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(39)

Rank #192 in News category

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Government

The World Unpacked

Updated 7 days ago

Rank #192 in News category

News
Government
Read more

The World Unpacked is a weekly foreign policy podcast, hosted by Jen Psaki, that breaks down the hottest global issues of today with experts, journalists, and policymakers who can explain what is happening, why it matters, and where we go from here. Tune in to get smart on foreign policy.

Read more

The World Unpacked is a weekly foreign policy podcast, hosted by Jen Psaki, that breaks down the hottest global issues of today with experts, journalists, and policymakers who can explain what is happening, why it matters, and where we go from here. Tune in to get smart on foreign policy.

iTunes Ratings

39 Ratings
Average Ratings
32
2
1
1
3

Great listen

By Jlsdwhuc - Jan 09 2020
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Love this show - deeper dive beyond just keeping up with the news. They always get interesting experts, and I get answers to the questions that have been on mind. Highly recommend!

Love it!

By jesskz - Jan 08 2020
Read more
Very interesting every episode! Keep them coming!

iTunes Ratings

39 Ratings
Average Ratings
32
2
1
1
3

Great listen

By Jlsdwhuc - Jan 09 2020
Read more
Love this show - deeper dive beyond just keeping up with the news. They always get interesting experts, and I get answers to the questions that have been on mind. Highly recommend!

Love it!

By jesskz - Jan 08 2020
Read more
Very interesting every episode! Keep them coming!
Cover image of The World Unpacked

The World Unpacked

Latest release on Jan 16, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 7 days ago

Rank #1: The Eruption of Protests in South America

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Growing protests are raging across South America. From Ecuador to Bolivia to Venezuela to Chile, the region is experiencing the largest outbreak of unrest in decades.

What is prompting these protests? Why are they happening now? And what does it say about leadership in the region? To help us better understand, Moisés Naím joined Jen in the World Unpacked studio.

Go deeper: In a recent article for Foreign Affairs, Moisés explains why Latin America was primed to explode.

Nov 21 2019

24mins

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Rank #2: Andrew S. Weiss and Eugene Rumer on the U.S.-Russia Relationship

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In the current political environment, developing any kind of effective strategy toward Russia is fraught with difficulty. A two-year, bipartisan task force convened by Carnegie Endowment and the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, has recommended that instead of fueling unrealistic expectations of a breakthrough, the Trump administration should seek incremental progress on specific topics, based on a set of guiding principles. In the latest Carnegie podcast, two of the authors of the report, Carnegie's Andrew S. Weiss and Eugene Rumer, share their thoughts on how to manage the relationship and what some of those guiding principles should be. Andrew S. Weiss is vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment and oversees research in Washington and Moscow on Russia and Eurasia. Weiss previously served as director for Russian, Ukrainian, and Eurasian Affairs on the National Security Council staff, as a member of the State Department’s Policy Planning Staff, and as a policy assistant in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy during the administrations of Presidents Bill Clinton and George H. W. Bush.​ Eugene Rumer is a senior fellow and director of Carnegie’s Russia and Eurasia Program. Prior to joining Carnegie, Rumer was the national intelligence officer for Russia and Eurasia at the U.S. National Intelligence Council from 2010 to 2014. He has also served on the National Security Council staff and at the State Department, taught at Georgetown University and the George Washington University, and published widely.

Mar 24 2017

26mins

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Rank #3: What do the U.S. midterm elections mean for foreign policy?

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Jen Psaki and the New Yorker’s Evan Osnos discuss the U.S. midterm elections, how the new Congress will affect U.S. policy abroad, and what the results suggest about the 2020 presidential contest. We want to hear from you! Write to us at diplopod@ceip.org, or call us at 202-939-2247. Leave us a voicemail and we might use your question on a future episode. You can also talk to us on Twitter using #DiploPod. And follow Jen on Twitter: twitter.com/JRPsaki Go Deeper: More about Evan Osnos: https://www.newyorker.com/contributors/evan-osnos

Nov 08 2018

27mins

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Rank #4: How Saudi Arabia and Iran Shape the Middle East

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Jen talks to Karim Sadjadpour and Kim Ghattas about the rivalry between Saudi Arabia and Iran, and how it shapes the Middle East. This episode originally aired on March 30, 2018. We'll be back with a new name, a new look, and new episodes on May 9.

Apr 18 2019

22mins

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Rank #5: Paul Haenle on U.S.-China relations in the Trump Administration

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The U.S.-China relationship is pivotal to the world order. U.S. President Donald Trump has repeatedly criticized China during his campaign and since his inauguration. The director of the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy, Paul Haenle, discusses Trump’s direct assaults on the cornerstones of the U.S.-China relationship, assessing the administration’s confrontational approach to questions such as the One China policy, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and North Korea. He also addresses the pressures facing Chinese President Xi Jinping as he approaches the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China, and how conceptions of China’s role in the world are shifting within the country. Paul Haenle is the director of the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center based at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. In addition to running the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center, Haenle is also an adjunct professor at Tsinghua, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate-level courses to Chinese and international students on international relations and global governance. Haenle served as the director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolian Affairs on the National Security Council staffs of former presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama prior to joining Carnegie.

