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Arts
Technology
Visual Arts

Photography.ca

Updated 9 days ago

Arts
Technology
Visual Arts
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Photography podcast blog and forum

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Photography podcast blog and forum

iTunes Ratings

38 Ratings
Average Ratings
34
3
0
0
1

Keep up the great work!

By Tofu-Fan - Feb 17 2015
Read more
Recently got into photography. This podcast is full of useful topics and tips. Thank you.

Good Job

By Janthephotoman - Oct 28 2012
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Worth a listen for sure. Many informative photo tips here.

iTunes Ratings

38 Ratings
Average Ratings
34
3
0
0
1

Keep up the great work!

By Tofu-Fan - Feb 17 2015
Read more
Recently got into photography. This podcast is full of useful topics and tips. Thank you.

Good Job

By Janthephotoman - Oct 28 2012
Read more
Worth a listen for sure. Many informative photo tips here.

Listen to:

Cover image of Photography.ca

Photography.ca

Updated 9 days ago

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Photography podcast blog and forum

128 — Your First Lens Should be a Nifty 50mm

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #128 talks about five reasons why I think the 50mm lens is the first lens you should get for your SLR or DSLR. Two of these reasons are all the aperture advantages this lens has to offer has and the fact that it’s one of the most affordable brand new lenses you are likely to find (that aren’t garbage).

If you have a full frame camera the 50mm will act as the conventional 50mm lens from the film camera days. On a crop sensor camera the lens will act more like a 75mm or 80mm lens and many people are using this lens to make wonderful portraits.

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast.

Click the player at the end of this post to listen to (or download) the 8ish minute podcast.

This is a 50mm lens — It’s the first lens you should buy for your DSLR or SLR.

This image was shot on a full frame DSLR using a 50mm lens at Palais Des Congres in Montreal, QC, Canada. The exposure was ISO 400 f/1.8 at 1/2500

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

Good comments from our last podcast - Point and Shoot Cameras Suck for Learning Photography

The Canon 50mm at The Camera Store
The Nikon 50mm at The Camera Store
Reversing rings at The Camera Store

The Canon 50mm at B&H
The Nikon 50mm at B&H
Reversing rings at B&H

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Many thanks to Alain Casault, Lisa Osta, and Tom Trottier for their comments from the last podcast. Thanks as well for the emails and welcome to all the new members of the bulletin board.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

May 27 2014

8mins

Play

110 — Crash course in black and white film photography

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Photography podcast #110 gives you a full on crash course in black and white film photography in around 30 minutes. Black and white film photography is not at all dead. Many creative photographers are getting their hands wet in a traditional darkroom.  If you’ve ever wanted to know what’s involved in black and white photography, I take you through the entire process. We talk about film cameras, film, developing film, printing contact sheets and printing a final print.
Thanks to John Vales from our photography.ca facebook group for suggesting this topic. Please feel free to “Like” that page.

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

Apug.org — Analog Photography Users Group
keh.com
Film photography podcast with John Meadows
Ilford Delta 3200
Kodak Tri-X film
Kodak T-Max film
The negative by Ansel Adams
Photo tutorial on developing film. Shows normal, under, overexposed negs
Loading film onto a reel

Circles is our regular forum assignment for Spetember
– Self Portraits in a Mirror is our level 2 assignment for September

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca (   A   T  ) G m ail  Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks to Lucille B and Michael Van der Tol who posted  blog comments about our last podcast. Thanks as always to everyone that sent comments by email about our last podcast. Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board. Most of the links to actual the products are affiliate links that help support this site. Thanks in advance if you purchase through those links.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe with Google Reader|Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player below.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Sep 06 2012

31mins

Play

132 — Rust Photography — Interview with Bryan Davies

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #132 features an interview with Canadian photographer Bryan Davies. During the interview we discuss Bryan’s rust photography. We cover what inspired the series, how it was shot, how it was post-processed and Bryan’s plans for the future.

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast.

Click the player at the end of this post to listen to (or download) the 13ish minute podcast.

Fargo Mania by Bryan Davies

Artful Rust image by Bryan Davies

Artful Rust image by Bryan Davies

Artful Rust image by Bryan Davies

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

Bryan Davies Rust photography
Bryan Davies’s work on fineartamerica.com
Facebook Rust art group
Contraste Art Agency
Photography.ca forum regular assignment — Frozen action images
Photography.ca forum level 2 assignment — Sounds

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Many thanks to Teddy Naimus for his comment from the last podcast. Thanks as well for the emails and welcome to all the new members of the bulletin board.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Nov 06 2014

13mins

Play

125 — How Much Post Processing is Too Much — Interview w/ Darwin Wiggett and Sam Chrysanthou

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #125 features an interview with photographers Darwin Wiggett and Sam Chrysanthou (apologies to Sam for mucking up her name) of oopoomoo.com where we talk about post processing in photography and how much post-processing is too much.

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast.

In this podcast we get into talking about the differences between photographers and digital artists in this changing age where anything seems to go photography-wise. This discussion podcast is inspired by a blog post by Darwin where he asked How Far is too Far?  The post refers to Darwin’s photograph of an owl and a swallow shot at the same time, but shot as two separate files that were blended together in Photoshop after capture.

What do you think, did Darwin go too far?

Great Grey Owl and Tree Swallow on Fence — Composite image by Darwin Wiggett

Butterfly and Flower — Composite image by Darwin Wiggett

In-camera capture by Sam Chrysanthou using a long exposure and a flashlight. The results look surreal but the effect is in-camera, not post production

It goes without saying that both Darwin and Sam DO post-process their images but they spend minimal time doing so. They just released an e-book outlining the shortcuts they use to process their images and they rely mostly on Adobe Bridge and Photoshop to do their editing. The book is called 7 Quick & Dirty Processing Shortcuts for Lazy Photographers.

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

How Far is too Far?
Should We Change the Word Photography?
7 Quick & Dirty Processing Shortcuts for Lazy Photographers

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks as well to Terry Babij who posted comments directly on the blog.  Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting! Happy New Year everyone!

