Cover image of Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon
(190)

Rank #72 in Government category

Government
Science
Social Sciences

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #72 in Government category

Government
Science
Social Sciences
Read more

No Jargon, the Scholars Strategy Network’s weekly podcast, presents interviews with top university scholars on the politics, policy problems, and social issues facing the nation. Powerful research, intriguing perspectives -- and no jargon. Find show notes and plain-language research briefs on hundreds of topics at www.scholarsstrategynetwork.org/nojargon.

Read more

No Jargon, the Scholars Strategy Network’s weekly podcast, presents interviews with top university scholars on the politics, policy problems, and social issues facing the nation. Powerful research, intriguing perspectives -- and no jargon. Find show notes and plain-language research briefs on hundreds of topics at www.scholarsstrategynetwork.org/nojargon.

iTunes Ratings

190 Ratings
Average Ratings
162
15
3
7
3

Excellent

By dabidm - Nov 09 2018
Read more
Excellent, digestible nuggets of wisdom. Just jump past the circus-y and abrasive intro jingle.

Very informative

By Mr. Buster! - Mar 16 2018
Read more
I only wish we could hear more right leaning researchers, but even so, really good material

iTunes Ratings

190 Ratings
Average Ratings
162
15
3
7
3

Excellent

By dabidm - Nov 09 2018
Read more
Excellent, digestible nuggets of wisdom. Just jump past the circus-y and abrasive intro jingle.

Very informative

By Mr. Buster! - Mar 16 2018
Read more
I only wish we could hear more right leaning researchers, but even so, really good material

Listen to:

Cover image of Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

No Jargon, the Scholars Strategy Network’s weekly podcast, presents interviews with top university scholars on the politics, policy problems, and social issues facing the nation. Powerful research, intriguing perspectives -- and no jargon. Find show notes and plain-language research briefs on hundreds of topics at www.scholarsstrategynetwork.org/nojargon.

Episode 162: The Hidden Listings

Podcast cover
Read more

Real estate agents help us navigate the housing market, get the best prices, and find the perfect house to call a home. But they also help decide who gets to live where, and not everyone gets the same options. Professor Elizabeth Korver-Glenn shares her research on the hidden ways real estate agents keep neighborhoods segregated, and what can be done to change their ways.

For more on this topics:

Jan 17 2019

21mins

Play

Episode 188: Why Cities Lose

Podcast cover
Read more

Imagine a nation where the political rules are unfair. In this imagine nation, there are two parties. The Big Country party has its strengthen in rural areas and gets a big head start in every election - they get to win if they earn around 46 percent of the vote. The other party, the party of the city people, gets held back - to win, they need to earn about 54 percent of the vote. As it turns out, this is not an imaginary nation at all, it’s the United States of America. Professor Jonathan Rodden dives into the research from his book on why cities lose when it comes to elections, what that means for our political system, and what can be done to change the situation.

Aug 29 2019

28mins

Play

Episode 177: Unintended Consequences

Podcast cover
Read more

Public policy influences just about every part of our lives, and perhaps one of the most important is our health and well-being. In this episode, produced in collaboration with the Health Policy Research Scholar program by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, two PhD candidates share their research on some unintended consequences at the intersection of health and policy. First, Tyler Jimenez explains how existential threats, like the fear of death, can affect people’s support for policies meant to address health inequalities. Next, Amy Jones lays out how the lives of students of color are impacted by our push for diversity on campuses, and what this means for their health.

For more on this topic:

May 30 2019

25mins

Play

Episode 126: Checking the President

Podcast cover
Read more

The Founding Fathers made sure to put checks in place that would prevent a president from becoming a king. But Professor Larry Jacobs explains that when it comes to foreign policy, the president goes largely unchecked. Next, Professor Frances Lee outlines the ways Congress has rebuked presidential power, even under the current administration. And finally, Professor Keith Whittington takes us to the courts, which have been skeptical of many of President Trump’s executive orders.

