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The World Unpacked

Updated 6 days ago

Education
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Government
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The World Unpacked is a weekly foreign policy podcast, hosted by Jen Psaki, that breaks down the hottest global issues of today with experts, journalists, and policymakers who can explain what is happening, why it matters, and where we go from here. Tune in to get smart on foreign policy.

Read more

The World Unpacked is a weekly foreign policy podcast, hosted by Jen Psaki, that breaks down the hottest global issues of today with experts, journalists, and policymakers who can explain what is happening, why it matters, and where we go from here. Tune in to get smart on foreign policy.

iTunes Ratings

44 Ratings
Average Ratings
36
2
1
2
3

A foreign policy podcast that stands out

By PekingRyan - Jan 15 2020
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There are plenty of global affairs podcasts out there that regurgitate the news cycle. Fewer sit down experts to weave their expertise into stories that illuminate and stick with you. Come for the challenging, timely topics. Stay for the analysis that goes beyond the typical dinner-table news fare.

Love it!

By jesskz - Jan 08 2020
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Very interesting every episode! Keep them coming!

iTunes Ratings

44 Ratings
Average Ratings
36
2
1
2
3

A foreign policy podcast that stands out

By PekingRyan - Jan 15 2020
Read more
There are plenty of global affairs podcasts out there that regurgitate the news cycle. Fewer sit down experts to weave their expertise into stories that illuminate and stick with you. Come for the challenging, timely topics. Stay for the analysis that goes beyond the typical dinner-table news fare.

Love it!

By jesskz - Jan 08 2020
Read more
Very interesting every episode! Keep them coming!
Cover image of The World Unpacked

The World Unpacked

Latest release on Feb 13, 2020

Read more

The World Unpacked is a weekly foreign policy podcast, hosted by Jen Psaki, that breaks down the hottest global issues of today with experts, journalists, and policymakers who can explain what is happening, why it matters, and where we go from here. Tune in to get smart on foreign policy.

Rank #1: Michael Pettis on U.S.-China Trade Relations

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President Trump has made it clear that he wants to reduce the U.S trade deficit with China. If he follows through on his campaign promises to impose tariffs, how would China react? Is a trade deficit with China necessarily a bad thing for the US? One of the most thought-provoking economists on China, Michael Pettis examines the trade relationship between Washington and Beijing, and explains how the Chinese growth model is facing unique challenges. Michael Pettis is a senior fellow in the Carnegie Asia Program based in Beijing. An expert on China’s economy, Pettis is professor of finance at Peking University’s Guanghua School of Management, where he specializes in Chinese financial markets. Pettis is also editor of China Financial Markets, which offers monthly insights into the financial and economic dynamics of China and the global economy. Learn more at ChinaFinancialMarkets.org.

Mar 10 2017

21mins

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Rank #2: Sanctions 101: How Powerful are Sanctions, Really?

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How powerful are sanctions, really? In this episode, Jen and Jarrett talk to former U.S. treasury secretary Jack Lew about how policymakers ought to approach sanctions, and the dangers of using sanctions unwisely. This is the second episode of a three-part special series on sanctions—a 101 on how sanctions work and how policymakers should use them. Don’t miss part one of our series on what sanctions are and how they work. Listen here: https://soundcloud.com/diplopod/sanctions-101-how-sanctions-work And come back tomorrow for part three of our series, when Jen and Jarrett talk to sanctions lawyer Greta Lichtenbaum about how she helps her clients navigate sanctions policies. To make sure you don’t miss anything, subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. Jacob Lew served as U.S. secretary of the treasury from 2013 to 2017. He previously served as White House chief of staff. Jarrett Blanc is a senior fellow in the Geoeconomics and Strategy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He was previously the State Department coordinator for the Iran nuclear deal (JCPOA). We want to hear from you! Write to us at diplopod@ceip.org, or call us at 202-939-2247. Leave us a voicemail and we might use your question on a future episode. You can also talk to us on Twitter using #DiploPod. And follow Jen! She’s on Twitter at https://twitter.com/jrpsaki. Go Deeper: Read Jack’s new Foreign Affairs article on economic statecraft: https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/world/use-and-misuse-economic-statecraft?gpp=6Kgbv%2BDmD6cFKWHq7SX4uzozL2Fad2ZDR1NuUFRHcUkvK3F2TndueEtGRWpxSUFvZG1sbGV6V3BITGNrWDVHOHoxaThIdnB6Y291ODZWUS9POjViMDg1N2FjN2ZiZmEzYTdmYzEzYjA4NDkzM2I2MTFjZTMzZjI1NTJhM... Watch Jack’s 2016 speech on U.S. sanctions policy: https://ceip.org/e-5191 More about Jack Lew: https://sipa.columbia.edu/faculty-research/faculty-directory/jacob-j-lew More about Jarrett Blanc: http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/1343 Follow Jarrett on Twitter at https://twitter.com/jarrettblanc