Dec 31 2013

30mins

Play

116 — Sharpness on Steroids — Focus stacking interview with Michael Breitung

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Photography podcast #116 features an interview with German landscape photographer Michael Breitung where we talk about why and how to do focus stacking in photography. Basically focus stacking involves taking multiple frames of the same scene but each frame is focused at a different part of the image. Then these frames are blended together using a graphics program like Gimp (free) or Photoshop (expensive). The result is sharpness and depth of field on steroids that can’t be matched by any camera lens combination on a 35mm DSLR camera at the time of this writing.  Only tilt shift lenses can compete in this extreme sharpness arena, but those lenses require many saved dollars or a rich uncle. This technique is free if you have the skills and a graphics program.

Scroll to the BOTTOM of this post to find the player to immediately listen to the audio podcast.

Bloody Causeway by Michael Breitung — This focus stacked image blends 4 frames into one. Each frame was focused at a different point and then blended in Photoshop. Check out the sharpness from the closest corners all the way to the end of the causeway. This is sharpness swimming in awesome sauce. The aperture used here was f/9.5

Kraichgau at Dawn — Focus stacked photograph by Michael Breitung

Kraichgau at Dawn Details — Close up comparison by Michael Breitung — Only 2 frames were needed to create the final full-sized image above this one. One frame (left) focused at the foreground corners, gets the corners sharp in the final image. The other frame (right) focused at the midground, gets both the midground and the background sharp. Then the frames are blended in Photoshop to produce the final image. The aperture used here was f/11.

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:
Michael Breitung Photography
Michael Breitung’s (advanced) start to finish tutorial on his (Lightroom/Photoshop) post-processing workflow and how he created the Bloody Causeway image.
Helicon Focus image stacking software
Zerene Stacker
Tilt shift lenses in landscape photography
March 2013 regular Assignment — Wet or Rain
March 2013 level 2 Assignment — Dramatic angles

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca (   A   T  ) G m ail  Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks to D. Lavoie who posted a blog comment about our last podcast. Thanks as well to everyone that sent comments by email about our last podcast. Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board. Most of the links to actual the products are affiliate links that help support this site. Thanks in advance if you purchase through those links.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe with Google Reader|Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player below.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Mar 07 2013

24mins

Play

120 — How to Create Interesting Stories Through Your Photography

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #120 provides tips on how to create, craft and tell more interesting stories through photography.  Some of the aspects we talk about include being active with framing, hunting down the gestures and watching the edges.

I’m super-pleased to welcome  The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  as a sponsor of The Photography.ca podcast! I’ve been buying my own gear there and recommending them for a few years now, and I’m a fussy bugger when it comes to both gear and recommendations. Their customer service is simply awesome and I often find that they have the best prices in Canada. They ship all over Canada.

Both these images were taken within the same minute. The bottom image however, tells a stronger story due to the dramatic gesture of the axe in the air, the smoke coming from the side of the roof and the fireman on the right of the roof that’s facing the camera. The top image isn’t bad, but it easily loses in a poker match when it goes head to head with the bottom image.

Winter’s Meeting — I waited in a window and actively composed this scene last winter. There is a strong suggestion of story here because the person in the background appears to be waiting for the foreground woman. I clicked the shutter only when I felt the timing was right compositionally.

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:
Long exposure images — Photography.ca forum’s regular assignment — July 2013
Macro photography — Photography.ca forum’s level 2 assignment — June 2013
Layering images with interesting elements — Photography podcast #102
Shoot in any light - Photography podcast #100

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks to Ben W who posted a blog comment about our last podcast. Thanks as well to everyone that sent comments by email about our last podcast. Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board. Most of the links to actual the products are affiliate links that help support this site. Thanks in advance if you purchase through those links.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player below.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Jul 24 2013

13mins

Play

122 — How Big Can I print that Photo — Interview with Royce Howland

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #122 features an interview with Royce Howland where we discuss how large we can print our photos. These days cameras of all kinds are everywhere and if we want to make big enlargements from those cameras we need to know how big we can print the image before it starts to look bad. Royce offers up tips on how to make ‘the best enlargement’, ‘a better enlargement’ or ‘a good enlargement’ based on the camera, the printing material, the subject matter and some other factors.

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast!

To recap the math in this podcast the best images get 300 pixels per inch. 200 pixels per inch gets you better enlargements and 100 pixels per inch yields good results. To get an idea of the possible enlargement range, we divide the image pixels of our camera by the PPI to get inches of print size.

Our theoretical 6 megapixel camera produced images of 3000 x 2000 pixels. So a good enlargement could be 30 x 20 inches, better could be 15 x 10 inches, and best 6.7 x 10 inches.

If we look at a 12 megapixel image (from a Canon 5D for example) the pixels are 4000 x 2666.  So a good enlargement could be 40 x 26.7 inches, better could be 20 x 13.3 inches, and best 13.3 x 8.9 inches.

If we look at a 24 megapixel camera the pixels are 6000 x 4000 so we could have a good enlargement of 60 x 40 inches, better one of 30 x 20 inches and best one of 20 x 13.3 inches.

7.5 megapixel camera phone shot by Royce Howland. This image could easily be printed 20 inches high.

37 megapixel medium format camera image by Royce Howland. This image could easily be printed 45 inches high.

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

The Digital Negative by Jeff Schewe
Perfect Resize
Qimage Ultimate
September regular assignment — Shoot from a high perspective
September level 2 assignment — Shoot into the light
Illuminite — Photography exhibition by Marko Kulik

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks as well to everyone that sent comments by email about our last podcast. Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board. Most of the links to actual the products are affiliate links that help support this site. Thanks in advance if you purchase through those links.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player below.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Sep 23 2013

50mins

Play

112 — Why camera bags suck

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Photography podcast #112 addresses a question posed by Gordon Laing on Google+
The best camera bag — what do you use?

I replied to that question saying that these days I usually shoot bag free and keep my lenses that are in lens holding cases, attached to my belt as per the picture below. In case people are interested, here is a list of the items that I carry with me most of the time without a bag. Gitzo carbon fibre tripod (2540LLVL) also referred to as ‘my baby’. That’s on a Gitzo tripod shoulder strap slung diagonally around my shoulder. It’s an ‘OK’ strap, no better. I’m still hunting for the perfect tripod shoulder strap. Usually I carry 3 lenses;  Nikon 14–24, Nikon 28–300, Nikon 50mm and 1 flash, the SB-800.

More details on the exact lenses and lens holders are listed in the affiliate links below from B&H.

I also carry in my pockets a cable release, spare batteries, lens cloth and a hex key for my camera bracket plate. Not shown is the flashlight that I’ll often have with me for night shoots. Not shown are the cokin filters that I sometimes keep in a pouch around my neck.

