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Self Defense Gun Stories

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Education
Society & Culture
Health & Fitness
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weekly reports and commentary on civilian self defense

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weekly reports and commentary on civilian self defense

iTunes Ratings

86 Ratings
Average Ratings
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Great content but the EDITING! Arg!

By Tahoe7798 - Oct 15 2018
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I love the concept of this podcast. Rob Morse, the host, compiles self defense stories from recent news articles and critiques the actions of the defender along with a guest commenter. The thing that makes it very difficult to listen is the heavy editing. It’s clear from speech patterns that sentences are cut in half and answers from the commenters are chopped to fit in a prescribed time. SO FRUSTRATING. I’d rather listen to this show with full answers and comments, even if it takes a few minutes longer. Please... no more ninja editing! And please let the guests speak freely instead of from a script. It sounds very contrived and lessens credibility.

Very good information

By laserant - Jan 03 2018
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I feel there is always a lesson to be learned from each podcast. Thank you

iTunes Ratings

86 Ratings
Average Ratings
71
8
4
1
2

Great content but the EDITING! Arg!

By Tahoe7798 - Oct 15 2018
Read more
I love the concept of this podcast. Rob Morse, the host, compiles self defense stories from recent news articles and critiques the actions of the defender along with a guest commenter. The thing that makes it very difficult to listen is the heavy editing. It’s clear from speech patterns that sentences are cut in half and answers from the commenters are chopped to fit in a prescribed time. SO FRUSTRATING. I’d rather listen to this show with full answers and comments, even if it takes a few minutes longer. Please... no more ninja editing! And please let the guests speak freely instead of from a script. It sounds very contrived and lessens credibility.

Very good information

By laserant - Jan 03 2018
Read more
I feel there is always a lesson to be learned from each podcast. Thank you

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Self Defense Gun Stories

Updated 4 months ago

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weekly reports and commentary on civilian self defense

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Episode 175 with Jeff Street

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Rob- Introduction

Welcome to episode 175 of Self-Defense Gun Stories. Perhaps you’re well trained, or maybe you’re simply curious about self-defense. I’m Rob Morse and I’m glad you found us. We’re joined this week by self-defense instructor Jeff Street.

Jeff- Hi, Rob.  I’ve been working and shooting and the weather is wonderful in sunny Florida.

Rob- We didn’t get any reviews or comments this week. Our listeners are our marketing department, so I’m asking you to go to the iTunes store where you subscribe to podcasts and let new listeners know this show is worth their time.

Jeff- We’ll talk about recent examples where gun owners were in a life threatening situation. Were they lucky, or did they have a plan? What should we do if we were in their place? We give you the links back to the original news article in our show notes.  Our first story took place last week in San Antonio, Texas.

First Story- Are you armed as you drive at night?

Rob- You and your friend are driving through San Antonio after work. You stop at a convenience store. You’re getting a drink when you notice a masked man pointing a gun at the store clerk. You’re armed. You’re friend puts his arm on yours. He has a taser and wants to try that first. Your friend tazes the armed robber. The attacker drops to the floor. A few seconds later the attacker reaches for his gun and tries to stand up. You shoot him. You both call police.

Police and EMTs arrive. They take a statement from you and other customers. They also get a copy of the security video.

What did our two defenders do correctly?

Jeff- Texas isn’t a constitutional carry state and doesn’t allow open carry without a license. That means our defenders had their concealed carry permits so they could carry their guns in public. They were armed. Our defenders recognized that the store clerk had not made a lethal threat against the robber. That means other citizens have the right to defend him. Our defenders had lethal and non-lethal tools. They tried non-lethal force, and then escalated to lethal force when they faced a threat the second time. They stayed at the scene. Called police, and made a statement.

Rob- We think about defending our family at home. It is another step to defend a stranger in a public place. Tell me about that.

Jeff- There are lots of small steps here.

Maybe you know the clerk because you use the same store once a week.

We’ve all seen the kids working at fast food restaurants. Maybe the clerk wasn’t 21 years old yet so he couldn’t get a permit and defend himself. Would you stand by while an innocent kid who was legally prohibited from defending himself was shot by a robber?

Maybe the clerk was older and had a permit, but didn’t want to draw his weapon in the face of an attacker who already had his gun out.

Maybe there were customers standing behind the attacker and the clerk didn’t want to defend himself because he was afraid of hitting bystanders.

Each of those situations might have a different answer. You won’t have time to make that decision, but you will have time to recognize a situation you’ve already thought about.

Rob- What would you like us to do if we were on either side of the checkout counter?

Jeff- Carry your defensive tools on your body. In many states, that means you need a permit, but not always. In some states you can carry at your place of business if you own the business. Often you can carry without a permit if you have the owner’s permission. Family members who work at the store can often carry without a permit.

Some small gas-station convenience stores sell alcohol. That means you can get drunks who are desperate for a drink and will rob the store to get it.

Have non-lethal force if you can. That could mean a taser and pepper spray. Buying them and putting them behind the counter isn’t enough. You need training to use them. Training teaches you what works. You can pepper spray someone who is grabbing you when they are too close to shoot. Maybe you can’t shoot someone across the room threatening another employee because you’re not confident about making that shot.

More than knowing the distance you need, going to a class will teach you the time you need. You typically have about 15 seconds to disarm someone after you tase them.

I also want you to have a trauma kit in your store. That might be for someone who is cut by a glass bottle, or it could be as serious as a gunshot wound.

Rob- Some of your students are small business owners. Did they read about an attack across the country or did it take an attack next door before they came to a class with you?

Rob- Anything else?

Jeff- That is enough for now. Our second story happened last week in Richland, Washington.

Second Story-Are you armed in public?

Rob- You’re walking down the street early in the morning. It is dark and a man steps in front of you and draws a gun. He says to empty your pockets. You do. In one pocket you have your Washington state concealed pistol license. You also have your firearm. You give him your money. You wait as he stuffs the cash into his pocket. Your attacker hits you in the face with his gun. That is when you move, draw your firearm, and shoot your attacker.

Now your attacker runs away. You call the cops. The police arrest your attacker, his wife, and his two teenage accomplices at the hospital. One of the teens has your money. The police found the robbers gun.

Your attacker is charged with first-degree robbery, first-degree assault and first-degree illegal gun possession. All have enhancements for firearms possession by a prohibited person. Your attacker was convicted of 13 felonies, including robbery, burglary, and possession of a firearm. He was out on parole.

Jeff- Our defender bought time. He gave the bad guy what he wanted. He moved and defended himself. He called the police and gave a report.

Rob- What would you like us to do.

Jeff- I want you to get to safety after you defend yourself. Maybe that means you run back to the store you left or to the convenience store at the corner.

You also win every fight you avoid, so stay off the street after midnight if you can. Some people work late. Stay away from strangers and cross the street if you have to.  In a situation like this, it really helps if you have practice drawing your firearm from concealment. Presentation is a skill, just like marksmanship. Go learn how to do it efficiently.

Rob- Talk about that.

Jeff- An instructor shows you want to do. Then, he watches as you demonstrate what you saw. Then, the instructor corrects the things you didn’t see, or mis-emphasized. Now that you have the right pattern, you need to practice over time so the motion becomes automatic.

Rob- That sounds so easy.

Jeff- It is simple. It works every time, but you can’t become fast overnight. You have to put in a few minutes a week to make it automatic. Then it becomes fast.

Another thing I noticed from this story is that it took place in the dark. Shooting in low light is another skill I want you to have. You can always do some dry practice at home in the dim.

Jeff- Our third story happened last week in Chicago, Illinois.

Rob- First this message from the Second Amendment Foundation.

Rob- Please support the Second Amendment Foundation at SAF.org

Third story-Are you armed after you shop?

Rob- You stop to buy something on your way home after work. You walk out of the store and turn down the street. You meet two men going the other way. They step in front of you. One of them pulls a gun from his pocket. They tell you to empty your pockets. You have your concealed carry license in your pocket. You have your concealed firearm on your hip. You step back, draw and fire your handgun. You shoot the armed attacker in the shoulder and thigh. Both men run. You run the other way and call police.

Your attacker is arrested at a local hospital.

Jeff- Our earlier story had one attacker. This one has two attackers, and that makes things harder for the defender. It is good that our defender had his permit. It is good that he was armed even though he only was out after work early in the evening. He defended himself when he saw a lethal an unavoidable theat. He stopped shooting when the threat stopped. He got to safety, called the police, and gave them a statement.

Rob- This is Chicago. What should we say to the police?

Jeff- Keep it simple.

Rob- Is there anything else you’d like us to do if we were in a similar situation? 

Jeff- Pick the attacker that is the greatest threat. Move and present your firearm. Shoot the worst threat. If the other threat is still there, then shoot them. Don’t shoot them if they are running away. 

Rob- I’ve had some classes inside shooting ranges where we could turn targets during a scenario. You didn’t want to shoot the back of the target. When do you talk to your students about the legal use of lethal force?

Jeff- Our last story took place last week in Columbia, South Carolina.

forth story- Are you armed when you meet someone for person-to-person sale?

Rob- You have some sport shoes for sale. A buyer contacts you on facebook. You agree to meet at a local restaurant after dark. Your wife comes with you. The buyer walks up and asks if you have the shoes. You ask if he has the money. He pulls out a gun and tells you to give him your wallet and the shoes.

You’re armed. You draw your firearm and shoot your attacker. You and your wife run away and call the police. They find your attacker and take him to the hospital for treatment of a gunshot through his hand and his leg.

Jeff- This story is interesting. There is only one attacker, but there are two of you to defend. South Carolina doesn’t have constitutional carry and doesn’t allow open carry without a permit. I’m glad our defender had a permit and was carrying that evening. He recognized a threat. He defended his family and stopped shooting when the attacker ran away. He didn’t chase the attacker. He called the police and made a report.

Rob- What would you like us to do?

Jeff- Make your sales at the police station in the daytime. I want both of you to be armed. I want you to practice together so you can defend yourself without getting shot or shooting each other. Again, this attack was in the dim. That makes it harder to see your target and much harder to see what is behind your target. Don’t shoot into the restaurant across the street as your attacker runs away.

Also, do you have any first aid training?

Rob- You gave us homework.

Jeff- We’re here to learn. Most gunshot wounds are survivable. The survival rate goes up if we get treated quickly. Do you know how to save your wife’s life, and does she know how to save yours? Carry your kit with you, or at least in your car.

Exit- Rob- That wraps up this episode. Jeff, thank you for helping us again. Where can we learn more about you?

Jeff- Find me at Step by Step Gun Training in Naples Florida.  We provide group classes as well as custom training and weekend competition. Leave us a message on the Step by Step Facebook page.

Rob- Leave us a message on the podcast facebook page after you look at Jeff’s classes.

Jeff- We share this podcast with you for free.  Please share the podcast with a friend and give us a rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher. We’re also available on Google Play Music,Tunein, Spotify, and iHeart Radio.

Rob- This podcast is part of the Self-defense radio network at sdrn.us

I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

The post Episode 175 with Jeff Street appeared first on Self Defense Gun Stories Podcast.

Dec 09 2019

23mins

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Episode 174 with Elizabeth Hautman

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Introduction

Rob- Welcome to episode 174 of Self-Defense Gun Stories. Perhaps you’re well trained, or maybe you’re simply curious about self-defense. I’m your host Rob Morse and I’m glad you found us. We’re joined this week by self-defense instructor Elizabeth Hautman. I looked back in our archives and Elizabeth and I have been recording together for three years. Thank you.

Elizabeth- Hi, Rob.  I’ve been working, and instructing, and…

Rob- We received two more ratings and two more comments on iTunes this week (112/63). Please go to the iTunes store where you subscribe to podcasts and let new listeners know this show is worth their time.

Elizabeth- We’ll talk about recent examples where gun owners were in a life threatening situation. Were they lucky, or did they have a plan? What should we do if we were in their place? We give you the links back to the original news article in our show notes.  Our first story took place last week in Taylors, South Carolina.

Rob- First story-  Are you armed at home in the middle of the day?

You’re a woman home alone on a Thursday morning. You live in an ordinary suburban neighborhood. It is about 10 am when a stranger knocks on your door. He asks if you have jumper cables he can borrow. You don’t have any. A few minutes later, the stranger opens your door, grabs you by the throat, and throws you to the ground. You’re armed. You draw your handgun and your attacker runs. You close and lock the door. Then you call the police.