Oct 16 2018

31mins

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Rank #3: What the Afghanistan Papers Taught Us

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Jen talks with Jarrett Blanc about the blockbuster report by the Washington Post, revealing hundreds of scathing interviews with U.S. officials involved in the war in Afghanistan.

The World Unpacked will be back in January. 

Dec 19 2019

40mins

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Rank #4: Andrew S. Weiss and Eugene Rumer on the U.S.-Russia Relationship

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In the current political environment, developing any kind of effective strategy toward Russia is fraught with difficulty. A two-year, bipartisan task force convened by Carnegie Endowment and the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, has recommended that instead of fueling unrealistic expectations of a breakthrough, the Trump administration should seek incremental progress on specific topics, based on a set of guiding principles. In the latest Carnegie podcast, two of the authors of the report, Carnegie's Andrew S. Weiss and Eugene Rumer, share their thoughts on how to manage the relationship and what some of those guiding principles should be. Andrew S. Weiss is vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment and oversees research in Washington and Moscow on Russia and Eurasia. Weiss previously served as director for Russian, Ukrainian, and Eurasian Affairs on the National Security Council staff, as a member of the State Department’s Policy Planning Staff, and as a policy assistant in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy during the administrations of Presidents Bill Clinton and George H. W. Bush.​ Eugene Rumer is a senior fellow and director of Carnegie’s Russia and Eurasia Program. Prior to joining Carnegie, Rumer was the national intelligence officer for Russia and Eurasia at the U.S. National Intelligence Council from 2010 to 2014. He has also served on the National Security Council staff and at the State Department, taught at Georgetown University and the George Washington University, and published widely.

Mar 24 2017

26mins

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Rank #5: Sanctions 101: How Do Sanctions Work?

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This is the first episode of a three-part special series on sanctions—a 101 course on how sanctions work and how policymakers should use them. This episode, Jen talks with her special cohost for this series, Jarrett Blanc, about what sanctions are and how they work. Over the next two days, we’ll release two more episodes—tomorrow Jen and Jarrett talk to former U.S. treasury secretary Jack Lew about how policymakers think about sanctions, and on Wednesday they’ll talk to sanctions lawyer Greta Lichtenbaum about how she helps her clients navigate sanctions policies. To make sure you don’t miss anything, subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. Jarrett Blanc is a senior fellow in the Geoeconomics and Strategy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He was previously the deputy lead coordinator and State Department coordinator for Iran nuclear implementation at the U.S. Department of State under President Obama, responsible for the implementation of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) on Iran’s nuclear program, including Iranian and U.S. commitments on sanctions. We want to hear from you! Write to us at diplopod@ceip.org, or call us at 202-939-2247. Leave us a voicemail and we might use your question on a future episode. You can also talk to us on Twitter using #DiploPod. And follow Jen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JRPsaki Go Deeper: More about Jarrett Blanc: http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/1343 Read Jarrett’s op-ed on Russia sanctions: http://ceip.org/p-77414 Listen to Jarrett talk about Iran sanctions: http://ceip.org/p-77016 Follow Jarrett on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JarrettBlanc

Oct 15 2018

16mins

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Rank #6: Iran's Cyber War

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While the loud, public conflict between the United States and Iran rages on, a secret war has been waged in the shadows for years. How dangerous is the cyberwar between the two countries? And how has the digital battlefield changed? Jen Psaki talks to Jon Bateman about the tools and strategies of both countries have developed, and what an all-out cyberwar would look like.