Obviously this setup will not work for many people carrying very large lenses and heavier gear — but this will work for most people that shoot with lenses that are about as large as an average 70-200mm  F-2.8. This setup is also meant to give people new ideas on carrying gear.

I’m also seriously into knowing if other people have alternative gear carrying methods so please feel free to share by commenting.

Although it’s no fashion get up, this set-up allows my back to feel great and it allows me to change lenses quickly.

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

Lowepro S&F Lens Exchange Case 200AW at B&H - My favourite lens holding case. It’s FAB!

Pearstone Onyx 60 Lens Case — In the podcast I talk about the Lowepro 2S but it seems to be discontinued. This model seems to have similar specs.

Lowepro 50mm lens holder at B&H

Lens Changer 75 Pop Down V2.0 from Think tank for larger lenses like a 100-400mm or for shooting 70-200mm with the lens hood attached. You may need to buy their belt to use this though.

Nikon 28-300mm f/3.5–5.6G ED VR Zoom Lens at B&H — I just love the versatility of the focal range.

Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8G ED AF Lens at B&H - This lens and I are having a wonderful relationship, I love her.

Gitzo GT2540LLVL Leveling Carbon Fiber Tripod at B&H - This tripod works well for me. Fairly big but not too big.

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca (   A   T  ) G m ail  Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks as always to everyone that sent comments by email about our last podcast. Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board. Most of the links to actual the products are affiliate links that help support this site. Thanks in advance if you purchase through those links.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe with Google Reader|Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player below.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Nov 08 2012

12mins

Play

121 — Make Better Self Portraits

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #121 offers up 6 tips on how to make better self portraits in photography. Making a self portrait, sometimes known as an autoportrait has a long history in photography and many past and modern photography Masters (Man Ray, Robert Mapplethorpe and the extremely prolific self portraitist Cindy Sherman for example) have produced fabulous self portraits. Please know in advance that we are not referring to ‘selfies’…which I rant on about for a little bit in this podcast. We are referring to self-portraits which require deliberate framing and thinking about the light, environment etc.

Thanks to  The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast!

Angst — Self portrait by Marko Kulik — 2000

Self Portrait as a Parisian by Marko and Carmy — 2009

Self Portrait as a Dock Worker by Marko and Carmy — 2013

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:
Styrofoam heads on Google (helps with focusing the camera)
Cindy Sherman’a 2012 exhibition at MoMA

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks to Royce Howland, Ken Wolter and Alvin who posted a blog comment about our last podcast. Thanks as well to everyone that sent comments by email about our last podcast. Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board. Most of the links to actual the products are affiliate links that help support this site. Thanks in advance if you purchase through those links.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player below.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Sep 02 2013

11mins

Play

115 — Color spaces — monitor settings — recommended hardware — Interview with Joe Brady

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Photography podcast #115 features an interview with Colour expert Joe Brady who works for Macgroup US.
Joe knows pretty much everything there is to know about getting accurate colour from your monitor and your printer. Joe has recorded 2 podcasts with us already about monitor calibration and those links are listed below in the shownotes. In this podcast, we tackle some colour concepts that are a source of confusion for many people. We talk about monitor settings like colour temperature, gamma, and luminance. Then we tackle the sRGB, Adobe RGB and Prophoto RGB colour spaces and explain what they are, the advantages of each and when and where they are most useful. Finally, Joe recommends some calibration tools, monitors and printers.

Scroll to the BOTTOM of this post to find the player to immediately listen to the audio podcast.

This image shows off the 3 main color spaces. You’ll note that the ProPhoto RGB color space contains the most colors. This makes it the best color space for printing your own images on a quality printer. When posting to the web, the colour space should be sRGB as that is the type of monitor that most people have.

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:
Podcast 62 – Monitor – printer calibration – Interview with Joe Brady
Podcast 63 – Review of the Colormunki and the i1XTreme
Joe Brady Photography
X-Rite ColorMunki Photo Color Management Solution at B&H
X-Rite ColorMunki Display at B&H
Eizo FlexScan SX2262W at B&H
Eizo ColorEdge CG223W 22 at B&H

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca (   A   T  ) G m ail  Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks to Mikey88  who posted a blog comment about our last podcast. Thanks as well to everyone that sent comments by email about our last podcast. Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board. Most of the links to actual the products are affiliate links that help support this site. Thanks in advance if you purchase through those links.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe with Google Reader|Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player below.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Feb 12 2013

33mins

Play

137 — 5 Photography Resolutions For the New year

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #137 finally returns to offer up 5 realistic photography resolutions that we can make for the upcoming year. Happy New year Everyone!!!

Click the player at the end of this post to listen to or download this (almost)10 minute podcast.

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks for all the support emails and welcome to all the new members of the photography.ca forum!

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!!

Dec 31 2016

9mins

Play

136 — Lube up your Old Filters

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #136 talks about creating dreamy images by placing Vaseline or petroleum jelly on an old UV filter attached to your lens. By doing this you are often able to create dreamy, impressionistic images. The procedure is simple; take an OLD UV filter (because removing the vaseline from the filter after use might damage its coating) and screw it onto a lens. Then place a wee bit of petroleum jelly (just a bit goes a long way) on your finger and apply it to the front of the UV filter. Take a few images and see what you get. Play with the level and position of the blur by removing some Vaseline or moving it around with your finger.

It goes without saying that you need to do this carefully so as not to allow the Vaseline to touch your camera or lens. The Vaseline should only be on the front of the filter. When you’re done shooting, remove the filter immediately and place it in a plastic bag. Then clean it (I just used regular dish soap) when you get home. If you have a few wet wipes along with a dry cloth (to thoroughly wipe your finger between moving the vaseline around and touching the shutter release button) and an extra plastic bag or two, you should have no problem doing this.

Feel free to add to the conversation by leaving a comment or sharing/liking this post in some way.

Click the player at the end of this post to listen to (or download) this 9.5 minute podcast.