Tag- No shots fired.

Elizabeth- 

She had a gun.
She wore the gun when she was at home
She acted in her defense and presented her gun.
She didn’t chase the bad guy
She locked the door
She called police
She gave a description
Police had video from where the intruder tried to enter other homes in the area, but not from when he entered her home.

 Rob- In some states, you can go to a range, shoot a number of guns, find one you like, buy a holster for it and carry at home this afternoon. Some states make it more complicated. What is your experience where you live in Colorado?

Elizabeth- You forgot to mention a way to safely store your gun and to clean it. In Colorado….

Rob- What would you like us to do if we were in the situation of being home alone?

Elizabeth- Lock your doors. Keep your distance from strangers.

I also want you to practice with your firearm when you’re not at the range. Unload your gun and practice presentation several times a week. Practice so you can do it unconsciously. In an emergency, people who practice don’t remember drawing their gun. It’s like putting out your hands to protect yourself if you fall down, they say that drawing and shooting just happened. Unload your gun and practice drawing while your sitting in a chair, sitting on the floor, or lying down on the floor.

Rob- I’ve had classes where we shot standing, kneeling on one knee, sitting on our heels, sitting on our bottom, and then lying down on our back and shooting between our legs. That isn’t what you learn in a first class.

Elizabeth- No, that isn’t where we start. There are lots of little things to learn. Firearm safety, basic marksmanship, learn to own a gun with storage and cleaning, how to go to the range, wearing a holster, presenting from a holster, presenting from under a concealment garment, learning to shoot from cover, and finally shooting on the move and in unusual positions.

Rob- I can’t practice that at my local range where they give me a port and don’t let me draw from the holster. You have a range in your backyard.

Rob- Is there something more you want to mention before we go on to our next story?

Elizabeth- That is enough for now. Our second story happened last week in Nashville, Tennessee.

Rob- Second Story-  Are you armed in your car as you drive home late at night?

You’re getting out of your car at 2:30 on a weekday morning. A car drives by and stops. The passenger points a gun out the window and tells you to hand it over. You have your concealed carry permit. You’re armed. You hand over your wallet and your phone. You step to the side, draw your firearm, and shoot at your attackers. They drive away. You have to shout for help since you lost your phone.

Elizabeth- Our defender had a gun. He applied for and received his carry permit. He had his gun concealed on his body. He recognized a threat and defended himself. He moved out of the way so he was a harder target, but he didn’t chase the bad guys and shoot at the car once his attackers were no longer a threat. He got to safety, called the police, and gave a statement.

Rob- But he lost his wallet and his phone.

Elizabeth- Your phone isn’t worth a bullet wound. Don’t get into a gunfight over THINGS. He put THINGS his attackers hands until he had a chance to defend himself. That was great thinking. Here, Rob, hold my purse.

Rob- So if you could, you’d empty your purse one item at a time so your attacker’s hands are full?

Elizabeth- Exactly.

Rob- What would you tell your students to do so they are prepared for a situation like this?

Elizabeth- Look around. If you know you’re going to arrive in the dark, then carry a flashlight. The police do that. The last victim these guys robbed didn’t have a flashlight in his hands.

Also, it is easy to get distracted on our phone after we drive. Look around, and don’t stand alone in the street late at night.

Practice moving as you present your firearm when you dry practice. Take small steps around the room and present your gun while your feet are moving. Later, you can shoot on the move at a range.

Rob- At least at your range.

Elizabeth- Some ranges let you move. Some don’t. Maybe you have to take a class from them before they will let you move and shoot.

Rob- So I have homework when I practice and some phone calls to make before I go the range again.

Elizabeth- I never said that self-defense was easy, but you can do it, Rob. We have clinics to practice different skills-
https://thewellarmedwoman.com/
https://twawshootingchapters.org/

Our third story happened last week in Texas City, Texas.

Rob- First this message from Doctors for responsible gun ownership, DRGO.us

Rob- Third story- Are you armed at work?

You run a small grocery/convenience store. It is about 9 at night when you hear shouting from the front of the store. You check the video monitors and you see two robbers pointing guns at your employees. You’re armed. You step into the store, draw your firearm, and shoot your attackers. Both attackers shoot their guns as they run from the store.

You check on your employees and your customers. They are uninjured, then you call the police. Security video shows the men outside and inside the store. There is no evidence that your shots hit the attackers.

Elizabeth- Our defender had a plan. He had video surveillance and he had a firearm. He was aware that something was happening. He recognized that his employees were facing a lethal threat. He had a plan of what to do. He acted on that plan. He didn’t chase the attackers. He checked to see if any of the victims were hurt. He called police and gave them the video of the attack.

Rob- When you say a plan, you mean he had a list of things he’d do before, during and after an attack?

Elizabeth- Exactly. Plan to check on the people in your store and see if they are hurt. Plan to treat anyone who is injured. Plan to close and lock the door after the attackers run away. Plan what you’ll say, and what you won’t say to the police. Plan to give them a copy of the video and to keep a copy for yourself and your lawyer. Go over that plan with your employees too. Make sure they know where the medical kit is stored, and what to say to the police.

You have a plan for fire, flood, or bad weather. Criminals frequently rob small stores, so plan what you’ll do. 

Rob- Can you give me an example? What would you want the employees to say?

Elizabeth- Our forth story took place last week in Berrien County, Michigan.

Rob- Fourth story- Are you armed at home late at night?

You’re in your room. It is about 9 at night when you hear shouts and voices from the front of the house. That doesn’t sound right, so you look down the hall. You see two masked men who have guns pointed at your housemates. They tell your friends to get down on the floor. You have a rifle in your room. You get your gun and shoot your attackers. They run. Your roommates are shaken and bruised, but not seriously injured.

You call the police.

Elizabeth- This is a frightening story. Your friends could have been murdered. In legal terms, they faced a lethal, immediate, and unavoidable threat. Fortunately, our defender recognized the threat. He also had a firearm immediately available.  He defended his roommates, and he didn’t chase the bad guys. He checked on his friends and called the police.

Rob- He used a rifle.

Elizabeth- Long guns are easier to shoot accurately than handguns. I wonder how his rifle was stored. In my house, it would be locked in a safe because my boys come to visit, but they make rapid access safes for long guns too, not only for handguns.

Rob- What would you like us to do is we were in this situation?

Elizabeth- Lock your doors. Make the bad guys break into your house. It sounds like there were several adults in the house. 

Don’t assume that you have to put your life at risk to save other adults. They are responsible for their safety, and it was their choice to be unarmed victims. It would be better if they were armed and you worked together on a safety plan.

Rob- But I was told that self-defense never happens.

Elizabeth- Right. It never happens thousands of times a day. Learn to defend yourself and then take a stop-the-bleed class so you can help others.

Rob- Our stories this week talked about being robbed at home, on the street, and at work.

Elizabeth- True, but look at it this way. Do you take the spare tire out of your car because you don’t plan to have a flat?

Rob- I never plan to have a flat tire, but they happen anyway.

Elizabeth- That is right. Bad guys follow us everywhere, so bring the tools you need all the time.

Exit-  Rob- You gave me more to think about. Elizabeth, thank you for helping us again. Where can we learn more about you?

Elizabeth- I instruct in Colorado Springs at my private range in Black Forest. Contact me at Colorado Boots Firearms Instruction.

Rob- After you look at Elizabeth classes, then leave us a message on the podcast facebook page.

Elizabeth- We share this podcast with you for free.  Please share the podcast with a friend and give us a rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher. We’re also available on Google Play Music,Tunein, Spotify, and iHeart Radio.

Rob- This podcast is part of the Self-defense radio network. Find more great podcasts at sdrn.us

I’m Rob Morse. We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

The post Episode 174 with Elizabeth Hautman appeared first on Self Defense Gun Stories Podcast.

Dec 02 2019

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Episode 173 with David Cole

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Rob- Introduction-

Welcome to episode 173 of Self-Defense Gun Stories. Perhaps you’re well trained, or maybe you’re simply curious about self-defense. I’m Rob Morse and I’m glad you found us. We’re joined this week by self-defense instructor David Cole.

David- Hi, Rob. I finished up the USPA season, and ’ve been hunting.

Rob- We received a rating and review on iTunes from Peekajew(110/61). Please go to the iTunes store where you subscribe to podcasts and let new listeners know this show is worth their time.

David- We’ll talk about recent examples where gun owners were in a life threatening situation. Were they lucky, or did they have a plan? What should we do if we were in their place? We give you the links back to the original news article in our show notes. Our first story took place last week in Burlington, North Carolina.

Rob- First story-  Are you armed at home on a Sunday morning?

You hear crashing sounds from the back of your house. The sounds repeat again and again. You grab your shotgun and go to find out what is happening. You see someone with an axe beating on your back door. You shout for him to leave and tell him that you’re armed. When the door breaks, you have your shotgun pointed at the intruder. Now, the intruder looks at you, looks at the gun, and drops the axe. He turns and runs away. You let him go. You stay in your house and call the police. Officers take a description of your intruder and arrest him as he’s walking down the street a few blocks away.

Tag- no shots fired.

David- The robber used tools left out by the homeowner. It’s not uncommon to have an axe in the backyard next to our woodpile. Still, it was good that our defender locked his doors and had a firearm nearby. He stayed away from the door and used verbal commands. He never let the robber get close to him. Our defender had enough presence of mind that he recognized that a lethal threat was feet away, but that he still had the option not to shoot, and that saved this criminal’s life. Our defender didn’t chase the bad guy. He called police and gave a good description of the criminal.

Rob- Do stories like this happen very often?

David- Criminals may change their habits over time. They often start by stealing things. They go from shoplifting to car theft to burglary. Although most burglaries occur during the daytime, when residents aren’t normally at home, sometimes they stop caring if we’re at home and their burglaries change to robberies. Then they might start robbing people on the street and at home.

The opioid epidemic which has affected much of the country, and is particularly bad in my area, can drive addicts to commit thefts in order to fund their habit, and often nothing is too insignificant to be a target for theft.

Rob- What would you like us to do if someone starts beating on our back door?

David- Put safety film on your windows before that happens. Strengthen your doors. Carry your keys with you And keep them on your nightstand, so you can set off the alarm on your cars. Go armed when you’re at home because this homeowner was counting on hope that he could get to his shotgun before the intruder could get it. Hope is a bad plan.

Better to “game out” scenarios which might occur and consider how you could respond. Make an actual plan…and share it with other members of the household. You also need to know your reaction time. If a person with an axe is close to you,  and you still have your gun hanging by one hand, then you’re going to get cut. Guns work at a distance so we want to use that distance to stay safe.

Rob- Talk to me about keeping a loaded gun in the home if you’re not carrying it with you.

David-  Secure storage is important to prevent unauthorized people from having access to your firearms. Having a loaded long gun ready to go like this man is all well and good…but what if there are kids in the house? What happens to that gun when you leave?

Rob- Talk to me about storing a loaded handgun that you usually carry on your body.

David- Of course, I’d prefer the loaded handgun be on my person, but if we’re going to stage one, the best option is one of the many rapid-access safes available on the market.

Rob- Is there something else that comes to mind about this story?

David- That is enough for now. Our second story happened last week in Austin, Texas.

Rob- Second Story-  Are you armed as you make a delivery?

You make an early morning food delivery to an apartment complex. You’re walking back to your car when a stranger comes up to you. The stranger asks you if you know what time it is. You don’t answer, and the stranger draws a gun. You draw yours, and the stranger walks away before you shoot. You duck down between the cars and dart back to your car. You call the cops and drive to a nearby convenience store. Once the cops are back at the apartment building, you drive back and give the police a description of your attacker.

The police find your attacker at the next apartment building.

Tag- no shots fired.

David- Our defender had his carry permit so he could legally carry a gun in public, and he had his gun on his person. He didn’t hesitate to present the gun. He called the police and moved to safety. He waited for police and was prepared to make a statement, and was able to identify his attacker.

Rob- What would you like us to do if we were in this situation.

David- Know when you may and may not use lethal force. Know the law so that you can be confident about your decision. Defend your life when you face a lethal, immediate, and unavoidable threat. In this case, although our defender would almost certainly been justified in shooting, for some reason he chose not to. It worked out in this case. However, had he decided to shoot, the ability to draw while moving and make hits until the threat stops would have been critical.