Jul 25 2019

30mins

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Rank #7: The Saudi-Iranian Rivalry

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For the latest episode of DipoPod, Jen Psaki interviewed Carnegie senior fellow Karim Sadjadpour and former BBC reporter and Carnegie senior visiting fellow Kim Ghattas to talk about the long standing rivalry between Iran and Saudi Arabia. Karim and Kim, experts on the region, discussed how the rivalry impacts the region and the sudden rise of Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman in Saudi Arabia. They also chatted about the shadow of American politics in the region including the election of U.S. President Donald Trump and the recent appointment of John Bolton as U.S. national security adviser. More about Sadjadpour - https://carnegieendowment.org/experts/340 More about Ghattas - https://carnegieendowment.org/experts/1407

Mar 30 2018

22mins

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Rank #8: Paul Haenle on U.S.-China relations in the Trump Administration

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The U.S.-China relationship is pivotal to the world order. U.S. President Donald Trump has repeatedly criticized China during his campaign and since his inauguration. The director of the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy, Paul Haenle, discusses Trump’s direct assaults on the cornerstones of the U.S.-China relationship, assessing the administration’s confrontational approach to questions such as the One China policy, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and North Korea. He also addresses the pressures facing Chinese President Xi Jinping as he approaches the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China, and how conceptions of China’s role in the world are shifting within the country. Paul Haenle is the director of the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center based at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. In addition to running the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center, Haenle is also an adjunct professor at Tsinghua, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate-level courses to Chinese and international students on international relations and global governance. Haenle served as the director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolian Affairs on the National Security Council staffs of former presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama prior to joining Carnegie.

Feb 17 2017

23mins

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Rank #9: Denis McDonough on the Role of Chief of Staff

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Carnegie Visiting Senior Fellow and former White House chief of staff Denis McDonough joined Tom Carver for a wide-ranging conversation, including reflections on his time as White House chief of staff during U.S. President Barack Obama, his views on the future of U.S. leadership in the world, and his thoughts on addressing the skills gap in the U.S. workforce, particularly in the face of rapidly advancing technological innovation. Denis McDonough is a visiting senior fellow in Carnegie’s Technology and International Affairs Program. Previously, he served as White House chief of staff for President Obama’s second term, managing the four thousand member White House staff, as well as cabinet secretaries and agency leaders. - http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/1329

Sep 15 2017

25mins

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Rank #10: Reaction to the Helsinki Summit

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The Helsinki meeting between U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin concluded with a tumultuous press conference filled with jaw-dropping statements on both sides. Carnegie experts Andrew Weiss and Alexander Gabuev joined Jen Psaki to dissect the summit and what it means for US-Russia relations going forward. Andrew S. Weiss is the James Family Chair and vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he oversees research in Washington and Moscow on Russia and Eurasia. Prior to joining Carnegie, he was director of the RAND Corporation’s Center for Russia and Eurasia and executive director of the RAND Business Leaders Forum. (More on Weiss -https://carnegieendowment.org/experts/824) Alexander Gabuev is a senior fellow and the chair of the Russia in the Asia-Pacific Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center. His research is focused on Russia’s policy toward East and Southeast Asia, political and ideological trends in China, and China’s relations with its neighbors—especially those in Central Asia. (More on Gabuev - https://carnegie.ru/experts/1017)

Jul 16 2018

19mins

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Rank #11: Sanctions 101

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This is the first episode of a three-part special series on sanctions—a 101 course on how sanctions work and how policymakers should use them. This episode, Jen talks with her Jarrett Blanc about what sanctions are and how they work. To make sure you don’t miss anything, subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. Jarrett Blanc is a senior fellow in the Geoeconomics and Strategy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He was previously the deputy lead coordinator and State Department coordinator for Iran nuclear implementation at the U.S. Department of State under President Obama, responsible for the implementation of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) on Iran’s nuclear program, including Iranian and U.S. commitments on sanctions.
We want to hear from you! Write to us at diplopod@ceip.org, or call us at 202-939-2247. Leave us a voicemail and we might use your question on a future episode. You can also talk to us on Twitter using #DiploPod. And follow Jen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JRPsaki

May 02 2019

14mins

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Rank #12: Avoiding Nuclear Collisions: The View from Russia