Here are some of the photographs I was able to make with this technique;

Crossing Ducks — Lafontaine Park Montreal — Image shot with a 50mm lens using a UV filter coated with petroleum jelly

Dreamy Carmy — Laurier Park Montreal — Vaseline in front of an old polarizing filter

Lily pads — In this series of images I took a straight shot and then 2 vaseline shots over the UV filter. You can see how completely different the 2 vaseline images look from one another. This difference is simply due to the quantity and position/pattern of the Vaseline on the filter

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:
Exhibition and Film on Impressionism and Photography (Lorin’s comment from podcast 135)
Pictorial Composition and the Critical Judgement of Pictures by Henry Rankin Poore

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred — Thanks Lorin Duckman, Dave Johnson and Jane Chesebrough! Thanks for all the support emails and welcome to all the new members of the photography.ca forum!

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Jul 31 2015

9mins

Play

135 — Photographers — Get Thee To a Museum

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #135 discusses how going to museums to study painters and paintings can improve your photography. After all, both painting and photography are 2D media trying to represent a 3D world. When photographers study the compositional and lighting techniques used by painting masters, their own photographs often improve.

Feel free to add to the conversation by leaving a comment or sharing/liking this post in some way.

Click the player at the end of this post to listen to (or download) this 15 minute podcast.

Caravaggio — The Conversion on the way to Damascus — 1601
Look how the scene and the subjects’ faces are lit, look at the gestures of the subjects and the overall composition. Photographers can learn a lot from the master painters that lived long ago.

When it comes to lighting portraits in photography, painters have been thinking about the lighting for their own subjects many hundreds of years before photography was invented. Photographers can learn so much about lighting by studying the great portrait painters.

Rembrandt — Self-Portrait — 1630 — Rembrandt is well known for his portrait lighting style. The triangle of light on the darker side of the face is one of Rembrandt’s signatures. Photographers love this lighting technique and it has become a basic portrait lighting style in photography.

Rembrandt — Jacob Blessing the Children of Joseph 1656 — Lovely lighting, great gestures and interesting compositions work well in photography as well as in painting.

When it comes to photographing mountains and other landscapes, photographers often zoom right into them as their first instinct and of course that’s a good thing to do for a shot or two, but then what? By studying the compositional techniques of landscape painters, we see that they often include lots of elements that compliment the main focal point in their images.

A.Y. Jackson — Winter Charlevoix County — 1932–33  - We can see that this painting has a mountain in the background. But it’s the way that Jackson ties in the foreground and midground with their visually interesting elements that help make this landscape painting interesting.

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:
Outline of painting history
Caravaggio
Rembrandt
A. Y. Jackson
Group of Seven (artists)

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks for all the support emails and welcome to all the new members of the photography.ca forum!

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Jun 26 2015

15mins

Play

134 — Finding Your Unique Photography style — Interview with Bret Culp

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #134 features an interview with Toronto, Ontario fine art photographer Bret Culp. During the interview we talk about finding and developing your own photography or shooting style. Bret offers up some practical tips on how to make this process easier.

Feel free to add to the conversation by leaving a comment or sharing/liking this post in some way.

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast.

Click the player at the end of this post to listen to (or download) the 30ish minute podcast.

Monolith, The face of Half Dome (1927) by Ansel Adams

Clearing Winter Storm (1938) by Ansel Adams

The Dark Hedges, Antrim, Northern Ireland, 2011 by Bret Culp

Dunluce Castle, Antrim, Northern Ireland, 2012 by Bret Culp

Bret shares his own Artist Statement on his Irish portfolio just to give listeners/readers an example on how developing an Artist Statement can focus you.

Irish Portfolio Artist Statement

“The mythic Irish landscape and its people have had a profound impact on one another. The Celts saw the land as a living source of wisdom, beauty and transformative spiritual power. Among the first to believe in the eternal nature of the human spirit they constructed monuments to death, rebirth and the cycles of the seasons and stars. Castles, fortresses and ruins are evidence of untold invasions and conflicts throughout a tumultuous history. These vestiges of the past continue to resonate through the countryside today. Beautifully poignant in the process of decay they tell their own story and possess their own mortality. Nothing that belongs to the earth is ever free from it. The sacred connection between the landscape of Ireland and its people has not disappeared over the centuries.” —Bret Culp

Overall Body Of Work Statement

“The transitory nature of existence binds everything in the material world. Careful observation reveals the beauty within each fleeting moment.” —Bret Culp

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:
Bret Culp’s Irish Portfolio
Ignore Everybody: and 39 Other Keys to Creativity by Hugh MacLeod

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Many thanks to Tim Mackle and Ruth M for their comments from the last podcast. Thanks as well for the emails and welcome to all the new members of the photography.ca forum!

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Jan 08 2015

33mins

Play

133 — Essential Camera Features — Interview with Royce Howland

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #133 features an interview with Canadian fine art photographer Royce Howland. During the interview we discuss what camera features we think are essential. There are loads of extra bells and whistles on cameras these days and even though both Royce and I have kick-butt camera gear, we ignore the majority of the new features and focus on the essentials. We also discuss essential camera modes and touch on essential lenses.

Of course feel free to let us know if you feel we missed something essential.

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast.

Click the player at the end of this post to listen to (or download) the 44ish minute podcast.

I Should Be So Industrious by Royce Howland

Royce wanted to mention something about this image because it relates to a cool feature of some new screens on cameras.

“Something we’re seeing more commonly, and the Pentax 645Z also has it, is a camera LCD that pops out with tilt or tilt-swivel movements so you can see it from different angles. I think this idea is great.….

…This sea holly bloom and bees were about 18 inches off the ground. I wanted a shooting angle of more or less straight across, rather than steeply downwards or whatever. That would have been very awkward (or even painful!) to shoot through the camera viewfinder, having to contort my neck, back, knees, etc. to work through the viewfinder for any length of time. Even using a normal, non-moving LCD would have been a bit of a challenge to see from above. Instead, I was able to put the camera on a stable tripod, sit on a short 3-legged stool, and pop out the LCD to a comfortable angle that I could see just by looking down. No neck or back strain even though I photographed from the low shooting angle for about an hour.”

Nick Cave Osheaga 2014 by Marko Kulik — This high ISO image was made using aperture priority and I moved the focus points over the hand invading Nick’s shirt. Moving those focus points is my favourite essential camera feature.

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

Royce Howland’s Photography / workshops
Tours-courses by Marko Kulik

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Many thanks to Sandra Foster for her comment from the last podcast. Thanks as well for the emails and welcome to all the new members of the bulletin board.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Dec 22 2014

44mins

Play

132 — Rust Photography — Interview with Bryan Davies

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #132 features an interview with Canadian photographer Bryan Davies. During the interview we discuss Bryan’s rust photography. We cover what inspired the series, how it was shot, how it was post-processed and Bryan’s plans for the future.

