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Government
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Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

Updated 2 months ago

Government
Science
Social Sciences
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No Jargon, the Scholars Strategy Network’s weekly podcast, presents interviews with top university scholars on the politics, policy problems, and social issues facing the nation. Powerful research, intriguing perspectives -- and no jargon. Find show notes and plain-language research briefs on hundreds of topics at www.scholarsstrategynetwork.org/nojargon.

Read more

No Jargon, the Scholars Strategy Network’s weekly podcast, presents interviews with top university scholars on the politics, policy problems, and social issues facing the nation. Powerful research, intriguing perspectives -- and no jargon. Find show notes and plain-language research briefs on hundreds of topics at www.scholarsstrategynetwork.org/nojargon.

iTunes Ratings

200 Ratings
Average Ratings
168
17
3
8
4

Excellent

By dabidm - Nov 09 2018
Read more
Excellent, digestible nuggets of wisdom. Just jump past the circus-y and abrasive intro jingle.

Very informative

By Mr. Buster! - Mar 16 2018
Read more
I only wish we could hear more right leaning researchers, but even so, really good material

iTunes Ratings

200 Ratings
Average Ratings
168
17
3
8
4

Excellent

By dabidm - Nov 09 2018
Read more
Excellent, digestible nuggets of wisdom. Just jump past the circus-y and abrasive intro jingle.

Very informative

By Mr. Buster! - Mar 16 2018
Read more
I only wish we could hear more right leaning researchers, but even so, really good material
Cover image of Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

Latest release on Jun 25, 2020

Read more

No Jargon, the Scholars Strategy Network’s weekly podcast, presents interviews with top university scholars on the politics, policy problems, and social issues facing the nation. Powerful research, intriguing perspectives -- and no jargon. Find show notes and plain-language research briefs on hundreds of topics at www.scholarsstrategynetwork.org/nojargon.

Rank #1: Episode 127: Surviving Poverty

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America—the world’s wealthiest country—is home to over 40 million people living under the poverty line. And for many, there is no safety net to fall back on. Professor Joan Maya Mazelis explains how we got here and highlights one innovative organization, run by and for poor people, that builds community among the poor and provides help when the safety net is missing.

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May 02 2018

23mins

Play

Rank #2: Episode 105: The Captured Economy

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Inequality is on the rise in America, but what’s behind it? Professor Steven Teles and Dr. Brink Lindsey lay out how federal and state policies help the rich get richer, slow economic growth, and promote inequality.

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Further Reading:

Nov 08 2017

28mins

Play

Rank #3: Episode 4: The Student Debt Crisis

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Professor Nicholas Hillman discusses the burden of student debt and dispels common misconceptions. Hillman is an Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Nov 03 2015

25mins

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Rank #4: Episode 119: Democracy in Decline

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It’s no secret. Our political future is uncertain and unpredictable. Author and scholar Yascha Mounk outlines how economic inequality, a backlash against increasing diversity, and the rise of social media all threaten democracies across the globe—and what we can do to save them.

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Further Reading:

Mar 07 2018

26mins

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Rank #5: Episode 3: The Tea Party Divided

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Professor Heath Brown discusses the Tea Party, explaining how this conservative movement has grown and changed – and how it may shape the 2016 elections. Brown is an Assistant Professor of Public Management at the City University of New York. 

Oct 28 2015

25mins

Play

Rank #6: Episode 58: Politics of Resentment

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Professor Kathy Cramer shares lessons from her conversations with rural communities in Wisconsin. Rural voters often feel forgotten, misunderstood, and disrespected, which directly affects their sense of politics and whom they elect to office.

Nov 15 2016

24mins

Play

Rank #7: Episode 116: Myth of Millionaire Tax Flight

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Raising taxes on the rich encourages job creators to skip town. Or so say some economists and policymakers. This week, Professor Cristobal Young dispels the myth of millionaires leaving high tax states and shows the many ways the wealthy are invested in the places they live.

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Further Reading:

Feb 14 2018

22mins

Play

Rank #8: Episode 213: Learning from Ebola

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With governments rushing to put in place policies and guidelines to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus, it’s important to look to the past to inform the present. And we don’t have to look far. Just 5 years ago, the world was concerned with a completely different outbreak: ebola. Professor Lily Tsai and Dr. Ben Morse examine how governments at the epicenter of the ebola outbreak responded to the spread of the disease, what the role of trust is in ensuring that people comply with government recommendations, and how leaders can build trust and buy-in both during and before a crisis.

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Apr 02 2020

29mins

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Rank #9: Episode 98: The Cost of College

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High costs are making college unaffordable, or even impossible, for many Americans. Professor Nicholas Hillman outlines why student loan debt has become such a major issue. Professor Laura Perna highlights a potential solution -- free tuition programs.