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The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace has relaunched our podcast—newly titled “DiploPod”—with the first interview in a series that will run through the end of the year. The series will focus on the dual nuclear threats posed by Iran and North Korea. Dmitri Trenin joins Jen Psaki for a candid discussion about the fallout from Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election, why North Korea may prefer Russia over China as an interlocutor, the view from the Kremlin of President Trump’s threats of military action, and how Russia may benefit from the end of U.S. rapprochement with Iran. Dmitri Trenin, director of the Carnegie Moscow Center, has been with the center since its inception. He also chairs the research council and the Foreign and Security Policy Program. (More on Trenin - http://carnegie.ru/experts/?fa=287)

Nov 02 2017

16mins

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Rank #13: Chayes and Teachout on Corruption

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Millions of people in the developing world encounter corruption every day, in the form of bribes they have to pay to go about their daily lives. But there’s an insidious form of corruption that permeates entire structures, including governments, which is often hidden in apparently legitimate activity. Carnegie Senior Fellow Sarah Chayes has been researching this form of corruption for the better part of a decade. She argues that in corrupt countries, kleptocratic networks involve not only government officials, but private industries and established criminal networks. In her recent report, When Corruption is the Operating System: The Case of Honduras, Sarah examines how the kleptocratic system functions in a case study on that country. Sarah joins Tom and Zephyr Teachout, author of Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin’s Snuff Box to Citizens United, and a democratic candidate in the New York gubernatorial race, for a discussion on corruption and power. Sarah Chayes is internationally recognized for her innovative thinking on corruption and its implications. Her work explores how severe corruption can help prompt such crises as terrorism, revolutions and their violent aftermaths, and environmental degradation. (More on Chayes - http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/712) Zephyr Teachout is an associate professor of law at Fordham University. (More on Teachout -https://www.fordham.edu/info/23186/zephyr_teachout)

Jun 09 2017

29mins

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Rank #14: A Conversation with Daniel Ellsberg

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Daniel Ellsberg may be best known for his role in exposing the realities of the Vietnam War by releasing the Pentagon Papers, but he also has a new book out, The Doomsday Machine, that lays out a stark depiction of nuclear war planning within the government. He joined Jen Psaki in the DiploPod studio to talk about the threat of nuclear war today, the importance of leaks, and the escalation of tensions with North Korea.​

Apr 27 2018

8mins

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Rank #15: Does NATO Still Matter?

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NATO played a pivotal role in the arms control treaties that kept a lid on the tensions of the Cold War. But arms control treaties are expiring, and recently, French President Emmanuel Macron described NATO as "brain dead". Jen talks to former NATO deputy secretary general Rose Gottemoeller about Turkey, Ukraine, New START, and NATO's future.

Dec 12 2019

18mins

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Rank #16: How Saudi Arabia and Iran Shape the Middle East

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Jen talks to Karim Sadjadpour and Kim Ghattas about the rivalry between Saudi Arabia and Iran, and how it shapes the Middle East. This episode originally aired on March 30, 2018. We'll be back with a new name, a new look, and new episodes on May 9.

Apr 18 2019

22mins

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Rank #17: Moises Naim on the Global Outlook

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Lot of cross-trends are buffeting the global scene at the moment: populism, nationalism, anti-globalization. Many of these come together in the form of Trump. But beneath these issues are other longer term shifts: in technology, demographics, and economy inequality. Moisés Naím, distinguished fellow at the Carnegie Endowment, is the chief international columnist for El País and La Repubblica and the author of the bestselling “The End of Power”. He spoke to Tom Carver about these global challenges and why Trump ultimately makes him feel optimistic about America. Moisés Naím is the chief international columnist for El País and La Repubblica, Spain’s and Italy’s largest dailies, and a contributing editor to the Atlantic. Naím’s public service includes his tenure as Venezuela’s minister of trade and industry in the early 1990s, director of Venezuela’s Central Bank, and executive director of the World Bank. (more about Naim - http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/21)

Sep 02 2017

28mins

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Rank #18: Brown, Cammack, and Zomlot on Revitalizing Palestinian Nationalism

