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Education
Society & Culture
Personal Journals

Tape

Updated 4 days ago

Education
Society & Culture
Personal Journals
Read more

A radio show about people who make radio, hosted by Mooj Zadie and Mickey Capper.

Read more

A radio show about people who make radio, hosted by Mooj Zadie and Mickey Capper.

iTunes Ratings

68 Ratings
Average Ratings
58
6
1
3
0

Interview big names in podcasts

By Podcast fan 12345 - Dec 15 2015
Read more
They have an impressive line up of podcasters!

Great insight ... Great guests

By Frequentflyer26 - Jan 21 2015
Read more
Wonderful, startling, fun conversations about the characters of the people of pubradio.

iTunes Ratings

68 Ratings
Average Ratings
58
6
1
3
0

Interview big names in podcasts

By Podcast fan 12345 - Dec 15 2015
Read more
They have an impressive line up of podcasters!

Great insight ... Great guests

By Frequentflyer26 - Jan 21 2015
Read more
Wonderful, startling, fun conversations about the characters of the people of pubradio.

Listen to:

Cover image of Tape

Tape

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

A radio show about people who make radio, hosted by Mooj Zadie and Mickey Capper.

11: Alex Goldman + PJ Vogt

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Alex Goldman and PJ Vogt are the creators of TLDR.

"The internet can feel like the same thing over and over again, and sometimes that's because the internet is the same thing over and over again. But sometimes it's because you've hemmed yourself to a boring internet by just paying attention to people who are much the same as you. So to the extent that we can get out of that, it gives our show more longevity."

Aug 26 2014

59mins

Play

34: Mike Pesca

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Mike Pesca is the host of Slate's The Gist.

"There was a time when the most intelligent guy in your town was just the guy who knew the most — he knew the family genealogy, he knew facts. We've gotten away from that. The facts are there on a computer. So I think the definition of intelligence has a lot to do with synoptical connections — the ability to make connections, the ability to make analogies. So I have these conceptual scopes — I find a way to tie seemingly disparate things together. This is how my mind naturally thinks, but this is also — since I have this show I know that I have to turn out content for it — this is how I've conditioned my mind to think."

Jun 27 2016

54mins

Play

33: Sruthi Pinnamaneni

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Sruthi Pinnamaneni is a producer at Reply All.

“It’s almost like me and the other person were learning about each other. And I don’t ever think about it like oh this is what makes this person weird or this is a weird moment. It’s just like moments where a thing feels real. You hear somebody tell you something and you feel like they’re telling it for the first time, and you just can’t get that quickly. It just takes time.”

Jun 21 2016

53mins

Play

38: Alex Blumberg

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Alex Blumberg is the co-founder of Gimlet Media. Prior to that he was a producer for This American Life.

"A big lesson for me is that there aren't really rules. If [the radio story] is really fun, and you really love it, it's probably going to work. ... And if it doesn't, if it drags, then you should come in with script. ... In the beginning, I was always asking myself, here's this like 3 minute piece of tape in my story — and every other piece of tape had been like 30 to 45 seconds, and here's this one that's a 3 minute chunk — but I think I like it at 3 minutes. Can I do it at 3 minutes or do I have to break it up? And the answer is yeah, if it works at 3 minutes then you can do it at 3 minutes. And if it doesn't, then it doesn't. And the more that happens where I am like my whole story was a piece of teaser tape — 12 seconds of tape here, and 12 seconds of tape here — and then 5 minutes where everything happens, that's fine. If it works, it works."

May 10 2017

1hr 32mins

Play

18: Alix Spiegel

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Alix Spiegel, a former producer at This American Life, is the co-host of NPR's Invisibilia.

"I always want to understand like why? What do you know that I don't know? What is your life? And how do you see the world? And that's it."

Feb 27 2015

45mins

Play

32: Jonathan Menjivar

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Jonathan Menjivar is a producer at This American Life.