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Further Reading:

Sep 05 2017

27mins

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Rank #10: Episode 95: Who is Affirmative Action For?

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Colleges highlight how affirmative action increases diversity on campus. Professor Natasha Warikoo discusses new investigations into school admissions and how focusing on diversity ignores the real reasons for affirmative action.

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Further Reading:

Aug 15 2017

23mins

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Rank #11: Episode 62: You’re Fired

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Tech error fixed: Professor Peter Shane describes the court case that could give the president new authority to fire any federal official, for any reason. He explains the history of the theory behind the court’s ruling and arguments for and against it.

Dec 09 2016

27mins

Play

Rank #12: Episode 18: Feminism, A Century Later

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Professor Kristin Goss explains how women’s groups have grown, shrunk, and fought against getting pigeonholed in the century since they gained the vote. Goss is an Associate Professor of Public Policy and Political Science at Duke University.

Jan 26 2016

22mins

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Rank #13: Episode 72: Power in Politics

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The outsized influence of money is a problem in U.S. politics. Sean McElwee and Professor Tabatha Abu El-Haj describe how donors skew policy and how getting more people to vote could counter big money in politics where repealing Citizens United cannot.

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Further Reading:

Feb 23 2017

38mins

Play

Rank #14: Episode 29: Part 1. What Made America Great

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Professor Paul Pierson presents the forgotten history of American prosperity: how public and private sectors worked together for economic growth and social progress. This mixed economy increased life spans, built infrastructure, and spurred innovation.

Apr 19 2016

26mins

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Rank #15: Episode 147: In Government We Distrust

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The government fights forest fires, protects us from foreign invasion, helps people go to college, and so much more. But Americans’ opinions of the government are increasingly negative. Professor Suzanne Mettler dives into why people don’t believe the government benefits them, even when it does, and how to bridge this disconnect between the government and the American people.

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Sep 13 2018

20mins

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Rank #16: Episode 15: Too Many Workers

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Daniel Alpert explains how the opening of the global market ​has reduced the bargaining power of workers at home and ​encouraged a global cycle of booms and busts. Alpert is a Fellow at The Century Foundation and a Managing Partner at Westwood Capital.

Jan 05 2016

26mins

Play

Rank #17: Episode 159: The Diaper Dilemma

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Babies need diapers. But for 1 in 3 mothers, diapers are just too expensive to always have on hand. And that can leave children and families in a precarious situation. Professor Jennifer Randles lays out the diaper dilemma, how it affects America’s families, and what policies can be put in place to help solve the problem.

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Dec 13 2018

24mins

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Rank #18: Episode 112: A Campaign Pitch

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The 2018 midterms are rapidly approaching and voters want to believe they’re going to make rational choices at the polls. But as Professor Casey Klofstad explains, there is an unexpected factor influencing voter behavior and affecting our elections—the tone of a candidate’s voice.

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Further Reading:

Jan 17 2018

24mins

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Rank #19: Episode 13: The Misinformation Age

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Professor Brian Southwell explains why people tend to believe false information and discusses strategies for correcting the public perception of misinformation. Southwell is a professor of Mass Communication at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Dec 22 2015

26mins

Play

Rank #20: Episode 66: Supreme Inequality

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The Supreme Court is helps shape civil rights in the United States, but it is less recognized for its role in intensifying economic inequality. Professor Stephen Gottlieb details cases in the high court that have promoted these inequalities.

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Further Reading:

Jan 10 2017

29mins

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Episode 225: Black Lives Matter, Police, and America’s Democracy

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Since the murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police at the end of May, the United States has been rocked by weeks of nationwide protests against police brutality, and it doesn’t look like they’re going anywhere anytime soon. Professor Vesla Weaver dives into how this movement is different from protests of the past, what brought us to the current situation, how our nation’s police system has affected Black and Brown people’s lives and understanding of our democracy, and what to make of calls for changes, such as abolishing the police.

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Note: This episode includes some explicit language.

Jun 25 2020

34mins

Play

Episode 224: Voting in 2020

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The 2020 election was already shaping up to be one of the most consequential and contentious in recent memory, and then came the COVID-19 pandemic. While much about the future is uncertain, we know this: the election cannot be run as originally planned. Professor Amel Ahmed lays out what policymakers can do to ensure that all voters can exercise their right to vote, what research can tell us about these various proposals, and how we can ensure that the public knows everything they need to vote before November comes.

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Jun 18 2020

21mins

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Episode 223: The Future of Abortion Care?

