where I just simply have to express it. I was telling that to a friend one time and he said “Really? Angry? Because almost none of your writing seems angry to me.” And I said “Well, that’s because the anger for me is a sense of provocation. It’s not what I then use to actually write the article.” So I may become really angry or grieved about something, but then I’m going to work through “Yeah, but why would somebody do this? Why would somebody hold to that view?” And then when the adrenaline hits I usually just sit down and just write the blog post altogether, in sometimes just a few minutes. But because it’s all there – whatever’s in the background has been fueled up with the adrenaline and then there it is.

The other kind of writing though that I find really beneficial is something that you’ll never see. It’s something that actually I heard recommended by a podcast host, Brian Koppelman, who is a filmwriter and producer and he hosts a podcast that I love called “The Moment.” And he recommended something called morning pages. As a matter of fact, he just mentioned “morning pages” one time on the program. And I didn’t even know what it was, so I Googled it. And I found out that morning pages is something recommended by this book “The Artist’s Way” which I then ordered and read. I don’t endorse everything or even most of what’s in that book. A lot of it is really New Age-y and sort of spiritually therapeutic sort of stuff. But there’s some really helpful stuff in there too that you can sieve out.

And one of those things was the idea of morning pages. And basically what it is that you get up first thing in the morning and you write 3 pages that no one is ever going to see, that you’re not going to look at at least for a long period of time. Where you can make all the mistakes and errors and you can just “stream-of-consciousness” write. And at first I thought, “That is going to be a total waste of time.” But I did it, and it was really helpful to me. Because when I would sit down first thing after waking up and just start writing, and not know where I’m going to go, I could find out some of the things that were actually burdening me at the time. Maybe some of the things that God was working on in my life. And so in doing that, I’ve kind of been able to find things to have more gratitude about. I’ve found some some sins to repent of. There are some things that I thought that I had forgiven, that when I’m doing these morning pages I realize “Wait a minute, if I’m still talking about this in this stream of consciousness way, then maybe I haven’t forgiven this.” All sorts of things have sort of come out of that, and it just kind of primes my brain to be able to think through other things during the day.

Again, what’s key to me is the idea that nobody is going to see this, I’m not going to look at this, so it doesn’t have to be perfect. Because perfection or the idea of perfection is what scares me from writing. And I think that’s true for a lot of people. It causes you to procrastinate because you think “I should wait until I can write this perfectly.” You’re not going to write this perfectly, there’s no way to write this perfectly, and you’re not even going to go back and look at it again. That’s important for me.

And then also, no one’s going to see it. You know, sometimes when I’m keeping a journal I’ve always got in the back of my mind “My kids are going to one day be reading this,” and I want to sort of put my best foot forward for my kids. This does away with the temptation toward that kind of performance or that kind of mask. Now obviously, I’ve got the notebook on my desk, and I could drop dead of a heart attack today and my kids could read the morning pages. But that’s not what’s in your mind as you’re doing it. So that’s helpful for me, and may be something that you enjoy or something that you don’t, but it has proven to be a source and a catalyst for a lot of things that I have later written about or preached about or talked about later on.

We’re going to take a few weeks off here on Signposts, and then we’ll be back coming into the fall with many new episodes of Signposts, including some things I’m really excited about right now that I’ll tell you about later. So have a good time, have a good summer, and we’ll reconnect afterwards.

The post How I Write appeared first on Russell Moore.

Jul 07 2017

12mins

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Rank #19: Signposts: A Conversation With Rod Dreher

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How should Christians respond to cultural transformations, many of which actively threaten the beliefs and practices of the church? Journalist Rod Dreher offers a provocative answer in his new book “The Benedict Option,” which encourages believers and churches to abandon the popular models of cultural engagement and focus instead on shoring up our own theological foundations and communities.

In this episode of Signposts I talk to Rod about the Benedict Option and what he hopes Christians take away from his book. Listen below and subscribe to Signposts to get new episodes automatically when they publish.

Transcript coming soon

The post Signposts: A Conversation With Rod Dreher appeared first on Russell Moore.

Mar 10 2017

19mins

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Rank #20: Will Complementarianism Survive After the #MeToo Movement?

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What does the Bible say about the gifts and callings of men and women?

Does complementarianism have a viable future?

I have had many people ask me over the last several months about the future of complementarianism. In recent months, our society has faced a reckoning over the toxic culture of sexual assault and abuse. And as we’ve seen, the church has not been spared in this upheaval. This has left many to wonder if complementarianism itself will survive.