"When I started in radio I imagined myself on the radio more. But I've come to a place where it doesn't matter to me. I just want to make stuff."

May 24 2016

59mins

Play

12: Stephanie Foo

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Stephanie Foo, a former producer at Snap Judgment, is a producer at This American Life.

"I think everybody has a story that is worth telling, but I think most people don't know what their best story is. At all. They'll think that it's their most life or death moment or that it's the moment that they feel changed them the most, but sometimes it's the most surprising little moments that really touch people. And I don't even know necessarily what those moments are in my life."

Sep 11 2014

49mins

Play

17: Andrea Silenzi

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Andrea Silenzi is the creator and host of Why Oh Why?. She's also the Senior Producer of Slate's The Gist.*

"I listen to a lot of radio and there's so much of 'This person wrote a book.' 'This person has a project.' 'This person has been working on this for years.' And I just think that I much prefer conversations where people have a personal connection that's at stake. ... Like I always get the pitch of I want to do speed dating and it's like no one I've ever known has actually sincerely ever done speed dating. So If I were to do a show about speed dating it would be the most inauthentic thing possible."

(*This episode is guest hosted by Avery Trufelman.)

Jan 22 2015

44mins

Play

15: Lynn Levy

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Lynn Levy is a producer at Radiolab.

"Sometimes if you’re interviewing an author they’ve already worked out the best way to tell the story. They’ve been through all the options in their head, they figured out what to omit and what to get rid of. And often times, even though they’re not reading from the book, they’ll literally be saying the words that they wrote down. Like you’ll hear phrases from the book in what they’re telling you. … And it can be really seductive when you’re interviewing these people because they’re giving it to you. You’re just like, well this is going to be very easy to edit. Thank you. The thing is when you actually do go to edit it it doesn’t have anything. It doesn’t have any tension, it doesn’t have any pathos, it doesn’t have any like… um… It doesn’t have any um! It doesn’t have any moments where you can hear somebody working things through. And I think one of the things that radio producers kind of know is that it’s a better story if something happens. You want to go out in the field and something is going to happen and you are going to record it and that’s going to make a better story. But that’s even true about interviews. You want something to happen in the person who’s talking while you’re talking to them. You want them to figure something out or work something through or confront something, if possible. … They think they know how the story goes and you have to convince them otherwise."

Dec 04 2014

46mins

Play

16: Hillary Frank

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Hillary Frank is the host and creator of The Longest Shortest Time.

"I hate small talk, and it makes me very uncomfortable. I don't know how to do it well. I want to have a real conversation with a person."

Dec 30 2014

52mins

Play

37: Lu Olkowski

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Lu Olkowski, an independent radio producer, is the host of CBC's Love Me.

"You spend so much time with people and I just think it's so shitty to suddenly — the story airs and you — disappear. ... I think that's terrible. And I just don't want to do that."

Feb 21 2017

39mins

Play

10: Tamara Keith

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Tamara Keith is NPR's White House Correspondent. She also co-founded B-Side Radio.

"There's drama in the human experience, and if people are willing to share that, there's a way to make it into a good story... says the person who only does stories about the White House and Congress."

Aug 08 2014

50mins

Play

35: Julia Barton

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Julia Barton is a freelance editor who edits for Revisionist History, The World, and Studio 360. She reports for Radiolab, Marketplace, 99% Invisible, and more.

"If people think they might want to be an editor the first step is to pitch to places that have good editors and get edited and really pay attention to that process. ... But also the second thing is to just listen to work — work that you like and work that you don't like — and figure out how are you reacting to it. Like where am I bored? Where am I confused? Where am I checking Twitter? Alternately, why am I unable to do what I thought I was doing because the story is so damn good that I can't do anything but listen to it?"

Jan 24 2017

1hr 2mins

Play

13: Michael May

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Michael May, a Third Coast Gold Award winner, is a freelance radio and print journalist. He teaches radio documentary at the Salt Institute.