For More on this Topic:

Apr 25 2018

31mins

Play

Episode 58: Politics of Resentment

Podcast cover
Read more

Professor Kathy Cramer shares lessons from her conversations with rural communities in Wisconsin. Rural voters often feel forgotten, misunderstood, and disrespected, which directly affects their sense of politics and whom they elect to office.

Nov 15 2016

24mins

Play

Episode 105: The Captured Economy

Podcast cover
Read more

Inequality is on the rise in America, but what’s behind it? Professor Steven Teles and Dr. Brink Lindsey lay out how federal and state policies help the rich get richer, slow economic growth, and promote inequality.

For More on This Topic:

Further Reading:

Nov 08 2017

28mins

Play

Episode 175: Groundbreakers, part 1

Podcast cover
Read more

For many renters, evictions can depend on the whims and wishes of their landlord. And with no right to a lawyer in housing court, there’s almost no chance to fight back and win. But that all recently changed in New York City and San Francisco. Professor Jamila Michener explains how both cities came to enact groundbreaking new laws to help tenants get access to a lawyer and what the movements behind these laws say about the power of organizing.

For more on this topic:

May 16 2019

27mins

Play

Episode 169: Who Controls the States?

Podcast cover
Read more

We like to think that state governments make decisions based on their particular situations. But it turns out, often that’s not the case. In fact, three large conservative groups have gained massive influence in state houses across the country, working to pass legislation in line with their views and corporate sponsors. Professor Alexander Hertel-Fernandez explains their rise and strategies, why state governments are so susceptible to their influence, and what this all means for American democracy.

For More on This Topic:

Mar 28 2019

29mins

Play

Episode 62: You’re Fired

Podcast cover
Read more

Tech error fixed: Professor Peter Shane describes the court case that could give the president new authority to fire any federal official, for any reason. He explains the history of the theory behind the court’s ruling and arguments for and against it.

Dec 09 2016

27mins

Play

Episode 29: Part 1. What Made America Great

Podcast cover
Read more

Professor Paul Pierson presents the forgotten history of American prosperity: how public and private sectors worked together for economic growth and social progress. This mixed economy increased life spans, built infrastructure, and spurred innovation.

Apr 19 2016

26mins

Play

Episode 4: The Student Debt Crisis

Podcast cover
Read more

Professor Nicholas Hillman discusses the burden of student debt and dispels common misconceptions. Hillman is an Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Nov 03 2015

25mins

Play

Episode 189: Who Owns America’s Schools?

Podcast cover
Read more

Back-to-school season is upon us, and back as well are some familiar debates. From charter schools to voucher programs, education in America is becoming more privatized than ever - and some communities are pushing back. Professor Janelle Scott reveals why so many schools are shifting toward privatization, why these reforms are so controversial, and what they mean for inequality in America’s education system.

For more on this topic:

  • Check out Scott’s research paper with Jennifer Holme on this topic (paywall)

Sep 05 2019

28mins

Play

Episode 125: Losing the Party

Podcast cover
Read more

US politics is built around two parties, but recently there have been growing rifts between and within them. First, Professor Eliot Cohen explains why some Republicans, like himself, left the party after the 2016 election. Next, Professor Didi Kuo highlights the importance of political parties for democracy and why many voters feel disconnected from them.

For More on this Topic:

Apr 18 2018

29mins

Play

Episode 127: Surviving Poverty

Podcast cover
Read more

America—the world’s wealthiest country—is home to over 40 million people living under the poverty line. And for many, there is no safety net to fall back on. Professor Joan Maya Mazelis explains how we got here and highlights one innovative organization, run by and for poor people, that builds community among the poor and provides help when the safety net is missing.

For More on this Topic:

May 02 2018

23mins

Play

Episode 3: The Tea Party Divided

Podcast cover
Read more

Professor Heath Brown discusses the Tea Party, explaining how this conservative movement has grown and changed – and how it may shape the 2016 elections. Brown is an Assistant Professor of Public Management at the City University of New York. 