In this episode of Signposts, I offer my answer to questions about the future of the church concerning sexuality and gender in the wake of the #MeToo movement.

Listen above, and be sure to subscribe to get new episodes of Signposts as they are released.

The post Will Complementarianism Survive After the #MeToo Movement? appeared first on Russell Moore.

Aug 03 2018

24mins

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A Conversation with Ken Burns and Dayton Duncan on Country Music

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In this episode I am joined by award-winning director and filmmaker Ken Burns and his producer Dayton Duncan to discuss their latest project for PBS, “Country Music.” They have worked together on several documentaries, including Jazz, Civil War, Baseball. In our conversation, we talk about American culture, the influences of country music, and the artists who understood the way that country music embodies the deep questions of humanity: identity, sin and redemption, and longing. 

I invite you to listen in on our conversation, and be sure to subscribe to receive future episodes of Signposts

Jul 08 2020

36mins

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A conversation with David French on the recent Supreme Court ruling

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In this special episode of Signposts, I am joined by David French, senior editor at The Dispatch. He is a graduate of Harvard Law School, the past president of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, and a former lecturer at Cornell Law School. He has served as a senior counsel for the American Center for Law and Justice and the Alliance Defending Freedom. In our conversation, we talk about the recent SCOTUS ruling in Bostock and what this means for religious liberty, as well as other cases we are both watching.

I invite you to listen in on our conversation, and be sure to subscribe to receive future episodes of Signposts

The post A conversation with David French on the recent Supreme Court ruling appeared first on Russell Moore.

Jun 18 2020

25mins

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A Conversation with Dr. Mark Noll on the history of evangelicalism

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In this episode of Signposts, I am joined by Dr. Mark Noll, research professor at Regent College, and the former Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. He is also the author of Evangelicals: Who they Have Been, Are Now, and Could Be (with George Marsden and David Bebbington, Eerdmans, 2019), In the Beginning Was the Word: The Bible in American Public Life (OUP, 2015), The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind (Eerdmans, 1995). In our conversation we talk the how to define an evangelical, the history of evangelicalism, both in the United States and abroad, and how evangelicals are responding to the current moment.

I invite you to listen in on our conversation, and be sure to subscribe to receive future episodes of Signposts

The post A Conversation with Dr. Mark Noll on the history of evangelicalism appeared first on Russell Moore.

Jun 17 2020

29mins

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Racial Justice and the Uneasy Conscience of American Christianity

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This special episode of Signposts is taken from my keynote at the “MLK50: Reflections from the Mountaintop” conference hosted in conjunction with The Gospel Coalition on the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.

Be sure to subscribe to receive all the latest episodes of Signposts.

The post Racial Justice and the Uneasy Conscience of American Christianity appeared first on Russell Moore.

Jun 02 2020

33mins

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A Conversation with Glenn Packiam on His New Book: Blessed, Broken, Given

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In this episode of Signposts, I am joined by Glenn Packiam, lead pastor of New Life Downtown in Colorado Springs, CO. He is also the author of Blessed, Broken, Given: How Your Story Becomes Sacred in the Hands of Jesus. This book is especially relevant in the midst of our current pandemic as we are all thinking about bread, communion, and how Christians respond to times of crisis.

I invite you to listen in on our conversation, and be sure to subscribe to receive future episodes of Signposts

The post A Conversation with Glenn Packiam on His New Book: Blessed, Broken, Given appeared first on Russell Moore.

Jun 01 2020

18mins

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A Conversation with Andrew Peterson

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In this episode of Signposts, recorded live at the ERLC, I am joined by author and musical artist, Andrew Peterson. Over the course of the conversation, we talk about his ministry, creative process, writing projects, and his latest book Adorning the Dark: Thoughts on Community, Calling, and the Mystery of Making.

I invite you to listen in on our conversation, and be sure to subscribe to receive future episodes of Signposts

The post A Conversation with Andrew Peterson appeared first on Russell Moore.

May 20 2020

30mins

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Preview: First Word

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Thanks for listening to Signposts. I mentioned previously that I’ve launched a new project called the Russell Moore Podcast. As a bonus for Signposts listeners, I wanted to share a preview of the series in Genesis, which is the series on the new podcast. Here’s the first episode of that series, which I’m calling “First Word.”