"I'm not interested in doing stories where I just label somebody some clinical label — a misogynist, sociopath. It's so easy to dismiss people, it's much more difficult to understand them."

Sep 29 2014

55mins

Play

36: Lewis Wallace

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Lewis Wallace was a reporter for Marketplace.

"I think our listeners and audiences are strong enough to hold that I can have a credible voice in reporting a story, and a truthful voice in reporting a story, and also have a perspective."

Feb 08 2017

1hr

Play

14: Pejk Malinovski

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Pejk Malinovski is a poet and a radio producer.

"I feel like when I make structure it's not a traditional Hollywood storyline where there's a beginning and a middle and an end and a conflict and resolution I think it's more about tension and release. I think it's more about composing musically basically."

Nov 03 2014

49mins

Play

9: Ann Heppermann

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Ann Heppermann, a Peabody Award winner, produces Slate's Culture Gabfest. She teaches radio writing and radio drama at Sarah Lawrence College.

"I don't think you want all crappy tape, but there's something about texture of crappy tape and Skype tape. If you think about sound as a palette, I kind of like phone tape and I like how it adds an element of grit to it."

Jul 16 2014

38mins

Play

30: Jessica Abel

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Jessica Abel is the author of Out on the Wire.

"The group edit format, while emotionally difficult, actually is an incredibly efficient tool. In an hour, two hours, you can get the intellectual work done on a piece that could take weeks without it.”

Mar 01 2016

30mins

Play

31: Emily Botein

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Emily Botein is the Vice President for On-Demand Content of WNYC.

"I feel like as a producer, the whole goal is to have someone become more human, reveal something more personal, say something surprising. So it's your job to make an unrealistically good situation — everything has to be perfect for the host, you want the host to be super comfortable, whatever the host likes. And stupid things, from like what they want to drink, to how they want the mic positioned, to where they want to sit, to anything. It's like you want to make a heightened version of life because you're trying to create a moment. You're not just trying to go gather a story. Something is supposed to happen on the tape. So you need to do everything possible to think about what can happen, and how can you try to trigger it."

Apr 14 2016

38mins

Play

29: Tim Howard

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Tim Howard is the senior producer of Reply All.

"You can do radio stories without stakes they just have to be really fun."

Jan 26 2016

1hr

Play

43: Nadia Sirota

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43: Nadia Sirota

Nadia Sirota is the host and co-creator of Meet the Composer and an acclaimed violist.

“I actually feel like somebody being joyful about something in their life is wonderful. ... There's this temptation when you're in college, and definitely when you're in conservatory, to try to find the right constellation of things to hate. That will make other people think you're smart. And it's really tempting, and it's really easy, in some levels, to sort of fall into that kind of negative world. In classical music, God knows there's so much tearing down of people and of technique and of whatever. ... It's so boring, and it's fascinating to listen to people talk about stuff they love because it requires a little bit of vulnerability. And also that's the kind of excitement that brings you to love something yourself.”

Oct 24 2019

38mins

Play

42: Avery Trufelman

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Avery Trufelman is a producer of 99% Invisible and the host of Articles of Interest.

“The literal battleground of interior and exterior forces in your world is what you’re wearing.”

Oct 18 2018

55mins

Play

41: Ira Glass

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Ira Glass is the host and executive producer of This American Life.

“It’s not an accident I made a radio show where I am having intimate conversations with people on tape. ... Like the only person who would go to the trouble to invent something like that is somebody who has difficulty with intimacy, you know what I mean? And I think that I totally was inventing a thing to do in conversations with people on tape that I was having so much trouble doing in real life.”

Oct 03 2018

50mins

Play

40: Julie Snyder

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Julie Snyder is the co-creator of Serial and S-Town. Prior to that, she was the senior producer of This American Life.

"So the original conceit [of This American Life] was using the tools of journalism to [tell stories from] everyday life but then I felt like we flipped it back. ... Like why can’t we take then the same sort of narrative tools that we have, that people use to just talk ... and apply that back to things that are traditionally topical stories and news stories?"