Feb 17 2017

23mins

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Rank #6: A Conversation with Daniel Ellsberg

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Daniel Ellsberg may be best known for his role in exposing the realities of the Vietnam War by releasing the Pentagon Papers, but he also has a new book out, The Doomsday Machine, that lays out a stark depiction of nuclear war planning within the government. He joined Jen Psaki in the DiploPod studio to talk about the threat of nuclear war today, the importance of leaks, and the escalation of tensions with North Korea.​

Apr 27 2018

8mins

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Rank #7: Putin 4.0

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Jen Psaki sat down this week with Andrei Kolesnikov, a senior fellow at the Carnegie Moscow Center, and Andrew Weiss, the vice president for studies overseeing the Carnegie’s Russia and Eurasia program for the latest episode of DiploPod. They discussed what to expect from the upcoming Russian elections, how President Putin has changed, and the surprising results from a new poll conducted by the Carnegie Moscow Center, in partnership with the Levada Center, about the desire for reform within Russia. Andrei Kolesnikov is a senior fellow and the chair of the Russian Domestic Politics and Political Institutions Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center. His research focuses on the major trends shaping Russian domestic politics, with particular focus on the fallout from the Ukraine crisis and ideological shifts inside Russian society. (More on Kolesnikov - http://carnegie.ru/experts/?fa=1015) Andrew S. Weiss is the James Family Chair and vice president for studies at the Carnegie, where he oversees research in Washington and Moscow on Russia and Eurasia. Prior to joining Carnegie, he was director of the RAND Corporation’s Center for Russia and Eurasia and executive director of the RAND Business Leaders Forum. (More on Weiss - http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/824)

Feb 09 2018

14mins

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Rank #8: Avoiding Nuclear Collisions: The View from Russia

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The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace has relaunched our podcast—newly titled “DiploPod”—with the first interview in a series that will run through the end of the year. The series will focus on the dual nuclear threats posed by Iran and North Korea. Dmitri Trenin joins Jen Psaki for a candid discussion about the fallout from Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election, why North Korea may prefer Russia over China as an interlocutor, the view from the Kremlin of President Trump’s threats of military action, and how Russia may benefit from the end of U.S. rapprochement with Iran. Dmitri Trenin, director of the Carnegie Moscow Center, has been with the center since its inception. He also chairs the research council and the Foreign and Security Policy Program. (More on Trenin - http://carnegie.ru/experts/?fa=287)

Nov 02 2017

16mins

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Rank #9: Interview with Nicholas Rasmussen

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In a special episode of Diplopod, Jen Psaki sat down with the outgoing Director of the National Counterterrorism Center and former Carnegie junior fellow Nick Rasmussen. They discussed how the threats facing the United States have changed since September 11th, whether the U.S. government is the most effective voice for combatting extremism online, and what social media companies should do to address the threat of terrorism.

Dec 15 2017

14mins

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Rank #10: Chayes and Teachout on Corruption

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Millions of people in the developing world encounter corruption every day, in the form of bribes they have to pay to go about their daily lives. But there’s an insidious form of corruption that permeates entire structures, including governments, which is often hidden in apparently legitimate activity. Carnegie Senior Fellow Sarah Chayes has been researching this form of corruption for the better part of a decade. She argues that in corrupt countries, kleptocratic networks involve not only government officials, but private industries and established criminal networks. In her recent report, When Corruption is the Operating System: The Case of Honduras, Sarah examines how the kleptocratic system functions in a case study on that country. Sarah joins Tom and Zephyr Teachout, author of Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin’s Snuff Box to Citizens United, and a democratic candidate in the New York gubernatorial race, for a discussion on corruption and power. Sarah Chayes is internationally recognized for her innovative thinking on corruption and its implications. Her work explores how severe corruption can help prompt such crises as terrorism, revolutions and their violent aftermaths, and environmental degradation. (More on Chayes - http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/712) Zephyr Teachout is an associate professor of law at Fordham University. (More on Teachout -https://www.fordham.edu/info/23186/zephyr_teachout)

Jun 09 2017

29mins

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Rank #11: Moises Naim on the Global Outlook