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast.

Click the player at the end of this post to listen to (or download) the 13ish minute podcast.

Fargo Mania by Bryan Davies

Artful Rust image by Bryan Davies

Artful Rust image by Bryan Davies

Artful Rust image by Bryan Davies

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

Bryan Davies Rust photography
Bryan Davies’s work on fineartamerica.com
Facebook Rust art group
Contraste Art Agency
Photography.ca forum regular assignment — Frozen action images
Photography.ca forum level 2 assignment — Sounds

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Many thanks to Teddy Naimus for his comment from the last podcast. Thanks as well for the emails and welcome to all the new members of the bulletin board.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Nov 06 2014

13mins

Play

131– The Lensbaby Composer Review

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #131 reviews a Lensbaby lens. Lensbaby lenses are special in that they have a sweet spot of sharp focus in the center of the lens and blur out toward the edges. In addition to this (and where the magic truly lives), you can actually bend the lens to move that sweet spot of focus around the frame. The particular lens I tested was a 50mm Lensbaby Composer with double glass optic. It’s great fun and fairly easy to use though you need to know in advance that it’s a manual lens. It will still help you figure out exposure based on your ISO and aperture ring you select, but you’ll be going old school and manually focusing this bad-boy. It’s worth it though as you can make some really creative in-camera images with this lens. It’s a fabulous lens to juice up your creativity.

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast and for allowing me to test this lens.

Click the player at the end of this post to listen to (or download) the 11ish minute podcast.

My hairless cat Baci with the Lensbaby Composer. Note his sharp central eye while everything else fades to blur

This is an image of the Jacques-Cartier Bridge in Montreal, Quebec. It was very easy to see and capture this effect in camera.

An image of the Jacques-Cartier Bridge in Montreal, Quebec. Because the bridge was not centered in the lens, I had to physically move the sharp sweet spot of focus by actually bending the lens and thus the image took longer to compose.

Norco Bicycle shot with the Lensbaby Composer

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

Lensbaby Composer user guide
The Lensbaby Composer  and other Lensbabies at The Camera Store
Tilt shift lenses for landscape photography
Lensbaby 3G review

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Many thanks to Barefoot, Troy Borque and Terry Babij for their comments from the last podcast. Thanks as well for the emails and welcome to all the new members of the bulletin board.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Oct 23 2014

11mins

Play

130 — The Big Stopper Filter Review

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #130 reviews the Big Stopper by Lee filters. The big stopper is a 10 stop glass filter that slows down shutter speeds in order to accentuate movement. Both clouds and water are classic subjects for use with this filter and the resulting photographs tend to be ethereal and dreamy. Aside from reviewing the filter, I offer up 6 tips on how to use it effectively.

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast.

Click the player at the end of this post to listen to (or download) the 18ish minute podcast.

This evening image of Rue Laurier in Montreal is a long exposure image using the big stopper. You can see movement in the clouds, and in the cars. The people look ‘ghostlike’ because they moved (somewhat) in place while waiting for the traffic light. Notice the traffic light has all 3 colours lit because the traffic light cycled during this 30 second exposure. Exif data — ISO 100, f/11, 30 second shutter speed.

Fast moving water at Chutes Dorwin in Rawdon, QC. Canada. In the top image I used my lowest ISO (50) with my smallest aperture (f/32) and this yielded a shutter speed of .4 seconds. The water does look dreamy. But when I used the big stopper, I was able to get much slower shutter speeds and the lower image was exposed for 15 seconds. It’s much dreamier and more ethereal looking but the filter must be used with care. If you look at the top of the bottom image you can see a rainbowish arc and this where flare entered my camera. As discussed in the podcast, this is easily solved with a hat (or postprocessing).

Fountain at Parc Lafontaine in Montreal, QC., Canada — The slowest shutter speed I could get without a filter was 1/60 in this light. When I put the big stopper on, It extends the available shutter speeds big time. The image on the right was a 15 second exposure using the big stopper and look how dreamy the water looks.

How the Lee filter system works

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

Podcast 77 - On Neutral density filters and graduated neutral density filters
Podcast 84 - Back Button autofocus
The big stopper at The Camera Store
Regular forum assignment — Repetition
Level 2 photography assignment — Forced perspective

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Aug 11 2014

18mins

Play

129 — How to Photograph Strangers

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #129 talks about how to photograph strangers in public so that your images are stronger and more interesting. I offer up 4 easy tips on how to make this process easier so that your shots have more punch at the end. These photographs were mostly taken over a period of 1 week. In the podcast I discuss the differences between when the subject is aware and unaware of the photographer’s presence.

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast.

Click the player at the end of this post to listen to (or download) the 11ish minute podcast.

Tens of thousands of cyclists lining up to start the Tour de L’isle. All it took was me waving my hand, and cyclists did the same. There is much more engagement than if I had not waved my hand and all the cyclists were looking in random directions. I was not an official photographer for the event. I had the same access as everyone else.

I shot Raphael Aubry from the band Waiting Game at the Montreal Jazzfest. I had the same access as everyone else. I just waited patiently for this moment of eye contact while I was framing the scene.

Every Sunday in Montreal, thousands of people gather at Mont-Royale for drumming, dancing etc. This image has no eye contact, but a strong gesture which for me, carries the image.

Just as a test for a group of adults i was giving a course to, I asked 5–6 people walking down the street if I could take their portrait. 100% of them said yes. Take a deep breath if you feel shy about this, people are flattered and tend to agree over 90% of the time when I simply ask them for permission.

The boy in this image never knew he was being photographed. The second I saw him engage in this behaviour I saw a story. (click to enlarge this image)

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

Photography forum assignments

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Many thanks to Nuno C., Barefoot and Christopher Steven B. for their comments from the last podcast. Thanks as well for the emails and welcome to all the new members of the bulletin board.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Jul 07 2014

10mins

Play

128 — Your First Lens Should be a Nifty 50mm

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #128 talks about five reasons why I think the 50mm lens is the first lens you should get for your SLR or DSLR. Two of these reasons are all the aperture advantages this lens has to offer has and the fact that it’s one of the most affordable brand new lenses you are likely to find (that aren’t garbage).