Rob- That was described to me as the rule of “Can, should, and must.” Why didn’t our defender know about that?

David- Concealed carry courses typically teach you how to safely carry a firearm and perhaps the basics of legal use of force so that you’re not a danger to the public. But most classes are too short to get in depth with the legal aspects of self-defense. Most classes also don’t have time to get into defensive firearm skills such as safely and efficiently drawing and presenting the gun, and other practical shooting skills. Go beyond the minimum education required by law. Today, there are millions of us who live in constitutional carry states where no training is legally required. It is up to us to learn what we need to know.

Rob– When was the last time you took a refresher class or read a book to get better at gun handling or the legal aspects of using lethal force in self-defense.

David- Read and listen to Anderew Branca at the Law of self defense!

Rob- Did you notice anything else?

David- This happened in dim light or in the dark. Consider how you will deal with this. Keep a quality flashlight with your defensive firearm, and don’t forget: It’s your house…turn the lights on! Take a low-light shooting class.

Rob- Where are we going next?

David- Our third story happened last week in Cocoa, Florida.

Rob-

Please support FASTER Colorado at Coloradans for Civil Liberties

Rob- Third story- Are you armed as you drive your cab?

It is early Sunday morning. You stopped to get gas and a soft drink. You see a security guard talking to two men outside the convenience store. The two men attack the guard. They keep hitting the guard even after he is down on the ground. You shout for them to stop. One of the men looks up and charges you. You have your concealed carry permit. You’re armed. You draw your gun and shoot your attacker once in the chest. Now he stops. You step back and call the police.

Later, the police told you your attacker jumped the security guard because he was peeing in public was the guard asked him to leave..

David- This is a tough one, for reasons we’ll get to in a moment. But our defender had his permit and was armed, and knew the law so he recognized when he could intervene in the defense of an innocent person. The victim was outnumbered and faced an immediate, unavoidable and potentially lethal threat so our defender was justified in using lethal force. The defender stopped shooting when the threat stopped. He stayed at the scene and gave a statement to the police.

Rob- There is more to it than that.

David- Defending an innocent party is always a tough call, because you don’t know what happened before you came on the scene. For example, most states allow you to use force to defend another if that person would have been allowed to use that level of force themselves. One of the fundamental elements of legal self-defense is innocence, meaning you didn’t start things. Do you know for sure that the person you are about to shoot is innocent? In this case, our defenders made the right call.

Rob- Speaking of making a call. Tell me about the 911 call.

David- You want to make that call. Don’t count on other people. You want to stay in touch with the dispatcher so you know when to put your gun away. Expect to be handcuffed until the police figure out what is going on. Be prepared to make a statement and help the police identify witnesses and point out any evidence that might help them investigate. You might also want to get the injured guard to safety and then make sure he receives treatment. Do you have first aid supplies and the training to use them?

David- Our forth story took place last week in Akron, Ohio.

Rob- Fourth story- Are you armed at work?

It is after dark. You and your co-worker are getting ready to close up for the day. Two men come inside your beauty supply store. They are dressed in black, wearing masks over their faces, and they have guns in their hands. They demand the money from the cash register. You draw your firearm and shoot one of your attackers and he drops to the floor. The other attacker runs away.

Rob- David, this news story leaves out some important details.

David- It really does. Let’s ask some of those unanswered questions after we know what the defender did correctly. First, our defender was armed. That probably means he had his concealed carry permit since Ohio is not a constitutional carry state. He called the police. He stayed at the scene and gave a statement.

Rob- Now let’s get to those questions.

David- Were both employees armed?

Rob- Why does that matter?

David- It is harder to defend against or control multiple people than just one! Just like two robbers are more difficult to manage than one…two defenders are harder to control than just one. If both defenders are armed, the robbers’ problem just got tougher.

Still, there are important considerations when working with an armed partner. We need to consider separating from each other; creating distance so that the threat can’t easily cover both of us. At the same time, we want to consider the direction we may have to shoot, and where our partner is positioned, so that we don’t shoot each other. And just like in our home defense planning, discussing scenarios and planning with our co-workers can help reduce confusion and lag time if a real defensive situation occurs.

Rob- You posted a video of you shooting several competition stages. You put two shots into each of two targets before a robber would be able to look up, take his gun off the counter, and see where you’re standing now.

David- True, but most people are not competitive shooters. Thinking out potential problems in advance can get us a step ahead, so that we don’t need to be so fast.

Have both you and your co-workers armed, if possible. Think about positioning, considering cover, concealment, and the locations of potential threats and your co-workers. Think about timing and opportunities to access your gun…or maybe creating a distraction.The best time to go to work is when the bad guy isn’t pointing a gun at you or at the other employees and isn’t looking at you.

After you shoot, then get away from your attackers. Lock the door. Find out if anyone like a co-worker or customer is hurt. Call 911 and be sure to tell them the scene is secure. Stay in the back room until the police or EMTs arrive. Holster your gun and keep talking to the dispatcher so you know when to go to the front of the store and unlock the door. Give a very brief statement to the police and give them the store security video.

Rob- Have you taught many people who carry in their stores?

David-  Unfortunately, a lot of workplaces don’t allow it, but I think that is improving.

Rob- Exit-

That wraps up this episode. David, thank you for helping us again. Where can we learn more about you?

David- Look for me on Facebook at Aegis Solutions. I also write about gun rights at DeltaBravoCharlie.com

Rob- After you look at David articles, then leave us a message on the podcast facebook page.

David- We share this podcast with you for free.  Please share the podcast with a friend and give us a rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher. We’re also available on Google Play Music,Tunein, Spotify, and iHeart Radio.

Rob- This podcast is part of the Self-defense radio network. Find more great shows at sdrn.us

I’m Rob Morse. We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories, and have a happy Thanksgiving.

The post Episode 173 with David Cole appeared first on Self Defense Gun Stories Podcast.

Nov 26 2019

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Episode 172 with Amanda Suffecool

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Rob- Introduction-

Welcome to episode 172 of Self-Defense Gun Stories. Maybe you’re well trained, or perhaps you’re simply curious about self-defense. I’m Rob Morse and I’m glad you found us. We’re joined this week by self-defense instructor Amanda Suffecool.

Amanda- Hi, Rob.  I’ve been putting on fashion shows, planning next years line up of fashion shows and teaching and training.   In 6 weeks was in Phoenix, DC, Scranton, Chino Valley, Chicago…

Rob- We received two more ratings on iTunes this week (109/60). Thank you to SkyChief and Laserant for leaving a review. Please go to the iTunes store where you subscribe to podcasts and let new listeners know this show is worth their time.

Amanda- We’ll talk about recent examples where gun owners were in a life threatening situation. Were they lucky, or did they have a plan? What should we do if we were in their place? We give you the links back to the original news article in our show notes.  Our first story took place last week in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Rob- First story-  Are you armed as you drive home?

You’re on your way home after work. The sun is setting when your teenage daughter calls you. She says two strange men are knocking on the doors and windows of your home. While you’re talking with her, your daughter says the strangers broke the glass door at the back of the house. You tell her to lock herself in the back bathroom. You drive faster and call the police.

The police tell you to wait outside your home until officers arrive. You have your concealed carry permit. You’re armed. You enter your home and go to your daughter. She is unhurt. You tell her to lock herself in the bathroom again and you stand guard until the police clear the house.

You gave the police good pictures of the intruders from your security system.

Amanda- That is every parents nightmare. Give the family credit for locking their doors. Mom thought ahead and had a security system installed. She trained her daughter about what to do when there was a threat. Mom called the police as soon as she could. She was armed and went to defend her daughter. I like it that mom did not clear her house, but left that to the police.

Rob- We’re seeing more stories like this. We have more people carrying concealed. We have more children home alone. Fewer of us know our neighbors very well. Is there anything that we might do if we’re in that situation?

Amanda- This home invasion happened in Fort Lauderdale and that is hurricane country. Add plastic security films to your outside glass. Can your children stay with a neighbor until you get home. Better yet, build a security plan with your neighbors so you can both watch out for each other. Also, teach your children to call 911.

We don’t know her daughter’s age. It makes a difference if she was an immature 12 year old or a mature 19 year old. When the kids are ready, talk to them about self-defense and teach them how to defend themselves.

Rob- Should we teach them to shoot?

Amanda- That is a parent’s decision, but we should do something. If our children are old enough to leave alone then we have to work with them on their safety. We ask 18 year olds to join the army and fly a plane, so they can have the necessary maturity.  And there are many less than lethal options for those in that mid-age zone.

Rob- Have you taught young adults in your classes?

Amanda-  Yes, we interview the parents and find out how they are storing their firearms. And AS LONG as it complies with basic safety rules, we will align our class to correspond with the family rules.  I don’t want to put parents into a situation where “the instructor said” something completely different than you did – dad.  

Rob- What else did you notice?

Amanda- did you catch where the dispatcher tells the parent to ‘stay outside’ – as if…   you would not find that I was willing to leave my child in danger while I was ‘safely outside’ with a guns and knowledge… a means of defending her.  Never in 1000 years. 

Rob- It sounds like the dispatcher is selling department policy rather than best practice.

Amanda- That is enough for now. Our second story happened last week in Glen Burnie, Maryland.

Rob- Second Story-  Are you armed at home early in the morning?

You’re doing early morning chores outside your home when you hear your girlfriend scream. You rush back inside and see two men with beating your girlfriend and holding her down. The men are armed with a gun and a knife. You grab your shotgun and shoot at them. They run. You call police and EMTs. You girlfriend goes to the hospital for a checkup. Fortunately, she is only bruised.

The police find one of your attackers at the hospital.

Amanda- These are tough stories this week. I’m glad our good guy owned a gun. An innocent person faced a threat that was immediate, unavoidable, and lethal, so our defender used his gun for self-defense. He stopped shooting once the attackers ran away. He called the police and EMTs. He stayed at the scene and gave a statement to the police.

Rob- What should we do when we’re at home?

Amanda- The first thing that comes to mind is to lock your doors. Also, having a gun tucked into a corner of your house is betting on luck. What if the bad guys are between you and your gun? Plan to to carry your defensive tools on your body, and it would have been nice if both adults were armed. Even then, there are also few problems I see. First, Glen Burnie is a suburb of Baltimore. Sheriffs in that area deny concealed carry permits to ordinary citizens, so you can’t carry in public, but you can carry at home.

The second thing I noticed is how strange this attack was. The attackers knew the homeowners. They entered the house even though someone was home. Most intruders run away when they encountered the occupants but these guys attacked them.

Rob- Why do you think that happened?

Amanda- The best bet is that either the attackers were on drugs or they were looking for drugs, or looking for money for drugs. 

Rob- That matches the statistics I’ve seen. Do you train many couples for armed defense?

Amanda- This is probably my least trained group.  In my area, or in my experiences in my area – one half of the couple is interested / invested and the other is apathetic.   It’s great when you see a couple that is just that – a couple, doing things together. Training, defending, and living a good life together.

Rob- does that make a difference if they work together?

Our third story happened last week in Memphis, Tennessee.

Rob- First this message from CPRC

Rob- Third story- Are you armed in public?

You walk out of a store late at night. As you’re walking across the parking lot, you notice that someone is inside your car. You shout for him to get out. Someone in a black SUV nearby shoots at you. You shoot back. The robber gets out of your car and jumps into the SUV before it drives away.

You call police. The SUV drops off the wounded robber at a nearby hospital.

Amanda- Our good guy was armed in public, he had his concealed carry permit and made use of it. He was aware of a problem before he got to his car. He tried verbal commands. He faced a lethal threat, one that you or I would not necesarily expect – from a ‘second area’ and not from the car that was his specific area of focus.   He defended himself. AND He stopped shooting when the bad guys drove away. AND He didn’t chase them, but stayed and called 911. He gave a brief statement to the police.

Rob- This is harder than hiding in your bedroom. 

Amanda- It is. Parking lots are dangerous. Parking lots at night are extra dangerous. You have to know how to carry concealed, how to present from concealment, and how to shoot in low light. I’d also bet our good guy was moving after the bad guys started shooting. I’d run back into the store I just left and stay there watching my car until the police arrived.