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Lot of cross-trends are buffeting the global scene at the moment: populism, nationalism, anti-globalization. Many of these come together in the form of Trump. But beneath these issues are other longer term shifts: in technology, demographics, and economy inequality. Moisés Naím, distinguished fellow at the Carnegie Endowment, is the chief international columnist for El País and La Repubblica and the author of the bestselling “The End of Power”. He spoke to Tom Carver about these global challenges and why Trump ultimately makes him feel optimistic about America. Moisés Naím is the chief international columnist for El País and La Repubblica, Spain’s and Italy’s largest dailies, and a contributing editor to the Atlantic. Naím’s public service includes his tenure as Venezuela’s minister of trade and industry in the early 1990s, director of Venezuela’s Central Bank, and executive director of the World Bank. (more about Naim - http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/21)

Sep 02 2017

28mins

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Rank #12: Brown, Cammack, and Zomlot on Revitalizing Palestinian Nationalism

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With other headlines coming out of the Middle East in recent years, the Palestinian issue has been pushed to the background. Repeated efforts to negotiate a two-state solution have faltered, and conditions in the Palestinian Territories have continued to deteriorate, with chronic shortages of food and water and a staggeringly high 60 percent unemployment rate among youth in the Gaza Strip. Amidst all of this, the Palestinian people seem to be losing faith in their leaders' ability to deliver. Carnegie scholars Perry Cammack and Nathan Brown recently conducted a survey of 58 Palestinian leaders, and found dwindling support for their own institutions. Tom is joined by Carnegie scholars Perry Cammack and Nathan Brown to discuss the findings in their report, Revitalizing Palestinian Nationalism: Options Versus Realities, with Husam Zomlot, the chief representative of the Palestinian General Delegation to the United States. Perry Cammack is a fellow in Carnegie's Middle East Program, where he focuses on long-term regional trends and their implications for American foreign policy. Prior to joining Carnegie in August 2015, Cammack worked on issues related to the Middle East as part of the policy planning staff of Secretary of State John Kerry from 2013 to 2015 and as a senior professional staff member for then senator Kerry on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. (More about Cammack - http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/1080) Nathan J. Brown is a professor of political science and international affairs at George Washington University and is a distinguished scholar and author of six well-received books on Arab politics. He serves on the Middle East and North Africa advisory committee for Human Rights Watch and the board of trustees at the American University in Cairo. (More about Brown - http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/238) Husam S. Zomlot is the chief representative of the Palestinian General Delegation to the United States and an adviser to Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.

Jul 21 2017

28mins

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Rank #13: Iran's Cyber War

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While the loud, public conflict between the United States and Iran rages on, a secret war has been waged in the shadows for years. How dangerous is the cyberwar between the two countries? And how has the digital battlefield changed? Jen Psaki talks to Jon Bateman about the tools and strategies of both countries have developed, and what an all-out cyberwar would look like.

Jul 25 2019

30mins

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Rank #14: Summer Break

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Like most of DC, we're going to take a few weeks off this August. We'll be back in September with more episodes. If there's a topic in foreign policy you'd like us to unpack, tweet @CarnegieEndow with #WorldUnpacked.

Aug 15 2019

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Rank #15: Michael Pettis on U.S.-China Trade Relations

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President Trump has made it clear that he wants to reduce the U.S trade deficit with China. If he follows through on his campaign promises to impose tariffs, how would China react? Is a trade deficit with China necessarily a bad thing for the US? One of the most thought-provoking economists on China, Michael Pettis examines the trade relationship between Washington and Beijing, and explains how the Chinese growth model is facing unique challenges. Michael Pettis is a senior fellow in the Carnegie Asia Program based in Beijing. An expert on China’s economy, Pettis is professor of finance at Peking University’s Guanghua School of Management, where he specializes in Chinese financial markets. Pettis is also editor of China Financial Markets, which offers monthly insights into the financial and economic dynamics of China and the global economy. Learn more at ChinaFinancialMarkets.org.

Mar 10 2017

21mins

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Rank #16: Tellis on Afghanistan’s Taliban problem

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As the recent horrific bombings show, there are no easy solutions in Afghanistan. The conflict is the United States’ longest-running war, and despite the billions of dollars that have been spent in foreign support since 9/11, the Taliban continues to pose a major security threat. The White House is in the midst of a review of its Afghanistan policy and will decide later this year whether to increase the number of US troops in the country. Carnegie expert Ashley Tellis has analyzed the issue for many years, and discusses the choices facing the White House with Tom Carver. Ashley Tellis served as senior adviser to the ambassador at the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi. He also served on the U.S. National Security Council staff as special assistant to President George W. Bush and senior director for strategic planning and Southwest Asia. He is the author of India’s Emerging Nuclear Posture (RAND, 2001) and co-author of Interpreting China’s Grand Strategy: Past, Present, and Future (RAND, 2000). Tellis holds the Tata Chair for Strategic Affairs.​ (More on Tellis - http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/198)