Sep 26 2018

56mins

Play

39: Robert Smith

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Robert Smith is a correspondent for NPR's Planet Money.

"I've done [radio] for 30 years. I don't want to come in and do the same story every time. Like I want things to be challenging. … And it's solely for myself. It's solely so I don't sound like a lot of NPR reporters — they've been there, they've seen it, they've done it. ... Even ones who are really good. They're just like, "I am good at this, I am doing what I always do." And so if the very least thing that comes out of [experimenting] is, "My God! That reporter sounds excited to be in a place, that reporter sounds engaged with people, that reporter feels like he or she is present, is listening," it's exciting! And so, that may be the only thing that people hear, is that — "Wow! You know, Robert seems like he really likes his job."

Nov 08 2017

1hr 31mins

Play

38: Alex Blumberg

Podcast cover
Read more
Alex Blumberg is the co-founder of Gimlet Media. Prior to that he was a producer for This American Life.

"A big lesson for me is that there aren't really rules. If [the radio story] is really fun, and you really love it, it's probably going to work. ... And if it doesn't, if it drags, then you should come in with script. ... In the beginning, I was always asking myself, here's this like 3 minute piece of tape in my story — and every other piece of tape had been like 30 to 45 seconds, and here's this one that's a 3 minute chunk — but I think I like it at 3 minutes. Can I do it at 3 minutes or do I have to break it up? And the answer is yeah, if it works at 3 minutes then you can do it at 3 minutes. And if it doesn't, then it doesn't. And the more that happens where I am like my whole story was a piece of teaser tape — 12 seconds of tape here, and 12 seconds of tape here — and then 5 minutes where everything happens, that's fine. If it works, it works."

May 10 2017

1hr 32mins

Play

37: Lu Olkowski

Podcast cover
Read more
Lu Olkowski, an independent radio producer, is the host of CBC's Love Me.

"You spend so much time with people and I just think it's so shitty to suddenly — the story airs and you — disappear. ... I think that's terrible. And I just don't want to do that."

Feb 21 2017

39mins

Play

36: Lewis Wallace

Podcast cover
Read more
Lewis Wallace was a reporter for Marketplace.

"I think our listeners and audiences are strong enough to hold that I can have a credible voice in reporting a story, and a truthful voice in reporting a story, and also have a perspective."

Feb 08 2017

1hr

Play

35: Julia Barton

Podcast cover
Read more
Julia Barton is a freelance editor who edits for Revisionist History, The World, and Studio 360. She reports for Radiolab, Marketplace, 99% Invisible, and more.

"If people think they might want to be an editor the first step is to pitch to places that have good editors and get edited and really pay attention to that process. ... But also the second thing is to just listen to work — work that you like and work that you don't like — and figure out how are you reacting to it. Like where am I bored? Where am I confused? Where am I checking Twitter? Alternately, why am I unable to do what I thought I was doing because the story is so damn good that I can't do anything but listen to it?"

Jan 24 2017

1hr 2mins

Play

34: Mike Pesca

Podcast cover
Read more
Mike Pesca is the host of Slate's The Gist.

"There was a time when the most intelligent guy in your town was just the guy who knew the most — he knew the family genealogy, he knew facts. We've gotten away from that. The facts are there on a computer. So I think the definition of intelligence has a lot to do with synoptical connections — the ability to make connections, the ability to make analogies. So I have these conceptual scopes — I find a way to tie seemingly disparate things together. This is how my mind naturally thinks, but this is also — since I have this show I know that I have to turn out content for it — this is how I've conditioned my mind to think."

Jun 27 2016

54mins

Play

33: Sruthi Pinnamaneni

Podcast cover
Read more
Sruthi Pinnamaneni is a producer at Reply All.