If you have a full frame camera the 50mm will act as the conventional 50mm lens from the film camera days. On a crop sensor camera the lens will act more like a 75mm or 80mm lens and many people are using this lens to make wonderful portraits.

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast.

Click the player at the end of this post to listen to (or download) the 8ish minute podcast.

This is a 50mm lens — It’s the first lens you should buy for your DSLR or SLR.

This image was shot on a full frame DSLR using a 50mm lens at Palais Des Congres in Montreal, QC, Canada. The exposure was ISO 400 f/1.8 at 1/2500

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

Good comments from our last podcast - Point and Shoot Cameras Suck for Learning Photography

The Canon 50mm at The Camera Store
The Nikon 50mm at The Camera Store
Reversing rings at The Camera Store

The Canon 50mm at B&H
The Nikon 50mm at B&H
Reversing rings at B&H

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Many thanks to Alain Casault, Lisa Osta, and Tom Trottier for their comments from the last podcast. Thanks as well for the emails and welcome to all the new members of the bulletin board.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

May 27 2014

8mins

Play

127 — Point and Shoot Cameras Suck for Learning Photography

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #127 goes into why point and shoot cameras suck for learning photography. I actually rag on point and shoot cameras quite a bit in this podcast but it’s because photography should be fun and learning photography on a point and shoot camera is rarely fun and almost never user-friendly. At the beginning stages of learning photography you need your camera to be user-friendly and it’s nice when your camera can handle any shooting situation. Point and shoots are inferior to any new DSLRs when it comes to photographing things that move. Given that precious memories (that involve movement) like your child walking/running are missed with a point and shoot, it’s an inferior tool.

That lovely intro aside, I do recommend a few user friendly Point and shoots for photographers that are comfortable with a Point and shoot’s limitations. They definitely are portable and can be handy in capable hands.

Click the player at the end of this post to listen to (or download) the 13ish minute podcast.

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast.

This point and shoot camera is not a good camera for learning photography

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

Podcast # 76 - Point and shoot cameras — Review of Canon G11
Exposure exposed — Easily master camera exposure and make stunning photos by Marko Kulik
Photo tours — private photo instruction in Montreal
Canon G16 at The Camera Store
Nikon P7800 at The Camera Store
The Eos Rebel T5 at The Camera Store
The Nikon D3200 at The Camera Store

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Apr 17 2014

13mins

Play

126 — 6 Tips to Improve the Edges of Your Photos

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #126 discusses the importance of the four edges of your photographs. They are seriously important and paying attention to them will improve your photography. The podcast offers up 6 (actually a few more than 6) practical tips on how to improve the edges of your photographs.

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast.

A sneak peek to one of the 6 tips which is useful to photographers of all levels is to check out the work of master painters. They knew about the edges, about the overall composition, and the rules of composition. Those rules directly apply to photography. This famous painting below done by Rembrandt shows dark edges all around which is of course no accident. He did it all the time. Notice where your eye ends up in the painting; on the wave at left and this too is no accident. When we can apply some of these principles to photography, our images almost always improve.

1633 — Rembrandt (1606–1669) Christ in the Storm on the Lake of Galilee.

Talk about how edges can add interest! This image by Selena Rhodes Scofield from our forum is framed in an extremely creative way and the unusual perspective just adds to the visual interest. In addition, both the seagull’s neck and its wing are creating interesting positive and negative shapes as they intersect with the edges and the rest of the image. Being on the lookout for these shapes is another way to spicify your photography.

seagull 3 by Selena Rhodes Scofield

Of course when you want to break guidelines, you break them whenever you want to. Just be aware that you are doing so. In this image below, Canadian Master photographer and teacher Freeman Patterson does just that.

From his book Photography and the Art of Seeing he wrote: “I saw this elderly lady as passing away from me and my world, so I photographed her through a window clouded by reflections and curtains. The shallow depth of field, which throws the reflections and curtains out of focus, creates a sense of the surreal and the unknown. The hand of the woman’s friend appears in the lower right corner. By all traditional standards of composition, the hand should not be there because it looks amputated. Yet it seems strangely appropriate, representing support that may be needed in the present, while at the same time adding to the impression of the world dissolving”

Photograph by Freeman Patterson from The Art of Seeing.

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

Photography and the Art of Seeing by Freeman Patterson. If you can only afford one photography book this year, buy this one.
Composition Basics by oopoomoo

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks as well to Don Crasco and Daniel Cybulskie who posted comments directly on the blog.  Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Feb 20 2014

12mins

Play

125 — How Much Post Processing is Too Much — Interview w/ Darwin Wiggett and Sam Chrysanthou

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #125 features an interview with photographers Darwin Wiggett and Sam Chrysanthou (apologies to Sam for mucking up her name) of oopoomoo.com where we talk about post processing in photography and how much post-processing is too much.

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast.

In this podcast we get into talking about the differences between photographers and digital artists in this changing age where anything seems to go photography-wise. This discussion podcast is inspired by a blog post by Darwin where he asked How Far is too Far?  The post refers to Darwin’s photograph of an owl and a swallow shot at the same time, but shot as two separate files that were blended together in Photoshop after capture.

What do you think, did Darwin go too far?

Great Grey Owl and Tree Swallow on Fence — Composite image by Darwin Wiggett

Butterfly and Flower — Composite image by Darwin Wiggett

In-camera capture by Sam Chrysanthou using a long exposure and a flashlight. The results look surreal but the effect is in-camera, not post production

It goes without saying that both Darwin and Sam DO post-process their images but they spend minimal time doing so. They just released an e-book outlining the shortcuts they use to process their images and they rely mostly on Adobe Bridge and Photoshop to do their editing. The book is called 7 Quick & Dirty Processing Shortcuts for Lazy Photographers.

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

How Far is too Far?
Should We Change the Word Photography?
7 Quick & Dirty Processing Shortcuts for Lazy Photographers

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks as well to Terry Babij who posted comments directly on the blog.  Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting! Happy New Year everyone!

Dec 31 2013

30mins

Play

124 — Luminosity Masks — Interview with Tony Kuyper

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #124 features an interview with Arizona fine art photographer Tony Kuyper. After years of experimentation Tony has developed an intermediate post processing technique NOT based on the pixels that make up the image but rather the brightness levels or tones that make up the image. One of the game changing reasons to work in this way is the tonal control and level of precision you can achieve with your selections and the fact that these selections are naturally perfectly feathered.  This is accomplished by creating a luminosity mask (in Gimp, Photoshop Elements or Photoshop) and Tony describes how and why to do this in the podcast.