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With other headlines coming out of the Middle East in recent years, the Palestinian issue has been pushed to the background. Repeated efforts to negotiate a two-state solution have faltered, and conditions in the Palestinian Territories have continued to deteriorate, with chronic shortages of food and water and a staggeringly high 60 percent unemployment rate among youth in the Gaza Strip. Amidst all of this, the Palestinian people seem to be losing faith in their leaders' ability to deliver. Carnegie scholars Perry Cammack and Nathan Brown recently conducted a survey of 58 Palestinian leaders, and found dwindling support for their own institutions. Tom is joined by Carnegie scholars Perry Cammack and Nathan Brown to discuss the findings in their report, Revitalizing Palestinian Nationalism: Options Versus Realities, with Husam Zomlot, the chief representative of the Palestinian General Delegation to the United States. Perry Cammack is a fellow in Carnegie's Middle East Program, where he focuses on long-term regional trends and their implications for American foreign policy. Prior to joining Carnegie in August 2015, Cammack worked on issues related to the Middle East as part of the policy planning staff of Secretary of State John Kerry from 2013 to 2015 and as a senior professional staff member for then senator Kerry on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. (More about Cammack - http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/1080) Nathan J. Brown is a professor of political science and international affairs at George Washington University and is a distinguished scholar and author of six well-received books on Arab politics. He serves on the Middle East and North Africa advisory committee for Human Rights Watch and the board of trustees at the American University in Cairo. (More about Brown - http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/238) Husam S. Zomlot is the chief representative of the Palestinian General Delegation to the United States and an adviser to Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.

Jul 21 2017

28mins

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Rank #19: Putin 4.0

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Jen Psaki sat down this week with Andrei Kolesnikov, a senior fellow at the Carnegie Moscow Center, and Andrew Weiss, the vice president for studies overseeing the Carnegie’s Russia and Eurasia program for the latest episode of DiploPod. They discussed what to expect from the upcoming Russian elections, how President Putin has changed, and the surprising results from a new poll conducted by the Carnegie Moscow Center, in partnership with the Levada Center, about the desire for reform within Russia. Andrei Kolesnikov is a senior fellow and the chair of the Russian Domestic Politics and Political Institutions Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center. His research focuses on the major trends shaping Russian domestic politics, with particular focus on the fallout from the Ukraine crisis and ideological shifts inside Russian society. (More on Kolesnikov - http://carnegie.ru/experts/?fa=1015) Andrew S. Weiss is the James Family Chair and vice president for studies at the Carnegie, where he oversees research in Washington and Moscow on Russia and Eurasia. Prior to joining Carnegie, he was director of the RAND Corporation’s Center for Russia and Eurasia and executive director of the RAND Business Leaders Forum. (More on Weiss - http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/824)

Feb 09 2018

14mins

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Rank #20: Tellis on Afghanistan’s Taliban problem

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As the recent horrific bombings show, there are no easy solutions in Afghanistan. The conflict is the United States’ longest-running war, and despite the billions of dollars that have been spent in foreign support since 9/11, the Taliban continues to pose a major security threat. The White House is in the midst of a review of its Afghanistan policy and will decide later this year whether to increase the number of US troops in the country. Carnegie expert Ashley Tellis has analyzed the issue for many years, and discusses the choices facing the White House with Tom Carver. Ashley Tellis served as senior adviser to the ambassador at the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi. He also served on the U.S. National Security Council staff as special assistant to President George W. Bush and senior director for strategic planning and Southwest Asia. He is the author of India’s Emerging Nuclear Posture (RAND, 2001) and co-author of Interpreting China’s Grand Strategy: Past, Present, and Future (RAND, 2000). Tellis holds the Tata Chair for Strategic Affairs.​ (More on Tellis - http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/198)

Jun 05 2017

19mins

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How Coronavirus is Cutting China Off from the World

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The Coronavirus outbreak has sparked fear around the world, leading to quarantines, transportation shut downs, and disrupting trade, travel, and more. Reports are now emerging that the Chinese government initially tried to cover up the outbreak, threatening doctors and forcing whistleblowers to recant their statements. How has the initial response changed? And what does Coronavirus mean for China going forward? Jen talks to James Palmer about the domestic and international reaction, and what it means for Chinese citizens.

Feb 13 2020

32mins

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Surviving Aleppo

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Waad al-Kateab was a college student in Aleppo when she picked up a video camera to document the Syrian revolution. She kept filming when she met and married her husband and had her first child. She kept filming when the Assad regime laid siege to her city, and when the Russian Air Force started bombing hospitals. Waad's husband, Hamza al-Kateab, became the last doctor running the last hospital in Aleppo. 

