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LSE: Public lectures and events

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

iTunes Ratings

203 Ratings
Average Ratings
140
30
14
8
11

Uneven Excelence

By Slanebrain - Jan 09 2020
Read more
The good podcasts are stratospheric but I’m afraid that the others . . . .

Engaging Thoughtful Content

By SlipperySnake321 - Oct 28 2019
Read more
Access to thoughtful experts, great questions, and overall a great learning opportunity. Thank you!

iTunes Ratings

203 Ratings
Average Ratings
140
30
14
8
11

Uneven Excelence

By Slanebrain - Jan 09 2020
Read more
The good podcasts are stratospheric but I’m afraid that the others . . . .

Engaging Thoughtful Content

By SlipperySnake321 - Oct 28 2019
Read more
Access to thoughtful experts, great questions, and overall a great learning opportunity. Thank you!
Cover image of LSE: Public lectures and events

LSE: Public lectures and events

Latest release on Jul 28, 2020

All 298 episodes from oldest to newest

Twilight of Democracy: the failure of politics and the parting of friends [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Anne Applebaum | Anne Applebaum discusees her new book, Twilight of Democracy. As well as a work of memoir and reporting, it is a deep meditation on the central political dilemma of our time: Why did the wave of enthusiasm for liberal democracy, shared across the political spectrum in the 1980s and 90s, come to an end? How did we come to be so divided? Why did everyone get so angry? Anne Applebaum, a historian of totalitarian regimes as well as an analyst of contemporary politics, offers an original interpretation of democratic decline. She charts the rise of autocratic and paranoid governments in Poland and Hungary, the cultural despair that fuelled Brexit, the media cacophony that has driven some Spaniards to return to old nationalist slogans, the apocalyptic pessimism that led many to support the election of Trump. Political leaders and historical figures appear in the story, but the book is focused above all on the dissatisfied intellectuals, philosophers, spin doctors and journalists who deliberately sought to create new definitions of “the nation,” new political realities, and sometimes deep new divisions. Anne Applebaum (@anneapplebaum) is the author of Gulag: A History, which won the Pulitzer Prize, of Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956, which won the Cundill Prize and Red Famine: Stalin's War on Ukraine which won the Lionel Gelber and Duff Cooper prizes. She is a columnist for The Atlantic and a senior fellow of the Agora Institute at Johns Hopkins University. She divides her time between Britain, Poland and the USA. After graduating from Yale University, she was a Marshall Scholar at LSE and St. Antony’s College, Oxford. You can order the book, Twilight of Democracy, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. The Department of International Relations is one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. We are ranked 4th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2019 tables for Politics and International Studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEApplebaum

Jul 28 2020

54mins

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Populism in the Post-COVID-19 World [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Sara Hobolt, Professor Michael Ignatieff, Professor Andrés Velasco, Jesse Norman MP | Until COVID-19 hit, populist politicians of the right and the left –many of them with evident authoritarian leanings— were on the rise around the world. This panel will focus on the causes and consequences of this populist surge, and will discuss ways in which liberal democracies can respond to the challenge of authoritarian populism. Because populist governments have been especially ineffective in dealing with the pandemic, the panel will also ask whether populists will pay a price at the polls or whether, on the contrary, the economic crunch resulting from COVID-19 will further enlarge their base of political support. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is the Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and Professor in the Department of Government and the European Institute. Michael Ignatieff (@M_Ignatieff) is a Canadian author, academic and former politician. He is currently rector and President of Central European University. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Professor of Public Policy and Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Jesse Norman (@Jesse_Norman) is Financial Secretary to the Treasury, responsible for HM Revenue and Customs and the National Infrastructure Strategy. His books include biographies of Edmund Burke and Adam Smith. He has been the Member of Parliament for Hereford and South Herefordshire since 2010. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and Sir W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. LSEPPR is a brand new public policy journal hosted by the School of Public Policy at LSE and published by LSE Press (@LSEPress). It will bring together policy-relevant research from across the social sciences. The first issue focuses on the causes and consequences of populist politics around the world, and discusses ways in which liberal democracies can respond to the challenge of authoritarian populism. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The Spinoza Programme on Institutions, Organizations and Growth supports research and events at LSE. It looks at contemporary challenges in economic policy formation to support long-run development. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPPR

Jul 23 2020

1hr 28mins

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How to Reform the WTO? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Ambassador Dr Jesus Seade, Sir Vince Cable, Dr Swati Dhingra, Piroska Nagy Mohacsi | The selection of the World Trade Organization's new Director General presents an opportunity for reform, but it could also result in a further weakening of the institution. Nominations for the position have just closed. LSE is organising a mini-series of presentations and discussions with the candidates. The first of the candidates to present their vision for globalisation, trade and the WTO will be Dr Jesus Seade, Undersecretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico and Mexico’s chief negotiator of the USMCA, the US, Mexico and Canada Trade Agreement (successor of NAFTA) which came into force on July 1 this year. Multilateral institutions are increasingly being challenged in recent years. One important criticism is that leaders for these organisations are not selected in a competitive and transparent manner. Promoting a stronger selection process should help enhance the legitimacy of these institutions. Calls for change have been particularly strong at the World Trade Organisation (WTO), the global body dealing with the rules of trade between nations. Vince Cable (@vincecable) is Professor in Practice at the Institute of Global Affairs, LSE. Sir Vince is the former Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (2010-2015) and represented the constituency of Twickenham as a Liberal Democrat MP and was party leader from 2017-19. Swati Dhingra (@swatdhingraLSE) is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the LSE, researching globalisation and industrial policy. Jesus Seade (@JesusSeade) is a candidate for WTO Director-General; Chief Negotiator of the USMCA, the US, Mexico and Canada Trade Agreement (successor of NAFTA); and Undersecretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico. Piroska Nagy Mohacsi (@NagyMohacsi) is Programme Director, Institute of Global Affairs at the LSE School of Public Policy. Erik Berglof (@ErikBerglof) is the inaugural Director of the Institute of Global Affairs (IGA) at LSE. He joined the School as a Professor in Practice in the Department of Economics. This event in the series has been organised by the Institute of Global Affairs and the School of Public Policy. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Jul 20 2020

1hr 33mins

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Journalism, Power and Pandemic [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Anushka Asthana, Pippa Crerar, Annette Dittert, Richard Horton, Sir Craig Oliver | How well has the UK news media kept the public informed and held the authorities to account during the COVID-19 crisis? Leading journalists and political communicators discuss how the news media has coped with the practical, editorial and political challenges of covering coronavirus. Anushka Asthana (@AnushkaAsthana) is editor-at-large for the Guardian, and host of the daily news podcast, Today in Focus. Pippa Crerar (@PippaCrerar) is the Political Editor of the Daily Mirror and Parliamentary Press Gallery chair Annette Dittert (@annettedittert) is London Bureau Chief of ARD. Richard Horton (@richardhorton1) is Editor of The Lancet. Craig Oliver (@CraigOliver100) is former No10 Director of Politics & Communications and Editor of BBC News at 6pm & 10pm. Charlie Beckett (@CharlieBeckett) is Professor of Practice, Director of Polis and the Polis/LSE Journalism AI project in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the Department of Media and Communications, School of Public Policy and Institute of Global Affairs. The Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE) is a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. We are ranked #1 in the UK and #3 globally in our field (2020 QS World University Rankings). The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Jul 15 2020

57mins

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COVID-19 and the Economy: what are the lessons so far? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Silvana Tenreyro | Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee member Silvana Tenreyro will discuss some of the emerging academic research on the macroeconomics of COVID-19, including how it has influenced her recent monetary policy decisions. Silvana Tenreyro is Professor in Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE and an external member of the Monetary Policy Committee at the Bank of England. She obtained her MA and PhD in Economics from Harvard University. Before joining the Bank, she was co-Director and Board member of the Review of Economic Studies and Chair of the Women’s Committee of the Royal Economics Society. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at LSE, is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics is a research centre that brings together a group of world class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and help design policies to alleviate it.

Jul 15 2020

57mins

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Against the System: anger, belonging and the crisis of liberalism [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Eric Lonergan, Martin Sandbu, Professor Lea Ypi | Recent elections in the advanced western democracies have undermined the basic foundations of political systems that had previously beaten back all challenges-from both the left and the right. The COVID-19 pandemic has intensified the backlash, further destabilising an already fragile political order. Eric Lonergan, Martin Sandbu and Lea Ypi discuss their recent research about the political and economic causes of this turbulence and consider ways out of the impasse. Eric Lonergan (@ericlonners) is is a macro hedge fund manager, economist, and co-author of Angrynomics. Martin Sandbu (@MESandbu) is European Economics Commentator for the Financial Times and author of The Economics of Belonging. Lea Ypi (@lea_ypi) is Professor in Political Theory in the LSE Department of Government. Jonathan Hopkin (@jrhopkin) is Professor of Comparative Politics in the LSE Department of Government and author of Anti-System Politics. You can order the books, The Economics of Belonging by Martin Sandbu, Angrynomics by Eric Lonergan and Anti-System Politics by Jonathan Hopkin (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is a world-leading centre for study and research in politics and government. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPoliticalSystems

Jul 14 2020

1hr 29mins

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Prospects for the UK Economy and Public Spending After COVID-19: new austerity or a new economy? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Stephanie Flanders, Professor Stephen Machin, Dr Gemma Tetlow | The UK government’s response to COVID-19 has seen sudden growth in public spending accompanied by a sharp fall in tax receipts. Public sector borrowing may exceed £300bn in 2020-21, with the UK’s national debt exceeding annual GDP for the first time for decades. What short-term stimuli might the Chancellor now employ to re-start growth? Can the government imaginably return to austerity policies? Will inequality have increased? Is this the time for a new approach to economic management? Can the economy go back to normal and grow if social distancing restrictions persist? Is the UK out of line with comparable countries? And what about Brexit? The panel will consider these issues and more. Stephanie Flanders (@MyStephanomics) has been Senior Executive Editor for Economics at Bloomberg News and head of Bloomberg Economics since October 2017. She was previously Chief Market Strategist for Europe at J P Morgan Asset Management in London (2013-17) and both BBC Economics Editor and BBC Newsnight’s Economics Editor (2002-13). Stephen Machin (@s_machin_) is Professor of Economics and Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, has been President of the European Association of Labour Economists, is a Fellow of the Society of Labor Economists and was an independent member of the UK Low Pay Commission from 2007-14. He has researched extensively in various areas of empirical economics, including current research interests in the areas of labour market inequality, social mobility, the economics of education and the economics of crime. Gemma Tetlow (@gemmatetlow) is Chief Economist at the Institute for Government. Between 2016 and 2018, Gemma was Economics Correspondent at the Financial Times, reporting on and analysing economic developments in the UK and globally. Before that, she led the Institute for Fiscal Studies’ work on public finances and pensions. She has a PhD in economics from University College London. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the Institute of Global Affairs and the School of Public Policy. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.

Jul 10 2020

1hr 27mins

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Debt Relief and Africa During COVID-19: the global response [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Mma Amara Ekeruche, Professor Anna Gelpern, Eric LeCompte, Dr Shirley Yu, Dr David Luke | The COVID-19 pandemic has decimated government fiscal policies across the globe, and economies worldwide are heading into historic recessions. Countries’ capabilities to address new challenges are increasingly stretched, yet efforts to tackle a health crisis in a globalised world remain highly interconnected. As low-income countries struggle to provide robust spending plans to support the population, calls have risen for the implementation of immediate debt relief from bilateral, multilateral and private creditors to African countries. Africa’s external debt payments have almost doubled in recent years, forming the backdrop of a reoccurring conversation around the debt’s sustainability at a time when money is urgently needed for domestic investments. Now the COVID-19 pandemic makes this discussion more urgent than ever. Multilateral institutions such as the IMF have recently announced sweeping debt relief packages for the continent, with the intention of facilitating governments to address the impact of the pandemic. However, questions remain on whether soliciting debt relief packages for the continent will be enough to sufficiently mitigate the worst effects of the pandemic, and if debt relief is pursued, then how should this be managed and under what conditions? Experts on foreign direct investment, development economics, international finance and macroeconomics will share their analysis of the situation in the face of the current crisis. Mma Amara Ekeruche (@Mmakeruch) is a Research Associate at CSEA. She holds a Masters in Economic Policy from University College London (UCL), United Kingdom and a Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana. Anna Gelpern is a nonresident senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, is professor of law and Agnes N. Williams Research Professor at Georgetown University. Eric LeCompte (@Eric_LeCompte) is an American commentator on politics, finance and religion. He serves on a working group with the UN Conference on Trade and Development. He is the current executive director of Jubilee USA Network. Shirley Yu (@shirleyzeyu) is Senior Visiting Fellow in the Institute of Global Affairs at LSE and an Asia fellow with the Ash Center of Harvard Kennedy School. She has a Ph.D. in political economy from China’s Peking University, and a Master’s degree in Government from Harvard University. She has published three books in Chinese, including On China, by Ambassadors, and the Rise of the RMB and the Fall of the Yen. She also served as mentor for Cherie Blair’s Foundation for International Women. David Luke (@DavidLukeTrade) is coordinator of the African Trade Policy Centre at the UN Economic Commission for Africa with the rank of a director at the Commission. He is responsible for leading ECA's research, policy advisory services, training and capacity development on inclusive trade policies and in particular the boosting intra-African trade and the continental free trade area initiatives. Prior to joining ECA in 2014, he served as UNDP trade policy adviser in Southern Africa and Geneva and also as Senior Economist and Chief of Trade at the Organization for African Unity/African Union Commission, and as an Associate Professor at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada. Tim Allen is the inaugural Director of the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa, and is a Professor in Development Anthropology in the Department of International Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Jul 09 2020