Rob- Tell me about that.

Amanda- Let’s back up. To defend yourself like this, you need to have some skills at the level of automatic or unconscious reactions. A new student is thinking about how the gun fits in their hand. Their attention is on the mechanics rather than on the tactics of staying alive. those skills become automatic by practicing at home with an empty gun. We call that “dry practice”. Work with an instructor so you have dry practice, range practice, and then review your progress with your instructor to make sure you haven’t let some bad habits creep in. Also, those automatic reactions go away if you don’t refresh them.   Think about it like the skills of driving a car. In the beginning you are unsure, watching and second guessing each step needed to keep the car on the road and the speed steady. Soon though – you are zipping around, driving with one hand, and a burger in the other. You need that level of skill with your firearm. 

Rob- When was the last time you tested your performance?

Amanda- I won a competition at Gunsite Academy last month, but I’d be kidding myself if I thought those skills would be there in six months if I didn’t practice.

Amanda- Our forth story took place last week outside Houston, Texas.

Rob- Fourth story- Are you armed at work?

You’re working in the back room of your jewelry store. You look up to see several young men rush through the front door. Now there are four men wearing masks and with hammers in their hands. They are threatening your employees and smashing your display cases.

You’re armed. You draw your gun, step to the doorway, and shoot your attackers. The robbers run away. You check on your employees and call the police.

Fortunately, your employes aren’t hurt. Police look at the security video from your store and from other stores nearby. The police locate the robbers and the getaway vehicle. They also find drugs and stolen jewelry from other stores. Two of the robbers were wounded.

Amanda- Our defender had an electronic door control so he had to look up and see each person who entered the store. He had a video system and a one way mirror so  he could watch the showroom while he worked in the back office. He was armed. He defended his employees. He didn’t chase the robbers down the street. He called police and gave them the surveillance video.

Rob- Does it get better than that?

Amanda- Maybe. The bad guy held the door open so the three other robbers could run inside. It also sounds like the store owner was the only person who was armed. This attack took place in Texas, so the employees could get their concealed carry permit.

Criminals don’t want a fair fight. There were four attackers in this case. Four attacker with a heavy blunt object.  Was it to break the cases or to break resistance? That means your entire staff needs to be part of the defense. They need to work together for their own safety.

The store owner was shooting at the attackers from the back of the store. His own employees were in front of him. Did they have a plan so the employees were supposed to get out of the way and drop to the floor?

Rob- The four attackers had hammers. If one of the employees was being beaten, he might have run toward the back of the shop. That means he might have run into a bullet fired by the store owner.

Amanda- It is really important to talk to your employees and get on the same page so you’re all working together.

Rob- A common excuse I’ve heard is that defense is the job of the police.

Amanda- That is an excuse. It isn’t true. The police won’t protect you, they cannot be everywhere.  They are 10 minutes away – 10 LONG minutes. The police will take a report and start an investigation. Your safety, and the safety of your employees or co-workers is up to you.

Rob- Anything else before we close out the show?

Amanda- One last thing. Have a medical kit. There was a lot of flying glass in this attack. Treat your staff and customers with respect and have more than a box of bandaids to help them.

Exit-

Rob- You wrap up a wound, and I’ll wrap up this episode. Amanda, thank you for joining us again. Where can we learn more about you?

Amanda- You can find me at eye on the target radio radio. I have a nationally syndicated radio show. You can call in and talk with us Sunday nights from 5 to 7 eastern time. I also instruct on the weekends, when I am not out representing the DCProject. 50 pro gun women from 50 states. Check out my website at EyeOnTheTargetRadio.com, and check out the DCProject.info

Rob- After you subscribe to Amanda’s show, then leave us a message on the podcast facebook page.

Amanda- We share this podcast with you for free.  Please share the podcast with a friend and give us a rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher. We’re also available on Google Play Music, Tunein, Spotify, and iHeart Radio.

Rob- This podcast is part of the Self-defense radio network at sdrn.us I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

The post Episode 172 with Amanda Suffecool appeared first on Self Defense Gun Stories Podcast.

Nov 18 2019

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Episode 171 with Ben Branam

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Rob- Introduction-

Welcome to episode 171 of Self-Defense Gun Stories. Maybe you’re well trained. I’m glad you found us even if you’re simply curious about self-defense. I’m your host Rob Morse and we’re joined this week by self-defense instructor Ben Branam.

Ben- Hi, Rob.  I’ve been teaching and testing some pistol caliber carbines. That’s fun.

Rob- We received another rating on iTunes this week (107/60). Please go to the iTunes store where you subscribe to podcasts and give us a rating and write a comment.

Ben- We’ll talk about recent examples where gun owners were in a life threatening situation. Were they lucky, or did they have a plan? What should we do if we were in their place? We give you the links back to the original news article on our website.  Our first story took place last week in West Philadelphia.

Rob- First story-  Are you armed at home?

You’re sitting on your front porch before 9 in the evening. A stranger comes up to you and asks you a question. The next thing you know, the stranger has a gun out of his pocket and demands you empty your pockets.

You have your concealed carry permit. You’re armed. You stand up to give your attacker what he asked for. You reach into your pockets and then shoot your attacker. He tries to run away and falls to the ground. You call the police.

The police take your attacker to the hospital.

What did our defender do correctly?

Ben- Our defender had a plan. He knew he could be attacked even though he was only sitting on the front porch of his house. He had a pistol permit in Philadelphia. He had a firearm as a defensive tool. He was wearing his gun on him. He defended himself when he faced an immediate, lethal and unavoidable threat. He stopped shooting when the threat went away. He called the police. The defender stayed at the scene and gave the police a statement.

Rob- That is a lot to do, and it is more than firearms safety and marksmanship. When do you talk to your students about those issues?

Rob- What would you like us to do if we faced a situation like that?

Ben- Learn to be John Farnam. John is a very respected firearms instructor and law enforcement officer. Meeting stranger is the dark on the street is dangerous. When the stranger steps off the sidewalk, I want you to say ,“Stop, don’t come any closer.” as you get up and move away from your attacker. It sounds rude. It is better to be rude than shot or robbed.

Rob- What else? 

Ben- Give the robber what he wants so his hands are full. Hand him the kitchen sink if he’ll take it. That is when you move, present your gun, and defend yourself. Keep pressing the trigger until the threat goes away.

I also want you to retreat to a safe place inside your house when you call the police. 

Rob- Why is that?

Ben- You don’t know if your attacker has an armed partner. 

And another thing, in some states you need a concealed carry permit to be armed on your porch. Learn your local laws.

Rob- Lets go on.

Ben- Our second story happened last week in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Rob- Second Story-  Are you armed at work?

You’re sitting in your truck in downtown Tulsa at five in the morning. You’re waiting for your construction crew to arrive and start work. You look up when you hear a loud sound. A stranger is beating your truck with a length of rebar. The stranger smashes your windows. You’re armed. You shoot your attacker until he drops the rebar and steps away from your truck.

You call the police. EMTs take your attacker to the hospital. They take you in for questioning and then release you.

Ben- Our defender had his gun with him. He defended himself. He called the police, and he gave a statement.

Rob- Would you give me an example about talking to the police?

Rob- How often are people attacked while they sit in their car?

Rob- Is that hard to learn, and who would teach me to defend myself as I’m sitting in my car?  

Ben- It is easy to learn, but it is hard to get there. 

Rob- What does that mean?

Ben- First you have to know the safety rules really well..and that is easy.. at least it is easy once you’ve mastered it.

Then you have to know marksmanship subconsciously so you know where the barrel is pointing even when you’re not looking at your gun..and that is easy.

Then you have to know how to present your firearm from concealment..without thinking about it..and that is easy.

And then we have to practice that while were sitting down..and that is easy.

And then we have to add the complications of seat belts and a steering wheel and windshield posts.

None of this is hard, but you have to know all of it unconsciously or I can’t really teach you to draw from concealment in your car because you’re distracted by everything else you don’t know.

Rob- So I have to take one step at a time.

Ben- Practice what you’ve been taught and then go learn a little more. Rather than making one ninja, let’s make ten million people a little safer each year.

Our third story happened last week in Cleveland, Ohio.

Rob- First this message from the Buckeye Firearms Foundation

Rob- Third story- Are you armed at work?

You’re working at the checkout aisle of a grocery store. It is noon when a man runs into the store wearing a mask over his face. He jumps over the counter and starts beating you. You fall to the ground.

You’re armed. You draw your gun and shoot at your attacker. Now your attacker runs away. No other customers or employees are hurt. Your co-workers call police.

Nearby police saw your attacker run from the store and arrest him. EMTs take you to the hospital.

Ben- Our defender thought he could be attacked because he’d heard of other stores in the area being robbed. He had a concealed carry permit. He was armed that day and the gun was on his person rather than in a backpack. Our defender stayed in the fight and worked to his own defense even though he was being hit. He got a hand on his gun and then shot at his attacker.

Rob- Was the victim hurt?

Ben- Our defender was hit six times in the head, so he was pretty badly beaten.

Rob- What would you like us to do in a situation like this? 

Ben- This is hard because you might not see your attack coming if you’re working with another customer. The attacker has the advantage of surprise and violence. I know what I’d do if I saw one of my co-workers being beaten. Ask all your co-workers to have a plan for your mutual defense. The other thing to do is to practice close-in defense.

Rob- Let’s talk about that. What exactly would you do if one of your co-workers was on the ground being hit?

Ben- Get close. Look where the shot will go. Maybe you have to be at contact distance.

Close-in defense means that you don’t use the sights. You don’t even extend the gun away from you because you’d be handing your gun to your attacker. You hold your gun as close as you can, but far enough from your body that the cylinder can rotate, or the slide can reciprocate. 

Rob- What would you do with your fellow employees?

Ben- Have a plan so every employee knows what to do if you’re attacked at work. This could be in a store, in an office, or at church. If you’ve listened to this podcast for a while, then you’ll think of things your co-workers won’t imagine.

Ben- Our forth story took place last week in Lithia, Florida.

Rob- Fourth story- Are you armed at home late at night?

You’re in the back bedroom of your home. You’re tired. It is nine at night and your eight months pregnant. Your husband and your 11 year old daughter are in the family room. You hear a crash, shouts, and screams. You get up and look down the hallway to see your husband on the floor. A masked man is beating him while another man has hold of your daughter and is kicking your husband. The attacker stops beating your husband and shoots at you.

You step back into the bedroom and grab the loaded rifle you keep there. You peak into the hallway and shoot one of the attackers as he comes toward you. Both attackers run away.

You check on your family and call EMTs.

Your husband is taken to the hospital with a fractured eye socket, a fractured sinus cavity, and a concussion. He required 20 stitches and three staples to close his wounds. Your daughter is unhurt.

Your attackers kicked in your back door. Police found one of your attackers dead in a ditch near the road.

Ben- This is really frightening because the bad guys grabbed the little girl. I am so glad this family was ready to defend themselves. They imagined that they could be attacked. They bought a defensive tool, in this case an AR-15. They learned how to use it, and it sounds like they practiced using it. Their doors were locked. Mom did a great job shooting down a hallway and not hitting her husband or daughter her. She didn’t chase the bad guys and got help on the way.

Rob- What are the advantages of handguns versus long guns for home defense? 

Rob- Is there anything you’d like us to do if we were in this situation? 

Ben- I wish mom and dad were carrying on their body. You might want to drop to a crouch so you’re shooting up toward the ceiling. You also want to practice moving from target to target with a rifle. A long gun blocks a lot of your view.

Rob- Where can people practice shifting from one target to another with a rifle? You can’t do that at most indoor ranges. 

Ben- Talk to your local range about taking a class.

Exit-

Rob- that wraps up this episode. Ben, thank you for helping us again. Where can we learn more about you?

Ben- Look for me at Modern Self Protection.com.  I live in San Antonio, and most of my classes are in central Texas. I teach armed self-defense and church security. Listeners can see my class schedule at my website, and they can also listen to my weekly podcast Modern Self-Protection.

Rob- After you look at Ben’s articles, then please leave us a message on the Self-Defense Gun Stories facebook page.

Ben- We share this podcast with you for free.  Please share the podcast with a friend and give us a rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher. We’re also available on Google Play Music,Tunein, Spotify, and iHeart Radio.