In my new podcast, we are going to start by journeying through Genesis. I’m calling this series “First Word: The Book of Genesis and the Kingdom of Christ.” In today’s text, we cover Genesis 1:1-3. This is a short passage of Scripture, but there is so much to unpack that sets the stage for the rest of the storyline of the Bible. Join me each week as we journey through Genesis and see what this first book of Scripture reveals about the Kingdom of God. 

Genesis 1:1-3 English Standard Version (ESV)

1 In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth. 2 The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters. 3 And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light.

I hope you’ll subscribe to the new podcast and leave a review or a comment.

The post Preview: First Word appeared first on Russell Moore.

May 12 2020

44mins

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Announcing My New Podcast

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In the Russell Moore Podcast, I will be teaching through books of the Bible (the thing I miss most since entering this new role), as well as reviving some older podcast topics. One of these is “Questions and Ethics” where I answer your questions about moral decisions you or those you know might be facing. Another is “The Cross and the Jukebox” which explored religious themes and cultural currents in country music. I hope you’ll subscribe and leave a review or a comment.

The post Announcing My New Podcast appeared first on Russell Moore.

May 07 2020

2mins

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A Conversation with Gov. Bill Haslam

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In this episode of Signposts, I am joined by Governor Bill Haslam, the former governor of Tennessee. In this conversation we talk about leadership and decision-making, criminal justice reform, handling approval and disapproval, and how his faith informed his work as a governor.

I invite you to listen in on our conversation, and be sure to subscribe to receive future episodes of Signposts

The post A Conversation with Gov. Bill Haslam appeared first on Russell Moore.

May 06 2020

26mins

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A Conversation with Phillip Bethancourt

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In this episode of Signposts, I am joined by my close friend and colleague, Phillip Bethancourt, the new pastor of Central Church in Bryan, Texas and former Executive Vice President of the ERLC. In this conversation we talk about college ministry, new challenges that college students face, and the opportunities that the church has to address the core Christian issues of kingdom and identity.

I invite you to listen in on our conversation, and be sure to subscribe to receive future episodes of Signposts.

The post A Conversation with Phillip Bethancourt appeared first on Russell Moore.

Apr 29 2020

19mins

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A Conversation with Gov. Jeb Bush

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In this episode of Signposts, I am joined by Governor John Ellis “Jeb” Bush, the former governor of Florida. In this conversation we talk about leadership in moments of crisis, how he saw leadership modeled in other members of his family, and how the coronavirus is changing the ways that people practice their faith.

I invite you to listen in on our conversation, and be sure to subscribe to receive future episodes of Signposts.

The post A Conversation with Gov. Jeb Bush appeared first on Russell Moore.

Apr 22 2020

14mins

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A Conversation with David Murray

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In this episode of Signposts, I am joined by author and professor, David Murray. Professor of Old Testament and practical theology at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary, David is also a counselor, and the author of Reset: Living a Grace-Paced Life in a Burnout Culture and Exploring the Bible. In this episode, we discuss his book, Reset, and explore the idea of applying the gospel to Christians facing burnout.

Be sure to subscribe to Signposts to get new episodes as they are released.

The post A Conversation with David Murray appeared first on Russell Moore.

Feb 07 2020

27mins

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A Conversation with N.T. Wright

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In this episode of Signposts, I am joined by renowned author and scholar, N.T. Wright. One of the world’s leading Bible scholars, Wright is the chair of New Testament and Early Christianity at the School of Divinity at the University of St. Andrews. He is also an Anglican bishop and bestselling author. Among his many award-winning works are Simply Good News, Simply Jesus, Simply Christian, Surprised by Hope, How God Became King, Scripture and the Authority of God, Surprised by Scripture, and The Case for the Psalms. He is also the author of the recent translation of the New Testament, The Kingdom New Testament, and the widely acclaimed series, Christian Origins and the Question of God. In this episode, we discuss a range of topics including his new book, The New Testament in Its World, which he co-authored with Michael F. Bird.

Be sure to subscribe to Signposts to get new episodes as they are released.

The post A Conversation with N.T. Wright appeared first on Russell Moore.

Jan 17 2020

27mins

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A Conversation with Former Klansman Thomas A. Tarrants

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In this episode of Signposts, I am joined by Thomas A. Tarrants. A former klansman whose life was radically changed by the gospel, Tarrants is president emeritus of the C.S. Lewis Institute, where he served from 1998 to 2019. Prior to working at the Institute, he was co-pastor of a multi-racial church, in Washington, DC. In our conversation, we discuss his memoir, Consumed by Hate, Redeemed by Love: How a Violent Klansman Became a Champion of Racial Reconciliation.

