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Rank #100 in News Commentary category

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News Commentary

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

Updated about 23 hours ago

Rank #100 in News Commentary category

Society & Culture
News
News Commentary
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A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

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A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

iTunes Ratings

67 Ratings
Average Ratings
67
0
0
0
0

Awesome

By strpg - Oct 15 2019
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I wish everyone would listen to this podcast

Awesome!

By Robin the listener - Jun 15 2019
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I learn from every episode of this podcast. Always thought provoking.

iTunes Ratings

67 Ratings
Average Ratings
67
0
0
0
0

Awesome

By strpg - Oct 15 2019
Read more
I wish everyone would listen to this podcast

Awesome!

By Robin the listener - Jun 15 2019
Read more
I learn from every episode of this podcast. Always thought provoking.
Cover image of MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

Latest release on May 30, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail about 23 hours ago

Rank #1: Ep. 112: Settler Sexuality's Slippery Slope

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On this week's roundtable: Settler Sexuality. A subject at the heart of two recent talks by our own Kim Tallbear (one at the sex-positive communities event ConvergeCon, the other at SoloPolyCon), we thought we'd use it as an opportunity to take a longer look at an often troubling and taboo topic. In particular, we discuss the insights of her keynote — "Yes, Your Pleasure! Yes, Self-love! And Don’t Forget, Settler Sex Is A Structure" — at the 2nd Annual Solo Polyamory Conference in Seattle, Washington.

An associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, Kim discussed her work at the MEDIA INDIGENA roundtable with host Rick Harp and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 27 2018

57mins

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Rank #2: Ep. 99: A deep dive into the Doctrine of Discovery (and how it's never gone away)

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This week: the 'Change the Date' debate. We discuss what seems to have been the most controversial Australia Day yet. Plus, divine intervention? As the Chilean government turns up the heat, why would the Pope push the Mapuche to turn the other cheek? And: bison on the brink? It's an animal many still revere—now, a scientist raises fresh concerns about its future.

Joining host Rick Harp this week are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jan 29 2018

1hr

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Rank #3: Ep. 60: Canada's Sexist Status Indian System

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THIS WEEK: We delve into an Indigenous woman's 30-year-plus court battle to regain her Indian Status, a battle that just resulted in victory in Ontario. But will Lynn Gehl's win against the sexism of Canada's Indian Status system endure? If so, what could it mean for thousands just like her? We then look at Bill S-3, a bill that, like Gehl's case, deals with gender discrimination in the Indian Act but, like most federal fixes in this area, only seems to exacerbate the problem it was meant to solve. Joining us again are scholar Pam Palmater and author Paul Seesequasis. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 29 2017

35mins

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Rank #4: Ep. 72: White Settler Revisionism and Making Métis Everywhere (Pt. 1)

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This week… the first in a two-part conversation that confronts the confusion and contention around what it means to be Métis. In their new article, "White Settler Revisionism and Making Métis Everywhere: The Evocation of Métissage in Québec and Nova Scotia." Co-authors Adam Gaudry (University of Alberta) and Darryl Leroux (Saint Mary’s University) argue that moves by some settler communities to insert a "Métis" identity into places and periods they don’t belong—namely, outside the Prairie homelands of the historic Métis Nation—all in an effort to "self-Indigenize," don’t just constitute wrong-headed fantasy, but a real and present danger to genuine Indigenous self-determination. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jul 23 2017

45mins

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Rank #5: Ep. 51: Indigenous Institutionalization, Then and Now

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This week, two troubling stories of Indigenous institutionalization. The first comes to us from an Ontario jail where 9 out of 10 inmates are Aboriginal—and 10 out of 10 reportedly face challenges of a mental, cognitive or addictive nature. The second features numbers no less startling: one young First Nations man, 18 years in the foster care system, put in and pulled out of 73 different homes! A hard life made only worse now that he's been charged with the recent killing of a Winnipeg transit driver. Joining us once again: scholar Brock Pitawanakwat and journalist Wawmeesh Hamilton. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Feb 25 2017

52mins

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Rank #6: Ep. 63: Does '13 Reasons Why' sensationalize suicide? Aboriginal authors on the curriculum

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On this week’s roundtable: sensationalizing suicide? We recount the critiques of 13 Reasons Why, the Netflix teen drama that's sparked controversy for centering the suicide of one of its characters. And shaking off Shakespeare: amid the recent kerfuffle over cultural appropriation, we’ll discuss why one Ontario school board has booted the Bard in favour of Indigenous authors. Joining us at our roundtable are Jessica Deer, a staff reporter with the Eastern Door newspaper in Kahnawake, and, in Phoenix, Arizona, Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker.