Rob- This podcast is part of the Self-defense radio network. Find more great shows, like Ben’s Modern Self Protection, at sdrn.us

I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

The post Episode 171 with Ben Branam appeared first on Self Defense Gun Stories Podcast.

Nov 12 2019

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Episode 170 with Tony Simon

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Rob- Introduction

Welcome to episode 170 of Self-Defense Gun Stories. Maybe you’re well trained, or perhaps you’re simply curious about self-defense. I’m glad you found us. I’m Rob Morse and we’re joined this week by self-defense instructor Tony Simon. Tony, you raffled off a firearm since you were on the podcast last time.

Tony- Hi, Rob.  I’ve been busy hosting the Diversity Shoot, taking classes and volunteering with CNJFO in New Jersey. I’m working on firearms giveaways on our PATREON.COM  2A4E PODCAST

Rob- The number of listeners fell last week. The good news is that we received another rating and one more review on iTunes (106/60). Here is a shout out to AidensProudMamma for leaving us a review. Please go to the iTunes store where you subscribe to podcasts and give us a rating and leave a comment.

Tony- Your recommendations tell new listeners that the show is worth a listen. Please share the show with a friend.

This episode, we’ll talk about recent examples where gun owners were in a life threatening situation. Were they lucky, or did they have a plan and good habits? We give you the links back to the original news stories in our show notes.

Our first story took place last week in Duffield, Virginia.

Rob- First story-  Are you armed at home?

You’re at home in your apartment on a weekday night. You have physical handicaps and don’t move well. You hear someone knocking on your door. You don’t expect company at this hour, so you grab your firearm for protection. Before you can answer the door, the door is kicked in. You shoot the home invader standing in your front room and he runs away. You call the police.

The police find your wounded attacker a block away. Your attacker is taken to the hospital and then taken to jail. He has open charges for drug offenses. Now he also has charges for breaking and entering in the nighttime with the intent to commit larceny

Tony- Lots of people have bad ankles, bad knees or suffer from injuries( temporarily or permanently). Criminals choose handicapped people as victims because they see them as prey that’s easy to catch and control.

This homeowner wasn’t going to be a defenseless victim and made plans for his self defense. He had a gun loaded and accessible. He got in a defensible position with his firearm when he had an unexpected visitor. When the attacker broke down the door, the homeowner defended himself, and then he stopped shooting when the defender ran away. He didn’t chase the bad guy and spray rounds at the retreating bad guy. The defender called the police and stayed at the scene to file a complaint. 

Rob- Is there something else that you’d like us to do if we have a knock on the door at 2 in the morning?

Tony- Turn on the outside lights. If it’s a stranger or not any one you want to see at that late hour shout at them to go away. Shout so loud that your neighbors will hear it and remember it when the police ask them what happened. Say you’ve called the police. Do not open the door. If you have a difficult time moving quickly make sure there are objects between you and the door. If the bad guy kicks the door open they will have to move around furniture that gives you more time to bring your defensive tool into play. 

Rob- I wouldn’t learn about that in a firearms safety class. When do you talk to your students about answering the door. 

Tony- Step at a time. We actually have a class called Home Defender where we run scenarios like this event with students. 

Rob- What does that look like. 

Tony- We don’t use real firearms in the class so it doesn’t have to be at a range. We use laser training guns that show up as a red dot on your target. We then run multiple different scenarios, many from this podcast, on our students. Then we go over what they did right, what can be improved upon and explain the whys behind the actions we suggest they take. 

Tony- There is a lot to learn for someone who hasn’t had a gun before. They learn how to safely handle a gun. They learn how to line up the sights and the target. They learn how to transport a firearm, and how to clean it and store it. They learn about ammunition. We take that for granted, but it takes practice until it becomes automatic.

Rob- Is there anything else before we go on? 

Tony- If you can, get your concealed carry permit and carry all the time, even at home. If you can carry in your home where you live,  do so.
Our second story happened last week in Sturgis, South Dakota.

Rob- Second Story-  Are you armed at home?

It is after midnight when you and your roommate hear something from the front yard. You look out the window and see someone trying to get into your locked cars. You go out front and shout for them to leave. Then, you go back inside and call the police.

You also get your gun. A second later the stranger walks into your home. You shout for him to leave, but he moves toward you. You shoot him. Now he runs away. The police find him nearby and take him to the hospital.

Tony- Our defender used verbal commands. The homeowners had a gun. They kept their distance and did not engage the intruder. They called the police. They defended themselves when they could not retreat. They did not chase the intruder when he ran away. They remained at the scene and gave a statement to the police.

Rob- I can guess what you’d like us to do. 

Tony- You’re right. Lock your doors. Make the bad guys break your house to get to you. It is better to have a damaged front door that held than to have an open door and have to shoot someone. As a locksmith I can repair your door for a lot less than shooting someone will cost and with less heartache.

Again, turn on the lights. Better yet, have motion activated lights in your driveway and front porch and if your car has a remote alarm, activate it.

Rob- Talk to me about defending yourself in your home.

Tony- Do you know what is behind your target? Firearm safety rules don’t change when you use your firearm defensively. You still have to know your target and what’s behind your target. 

Is it a solid brick wall, or is it your neighbors bedroom in the next apartment? Shooting in low light is also important. Have you practiced? Can you defend the center of your home or apartment from your bedrooms? Do you and your roommate have a plan and have you practiced that plan so it is habitual? The logical part of your brain isn’t working when someone kicks in your door at 2 in the morning. You need to rely on the self-defense habits you’ve made by practice.

Rob- Anything else?

Tony- I bet this homeowner wishes he’d simply called the police. He didn’t know how many people were outside and if they were armed.

Our third story happened last week in Hollywood, California.

Rob- Please support the Second Amendment Foundation at SAF.org

Rob- Third story- Are you armed at work?

You run a small supermarket. You’re standing outside with your employees as they clean gang graffiti off the wall of your store. A carload of local gang members rolls up and they tell you to stop. They point firearms out the window of their car. You have your concealed carry permit. You’re armed this morning. You draw your concealed pistol and shoot your attackers. They drive away. Neither you nor your employees are injured. You call the police.

The police arrest one of your attackers when he goes to a local hospital for treatment. Gangs have been threatening you and demanded a hundred thousand dollars in protection money.

Tony- Our defender knew he might face an attack. He had his carry permit. Hopefully he contacted the police when he was threatened before the attack. You want to start a paper trail when security issues like this first start. He was with his employees so that they would have an armed defender. 

He recognized an attack when it happened. He acted to end the threat. He stopped shooting when the treat was over. I assume he sent his employees to a safe location inside the store, then called the police. He remained at the scene and gave a statement.

Rob- What would you tell your students to do?

Tony- I remember an internet meme about the rules of a gunfight. Rule #1 bring a gun Rule #2 Bring friends and have them bring their guns.

It would have been better if multiple employees were also armed. Having a staff that is trained, armed and that has a defensive plan makes your place of business a hard target and much much safer.

Make sure someone stays at the scene of the crime to preserve the evidence. In this case, there were over forty shell casings on the ground.

Have a medical kit in the store. Have medical training for your staff.

Go through medical drills so you AND your employees know what to do if someone is injured. Workplace injuries happen every day. 

Once you get your employees inside, then ask them all to call 911 and report the crime.

Be brief with the police. Tell them you defended yourself. Show them the evidence. Show them the witnesses. Then say you’ll answer all their questions after you spoke with your lawyer.

Rob- When do your students learn to draw a concealed firearm?

Tony- Drawing from concealment is a class of its own. It involves lots of repetitive movements in class and practice outside of class. 

I can show them the draw, but they have to make it an automatic movement. 

Clear the garment, grab the gun, take it from the holster, put both hands on the gun, bring the gun to your line of sight, touch and press the trigger. Practice that until it is a smooth fluid motion that you do without thinking about it. Practice with an unloaded gun.

Tony- Our forth story took place last week in Highland Park, Michigan.

Rob- Fourth story- Are you armed at work?

You’re counting up the receipts for the night at your restaurant. There are only a few people left sitting at the bar, so you’re closing early. The man at the bar draws a gun and points the gun at you. He demands the money. You have your concealed carry permit. You’re armed. You push the money toward the robber and step back. Next, the robber points his gun at the bartender and demands her phone. You present your firearm and shoot your attacker until he drops his gun. The attacker falls to the floor, so you and the bartender run to the back of the store. The bartender was grazed by one of your shots. You call the police and ask for EMTs.

EMTs take your employee and the robber to the hospital. Your employee is examined and released. The robber is declared dead. The police take copies of your security video.

Tony- Our business owner had a plan of action. He got his carry permit. He had security video. He was carrying concealed that night. He recognized a threat and did not draw against a drawn gun. He waited his turn and exercised Tactical Patience(my favorite Ben Branam term). He defended himself and others from an immediate, lethal, and unavoidable threat. He was so familiar with his gun that he could operate and fire accurately in dim light. He stopped shooting when the threat stopped. He took care of the injured employee, and called the police and EMTs. He stayed at the scene and made a statement. He gave security video to the police.

Rob- That list is almost as long as the news story.

Tony- That is why I think our defender planned and rehearsed what to do. He was acting on his planned actions rather than having to stop to think through each step.

Rob- What would you like us to do if we were in this situation.

Tony- I want you to include your other employees in your security plan. Is there always someone in the store who is armed? Have you and your armed employee trained or practiced together?

Are they always with customers and the cash register? Multiple armed good guys that have a plan and have practiced and trained together are a force multiplier. 

Practice drawing and shooting in low light. Practice with dummy guns when the business is closed.  Know the distances in your business so the distances you practice are realistic. You own every shot you fire. Only hits count and you can’t afford to miss because your shots could injure innocent people.

Rob- How much does it help if both the owner and bartender were armed?

Tony- It gives you options that you don’t have otherwise. It is much more likely that one of you won’t be observed and won’t have a gun pointed at you. It also means that the person who is being watched can move away from the attacker to make room for the defense.

Rob- Where would I learn so shoot in dim light, and what would I learn if I practiced that? 

Tony- Many instructors host low light classes that teach students how to shoot in low light, how to use hand held lights along with a firearm, and how to use weapons mounted lights.

Exit

Rob- that wraps up this episode. Tony, thank you for helping us again. Where can we learn more about you?

Tony- Find me at Diversityshoot.com You can find me on Instagram and facebook at Simon Says Train and The 2nd is For Everyone podcast

Rob- After you look at Tony websites, then leave us a message on the podcast facebook page or on the podcast webpage.

Tony- We share this podcast with you for free.  Please share the podcast with a friend and give us a rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher. We’re also available on Google Play Music,Tunein, Spotify, and iHeart Radio.

Rob- This podcast is part of the Self-defense radio network at sdrn.us

I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

The post Episode 170 with Tony Simon appeared first on Self Defense Gun Stories Podcast.

Nov 04 2019

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Episode 169 with Tiffany Johnson

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Rob- Introduction-

Welcome to episode 169 of Self-Defense Gun Stories. Maybe you’re well trained, or perhaps you’re simply curious about self-defense. Well you’re in the right place and I’m glad you found us. I’m Rob Morse. We’re joined this week by self-defense instructor Tiffany Johnson. Tiffany, I saw where you’ve been in Texas last week.

Tiffany- Hi, Rob.  I’ve been presenting the new NRA class on concealed carry.
CCW basic + Instructor course at KR Training
Certified 14 new NRA CCW instructors, including Karl Rehn and his team at KR training.

Rob- We received four more ratings and one more review on iTunes this week (105/59). Please go to the iTunes store where you subscribe to podcasts and give us a rating and leave a comment.

Tiffany- We’ll talk about recent examples where gun owners were in a life threatening situation. Were they lucky, or did they have good habits? We give you the links back to the original news article in our show notes. Our first story took place last week in Franklin, Kentucky.

Rob- First story-  Are you armed at work?

You’re working in your cell phone store. It is about 7 at night. Customers come in and want help with their phones or to add money to their accounts. Some pay by credit card and some pay with cash. Two men walk in and before you know it, one of them is pointing a gun at you. Your attacker is wearing a hoodie and a mask. He demands the money from the till.

You’re armed. You draw your firearm and the two criminals run from the store. Neither you, nor any other customers or employees are hurt. You call the police and show them the security videos.