Be sure to subscribe to Signposts to get new episodes as they are released.

The post A Conversation with Former Klansman Thomas A. Tarrants appeared first on Russell Moore.

Dec 18 2019

27mins

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Bonus Episode: A Conversation with Governor Bill Lee

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Earlier this week, I had the privilege of hosting Governor Bill Lee in our ERLC offices in downtown Nashville. Governor Lee serves as the 50th and current governor of Tennessee. During our time together, we sat down for a live interview in which we talked about his faith in Christ, the role of suffering in his life, his motivations for running for office, criminal justice, and a host of other issues. It was a really meaningful conversation to me, and I wanted to share it with all of you.

From my conversation with Governor Lee

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The post Bonus Episode: A Conversation with Governor Bill Lee appeared first on Russell Moore.

Dec 06 2019

40mins

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A Conversation with George F. Will

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In this episode of Signposts, I am joined by New York Times bestselling author and political commentator, George F. Will. A Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist, Will writes a twice-weekly syndicated column on politics and domestic and foreign affairs for the Washington Post. In this episode, we discuss his new book, The Conservative Sensibility, as well as a number of other topics.

Be sure to subscribe to Signposts to get new episodes as they are released.

The post A Conversation with George F. Will appeared first on Russell Moore.

Dec 04 2019

24mins

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A Conversation with Ben Shapiro

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In this episode of Signposts, I am joined by NYT best-selling author and political commentator, Ben Shapiro. One of the most well-known conservative commentators in the United States, Shapiro serves as editor in chief of dailywire.com. In this episode, we discuss his new book, “The Right Side of History: How Reason and Moral Purpose Made the West Great” as well as a number of other topics.

Signposts with Ben Shapiro

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The post A Conversation with Ben Shapiro appeared first on Russell Moore.

Nov 20 2019

20mins

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A Conversation with Michael Card

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In this episode of Signposts, I am joined by my good friend, Michael Card. Michael is an award-winning musician and performing artist. His many books include Scribbling in the Sand, A Fragile Stone, and the Biblical Imagination Series on the four Gospels. In this episode, we discuss his latest book, Inexpressible: Hesed and the Mystery of God’s Lovingkindness.

Signposts with Michael Card

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The post A Conversation with Michael Card appeared first on Russell Moore.

Oct 17 2019

21mins

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A Conversation with Rosaria Butterfield

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In this episode of Signposts, I am joined by Rosaria Butterfield for a conversation about the gospel and hospitality in Christian community. A former tenured professor of English and women’s studies at Syracuse University, Rosaria converted to Christ in 1999 in what she describes as a train wreck. In this conversation, we also discuss her memoir, The Secret Thoughts of an Unlikely Convert, which chronicles that difficult journey. She is married to Kent, a Reformed Presbyterian pastor in North Carolina, and is a homeschool mother, author, and speaker. You can learn more about Rosaria here.

Signposts with Rosaria Butterfield

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The post A Conversation with Rosaria Butterfield appeared first on Russell Moore.

Oct 02 2019

31mins

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A Conversation with Thomas S. Kidd

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In this episode of Signposts, I am joined by Thomas S. Kidd. Dr. Kidd serves as Distinguished Professor of History, James Vardaman Endowed Professor of History, and Associate Director of the Institute for Studies of Religion at Baylor University. A prolific author, he blogs regularly on evangelical history for The Gospel Coalition in collaboration with Justin Taylor, and has written numerous biographies and works on religious history including Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father, Baptists in America: A History, and God of Liberty: A Religious History of the American Revolution. I deeply enjoyed this conversation with Dr. Kidd, especially our discussion of his most recent book, Who Is an Evangelical?

You can find the full list of Dr. Kidd’s books here. Be sure to subscribe to Signposts to get new episodes as they are released.

The post A Conversation with Thomas S. Kidd appeared first on Russell Moore.

Sep 18 2019

29mins

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iTunes Ratings

157 Ratings
Average Ratings
132
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5
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Great

By Jon3191 - Jan 08 2019
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I’m grateful for this podcast, and I always enjoy it. Thank you

thank you for pleasing God & not people

By Bjoifdstjhdtu - Apr 14 2018
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one of my favorite podcasts!