Oct 28 2015

25mins

Play

Episode 90: The Past and Future of the Constitution

Podcast cover
Read more

Is the U.S. Constitution about to change? Professor David Marcus lays out why some states are calling for a constitutional convention to introduce amendments. And Professor David Robertson delves into the history behind this founding document.

For More on This Topic

Further Reading

Jul 12 2017

30mins

Play

Episode 18: Feminism, A Century Later

Podcast cover
Read more

Professor Kristin Goss explains how women’s groups have grown, shrunk, and fought against getting pigeonholed in the century since they gained the vote. Goss is an Associate Professor of Public Policy and Political Science at Duke University.

Jan 26 2016

22mins

Play

Episode 49: Science of Abortion Law

Podcast cover
Read more

Professor Ushma Upadhyay examined an abortion pill law in Ohio that required health care providers to use outdated FDA rules. Said to protect women’s health, the law instead hurt women’s health and increased the cost and time spent for the procedure.

Sep 06 2016

20mins

Play

Episode 72: Power in Politics

Podcast cover
Read more

The outsized influence of money is a problem in U.S. politics. Sean McElwee and Professor Tabatha Abu El-Haj describe how donors skew policy and how getting more people to vote could counter big money in politics where repealing Citizens United cannot.

For More on this Topic:

Further Reading:

Feb 23 2017

38mins

Play

Episode 24: Senate Chamber, Echo Chamber

Podcast cover
Read more

Professor Dana Fisher shows that policymakers only hear scientific information about climate change that reaffirms their own positions. Fisher is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Maryland.

Mar 08 2016

25mins

Play

Episode 200: Democracy in the States

Podcast cover
Read more

This year, millennials officially became the largest generation in America. In passing over Baby Boomers, these young Americans, along with Generation Z, have the potential to change US politics by making their voices heard at the polls. The only problem is, many of them don’t turn out to vote. Professor Jake Grumbach explains what’s behind their low voter turnout, how one policy could change that, and what this all says about the role of states in pushing US policy and democracy forward.

Dec 05 2019

31mins

Play

Episode 199: Empty Wallets, Empty Stomachs

Podcast cover
Read more

The old saying goes: breakfast is the most important meal of the day. And yet, across the country, there are thousands of children who struggle to find a good meal in the morning. In fact, hunger is likely a bigger problem in this country than most people realize. Professor Maureen Berner lays out the problem of food insecurity in American, what it can tell us about the larger issue of poverty, and how we need to reframe our thinking to address the problem.

For more on this topic:

Nov 21 2019

26mins

Play

Episode 198: What’s My Schedule?

Podcast cover
Read more

Imagine you’re a working parent. You make ends meet with a part-time job at a department store, but the ever-changing schedule makes life difficult. Some weeks, you work so much that you’re left scrambling for last-minute childcare. Others, you barely get enough hours to cover all your expenses. Professor Susan Lambert describes why this has become the reality for an increasing number of Americans, how these scheduling practices impact both employees and their employers, and what policymakers can do to ease the burden.

For more on this topic:

Nov 14 2019

28mins

Play

Episode 197: Making Research Matter

Podcast cover
Read more

What works best to teach children in our schools? How does pollution affect public health? Why is economic inequality on the rise? These are just some of the big and important questions researchers try to answer every day. But all too often, their findings don’t actually help usher in improvements in the lives of people. Why not? The William T. Grant Foundation’s Vivian Tseng shares the history of research use in U.S. education policy, how a new approach to research can improve connections between scholars and policymakers, and what further changes are needed to make research matter.