Although this is an intermediate level podcast, newer photographers might want to listen to get ideas for future study and post-processing play. Tony explains the concepts clearly!

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast.

Here are some of Tony’s images processed with and without luminosity masks. You can see that the images processed with the masks ‘sing’ louder.

Brine Stones by Tony Kuyper — processed without luminosity masks

Brine Stones by Tony Kuyper — processed with luminosity masks

Elephant’s Feet by Tony Kuyper processed without luminosity masks

Elephant’s Feet by Tony Kuyper processed with luminosity masks

Navajo Bridge by Tony Kuyper processed without luminosity masks

Navajo Bridge by Tony Kuyper processed with luminosity masks

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

Luminosity masks — Tutorial on Tony’s site
Tony’s tutorials page
GIMP luminosity mask tutorial
Photography assignment on our forum — Space
Level 2 photography assignment on our forum — Diptychs
Illuminight — Photography exhibition by Marko Kulik

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks as well to Mike Bons, Lucy 72, Jimmy Brown, and Darnell B who posted comments directly on the blog.  Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Dec 18 2013

31mins

Play

123 — Entry Level Camera Trigger Showdown — PocketWizard versus Cactus

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #123 compares 2 entry level triggering devices for your camera. A ‘trigger’ is simply a device that allows your camera to fire nearly any portable flash, monolight or studio flash while it is OFF-camera. The ability to fire a flash or other light source while OFF-camera allows you to modify the direction and the quality of the light(s) to produce much more creative and professional looking photography versus direct on-camera flash. The 2 units tested are the PocketWizard Plus X and the Cactus V5 Duo.

The PocketWizard Plus X transceiver (sold as a single unit for $99.00) and the Cactus V5 Duo (2 transceivers for $99.00 or sold individiually at $59.00)

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast and for loaning me the test equipment for this week’s podcast!

Both these units do the identical job with identical (100%) reliability in both my indoor and outdoor tests. The top photo shows how the Cactus transceiver attaches to both the camera and to an off-camera flash. The bottom photo shows how the PocketWizard Plus X transceiver attaches to both the camera and to an off-camera flash. The main difference is that the PocketWizard is missing the extra hot shoe so it attaches to the off camera flash with (an included) sync-wire.

The build quality of the PocketWizard is slightly more robust than the Cactus V5 and its legendary reliability (PocketWizards have been around for decades) and the fact that they work with every other PocketWizard ever made are its main advantages.

Where the Cactus V5 duo really shines is with the addition of the extra hot shoe on the unit. Here the flash will act as an on axis-fill flash to fill in shadows created by another light, and it fits snugly into the hot shoe on top of the Cactus V5. At left is the PocketWizard attempting the same task but because it has no extra hot shoe it must be attached to the camera’s flash via an included sync-wire

Both these units will do the identical job, but the Cactus’s design (at right) is more elegant, easier to attach and the Cactus V5 Duo is half the price of the PocketWizard Plus X. Unfortunately the Cactus V5 will NOT work with PocketWizards or even different Cactus models.

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

The PocketWizard Plus X at The Camera Store
The Cactus V5 Duo at The Camera Store
Illuminight — Photography exhibition by Marko Kulik

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks as well to Enrique Waizel, Bernard Dallaire, Jason, Darnell B and Royce Howland who posted comments directly on the blog.  Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player below.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Oct 31 2013

14mins

Play

122 — How Big Can I print that Photo — Interview with Royce Howland

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #122 features an interview with Royce Howland where we discuss how large we can print our photos. These days cameras of all kinds are everywhere and if we want to make big enlargements from those cameras we need to know how big we can print the image before it starts to look bad. Royce offers up tips on how to make ‘the best enlargement’, ‘a better enlargement’ or ‘a good enlargement’ based on the camera, the printing material, the subject matter and some other factors.

Thanks to The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast!

To recap the math in this podcast the best images get 300 pixels per inch. 200 pixels per inch gets you better enlargements and 100 pixels per inch yields good results. To get an idea of the possible enlargement range, we divide the image pixels of our camera by the PPI to get inches of print size.

Our theoretical 6 megapixel camera produced images of 3000 x 2000 pixels. So a good enlargement could be 30 x 20 inches, better could be 15 x 10 inches, and best 6.7 x 10 inches.

If we look at a 12 megapixel image (from a Canon 5D for example) the pixels are 4000 x 2666.  So a good enlargement could be 40 x 26.7 inches, better could be 20 x 13.3 inches, and best 13.3 x 8.9 inches.

If we look at a 24 megapixel camera the pixels are 6000 x 4000 so we could have a good enlargement of 60 x 40 inches, better one of 30 x 20 inches and best one of 20 x 13.3 inches.

7.5 megapixel camera phone shot by Royce Howland. This image could easily be printed 20 inches high.

37 megapixel medium format camera image by Royce Howland. This image could easily be printed 45 inches high.

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:

The Digital Negative by Jeff Schewe
Perfect Resize
Qimage Ultimate
September regular assignment — Shoot from a high perspective
September level 2 assignment — Shoot into the light
Illuminite — Photography exhibition by Marko Kulik

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks as well to everyone that sent comments by email about our last podcast. Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board. Most of the links to actual the products are affiliate links that help support this site. Thanks in advance if you purchase through those links.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player below.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Sep 23 2013

50mins

Play

121 — Make Better Self Portraits

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #121 offers up 6 tips on how to make better self portraits in photography. Making a self portrait, sometimes known as an autoportrait has a long history in photography and many past and modern photography Masters (Man Ray, Robert Mapplethorpe and the extremely prolific self portraitist Cindy Sherman for example) have produced fabulous self portraits. Please know in advance that we are not referring to ‘selfies’…which I rant on about for a little bit in this podcast. We are referring to self-portraits which require deliberate framing and thinking about the light, environment etc.

Thanks to  The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  for sponsoring the Photography.ca podcast!