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Even at the best of times, accessing abortion care in the United States can be an arduous process. During a pandemic, the challenges only mount further. Clinics are closed down and, in some places, politicians have begun using COVID-19 to block abortion, calling it “nonessential” healthcare. Professor Carrie Baker explores whether telemedicine abortion could provide a solution, what barriers exist to implementing it, and what this all means for the future of reproductive rights in the United States.

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Jun 11 2020

34mins

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Episode 222: Violence in Resistance

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In cities and towns across the country, protests have erupted following the police killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, and others. While many of the protests remained peaceful, others turned violent, with buildings being destroyed or looted and clashes breaking out between the police and protestors. In this archive episode, Professor Ashley Howard explains the history behind these protests, why protests sometimes turn violent, how governments often respond, and what the role of social media is in all of this.

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This episode originally aired on February 14, 2017.

Jun 02 2020

24mins

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Episode 221: America’s Undocumented Students

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Being a college student can be stressful enough, but when you’re an undocumented immigrant, there are many additional hurdles in your way. Dr. Sayil Camacho unpacks what it’s like to be an undocumented student at our nation’s colleges and universities, what more university administrators and faculty can do to support them, and how DACA and the upcoming Supreme Court decision on the program factor into it all.

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May 28 2020

30mins

Play

Episode 220: Vaccination Education

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As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve, it’s widely accepted that without a vaccine, life cannot go back to normal. But as it turns out, not everyone is on board. Over the last several years, an anti-vaccine movement has gained steam in the United States, with more and more people deciding to skip vaccines for themselves and their children. In this archive episode, Dr. Matthew Woodruff dives into the science and history behind vaccines and how we can better educate people on their value.

This episode originally aired on August 8, 2017.

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May 21 2020

27mins

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Episode 219: The College Hookup

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The scene is so common it’s almost cliche: two beautiful young people meet at a rowdy college party and drunkenly fall into bed together. American pop culture is fascinated by college hookups, but is casual sex really as widespread as it seems? Professor Lisa Wade breaks down who participates in hookup culture, what they get out of it, and as more students speak up about the problem of on-campus sexual assault, what role universities have to play in shaping their sexual cultures.

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May 14 2020

29mins

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Episode 218: When Disasters Strike

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In any sense of the word, the COVID-19 crisis can be considered a disaster. Tens of thousands of people have lost their lives, millions have lost their jobs, and nearly everyone is experiencing a sense of shock at how quickly our world was turned upside down. But of course, the current crisis is also dramatically different from previous disasters, like hurricanes or wildfires. Professor Susan Sterett dives into how COVID-19 follows the same patterns of previous disasters and how it diverges, what we can learn from previous disasters to inform our current efforts, and how we can prepare for a future where the coronavirus will inevitably collide with other disasters.

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May 07 2020

28mins

Play

Episode 217: Feeling the Economic Pain

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Every Thursday since America started locking down to prevent the spread of the deadly coronavirus, a tragic new number is released: the latest unemployment claims. Tens of millions of Americans have already filed for unemployment, and that number is likely to keep going up. Professor Anna Gassman-Pines lays out who is most affected by the dramatic economic downturn we’re seeing, what job losses mean for children, families, and entire communities, and how policymakers can help buffer against some of the worst effects of this economic crisis.

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Apr 30 2020

25mins

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Episode 216: A Model for Care

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With the COVID-19 crisis spreading rapidly across the US, much attention has been paid to the hospitals on the front lines of this pandemic. But there is another set of healthcare providers that also has a crucial role to play in managing this outbreak: community health centers. Professor Peter Shin unpacks what exactly community health centers are, why they were established and who they serve, what role they have to play in the COVID-19 pandemic, and how policymakers can ensure their survival during this unprecedented time.

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Apr 23 2020

19mins

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Episode 215: Polarization in a Pandemic

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We’re in April, as the world grapples with the coronavirus pandemic. Today, the U.S. has more reported cases than any other nation on earth - a fact that may in part be due to testing levels, but could also be due to a series of massive public policy mistakes. In the U.S., the federal response has been chaotic, to say the least. And here’s one reason: President Donald Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi don’t talk to each other. The intense anger and distrust between Republicans and Democrats could literally be costing our nation lives. Lee Drutman explains how we got into this mess and how we can get out of it. 

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Apr 16 2020

30mins

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Episode 214: A Second Safety Net

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As policymakers on Capitol Hill work to expand America’s safety net in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and economic downturn, it’s becoming increasingly clear that it might not be enough. So where can we look for guidance on what more needs to be done? Perhaps another deadly virus, HIV, where a separate and robust safety net has been established to support those who have been diagnosed. Professor Celeste Watkins-Hayes explains what the HIV/AIDS safety net looks like, what we can learn from this previous effort to combat a deadly virus, and how the inequalities of the HIV/AIDS epidemic are playing out with coronavirus.