For more on this topic:

  • Read Vivian’s blog post about evidence use across sectors and around the globe
  • Find her paper with Professor Cynthia Coburn on using evidence in the U.S.
  • Check out the William T. Grant Foundation’s research grants on improving the use of research evidence

Nov 07 2019

28mins

Play

Episode 196: The Rise of Anti-LGBT Hate Crimes

Podcast cover
Read more

Twenty-one years ago this month, a gay University of Wyoming student by the name of Matthew Shepard was brutally murdered. His story brought national attention to anti-LGBT hate crimes and spurred a popular movement for hate crime legislation. Since then, the LGBT community has won major advances and become more visible than ever - but hateful attacks are on the rise. Professor Liz Coston explores why these crimes keep happening, what they look like in 2019, and what can be done to protect and support the LGBT community in the years to come.

For more on this topic:

Oct 31 2019

25mins

Play

Episode 195: The Promise of Midwives

Podcast cover
Read more

America is the richest country on Earth with some of the most advanced healthcare services you can find. And yet, every year, hundreds of women die during childbirth, an issue that particularly affects black women. One of the potential solutions that’s being offered: returning to the centuries old practice of community midwives. Rachel Applewhite lays out what research can tell us about the effectiveness of midwives and doulas, how they help serve communities left behind by our healthcare system, and what can be done to expand access to their potentially life-saving services.

For more on this topic:

Oct 24 2019

24mins

Play

Archive Episode 87: NAFTA Winners and Losers

Podcast cover
Read more

Despite an ongoing impeachment inquiry, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi has been signaling that a new trade deal with Mexico and Canada is in the final stages of negotiations, and Congress could be ready for a vote in the near future. In this archive episode, Professor Alyshia Gálvez dives into the often overlooked consequences of this trade agreement on food and health in both the U.S. and Mexico. 

For more on this topic:

Oct 17 2019

25mins

Play

Episode 194: The Science of Science Communication

Podcast cover
Read more

With a global climate strike on September 20th and waves of protests surrounding the UN summit on climate change, public interest in science seems to be on the rise. And scientists are answering the call, with more researchers than ever taking to social media to share their work with the public and each other. Professor Sara Yeo discusses how different audiences perceive science communication, the ways in which emotions can factor into it, and how scientists can make the most of engaging online.

For more on this topic:

Oct 10 2019

18mins

Play

Episode 193: The Toll of Stereotypes

Podcast cover
Read more

America’s schools are supposed to treat all students fairly. But we know that all too often, black students face racial discrimination, stigma, and stereotypes in their schools. And for black girls in particular, that can be compounded by their gender as well. Professor Seanna Leath explains how do these experiences affect the lives and development of black girls, what broader stereotypes and stigmas exist around mental health for black women, and what can be done to improve the situation.

For more on this topic:

Oct 03 2019

26mins

Play

Episode 192: Black Homes, Black Cities

Podcast cover
Read more

Memphis, Baltimore, and Detroit. East Cleveland, Ohio, and Wilkinson, Pennsylvania. Black cities are on the rise. In 1970, Black people made up a majority of 460 cities and towns across the United States. Forty-seven years later, the number of majority Black municipalities is up to 1,262. Dr. Andre Perry discusses what is driving this increase, why black cities and black neighborhoods have been devalued, and how America can do right by these places.

For more on this topic:

Sep 26 2019

23mins

Play

Episode 191: Paying for Pollution

Podcast cover
Read more

Climate change is threatening our world, that much is becoming more and more apparent every year. And often it seems like little is happening on a policy level to address this impending crisis. But, in 2008, a group of states in the Northeast managed what seemed nearly impossible. They put in place a robust, multi-state system to put a price on carbon. Professor Leigh Raymond explains how they were able to overcome obstacles that have doomed so much other climate policy, how exactly this system works, and what lessons can be learned for other climate proposals.

For more on this topic:

Sep 19 2019

22mins

Play

Episode 190: Dental Care for All

Podcast cover
Read more

For many people, regular visits to the dentist are little more than a necessary inconvenience. But in lower-income communities, access to dental care can be all but nonexistent - with serious consequences for public health. Professor Donald Chi lays out how a single childhood cavity can lead to a lifetime of problems, why so many people struggle to access even basic dental care, and what policymakers can do to provide every American with the coverage they need.