Jun 05 2017

19mins

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Rank #17: Tellis and Emmott on the Challenges Facing Western States

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The West has long been a font of stability, prosperity, and security. Yet when faced with global instability and economic uncertainty, it is tempting for states to react by closing borders, hoarding wealth, and solidifying power. In a compelling new book, The Fate of the West: The Battle to Save the World’s Most Successful Political Idea, former Economist editor Bill Emmott argues for a return to the core values of openness and equality of opportunity that are increasingly eroded in today’s global political climate. Emmott joins Ashley J. Tellis, the Tata Chair in Strategic Affairs at Carnegie, and Tom Carver to discuss the challenges facing Western states and potential strategies for the revitalization of liberal democracy. Ashley Tellis served as senior adviser to the ambassador at the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi. He also served on the U.S. National Security Council staff as special assistant to President George W. Bush and senior director for strategic planning and Southwest Asia. He is the author of India’s Emerging Nuclear Posture (RAND, 2001) and co-author of Interpreting China’s Grand Strategy: Past, Present, and Future (RAND, 2000). Tellis holds the Tata Chair for Strategic Affairs.​ (More on Tellis - carnegieendowment.org/experts/198) Bill Emmott is an independent writer, lecturer, and consultant on international affairs, and former editor-in-chief of the Economist. He is also chairman of The Wake Up Foundation. (More on Emmott - billemmott.com)

Jun 23 2017

26mins

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Rank #18: Ülgen and Brattberg on Turkey's Future

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Where is Turkey heading? Last month president Erdogan narrowly won a referendum to give his presidency sweeping new powers. What does this portend for Turkey's relationship with the region and the rest of the world? And how far is he planning to go to entrench the pier of the AKP in his pursuit of Islamic nationalism at home? Tom Carver discussed Turkey's trajectory with Carnegie Europe's Sinan Ülgen and the director of Carnegie’s Europe Program, Erik Brattberg. Sinan Ülgen is the author of Governing Cyberspace: A Road Map for Transatlantic Leadership (Carnegie Europe, 2016), Handbook of EU Negotiations (Bilgi University Press, 2005), and The European Transformation of Modern Turkey with Kemal Derviş (Centre for European Policy Studies, 2004). He has served in the Turkish Foreign Service in several capacities: in Ankara on the United Nations desk; in Brussels at the Turkish Permanent Delegation to the European Union; and at the Turkish embassy in Tripoli. (More on Ülgen - http://carnegieeurope.eu/experts/?fa=547) Erik Brattberg is director of the Europe Program and a fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington. He joined Carnegie from the McCain Institute for International Leadership at Arizona State University, where he was the director for special projects and a senior fellow. (More on Brattberg - http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/1342)

Jun 16 2017

26mins

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Rank #19: Arms Race Redux

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President Trump surprised foreign policy experts when he pulled out of the INF Treaty last week, raising the prospect of a new nuclear arms race. Jen talks to Russian nuclear policy expert Alexey Arbatov and Carnegie’s Eugene Rumer to explain what’s at stake. Eugene Rumer is a senior fellow and the director of Carnegie’s Russia and Eurasia Program. Alexey Arbatov is the head of the Center for International Security at the Primakov National Research Institute of World Economy and International Relations. We want to hear from you! Write to us at diplopod@ceip.org, or call us at 202-939-2247. Leave us a voicemail and we might use your question on a future episode. You can also talk to us on Twitter using #DiploPod. And follow Jen on Twitter: twitter.com/JRPsaki Go Deeper: Read Alexey’s take on the danger of withdrawing from the INF Treaty: https://carnegie.ru/commentary/77589 Read Carnegie experts on the prospect of an arms race: https://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurope/77575 Read Carnegie expert Dmitri Trenin on INF withdrawal: https://carnegie.ru/commentary/77568 More about Eugene Rumer: http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/917 More about Alexei Arbatov: https://carnegie.ru/commentary/experts/367

Oct 30 2018

26mins

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Rank #20: Douglas H. Paal on the Upcoming Meeting Between the U.S. and North Korea

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In the latest episode of DiploPod, Jen Psaki sits down with Douglas Paal to discuss the upcoming meeting between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un. They examine what the North Koreans might want from talks, what expectations and concerns regional actors including China, Japan, and South Korea may have, and how Trump’s decision on whether to stick with the Iran nuclear deal could complicate possible diplomacy with Pyongyang. Douglas H. Paal is vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He was an unofficial U.S. representative to Taiwan as director of the American Institute in Taiwan (2002–2006) and on the National Security Council staffs of presidents Reagan and George H. W. Bush between 1986 and 1993 as director of Asian affairs and then as senior director and special assistant to the president. (More on Paal - https://carnegieendowment.org/experts/397)

Mar 16 2018

20mins

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