“It’s almost like me and the other person were learning about each other. And I don’t ever think about it like oh this is what makes this person weird or this is a weird moment. It’s just like moments where a thing feels real. You hear somebody tell you something and you feel like they’re telling it for the first time, and you just can’t get that quickly. It just takes time.”

Jun 21 2016

53mins

Play

32: Jonathan Menjivar

Podcast cover
Read more
Jonathan Menjivar is a producer at This American Life.

"When I started in radio I imagined myself on the radio more. But I've come to a place where it doesn't matter to me. I just want to make stuff."

May 24 2016

59mins

Play

31: Emily Botein

Podcast cover
Read more
Emily Botein is the Vice President for On-Demand Content of WNYC.

"I feel like as a producer, the whole goal is to have someone become more human, reveal something more personal, say something surprising. So it's your job to make an unrealistically good situation — everything has to be perfect for the host, you want the host to be super comfortable, whatever the host likes. And stupid things, from like what they want to drink, to how they want the mic positioned, to where they want to sit, to anything. It's like you want to make a heightened version of life because you're trying to create a moment. You're not just trying to go gather a story. Something is supposed to happen on the tape. So you need to do everything possible to think about what can happen, and how can you try to trigger it."

Apr 14 2016

38mins

Play

30: Jessica Abel

Podcast cover
Read more
Jessica Abel is the author of Out on the Wire.

"The group edit format, while emotionally difficult, actually is an incredibly efficient tool. In an hour, two hours, you can get the intellectual work done on a piece that could take weeks without it.”

Mar 01 2016

30mins

Play

29: Tim Howard

Podcast cover
Read more
Tim Howard is the senior producer of Reply All.

"You can do radio stories without stakes they just have to be really fun."

Jan 26 2016

1hr

Play

28: Jacob Goldstein

Podcast cover
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Jacob Goldstein is a reporter for NPR's Planet Money.

"I've never been that interested in the classic investigative story — here's this victim and here's this villain, and implicitly, I, the reporter, am the hero. ... They were never the kind of stories I wanted to read, they were never the kind of stories I wanted to write. I like profiles of weirdos and stories about systems."

Dec 09 2015

45mins

Play

27: Audie Cornish

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Audie Cornish is the host of All Things Considered.

"I ran a gauntlet of people who underestimated me. Every subject is like, "Are you the intern?" Every lawmaker is like, "I don't understand who you are?" People don't see me so when they finally meet me they're not sure what to think. And I think the only way you can get through this job, or any other job where people will underestimate you on arrival, is to just not on board it. Like I can't collect it. And so, maybe it means I've been successful because I can't remember any [moments of microaggressions]."

Oct 14 2015

32mins

Play

26: Sean Rameswaram

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Sean Rameswaram is the host of sideshow.

"On the outside, which I was on the outside for a long time, I thought public radio takes itself too seriously. My favorite moments in public radio are when Scott Simon interviews Ke$ha. We don't need to be highbrow all the time and it's actually endangering our medium."

Sep 21 2015

46mins

Play

25: Kaitlin Prest

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Note: This episode is explicit.

Kaitlin Prest is the host and creative director of The Heart.

"My whole thing about making stuff is I want it to *feel* like the thing. If you're making a show about love, I want to feel like I'm falling in love when I listen to the show."

Jul 09 2015

43mins

Play

24: Anshuman Iddamsetty

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Anshuman Iddamsetty is Hazlitt’s art director and audio/visual producer.*

"I stare at waveforms constantly. So like I'm staring at the layout of the waveforms more than anything. There is a sort of visual component to how the show finally comes together, right? I can tell how many — again I understand how out to lunch I sound now — but, if i’m being honest, I can kind of tell, “No, this sounds right because I can see the ratio of the a person’s cut up voice to the music to the sound effects to my voice, and the sort of compression of the guest coming in at certain points, or like how quickly a guest’s voice turns the corner."

(*This episode is guest hosted by Ethan Chiel)

May 27 2015

49mins

Play