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Apr 09 2020

35mins

Play

Episode 213: Learning from Ebola

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With governments rushing to put in place policies and guidelines to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus, it’s important to look to the past to inform the present. And we don’t have to look far. Just 5 years ago, the world was concerned with a completely different outbreak: ebola. Professor Lily Tsai and Dr. Ben Morse examine how governments at the epicenter of the ebola outbreak responded to the spread of the disease, what the role of trust is in ensuring that people comply with government recommendations, and how leaders can build trust and buy-in both during and before a crisis.

For more on this topic:

Apr 02 2020

29mins

Play

Episode 212: Fighting Hunger During a Pandemic

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Around the United States, schools are shutting down due to coronavirus. For some Americans, this means setting up a home office and learning to work with children underfoot. But others are facing a far more serious crisis: with school cafeterias closed indefinitely and employment increasingly precarious, how will they manage to put food on the table? Professor Daphne Hernandez lays out the problem of food insecurity in America, how coronavirus is affecting the situation, and what policymakers can do to help families in need -- now and in the future.

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Mar 26 2020

23mins

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Episode 211: Rethinking Global Philanthropy

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Money. Power. Knowledge. Health. Education. When you look around the world, when it comes to resources and opportunities, there are massive imbalances between countries and even inside countries. In the name of making the world a better place, people and institutions with great wealth often donate some of their money around the world through philanthropy. Rakesh Rajani shares stories and lessons learned from years of work in global philanthropy and outlines what changes are needed to make this work more effective and meaningful.

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Mar 19 2020

26mins

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Episode 210: Students at the Polls

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With the 2020 primary in full swing, college campuses are full of conversations about politics, policy, and the future of American democracy. But many of these college students don’t turn out when it actually matters, on Election Day. In fact, in the last presidential election, only around half of all young voters came out to the polls. In this archive episode, Dr. Nancy Thomas explores what gets students to vote and how college administrators, faculty members, and students can improve voting rates on their campuses.

This episode originally aired on October 11, 2018.

For more on this topic:

Check out a Washington Post story about their 2018 midterm election report showing that rates among college students doubled

Mar 12 2020

24mins

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Episode 209: Reporting from the Twittersphere

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Social media has permeated countless aspects of our daily lives. But perhaps no platform has influenced the media like Twitter, shaping not only what many journalists cover, but also how they cover it. Professor Shannon McGregor dives into the role of Twitter in today’s media environment, why the platform is an imperfect measure of public opinion, and how social media can become a better tool for journalists working with limited resources at their disposal. 

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Mar 05 2020

29mins

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Episode 208: On the Abortion Front Line

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Over the last couple of years, states have passed increasingly restrictive laws in an effort to reduce access to abortion. And this year, the Supreme Court is deciding on new cases that could validate some of the harshest laws, potentially opening the door for an end to Roe v. Wade. But at the forefront of this fight over abortion access are providers few people know about: independent abortion clinics. PhD candidate Amy Alterman explains what exactly these independent clinics are, how they are affected by anti-abortion stigma, and how comedians are helping to lift up and support their work.

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Feb 27 2020

33mins

Play

Episode 207: From The Tea Party to The Resistance

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In 2009, Barack Obama was sworn in as the first African American president in this country’s history after a momentous election. But for many in this country, that election was anything but joyous. Soon after, a movement that became known as the Tea Party took shape on the right in opposition to this president and his policies. Fast forward 8 years and a very familiar story seemed to play out, but this time on the left. It became known as The Resistance. PhD candidate Leah Gose explains what similarities and differences exist between these two groups and what we can learn by looking at the two of them together.

Feb 20 2020

32mins

Play

Episode 206: Creating Inclusive Campuses

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Over the last few decades, minority enrollment at America’s colleges and universities has increased exponentially. These institutions, many predominantly white, like to tout enrollment rates as evidence of their commitment to racial diversity. But do these numbers tell the whole story? Professor Bedelia Richards details how black students still frequently experience discrimination on campus, what this means for their education and wellbeing, and how universities can make change to help create more inclusive campuses.

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Feb 13 2020

28mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

200 Ratings
Average Ratings
168
17
3
8
4

Excellent

By dabidm - Nov 09 2018
Read more
Excellent, digestible nuggets of wisdom. Just jump past the circus-y and abrasive intro jingle.

Very informative

By Mr. Buster! - Mar 16 2018
Read more
I only wish we could hear more right leaning researchers, but even so, really good material