Waad's footage became the Oscar nominated film, For Sama, which tells the harrowing story of the siege of Aleppo in the form of a letter from mother to daughter. Jen talked with Waad about why she started filming, and why she and her husband chose to stay. 

To learn more about Waad al-Kateab's advocacy, visit ActionforSama.com. For more information about the film visit ForSamaFilm.com

Feb 06 2020

27mins

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The Death of the Two State Solution

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President Trump's recently announced peace deal might be dead on arrival, but it may still create facts on the ground that make the two-state solution impossible. Jen talks to Marwan Muasher about what Jared Kushner's "deal of the century" means for Israel, Palestine, and the United States. 

Jan 30 2020

19mins

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The Terror in Xinjiang

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Reports of China's repression of its Uighur minority have been trickling out for years, but recently leaked documents tell the story of sweeping and systematic campaigns of detention, cultural genocide, brainwashing, and forced labor. Jen talks to James Palmer about what he's learned about the situation on the ground, what the example of Xinjiang has meant for the Hong Kong protestors, and what consequences these two crises have had for China on the world stage.

Jan 23 2020

27mins

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Iraq: Caught in the Crossfire

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The U.S. killing of Qassem Soleimani has upended Iraq's already fragile political system. How do Iraqis see the escalating tension between the U.S. and Iran? Jen talks to Iraqi journalist Ghaith Abdul-Ahad about how Iraqis see the conflict, and what it means for Iraqi society.

Note: Ghaith called us from Istanbul, and was joined by his cat, who you'll hear on this recording.

Jan 16 2020

25mins

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Iran's Revenge: A Dish Served Cold

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Last week Donald Trump ordered a drone attack that killed top Iranian general Qassim Suleimani. On Tuesday, Iran retaliated by firing a dozen ballistic missiles at Iraqi bases hosting U.S. military forces. On Wednesday, President Trump declared an end to the escalatory spiral with Iran. But is it really over? Jen talks to Karim Sadjadpour about what Iran might do next. 

Jan 09 2020

27mins

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What the Afghanistan Papers Taught Us

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Jen talks with Jarrett Blanc about the blockbuster report by the Washington Post, revealing hundreds of scathing interviews with U.S. officials involved in the war in Afghanistan.

The World Unpacked will be back in January. 

Dec 19 2019

40mins

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Does NATO Still Matter?

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NATO played a pivotal role in the arms control treaties that kept a lid on the tensions of the Cold War. But arms control treaties are expiring, and recently, French President Emmanuel Macron described NATO as "brain dead". Jen talks to former NATO deputy secretary general Rose Gottemoeller about Turkey, Ukraine, New START, and NATO's future.

Dec 12 2019

18mins

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Iran's Deadly Protests

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When Iranians took to the streets to protest an abrupt hike in gas prices, the government turned off the internet. When it came back on, the world saw the devastating aftermath of the deadliest crackdown in Iran since the 1979 revolution. 

Why was the crackdown so severe? And what role dis U.S. sanctions really play in bringing the protests about? Jen talks to Karim Sadjadpour about what the unrest means for the Iranian regime and for U.S. strategy. 

Dec 05 2019

23mins

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Happy Thanksgiving!

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The World Unpacked is on hiatus this week. For our U.S. listeners, Happy Thanksgiving!

If there's a topic in foreign policy you'd like us to unpack, tweet @CarnegieEndow with #WorldUnpacked.

Nov 28 2019

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The Eruption of Protests in South America

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Growing protests are raging across South America. From Ecuador to Bolivia to Venezuela to Chile, the region is experiencing the largest outbreak of unrest in decades.

What is prompting these protests? Why are they happening now? And what does it say about leadership in the region? To help us better understand, Moisés Naím joined Jen in the World Unpacked studio.

Go deeper: In a recent article for Foreign Affairs, Moisés explains why Latin America was primed to explode.

Nov 21 2019

24mins

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Freedom of Foreign Press in China

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The Chinese government’s long held strategy to control dissent within their borders has had enormous impact on members of the media—particularly foreign media.

Jen sat down Charles Hutzler, the former Beijing bureau chief at the Wall Street Journal, who has spent more than 20 years reporting in Beijing. He describes how even during massive social changes in China, the government’s view of media’s role has not changed.