May 22 2017

1hr 1min

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Rank #7: Ep. 98: Peering into the Playbook for White Denial of Indigenous Injury

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This week.. Politician contrition: an Alberta MLA walks back some sweeping off-hand comments about Aboriginal voter behaviour in his riding; A flyer full of ire: anonymous posters at an Atlantic university proclaim Indigenous people to be the overwhelming "beneficiaries," not the "victims" of European culture. Debunking denial: We take a deep dive into the playbook of White 'Denialism.'

Brock Pitawanakwat, an assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, return to the roundtable. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jan 21 2018

1hr 28mins

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Rank #8: Ep. 76: Charlottesville, Guam and the 'Eskimos' of Edmonton

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This week... Why Indigenous people totally relate to recent violence over icons of intolerance in Charlottesville, Virginia; we get into Guam, a strategic US island colony that found itself smack dab in the middle of nuclear brinkmanship with North Korea; and, Inuk singer Tanya Tagaq adds her voice to calls for the Edmonton Eskimos to change their team’s name. Returning to the roundtable are Lakota activist/communicator Taté Walker, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

Aug 21 2017

1hr 1min

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Rank #9: Politics and public health in a pandemic (Ep 206)

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Patient privacy, public protection: they can feel at odds in this era of coronavirus. And yet, when it comes to the impacts of the virus on black and brown people, some say there’s not enough information being captured and communicated. But could knowing who is infected risk stigma in turn?

Tackling these thorny questions and more with host/producer Rick Harp this week are Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC, as well as Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment.

// Our theme is ‘nesting’ by birocratic.

Apr 27 2020

54mins

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Rank #10: Ep. 73: White Settler Revisionism and Making Métis Everywhere (Part 2)

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This week... the conclusion to our conversation with the authors of the recent article, "White Settler Revisionism and Making Métis Everywhere: The Evocation of Métissage in Québec and Nova Scotia." Scholars Adam Gaudry (Native Studies & Political Science, University of Alberta) and Darryl Leroux (Sociology & Atlantic Canada studies, Saint Mary’s University) return to discuss why this urge of some Settlers to 'play Métis' is a fantasy that could prove fatal to the rights of all Indigenous peoples in Canada. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jul 29 2017

41mins

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Rank #11: Ep. 80: Cherokee Freedmen, Adam Beach Boycott, Indian Country Today

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Fight of the Freedmen: Has a court victory for the descendants of ex-slaves of the Cherokee guaranteed the return of their citizenship? Casting controversy: Why Adam Beach wants other Aboriginal actors to boycott a new television series. Out of Print: why it looks very much like there’s no tomorrow for Indian Country Today.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Sep 16 2017

1hr 10mins

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Rank #12: Ep. 108: Reading the larger lessons of Sherman Alexie's literary rise and fall

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THIS WEEK / 'Sorry' for the racism: As National Geographic tries to atone for its problematic history with non-white people, we assess how much credit (and critique) they deserve. / 'Sorry' for the sexual harassment: As Native American writer Sherman Alexie continues his free-fall amid accusations of mistreating women, we’ll read into his story for larger lessons. / 'Sorry' (not sorry) for the journalism: A Canadian reporter faces potential jail-time for embedding himself inside an Indigenous-led protest against an east coast mega-project.

Joining host Rick Harp at this week’s roundtable are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Mar 30 2018

1hr 26mins

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Rank #13: Ep. 175: The Serious Business of Self-Indigenization

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On this week’s collected, connected conversations—the last in our Summer Series—the serious business of self-Indigenization. On its face, Indigenous identity would seem like it would be simple to understand who is and who isn’t First Nations, Inuit or Metis. That is, if you choose to look past the colonial elephant in the room. And yet, complicated and confusing as colonialism can make the identification process, it all comes down to knowing not only who claims which Nation or People—but which People or Nation claims them.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Writer, blogger and educator Cutcha Risling Baldy and Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker; Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and writer Terese Mailhot; CBC broadcaster and writer Waubgeshig Rice, and sports business columnist Jason Notte; Ken Williams, assistant professor, University of Alberta Department of Drama, and Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University; Adam Gaudry, Associate Professor and Associate Dean of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Darryl Leroux, Associate Professor, Social Justice & Community Studies, Saint Mary’s University.

This podcast was edited and produced by Anya Zoledziowski and Rick Harp.

CREDITS: Creative Commons music in this episode includes the following works by Kevin MacLeod: "Awkward Meeting," "Upbeat Forever," "Western Streets," "The Show Must Be Go" and "Beauty Flow." It also includes "Heimweh" by Sascha Ende and "Crown" by Kuzzzo. Learn more about MacLeod and Ende at incompetech.com and filmmusic.io; Kuzzzo at Fugue. Our intro music comes courtesy of BenevolentBadger.com

Aug 28 2019

1hr 10mins

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Rank #14: Ep. 187: Is Repatriation Really 'Reconciliation'?