For more on this topic:

Sep 12 2019

20mins

Play

Episode 189: Who Owns America’s Schools?

Podcast cover
Read more

Back-to-school season is upon us, and back as well are some familiar debates. From charter schools to voucher programs, education in America is becoming more privatized than ever - and some communities are pushing back. Professor Janelle Scott reveals why so many schools are shifting toward privatization, why these reforms are so controversial, and what they mean for inequality in America’s education system.

For more on this topic:

  • Check out Scott’s research paper with Jennifer Holme on this topic (paywall)

Sep 05 2019

28mins

Play

Episode 188: Why Cities Lose

Podcast cover
Read more

Imagine a nation where the political rules are unfair. In this imagine nation, there are two parties. The Big Country party has its strengthen in rural areas and gets a big head start in every election - they get to win if they earn around 46 percent of the vote. The other party, the party of the city people, gets held back - to win, they need to earn about 54 percent of the vote. As it turns out, this is not an imaginary nation at all, it’s the United States of America. Professor Jonathan Rodden dives into the research from his book on why cities lose when it comes to elections, what that means for our political system, and what can be done to change the situation.

Aug 29 2019

28mins

Play

Episode 187: Red Flags

Podcast cover
Read more

El Paso, Texas. Dayton, Ohio. These two cities are the latest in a long string of communities that have experienced horrific mass shootings. And once again, the news of these shootings bring up many questions. Dr. Sierra Smucker lays out what we know about mass shooters and the connection to domestic violence, what gun regulations are already on the books and whether or not they seem to be effective, and what more can be done to prevent future shootings. 

For more on this topic:

Aug 22 2019

26mins

Play

Episode 186: Modernizing Congress

Podcast cover
Read more

The US Congress is a bedrock of American democracy, but as it stands, it often seems to be stuck in the dark ages. With more and more technology emerging to help connect people, ideas, and information across the country, Congress often still works as if the internet didn’t exist. Dr. Lorelei Kelly dives into the problems facing Congress, what it takes to bring this institution into the 21st century, and how a few members are leading the way.

For more on this topic:

Aug 15 2019

24mins

Play

Archive Episode 71: Violence in Resistance

Podcast cover
Read more

Around five years ago, Ferguson, Missouri erupted in violent protests after the fatal police shooting of teenager Michael Brown. The Ferguson protests were part of a wave of protests nationwide spurred by police shootings of unarmed black men and the disproportionate violence that communities of color have often faced. In this archive episode, Professor Ashley Howard explains what these protests mean, what their history is, and how new laws, policing methods, and social media are changing the way people demonstrate.

For More on this Topic:

Aug 08 2019

24mins

Play

Episode 185: America’s Long Immigration Debate

Podcast cover
Read more

At the beginning of his campaign for president, Donald Trump disparaged Mexican immigrants coming to the US and since then, immigration has been a centerpiece of his administration. But to say that America’s immigration debate started with Donald Trump is simply not true. Professor James Hollifield highlights the long history of immigration policy in this country and argues that the conversation won’t be going away any time soon, no matter what happens in 2020.

For more on this topic:

Aug 01 2019

26mins

Play

Episode 184: Hollywood’s Diversity Problem

Podcast cover
Read more

When the 2016 Academy Award acting nominations all went to white performers for the second consecutive year, a trending hashtag - #OscarsSoWhite - swept Twitter. But in the span of just a few years, things seem to have changed. Professor Nancy Yuen explains the state of diversity in Hollywood, what challenges persist today, and how to reform the industry.

Jul 25 2019

26mins

Play

Episode 183: Do Endorsements Really Matter?

Podcast cover
Read more

When politicians run for local office, they try to appeal to lots of different kinds of voters. And one way they do this is by collecting endorsements from public figures and organizations those voters trust. But does that actually influence the way people vote? Professor Andrea Benjamin explores the role of endorsements in local elections, how race plays into the equation, and what this means for campaigns both big and small.

For more on this topic:

Jul 18 2019

24mins

Play