Tiffany- (What did our defender do correctly?) Our defender did a number of things to save his own life. We know he was armed. We know he had his firearm on his body rather than keeping it in a lock box in the back office. We know he drew his firearm when he faced an immediate, unavoidable, lethal threat. We know he did not chase his attackers when they ran down the street. He checked on his employees and his customers. He had a video security system in place. He called the police and gave a statement.

Rob- What would you tell your students to do?

Tiffany-  

  • Be thoughtful and deliberate (and patient) when looking for opportunities to retake the initiative and regain control
  • Careful about drawing against a drawn gun
  • Importance of knowing the basics of how guns work – suspect racking the slide?

Rob- How can we draw against a drawn gun? 

Tiffany- Don’t do that. Wait your turn. Our attacker was distracted.

Rob- How would you practice shooting at close range as you move?

Tiffany-  Movement doesn’t have to be dramatic or extreme. Simply practicing a subtle sidestep can make a huge difference. Also, for average everyday folks who aren’t putting 10K rounds downrange every year, it might be better to think about move-shoot-move as opposed to moving while shooting. Simultaneous moving and shooting can require more coordination and proprioception than most people have habituated, so the safer bet is to step and shoot rather than shooting while running, etc. Also, more practical in terms of what’s normally allowed at a gun range.

Rob- Our defender talked to the police. He had video evidence in his favor. What should we tell the police, and what should we wait for our lawyer to say?

Tiffany- Tell the police generally that there was an attempted robbery, that the robbers pointed a gun at you, and that you were forced to defend yourself and your customers. Then request medical attention and assure the police you’re willing to cooperate further after you’ve had a chance to consult with an attorney.

Rob- Is there more?

Tiffany- That is enough for now. Our second story happened last week in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Rob- Are you armed when you go out with your family in public?

Your daughter found a used cell phone she wants to buy. She sets up the exchange, but you decide to go with her. It is dark when you get to the address. You ring the bell but none answers. Two men walk up as you go back to your car. One of them has a gun in his hands and your other attacker has a knife. They demand your money and your cell phone.

You have your Utah concealed firearms permit. You’re armed tonight. You hand over your wallet and your phone. Then you draw your firearm and shoot [at] your attackers. Your attackers run away. You drive to safety and call the police.

The police take your description and find your attackers. Their gun was a BB gun. They are charged with two counts of aggravated robbery and intentionally giving false information to a police officer. They have previous convictions for shoplifting and failure to appear in court. There were open warrants for their arrest.

Tiffany- Our defender went with his daughter because he didn’t want her to meet strangers in a strange place at night. It’s a good thing he didn’t let her go by herself, although he probably wishes he had urged her to schedule a daytime meeting rather than a nighttime meeting. He had a gun.  He brought the gun. He carried it on his person rather than keeping it in the trunk of his car. He got to safety after the attack. He called the police and filed a report. However, I’m a little leery of his decision to fire at these robbers as they were running away. According to the article, the encounter was over and the robbers were clearly leaving. They posed no further threat to the dad and his daughter. The dad said he fired “to protect others.” That’s a tough call, in my opinion. He didn’t hit either one of the robbers, but his bullets did go somewhere. He claimed he was protecting others, but his actions might have endangered others. He’s lucky he wasn’t charged, and he’s even luckier that his stray bullets didn’t hit an innocent bystander. 

Rob- That is a lot to get right. He had to draw his firearm from concealment, probably on the move, and shoot outdoors at night. We don’t learn to do that in our first class..or even our second class. 

Tiffany- Firearms safety. Marksmanship. Concealed carry. Self-defense on the move. use of lethal force, and low light. Being in the dark meant that our victims were harder to shoot too, so it is a mixed situation.

Rob- How long does that take?

Tiffany- It takes practice. You won’t know how to safely handle a gun after you take the class until you practice on your own. You have to practice at home with an empty gun..we call it dry practice, to learn how to draw. Put in ten minutes of practice every other day and you’ll have it in a month. The more you practice, the more comfortable you’ll be with safe gun-handling, and the less brain power you’ll need to spend on executing those motor skills under stress. That frees up more brain space to focus on staying calm, being mentally nimble, thinking quickly on your feet, and successfully negotiating a life-threatening emergency.

Rob- What would you like us to do when we sell something online?

Tiffany- Make the trade at the police department parking lot at noon. I’m serious. Call the local police and ask them if they have a location with video surveillance so you can safely make the trade.

I don’t know how old the young woman was, but if she was over 18, then she could carry a firearm in Utah. She is going to be out on her own soon and has to provide her own protection.

Rob- Let’s go on.

Tiffany- Our third story happened last week in Deschutes County, Oregon.

Rob- First this message from Doctors for responsible gun ownership, DRGO.us

Rob- Third story- Are you armed at home?

It is about two in the morning when you hear someone kick his way through the back door of your home. You grab your rifle and confront the intruder. The intruder runs away and you call the police. The intruder returns a few minutes later. You hold the intruder until the police arrive. The intruder is charged with first-degree burglary, first-degree criminal trespass and second-degree criminal mischief.

Police say the intruder lives nearby and had tried to break into another home nearby when he left yours.

(Tag- no shots fired)

Tiffany- Our defender had a defensive tool, in this case a rifle. He was able to get to it quickly. He defended himself, but didn’t face an immediate, lethal and unavoidable threat, so he didn’t shoot. That shows good judgement. He called the police and gave a statement.

Rob- We talk about contacting our lawyer when we have to use a gun for defense. Would you give the same advice even if we don’t shoot the gun?

Tiffany-  Absolutely. Using a gun against another human being is fraught with potential legal perils, regardless of whether we actually fire the gun. It’s always a good idea to contact an attorney, especially early after the encounter when outcomes are still uncertain and emotions are running high.

Rob- What would you like us to do if we hear our back door kicked in?

Tiffany-  Our defender in this case did an excellent job of being prepared with a readily accessible defensive tool that he was able to employ without injury or harm. That’s a win for all involved. 

My only caution here would be about holding someone at gunpoint. We are not the police. Obviously it’s a homeowner’s right to do that if he/she chooses, but I have trouble seeing the advantages of that strategy. Let the police do their jobs. You just told this person to leave your house a few minutes ago. You’ve armed yourself because you fear this person poses an immediate lethal threat. If those things are true, then it doesn’t make sense to force the person to remain in your home at gunpoint. 

Tiffany- Our forth story took place last week in New York City.

Rob- Fourth story- Are you armed at work?

It is after midnight as you’re working at a small market. A man walks in and pulls a gun from his pocket. The robber points the gun at you and demands the money from the cash register.

You have your license to carry a gun in your store. You’re carrying your firearm concealed. You step away from the cash register and draw your gun. You shoot your attacker several times. Your attacker runs from the store. You call the police and give a report when they arrive a few minutes later.

Your attacker was found lying on the sidewalk a block away and was taken to the hospital in critical condition.

Tiffany- Our defender had a plan. He had to apply for a permit to own his firearm. He had to apply for a permit to keep it at work. He carried it on his body. Our defender recognized a lethal threat and defended himself. He shot his attacker and didn’t shoot innocent bystanders. He stayed at the scene rather than chase his attacker down the street. Our defender contacted the police. And, wearing a holster gave the defender a safe place to put his gun before the police arrived. 

Rob- That is a lot of preparation. Did you notice anything else?

Tiffany- I was surprised that the article didn’t show security video. Maybe it was there, but wasn’t made public.

Rob- What do you tell your small business owners to do?

Tiffany- Empty the cash register during daylight hours. If possible, have more than one employee in the store at a time. Have both of them armed and trained so they work together in their mutual defense. I also want them to add those cameras. 

Rob- What should we tell the police?

Tiffany- Again, just give police very basic, general information. A man pulled a gun and demanded cash, my life was in danger, I had to defend myself. Then I’d assure police that I do intend to cooperate fully, but first I really need medical attention, and I need to speak to an attorney. Always ask for medical attention even if you don’t think you’re hurt. 

Exit- Rob- that wraps up this episode. Tiffany, thank you for helping us again. Where can we learn more about you?

Tiffany- Look for me at frontsightpress.com and citizenssafety.com

Rob- After you look at Tiffany articles, then leave us a message on the podcast facebook page.

Tiffany- We share this podcast with you for free.  Please share the podcast with a friend and give us a rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher. We’re also available on Google Play Music,Tunein, Spotify, and iHeart Radio.

Rob- This podcast is part of the Self-defense radio network at sdrn.us

I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

The post Episode 169 with Tiffany Johnson appeared first on Self Defense Gun Stories Podcast.

Oct 28 2019

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Episode 168 with Andee Reardon O’Brion

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Rob- Introduction- Welcome to episode 168 of Self-Defense Gun Stories. Maybe you’re well trained, or perhaps you’re simply curious about self-defense. I’m Rob Morse. We’re joined this week by self-defense instructor Andee Reardon O’Brion.

Andee- Hi, Rob.  I’ve been running classes in the rush before the holidays.

Rob- Andee, we received two more ratings and and one more review on iTunes this week (101/58). Please go to the iTunes store where you subscribe to podcasts and give us a rating and leave a comment. This is a shout out to Harley of Arkansas for sending in a self-defense story that happened in his hometown.

Andee- We’ll talk about recent examples where gun owners were in a life threatening situation. Were they lucky, or did they have a plan? What should we do if we were in their place? We give you the links back to the original news article in our show notes and on our website.  Our first story took place last week in Birmingham, Alabama.

Rob- First story-  Are you armed at work?

It is 6:30 in the evening. You’re standing behind the counter in your beauty supply store. The bell rings, and a few seconds later you look up to see two masked men with their guns pointed at you and pointed at the customer in front of them. You step back from the cash register and one of the robbers pushes the customer to the floor. The other robber jumps up on the counter and heads for the open cash drawer. You draw your gun and shoot at the robbers. Both of them run from the store.

Neither you nor your customer are hurt. You call the police and show them the security videos.

Andee- According to the FBI, there were a little over a quarter-million armed robberies in the USA last year. Shop owners know the risks. This shop owner was armed.He also made some good, quick decisions. It was hard to see what he was doing with his hands behind the counter displays. Stepping away from the cash register meant the robber had to look in two directions at one time, at our defender, and at the register. That gave our defender the time he needed to draw his firearm without getting shot. Our defender took his shot, moved to cover, stopped shooting after the thieves ran, called the police and stayed at the scene to give a report.

Rob- He did a lot of things right.  

Andee- He thought about this ahead of time. Having a safety plan for your business is important. He carried a concealed firearm on his body. He also had security cameras that documented the attack and how he defended himself. Having a plan kept him out of the hospital. Those video cameras kept him out of the police station and saved him thousands and thousands of dollars in legal bills.

Rob- What else should we do in a situation like this one?

Andee- Talk to your employees. Include them in the plan, and practice with them. Also, our store owner could use more practice at the shooting range because he missed his attacker at close range. Shooting defensively while being under attack is easier said than done. You must practice.

Rob- We think of that as an easy shot. It takes practice to hit your target at close range?

Andee- You can miss your target even when your attacker is only a few feet away from you. You’re moving. They are moving. Anyone can shoot if they stand still and move slowly. But when someone has a gun pointed at you, you’re in a hurry, and don’t get your shots on target before you press the trigger.. Unless you practice.
Rob- Anything else?

Andee- That is enough for now. Our second story happened last week in Manatee County, Florida.

Rob- Second Story-  Are you armed at home?

It is 10pm. Your son says he sees a strange bicycle and backpack in front of your home. You hear strange sounds coming from outside your home. You grab your gun and walk into your garage. There is a stranger pulling things out of your garage. You ask what he thinks he is doing, but his answer doesn’t make sense. You draw your gun and shout for your son to call the police.

The police arrive a few minutes later and arrest your intruder. He is charged with felony burglary.

(Tag- no shots fired)

Andee- I don’t know about Florida, but here in Maine, stealing someone’s firewood is no joke. I’m thinking the intruder was on drugs since he was taking wood from the garage (in Florida) and stacking it outside. Our defender used verbal commands. He wasn’t attacked, didn’t face an immediate, unavoidable lethal threat, so he didn’t shoot. He called the police and gave a report. But this story could have ended much differently…

Rob- It is fairly common to have someone break into a car, a garage, or a shed outside our home. What would you like us to do in a situation like this?