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This week: Bringing blood home. Over a half-century after their removal, a large cluster of blood samples from Indigenous islanders in Australia have been returned to whence they came. The result of direct negotiations with the affected community, the move has been held up as historic for the country. But if Australia’s on the bleeding edge of repatriation, what about the rest of the world? From skin to saliva, blood to bones, do we even know how much Indigenous material has been banked across the globe? And should we put repatriation under the banner of reconciliation?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp to take the pulse of these and other questions are University of Alberta associate professor of Native Studies Kim TallBear, as well as Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Nov 29 2019

52mins

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Rank #15: Ep. 85: Acknowledging Toxic Indigenous Masculinity: Are We at a Turning Point?

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1. In name only: How did an Ontario city manage to strike up an Indigenous working group—minus any Indigenous people? 2. Ciao, chief! As a gesture of what it calls reconciliation, a school board decides it needs to drop the word “chief” from all of its employees’ job titles. 3. Book bind: After a number of contributors pull out of an Aboriginal anthology over the inclusion of an author convicted of domestic assault, the author asks the publisher to remove his work instead. We’ll discuss whether this sequence of events has made new room to discuss Indigenous male violence.

Back at the roundtable are Brock Pitawanakwat, an assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 21 2017

57mins

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Rank #16: Ep. 22: Critiquing Canada's Inquiry into Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women

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When loved ones die, there’s no question who suffers most—their families. And of those who pushed hardest for the newly-launched National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, none fought more fiercely than the relatives of these stolen sisters. Now some of those families have been left disappointed by the details of its terms of reference. Such concerns are echoed by groups like the Native Women’s Association of Canada and Pauktuutit, who say there are fundamental flaws in the Inquiry’s scale and scope. Joining us this week with her reflections is Pam Palmater, Chair in Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University in Toronto. // Our theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

Aug 05 2016

24mins

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Rank #17: Ep. 184: Escaping the Orbit of Settler Colonialism

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It’s a dilemma that confronts much of Indigenous media: with so much of our time spent working to counter, correct and contextualize mainstream misinformation, do we not risk becoming “This Week in Settler Colonialism”? Does routinely responding to routine violations of our lands and lives see us become all-consumed by what the State does and doesn’t do? How do we resist that pull of a Settler center of gravity, and stop merely critiquing, and start actually creating outside of its orbit?

Questions on our minds a lot these days as we begin a conversation on where else we might invest our attention and intentions, to build on our original mission as an Indigenous reality check on the misrepresentations of Settler-oriented media.

Joining host/producer Rick Harp this week are Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism, and Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University.

CREDITS: This episode of the podcast was edited by Anya Zoledziowski; hosted and produced by Rick Harp. Our theme is nesting by birocratic.

Nov 11 2019

44mins

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Rank #18: Ep. 67: Why It's Not Okay in Thunder Bay for Indigenous Youth; Does Canada/AFN MOU Go Too Far?

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This week: why things aren't okay in Thunder Bay. In the wake of two more Indigenous teens found dead in this northwestern Ontario city’s waterways, their home First Nations are sounding alarm bells, but local police maintain there is no crisis. And WTF is a MOU, and why should we care? We unpack the recent signing of a joint memorandum of understanding between the Canadian government and the Assembly of First Nations. Back again are Karyn Pugliese, APTN's Executive Director of News and Current Affairs with the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network and Lisa Girbav, a radio broadcaster from the Tsimshian territory and a student at UBC. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jun 18 2017

51mins

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Rank #19: Ep. 16: Could legal action make Canada walk its talk on Indigenous languages?

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This week: the fight for funding of Indigenous languages. Despite the best efforts of the Canadian government to wipe out the roughly 60 Aboriginal languages in that part of the world (what some call deliberate linguicide) those ancestral tongues are not yet stilled. But this is no time for complacency, which is why people like Lorena Fontaine, an associate professor of Indigenous Governance at the University of Winnipeg, is part of the team behind a lawsuit that they hope will force Canada to truly walk its talk on Indigenous language revitalization. // Our theme is 'nesting' by Birocratic.

Jun 26 2016

20mins

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Rank #20: Ep 61: How Canada's first Indigenous policy was founded on famine

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This week, an extended interview with James Daschuk, author of Clearing the Plains: Disease, Politics of Starvation, and the Loss of Aboriginal Life. The award-winning book is a harrowing, historical account of Canada's original Aboriginal policy—re-location via starvation. In this conversation, originally recorded in 2014, Daschuk discusses his investigation into the roles that disease, climate and politics played in the deaths and subjugation of thousands of Aboriginal people in the late 1800s, an era when Canada’s first prime minister—John A. Macdonald—relentlessly pursued his so-called 'National Dream.' A pursuit that coincided with the often nightmarish existence of first peoples on the Plains. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 07 2017

1hr 7mins

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