Angst — Self portrait by Marko Kulik — 2000

Self Portrait as a Parisian by Marko and Carmy — 2009

Self Portrait as a Dock Worker by Marko and Carmy — 2013

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:
Styrofoam heads on Google (helps with focusing the camera)
Cindy Sherman’a 2012 exhibition at MoMA

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks to Royce Howland, Ken Wolter and Alvin who posted a blog comment about our last podcast. Thanks as well to everyone that sent comments by email about our last podcast. Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board. Most of the links to actual the products are affiliate links that help support this site. Thanks in advance if you purchase through those links.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player below.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Sep 02 2013

11mins

Play

120 — How to Create Interesting Stories Through Your Photography

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Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #120 provides tips on how to create, craft and tell more interesting stories through photography.  Some of the aspects we talk about include being active with framing, hunting down the gestures and watching the edges.

I’m super-pleased to welcome  The Camera Store (The largest camera store in Calgary, Alberta, Canada)  as a sponsor of The Photography.ca podcast! I’ve been buying my own gear there and recommending them for a few years now, and I’m a fussy bugger when it comes to both gear and recommendations. Their customer service is simply awesome and I often find that they have the best prices in Canada. They ship all over Canada.

Both these images were taken within the same minute. The bottom image however, tells a stronger story due to the dramatic gesture of the axe in the air, the smoke coming from the side of the roof and the fireman on the right of the roof that’s facing the camera. The top image isn’t bad, but it easily loses in a poker match when it goes head to head with the bottom image.

Winter’s Meeting — I waited in a window and actively composed this scene last winter. There is a strong suggestion of story here because the person in the background appears to be waiting for the foreground woman. I clicked the shutter only when I felt the timing was right compositionally.

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:
Long exposure images — Photography.ca forum’s regular assignment — July 2013
Macro photography — Photography.ca forum’s level 2 assignment — June 2013
Layering images with interesting elements — Photography podcast #102
Shoot in any light - Photography podcast #100

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks to Ben W who posted a blog comment about our last podcast. Thanks as well to everyone that sent comments by email about our last podcast. Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board. Most of the links to actual the products are affiliate links that help support this site. Thanks in advance if you purchase through those links.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player below.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Jul 24 2013

13mins

Play

119 — Manipulating Photojournalism — Interview with Moe Doiron

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Photography podcast #119 is the second of two episodes dedicated to manipulation in photojournalism. In this episode we feature a 70 minute casual conversation with Moe Doiron, a photojournalist with The Globe and Mail, Canada’s largest National Newspaper.

In the interview we revisit the 2012 winning world press photo by Paul Hansen, discuss the Chicago Sun-Times firing of their Photojournalism staff and chat about Moe’s multi-decade career as a photojournalist. and photo editor.

Past World Press Photo winners from the archives  - Click to enlarge the full set from 1955–2009

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:
World Press Photo of the year (Large)
A pet’s perspective — Low angled images — Photography.ca forum’s regular assignment — June 2013
f/16 or smaller — Photography.ca forum’s level 2 assignment — June 2013
Photography Podcast 118 — Manipulating Photojournalism — Interview with Carl Neustaedter

PLEASE NOTE THAT IF YOU USE GOOGLE READER TO SUBSCRIBE TO THIS SITE, YOU’LL NEED TO CHOOSE ANOTHER SUBSCRIPTION METHOD ASAP AS GOOGLE READER WILL HAVE ITS FUNERAL ON JULY 1. JUST GO TO THE TOP RIGHT ON ANY PAGE TO CHOOSE ANOTHER SUBSCRIPTION METHOD.

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks to Jason, Juliet O’Neill and Yisehaq who posted a blog comment about our last podcast. Thanks as well to everyone that sent comments by email about our last podcast. Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board. Most of the links to actual the products are affiliate links that help support this site. Thanks in advance if you purchase through those links.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player below.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Jun 28 2013

1hr 12mins

Play

118 — Manipulating Photojournalism — Interview with Carl Neustaedter

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Photography podcast #118 is the first of two episodes dedicated to manipulation in photojournalism. This first episode features an interview with Carl Neustaedter who is the deputy editor of the Ottawa Citizen, the largest daily newspaper in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Carl is one of the people who decides on a daily basis what images make it into the newspaper.

In this interview we discuss how much manipulation is too much manipulation when it comes to news photography.

In particular, we talk about this year’s winning world press photo by Paul Hansen. We also talk about using Instagram and Hipstmatic style filters in news photography. We discuss some famously ‘over’ manipulated news images like the O.J. Simpson Cover on Time Magazine back in 1994.  We also discuss more subtle modern ways in which digital news images are manipulated. Finally, we discuss the firing of the photojournalism staff at the Chicago Sun-Times.

Scroll to the BOTTOM of this post to find the player to immediately listen to the audio podcast.

In 1994 Time and Newsweek used the same image of O.J. Simpson on their cover. Our eyes can see that Time over-processed the image. Image from Wikipedia.

A Grunt’s Life by Damon Winter — An award winning photo essay documenting a soldier’s life taken using the Hipstamatic App on an iphone. The essay was originally published in The New York Times.

Alex Rodriguez — Instagram photo by Nick Laham published in The New York Times.

World Press Photo of the year 2012 — City Burial by Paul Hansen

Links /resources mentioned in this podcast:
World Press Photo of the year (Large)
A Grunt’s Life — Damon Winter — The New York Times
From iPhone to printed page: The rise of Instagram in major publications
We Need Photojournalists — Article by SND.org
Carl Neustaedter on LinkedIN
A pet’s perspective — Low angled images — Photography.ca forum’s regular assignment — June 2013
f/16 or smaller — Photography.ca forum’s level 2 assignment — June 2013

If you liked this podcast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are interested in writing for our blog please contact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using standard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Facebook profile — Feel free to “friend” me — please just mention Photography.ca
My Twitter page — I will follow you if you follow me — Let’s connect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t reciprocate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurking on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly  Photography forum

Thanks to Stephen, Darnell B, Dwayne and Royce Howland who posted a blog comment about our last podcast. Thanks as well to everyone that sent comments by email about our last podcast. Although ALL comments are appreciated, commenting directly in this blog is preferred. Thanks as well to all the new members of the bulletin board. Most of the links to actual the products are affiliate links that help support this site. Thanks in advance if you purchase through those links.

If you are looking at this material on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and podcast and get this and other photography info directly from the source. |Subscribe with iTunes|Subscribe via RSS feed |Subscribe with Google Reader|Subscribe for free to the Photography podcast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can download this photography podcast directly by clicking the preceding link or listen to it almost immediately with the embedded player below.

Thanks for listening and keep on shooting!

Jun 18 2013

45mins

Play