Andee- Lock your doors and call the police. If everyone is safe in the house DO NOT LEAVE! What if the crazy man in the garage had attacked you? What if he was armed? What if there were several of them? Let the police handle the problem for you. Call the police and be a good witness in the meantime.

Rob- What should we do if we live a long way from the police and it takes them a long time to get to us?

Andee- That is another reason to carry your gun on you. Does your spouse have a gun? Do you have grown children in the home who can help with your defense? Even if your children are small, make them part of the family safety plan so they know what to do and where to go as you wait for police.

It seems unfair, but it is way cheaper and safer to replace the stuff in your garage than to go into your garage, get attacked, and have to shoot someone.

Protecting yourself and your family is your first priority. Firewood isn’t worth losing your life over. Keep your family with you inside and wait for police.

Rob- That sounds like a plan. Do you talk about that plan with your students?

Andee- Yes. We even discuss it often here on the show.  Everyone in your household should be included in a safety plan. Prepare for different situations, practice and make sure everyone knows what to do. Remind your household members what is important to “rescue” and what can be replaced. In this case, the homeowner risked his life and could have ended up in jail because he acted without a plan…  for a pile of wood.

We teach children that in a fire we get out, we don’t worry about toys and things, it’s just important that our loved goes are safe. Same thing goes. When I teach a concealed carry course, we talk about the shark tank factor. You don’t use your firearm to protect something you wouldn’t protect from a shark- (explain the shark tank factor)

Our third story happened last week outside of New Orleans, Louisiana.

Please support FASTER Colorado at Coloradans for Civil Liberties

Rob- Third story- Are you armed at home?

You are watching your three great-grandchildren. It is just before midnight when your granddaughter arrives to pick up her kids. She looks upset, and tells you to call the police because her boyfriend is outside threatening her. Before you complete the call, the boyfriend comes into your home and starts hitting you. You run to the back of your home and grab your shotgun. The boyfriend is pushing your granddaughter and her children outside. You shoot him and he drives away with your granddaughter. Now you call the police. They arrest your attacker at a nearby hospital. He is charged with home invasion, battery, kidnapping, domestic abuse and child endangerment. He is being held without bail.

Andee- Wow. There is a lot to say about this. I’d like to make a point to say we don’t have a gun problem in the USA, we have a domestic violence problem. Thankfully, our defender had a gun at home. He tried to stop a kidnapping. He did not chase the fleeing attacker as he drove away, and our defender did not injure innocent bystanders. He stayed at the scene and called the police.

Rob- What would you tell your students to do in a situation like this?

Andee- Our defender was lucky the attacker didn’t follow him into the back of the home. I want you to make a habit of locking your doors. Carry your defensive tools on your body. This attack happened in Louisiana, and Louisiana issues concealed carry permits. That means you can be prepared at home and outside your home. This is particularly important if you know there is a history of domestic violence with family or friends. Also, talk with your family members and have a plan so you know how to help each other during an emergency.

Rob- Tell me a little bit about that family plan.

Andee-  A family plan should include a safe room where you can secure yourself and loved ones until help arrives.  You should all know whose role is to call 911 and who is to retrieve a weapon to use in case the safe room has been breached. There’s escape routes to plan, a meeting place (could be a neighbor’s house or a tree) and what is to be said to the police when they arrive.

Rob- This situation is very different that slowly shooting a piece of paper at 20 feet at the shooting range. Where should we learn to draw a concealed firearm and shoot accurately?

Andee-  If you took a basic pistol class and haven’t gone beyond that, I really want to challenge you to take your skills to the next level.  Find a concealed carry class, intermediate or advanced pistol class. Look for workshops and skill development courses in your area. You may even need to travel a little to get some good training.  It’s worth it. Practice at home. Drawing practice and dry fire doesn’t cost a cent and you can do it at home while you watch TV. If you’re not doing this at the bare minimum, you’re cheating yourself out of skills you may need to save your life.

Rob- Where do we go next?

Andee- Our forth story took place last week in Andrews, Texas.

Rob- Fourth story- Are you armed as you drive?

You and your friend stopped your car in front of the post office. You hear someone shout and you see a woman fall to the ground. Her attacker has a knife in his hand and is stabbing the woman. You get out of the car and step towards them. Now the woman runs across the street to enter a business there. Her attacker moves toward you with his knife still in his hand. He has tattoos on his face. You and your friend present your firearms and tell the man to stop. You order him to the ground and call the police and EMTs.

EMTs take the injured victim to the hospital, and the police arrest your attacker. Your attacker was charged with two counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and assault against a family member after a previous conviction of domestic violence.

(Tag- no shots fired)

Andee- Our defenders saw an assault. They saw a woman fleeing, being overtaken, they saw her fall, and they saw her being stabbed. They both decided that this was an immediate lethal threat and that the victim had not precipitated the assault with an earlier threat. The defenders were armed and they used verbal commands. They used the threat of lethal force to stop that attack on the woman and to prevent the attack on themselves. The injured victim fled, and the good guys called the police. The defenders remained on the scene and gave a statement.

Rob- What would you like us to do if we were in that situation.

Andee- Our defenders were both armed. If they had practiced together at all, then they were a very hard target for the attacker. They could defend themselves and they could stop any further attack on the injured victim. But there is more I want to say.

Rob- Talk to me.

Andee- It’s super important in this situation to know your rights. You are not a cop, the same rules do not apply. You need to know the limits of what is allowed or you can become the aggressor. Suppose you stopped the attack, and the attacker turns and walks away. You no longer face a lethal threat. We are not the police and we can’t use lethal force against the attacker at that point.

Rob- This is our second story this week where the defenders didn’t shoot anyone.

Andee- Most defenders don’t press the trigger. Most criminals don’t want to be shot, not by the police and not by us either. Knowing how to conduct yourself in this type of situation can keep you from ever needing to press the trigger. Read up on verbal commands, build scenarios in your head and practice how you would react to an active assailant situation.

Andee- The USCCA’s Concealed Carry course is a great class and goes over what the requirements are to keep yourself legally justified to shoot.  If you can, find a concealed carry course in your area that also has a lawyer teaching the law portion of the course. The information in either of these courses could save your life or at least protect you from jail.

 I’d also like to point out that if this had happened IN the post office, the story could have ended much differently. Because it’s a federal building, the concealed carriers who stopped the attacker from doing more harm would not have been able to legally be carrying their firearms in the building. I point this out because a lot of gun laws sound like a good idea until you realize that they only prevent good people from being able to stop crime.

Exit-  Rob- that wraps up this episode. Andee, thank you for helping us again. Where can we learn more about you?

Andee- Look for me at EastCoastSchoolofSafety.com and on my facebook and Instagram pages with the same name.

Rob- After you look at Andee’s classes, then leave us a message on the podcast facebook page.

Andee- We share this podcast with you for free.  Please share the podcast with a friend and give us a rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher. We’re also available on Google Play Music,Tunein, Spotify, and iHeart Radio.

Rob- This podcast is part of the Self-defense radio network. Find more great shows at sdrn.us I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

The post Episode 168 with Andee Reardon O’Brion appeared first on Self Defense Gun Stories Podcast.

Oct 17 2019

18mins

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Episode 167 with Jeff Street

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Rob- Introduction-

Perhaps you’re curious about self-defense, or maybe you’re already trained. Welcome to episode 164 of Self-Defense Gun Stories. I’m Rob Morse. We’re joined this week by self-defense instructor Jeff Street.

Jeff- Hi, Rob.  I’ve been working and shooting and teaching. I taught a legal minds class and also taught 25 yard shots in a private lesson, started toastmasters so I’ll speak better. 

Rob- We received 5more ratings and 2 more comments on iTunes. Please go to the iTunes store where you subscribe to podcasts and let new listeners know that this podcast is worth their time.

Jeff- We’ll look at examples where gun owners were in a life threatening situation. Were they lucky, or did they know what to do? We post the links back to the original news article in our show notes.  Our first story took place last week in Salina, Kansas. (Sal-line-ah)

Rob- First story-  Are you armed at home?

You and your daughter are at home on a Thursday night. You hear a crash from the other end of the house and walk toward the sound to see what happened. You see a stranger standing in your house. Your front door is broken, and the man is grabbing his foot that is bleeding on your floor.

You tell him to get out, but he says he’s being chased by other people, and the stranger tries to close and lock your front door.

You shout for your 12 year old daughter to grab your gun, and you stay between the intruder and your daughter. A moment later your daughter brings you your gun. You tell the stranger that you’ll shoot him if he comes any closer. Then you call the police.

The police arrest the stranger and take him to the hospital for treatment.

Tag- No Shots Fired

Jeff- Let’s start with what our defender did correctly.

Our defenders had a plan. Dad and daughter talked about what to do if there were an intruder in the house.

Dad stayed between the intruder and his family.

He asked his daughter to get his gun, his self-defense tool.

He retreated, because his self-defense tool will work at a distance.

He told the intruder that he would shoot if he came closer.

He called the police.

The police came and no one got shot.

Rob- All that is true, but this story seems strange.

Jeff- I’ll bet the intruder was on drugs. He might have turned violent, but he didn’t, so our good guy didn’t have to shoot.

Rob- What would you like us to do in a situation like this.

Jeff- Have your defensive tool with you. Have your phone with you. It would be nice to a tourniquet with you too.

Once you see a bad guy in your home. Back away and call the police.

Rob- Anything else you notice?

Jeff- What happened to the gun when the police arrive? This is what I want you to do if you don’t have a holster. I’m concerned that his 12 year old daughter had access to his firearm. I’d rather the gun was on his body and secure.

Rob- That is important.

Jeff- Please secure your firearm when it isn’t on your body. And that’s enough for now. Our second story happened last week in Nicholasville, (Nic-O-Lass-Vill) Kentucky

Rob- Second Story-  Are you armed as you drive?

You’ve been here before. It is an hour after dark on a Saturday night. You’re delivering pizza to a hotel. You pick up your carry pack and walk toward the front door. A man and a boy walk across the parking lot to meet you. A moment later you notice that the man has a gun in his hand. He tells you to give him your wallet and cell phone.

You’re armed. You put down your pizza boxes. You also reach for your gun and shoot your attacker. Your attacker shoots back as he hobbles to his car and drives away. The police arrest your attacker and his teenage accomplice when he pulled over to treat his injuries.

You and the rest of the people in the parking lot are unhurt.

Fallacy: “They came out of Nowhere”. 

Jeff- Look at what happened. Our good guy had his hands full of packages when he was attacked. He was in a public place with other people in the parking lot. He was attacked by two people after dark. That is a lot to overcome.

The good news is that our defender was armed. He had a plan. 

Rob- What would you like us to do if we were in a similar situation? 

He didn’t stand there handcuffed by the pizza boxes while he was searched and robbed of his wallet, his phone, his keys and his gun. It sounds like our defender was aware of the people standing near or behind his attackers, and our good guy didn’t shoot anyone who didn’t need to be shot. Our good guy stopped shooting as the bad guys ran away. 

Our defender also stayed at the scene to talk to the police.

Jeff- I wonder if the delivery driver could have parked right in front of the main entrance.

If you’re attacked, then hand the pizza boxes, or your groceries, or your purse, to your attacker. Now his hands are full. Move as you draw and move as you shoot. Keep moving until you have a car between you and the threats. Scream for help. That will get everyone to look at you and you want a lot of witnesses. Don’t worry about saying words as you yell, just make noise. When the immediate threat has gone away, then shout for everyone to call 911 as you put away your gun.

Rob- I’ve been on the road for the last few weeks. Are parking lots dangerous?

Jeff- They are the hunting grounds of choice for criminals because the robbers can get away so easily.

Rob- It sounds like our defender was carrying on body and had to present his firearm from a holster. Let’s say that I have my concealed carry permit. What happens next so that I know how to quickly and reliably present a firearm in a stressful situation?

Jeff-  Our third story happened last week in San Pedro, California.

Rob- Please support the Crime Prevention Research Center at http://crimeresearch.org/

Rob- Third story- Are you armed at home?