1hr 31mins

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Is big data good for our health? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Stephen L. Roberts, Dr Leeza Osipenko, Professor Barbara Prainsack, Dr James Somauroo | With more and more information about us available electronically and online, this episode of LSE IQ asks, ‘Is big data good for our health?’ Advances in bio-medical technologies, along with electronic health records and the information we generate through our mobile phones, Smart Watches or Fit bits, our social media posts and search engine queries, mean that there is a torrent of information about our bodies, our health and our diseases out there. Alongside this, the tremendous growth in computing power and data storage means that this ‘Big Data’ can be stored and aggregated and then analysed by sophisticated algorithms for connections, comparisons and insights. The promise of all of this is that big data will create opportunities for medical breakthroughs, help tailor medical interventions to us as individuals and create technologies that will speed up and improve healthcare. And, of course, during the COVID-19 pandemic we’ve also seen some countries use data, generated from people’s mobile phones, to track and trace the disease. All of this poses opportunities for the tech giants and others who want to be part of the goldrush for our data - and to then sell solutions back to us What are the risks in handing over our most personal data? Will it allow big data to deliver on its hype? And is it a fair exchange? In this episode, Oliver Johnson speaks to Dr Leeza Osipenko, Senior Lecturer in Practice in LSE’s Department of Health Policy; Professor Barbara Prainsack, Professor of Comparative Policy Analysis at the University of Vienna and Professor Sociology at King’s College London; Dr Stephen L. Roberts, LSE Fellow in Global Health Policy in LSE’s Department of Health Policy; and Dr James Somauroo, founder of the healthtech agency somX and presenter of The Health-Tech Podcast.

Jul 08 2020

39mins

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Policies to Fight the Pandemic in Latin America and the Caribbean [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Eric Parrado Herrera, Dr Victoria Nuguer, Dr Andrew Powell, Professor Andrés Velasco, Brian Wynter | The novel coronavirus, COVID-19, is taking a huge toll across the world, and governments in Latin America and the Caribbean are taking aggressive measures to save lives. Within a matter of weeks, the macroeconomic outlook for the region has changed dramatically. Financing costs have risen, commodities fallen, and large losses of GDP now seem unavoidable. However, the self-imposed partial closure of the economy is anything but a normal recession, and typical countercyclical demand management, both fiscal and monetary, is likely to be inconducive. Introduced by LSE Director Dame Minouche Shafik, a panel from the IDB and LSE will discuss the 2020 Latin American and Caribbean Macroeconomic Report and its diagnosis of a rapidly changing environment and policy recommendations aimed to bring relief, maintain economic stability, and keep the core of the economy intact. Eric Parrado Herrera is Chief Economist and General Manager of the Research Department of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) since March 2019. Before joining the IDB, he was a professor of economics and finance at the ESE Business School of the Universidad de los Andes in Santiago, Chile. Victoria Nuguer is a Senior Researcher in the Inter-American Development Bank’s Research Department. She holds a Ph.D. from École Polytechnique Fédéral de Lausanne in Switzerland and a bachelor’s degree from the Universidad de Buenos Aires in Argentina. Prior to joining the Bank in May 2017, she spent nearly three years as a Research Economist in the Bank of Mexico. Andrew Powell (@AndyPowell_IDB) is the Principal Advisor in the Research Department (RES) at the Inter-American Development Bank. He holds a Ba, MPhil. and DPhil. (PhD) from the University of Oxford, was Lecturer at Queen Mary’s College, London and at the University of Warwick, was Chief Economist of the Central Bank of the Republic of Argentina and Professor at the Universidad Torcuato di Tella in Buenos Aires. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. In 2017-18 he was a member of the G20 Eminent Persons Group. Brian Wynter is a company director and consultant. A proud graduate of LSE and Columbia University’s SIPA with financial markets experience in the private sector and the IMF’s Caribbean Regional Technical Assistance Centre, he was the founding CEO of Jamaica’s Financial Services Commission and, most recently, Governor of Jamaica’s central bank. Gareth Jones is Director of the Latin America and Caribbean Centre at LSE. He is Professor of Urban Geography in the Department of Geography and Environment at LSE and an Associate Member of the International Inequalities Institute. Minouche Shafik, Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science, will introduce the event. Malcolm Geere, Inter-American Development Bank Executive Director for the United Kingdom will also speak at the beginning of the event. The Latin America and Caribbean Centre (@lse_lacc) is the focal point for LSE’s research and public engagement with Latin America and the Caribbean, the Centre builds upon the School’s long and important relationship with the region. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.

Jul 07 2020

1hr 29mins

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