Nov 14 2019

36mins

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What Baghdadi's Death Means for ISIS

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Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi shaped and led ISIS, defining its brutal ideology and establishing himself as a "caliph of all Muslims". What does his death mean for ISIS? Jen talks to Carnegie expert H.A. Hellyer about how Baghdadi shaped the ideologies of extremism, and what can be done to reverse the tides of radicalization.

Go further: https://carnegieendowment.org/2019/10/28/conditions-that-created-isis-still-exist-pub-80219

Nov 07 2019

26mins

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"Get Rid of Everyone": Lebanon's Arab Spring 2.0

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Protestors around Lebanon have already won many victories, including the resignation of Prime Minister Saad Hariri. But can a deeply sectarian government really start afresh? Jen talks to Marwan Muasher about what the protestors are looking for and whether or not they're going to succeed. 

Oct 31 2019

21mins

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How a Poet Defied El Salvador's Death Squads

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Carolyn Forché was an acclaimed twenty-seven year old poet in 1977 when a stranger persuaded her to travel to El Salvador, a country on the brink of war. What she saw there, recounted in her recent memoir, What You Have Heard Is True, changed her life and caused her to question everything she thought she knew about American foreign policy. Jen talks to Carolyn about what she saw, what she learned, and how the dynamics and dilemmas she so vividly portrays have re-emerged in Central America and U.S. immigration policy.

Oct 24 2019

34mins

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Fixing Interpol with Matt Apuzzo

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Interpol conjures up images of shady agents in sharp suits, jetting around the world to capture international criminals. But recently the international police agency has come under fire, as autocratic regimes around the world have used its Red Notice system to harass and arrest political exiles. Has Interpol become just an international extension of the regimes of Vladimir Putin and Xi Jin Ping? Should the organization be reformed? Or is the criticism too harsh for a one hundred year old organization with a history of tracking criminals across borders? Jen talks to New York Times reporter Matt Apuzzo about where things went wrong, and how they could get back on track.

Oct 17 2019

28mins

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Mohammad Bin Salman's Recklessness and Saudi Arabia's Future

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Mohammad Bin Salman rose to power with the promise of reform and liberalizing Saudi society. The war in Yemen and the murder of Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi have changed his reputation dramatically - but has he suffered any real consequences? Jen talks with Yasmine Farouk about MBS's ambitions, recklessness, brutality, and miscalculations.

Oct 10 2019

35mins

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Indonesia's Youth Are Trying to Save the Country

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Tens of thousands of Indonesians took to the streets last week to protest a series of controversial moves undertaken by President Jokowi and his government. While Indonesians are no stranger to protests, these demonstrations come less than five months after Jokowi was re-elected with 55% of the vote. Jen talks to Dan Slater about why voters have turned against a seemingly popular, democratically-elected leader.

Oct 03 2019

20mins

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How UNGA Happens

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The United Nations General Assembly has gathered world leaders since 1945. But while presidents and prime ministers stage dramatic speeches in the hall, much of the real diplomatic work takes place on the sidelines. How does UNGA really work? What thorny issues are diplomats tackling this week? And what will we remember from this year's meeting? Jen talks to Carnegie expert Salman Ahmed, who has almost twenty years of experience at the UN. 

Sep 26 2019

32mins

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How the Hong Kong Protests Look from Beijing

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Hong Kong has been in turmoil for months, as residents in their millions continue to take to the streets. What started as a protest against an extradition bill has grown into a full blown movement for democracy. As the protests have grown, the central government has deployed disinformation strategies to shape public perception of what's happening on the ground, and has accused the United States of fomenting the unrest. How have the protests changed since they started this summer? How has the Chinese government's response evolved? And how do ordinary people in Beijing think about the protests? Jen talks to Steven Lee Myers of the New York Times, who has been reporting from the ground in both Hong Kong and Beijing, about what might change Beijing's calculations in the future.

Sep 19 2019

25mins

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iTunes Ratings

44 Ratings
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A foreign policy podcast that stands out

By PekingRyan - Jan 15 2020
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There are plenty of global affairs podcasts out there that regurgitate the news cycle. Fewer sit down experts to weave their expertise into stories that illuminate and stick with you. Come for the challenging, timely topics. Stay for the analysis that goes beyond the typical dinner-table news fare.

Love it!

By jesskz - Jan 08 2020
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Very interesting every episode! Keep them coming!