You’re at home on a weekday morning. You hear someone banging on your front door. The stranger says to open up because he lives here and needs to get inside. You’re the homeowner, and you tell the stranger to go away. A minute later, you hear a window open at the side of your house, and a stranger walks into your home. You’re armed. You stay between the intruder and the other residents in your home. You shout for the intruder to leave. Your gun is out and you say you’ll call the police. The intruder says, “uck the police”, and lunges at you. You shoot the intruder three times and then back away. The intruder backs up. You call the police.

The police say that the intruder tried to break into another home on the next block and stole a car.

Possible Suicide by Home Owner?

Jeff- Our defender was armed. He had a dog that was probably barking at the intruder. The defender kept the other occupants of the house from being attacked. He called police. He did not close with the attacker but defended himself when he was attacked. Our defender stopped shooting when the threat stopped. The defender retreated to safety, and then stayed at the scene to talk with police.

Rob- Is there something else our defender might have done?

Jeff- Lock your windows and doors. It would be great to have an alarm. It sounds like there was another adult in the house. It would have been better if she had been armed as well. Our defender could have been shot if our defender was armed. That is why we want to retreat to a safe room with the rest of the occupants and call the police.

Rob- The intruder claimed he lived there. 

Jeff- We don’t know if he said that as a was to get the occupants to let him in, or if the intruder was hallucinating. Most assailants are intoxicated, so he could have been drugged or crazy.

Rob- Can you think of anything else we should know before we go on?

Jeff- Home invasions happen pretty often. I like having a security alarm as well as two alarm dogs. 

Also, it isn’t clear that our defender had a holster with him. Don’t have a gun in your hands when the police arrive. The other people in the house can meet the police and tell them the gun has been put away.

Our fourth story took place last week in Conyers, Georgia.

Rob- Fourth story- Are you armed at home?

It is early in the morning, and you’re standing outside your home with your girlfriend and your nephew. Your mom is inside the house. Three young men walk up to you. They are wearing masks. They tell you to hand over your wallet, and one of the young men points a gun at your family. He shoots at your house and your car.

You’re armed. You step to the side and present your firearm. You shoot the armed gunman in front of you, and then you shoot the other two attackers. Your attackers run, but you see one of them fall. You and your family retreat into your house. You stay inside and call the police. None of your family is hurt.

The police said your three attackers were 15 and 16 years old.

Jeff- The evidence we have so far looks like a clear case of self defense, however some community leaders are second guessing our defender without any evidence supporting their claims.

We don’t know what an attacker will look like. It sounds like this defender was armed and carrying on his body. He protected his family. He stopped the thereat and then retreated. He called the police and then gave a statement.

Rob- You’ve called the police. What happens next?

Jeff- Get your family to a safe location. In this case, inside your home. Stay on the phone with 911. Put your gun into its holster so it isn’t in your hand.

Rob- This has just been the worst day you’ve ever had. What do you say to the police?

Jeff- Don’t say a lot. Say this. I was attacked. My attackers were armed and I had to defend myself and my family. I think they shot at me, so there might be shell casings and bullet holes out front. I’ll cooperate completely and answer all your questions after I talk to my lawyer.

Exit-  Rob- that wraps up this episode. Jeff, thank you for helping us again. Where can we learn more about you?

Jeff- Find me at Step by Step Gun Training in Naples Florida.  We provide group classes as well as custom training and weekend competition. Leave us a message on the Step by Step Facebook page.

Rob- After you look at Jeff articles, then leave us a message on the podcast facebook page.

Jeff- We share this podcast with you for free.  Please share the podcast with a friend and give us a rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher. You can also find us on Google Play Music,Tunein, Spotify, and iHeart Radio.

Rob- This podcast is part of the Self-defense radio network at sdrn.us

I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

The post Episode 167 with Jeff Street appeared first on Self Defense Gun Stories Podcast.

Oct 09 2019

15mins

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Episode 166 with Elizabeth Hautman

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Rob- Introduction-

Perhaps you’re curious about self-defense, or maybe you’re already trained. I’m glad you found us. Welcome to episode 166 of Self-Defense Gun Stories. I’m Rob Morse. We’re joined this week by self-defense instructor Elizabeth Hautman.

Elizabeth- Hi, Rob.  I’ve been working and shooting.

Rob- We received two more comments on iTunes. Thank you Jagger and Maaco. (94/56). Please go to the iTunes store where you subscribe to podcasts and give us a rating and leave a comment. You can share the podcast on Facebook from iTunes.

Elizabeth- We’ll talk about recent examples where gun owners were in a life threatening situation. Were they lucky, or did they have a plan? What should we do if we were in their place? We give you the links back to the original news article in our show notes.  Our first story took place last week in Daphne, Alabama.

Rob- First story-  Do you have a gun nearby at home?

You’re a 44 year old woman. It is Tuesday morning and you’re getting out of the bath. Your kids rush in and say that someone came into the  house, and that the intruder doesn’t belong there. You grab some clothes and confront a woman standing in your house. She used to live here, but doesn’t live here any longer. You back up to your bedroom and get your handgun from your dresser. Again you demand that the woman leave your house. She lunges for your gun. The attacker stops and runs away when you shoot her. You stop too, and call the police.

Elizabeth- This mom did a lot to save herself and her kids. She was armed. She protected her children when the intruder tried to disarm her. She didn’t chase the intruder, but stayed to take care of her kids. And, she called the police.

Rob- She was successful, but there are a few things we should do.

Elizabeth- Please lock your outside doors. Make the bad guy smash his way inside before they can get to your kids, and it doesn’t cost you a penny.  Have you gun in a secure rapid access safe where you children can not reach it. That costs about $100. Talk to your children so your entire family has a plan. Then I want you to practice the plan with your children. Do a practice intruder drill the same way you walk through a fire drill. We don’t want the children near the attacker, even if the attacker used to live in the same house.

Rob- When do you talk about that with your students?

Elizabeth-  It’s an important part of my class. We need to run drills with our family.

Rob- Anything else?

Elizabeth- I’d like you to carry on body with your gun in a holster. That way you don’t have to run away from the attacker and leave your children vulnerable as you go get your gun. Then again, I’ll give you a pass while you’re  in the bath.

Rob- Anything else?

Elizabeth- That is enough for now. Our second story happened last week in Coshocton County, Ohio.

Rob- Second Story-  Are you armed at a fast food restaurant?

You’re a 70 year old man and you drive into McDonalds for an early lunch just before noon. You’re standing in line when another customer starts threatening to stab other customers and the clerks behind the counter. You can’t believe it at first. Then you take the attacker seriously and start to step back. You notice that some of the customers are women with young kids. Some of the clerks behind the counter are only teenagers.

You have your Kentucky concealed carry license. Your license is good here in Ohio, and you’re armed today. You draw your firearm and tell the attacker to put down the knife and to stop threatening people. You tell him again, and now he turns and walks out of the store. There are people outside, so you follow the attacker. Again, you tell him to drop the knife before the police arrive.

The young man drops the knife. The police take him into custody a few minutes later. The police said you might have saved lives inside the restaurant..and saved the attackers life as well by getting him to drop the knife.

(Tag- No shots fired)

Elizabeth- Our defender might have saved a lot of lives. We don’t know if the attacker was on drugs, if he was out for money, or if he wanted to commit mass murder. No one expects to be robbed at McDonalds, but that is why we carry all the time and we carry on our person. The gun wasn’t outside in his truck or in his briefcase.

He presented his firearm and then used verbal commands to try and stop the threat. He followed the attacker because there were other innocent people outside.

Rob- What else did you see?

Elizabeth- Our defender had every right to shoot immediately. This time, the verbal commands stopped the threat. It could just as easily been that the attacker lunged at an innocent person and stabbed them before you could stop him. We don’t know, and we can’t know what the attacker will do.

We want to tell the innocent people to back away and call 911. We also want a few of the people who are talking to 911 to stay with us and tell us when the police are about to arrive. We want to re-holster our gun when they jump out of the police cars.

Rob- It sounds like the defender felt compelled to get involved. He couldn’t stand back and be a good witness.

Elizabeth- There were kids and teenagers at risk, and they can’t defend themselves. They depend on us to protect them.

Rob- When do you talk to your students about a situation like this?

Our third story happened last week in Guthrie, Oklahoma.

Rob- First this message from the Buckeye Firearms Foundation

Rob- Third story- Are you armed at home?

You’re working at home when your daughter runs in to get you. She says, “Dad, there is a guy in our garage. I think it might be the guy they talked about on the news.” The guy your daughter is talking about is wanted by the police. If your daughter saw the man then it is a good guess that he saw your daughter as well. You tell her to call 911 and to wait inside. You grab your gun and look through the window. You see the man in your garage and go towards him. You order him to the ground. The fugitive complies. The criminal and his girlfriend have been robbing small stores and stealing cars in Texas and Oklahoma.

(tag no shots fired)

Elizabeth- Let’s give credit to both the dad and the daughter. She retreated. She got help from her dad. She called 911. Good for her.

Dad had a gun. He ordered the intruder to the ground, and didn’t shoot when there was not an immediate, serious, and unavoidable threat. Dad complied with the police when they got there, and the bad guy went to jail.

Rob- What would you like us to do?

Elizabeth- I watched the video, and the daughter was old enough to go armed at home. I want dad armed as well with a gun on his hip. What would have happened if the intruder was armed and the bad guy followed the young woman inside?  Dad was lucky that he had time to get his gun. Now you have to protect your family with your bare hands, and that is a bad plan.

I tell my students to lock the door, get your gun, retreat to a safe room with your family, and call the police.

Rob- When do you talk about that with your students?

Elizabeth- This family didn’t have a plan. The daughter said she didn’t know what to do in the television interview. One of the best ways to protect your family is to talk with them about what to do if you have an intruder.

Elizabeth- Our forth story took place last week in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Rob- Fourth story- Are you armed at work?

It is 3am and you’re behind the counter at your 7-11 convenience store. A man runs in with a gun in his hand. He points the gun at you and then jumps over the counter. You let him take the money from the cash register. Some of your employees and customers sneak into the back room. After the robber stuffs his pockets, he follows your employees toward the back.

You’re armed. You draw your handgun and shoot the attacker. He shoots back. You’re hit. The robber runs out the back and you lock the door behind him.

Your employees and customers are shaken but not hurt. Now you call the police and EMTs. The police find the wounded robber across the street. Both of you are taken to the hospital.

Your attacker is charged with attempted robbery with a dangerous weapon, assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill, inflicting serious injury and possession of a firearm by a felon.

Elizabeth- Wow. The store owner was willing to give up the money, but not the safety of his employees and customers.  Good for him. He had a gun. He waited until he had to use it. He stayed at the scene and made it safe by locking the back door. Then, he called police. 

Rob- The store owner was shot but he continued to protect innocent people.

Elizabeth- That is what good guys do.

Rob- You have small business owners as clients. What do you want them to do in a situation like this?

Elizabeth- My students often ask me when to shoot and when to stop shooting. Shoot when you face an immediate, lethal, and unavoidable threat to you or other innocent people. Shoot until the threat stops.

Rob- What else would you like us to do?

Elizabeth- These convenience stores are robbed frequently. See if more than one of your employees can carry a gun. Talk with them, have a plan of action, and train with them.

There is a frightening thing that happens in a robbery like this. Everyone drops to the floor when the shooting starts. That means there are a lot of bodies lying on the floor when robber runs away, but you don’t know if they are hurt or injured. Go to your employees and customers and tell them it is safe to get up. Make sure they are OK and ask them to call 911.

I assume the store had video surveillance.  Have a medical trauma kit at the store and train your employees how to use it. Notice that both of these individuals were shot and both survived.

Exit-  Rob- that wraps up this episode. Elizabeth, thank you for helping us again. Where can we learn more about you?

Elizabeth- I instruct in Colorado Springs at my private range in Black Forest. Contact me at Colorado Boots Firearms Instruction.

Rob- After you look at Elizabeth’s classes, then leave us a message on the podcast facebook page and the self defense gun stories webpage.

Elizabeth- We share this podcast with you for free.  Please share the podcast with a friend and give us a rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher. We’re also available on Google Play Music,Tunein, Spotify, and iHeart Radio.

Rob- This podcast is part of the Self-defense radio network at sdrn.us

I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back in a few weeks with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

The post Episode 166 with Elizabeth Hautman appeared first on Self Defense Gun Stories Podcast.

Sep 16 2019

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