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LSE: Public lectures and events

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Rank #93 in Education category

Education
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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

iTunes Ratings

193 Ratings
Average Ratings
133
28
14
8
10

Uneven Excelence

By Slanebrain - Jan 09 2020
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The good podcasts are stratospheric but I’m afraid that the others . . . .

Engaging Thoughtful Content

By SlipperySnake321 - Oct 28 2019
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Access to thoughtful experts, great questions, and overall a great learning opportunity. Thank you!

iTunes Ratings

193 Ratings
Average Ratings
133
28
14
8
10

Uneven Excelence

By Slanebrain - Jan 09 2020
Read more
The good podcasts are stratospheric but I’m afraid that the others . . . .

Engaging Thoughtful Content

By SlipperySnake321 - Oct 28 2019
Read more
Access to thoughtful experts, great questions, and overall a great learning opportunity. Thank you!
Cover image of LSE: Public lectures and events

LSE: Public lectures and events

Latest release on Feb 14, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 7 days ago

Rank #1: The Coddling of the American Mind [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Jonathan Haidt | A timely investigation into the new safety culture in universities and the dangers it poses to free speech, mental health, education, and ultimately democracy. This event marks the launch of Jonathan's new book, The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure. Jonathan Haidt (@JonHaidt) is a social and cultural psychologist and the Thomas Cooley Professor of Ethical Leadership at New York University's Stern School of Business. He is the author of The Righteous Mind and The Happiness Hypothesis. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is currently Professor of Behavioural Science at the LSE. He is Head of Department in Psychological and Behavioural Science and Director of LSE's Executive MSc Behavioural Science. LSE's Behavioural Science Hub (@LSEBehavioural) is a collaboration across the School in all things behavioural. Its two main goals are to provide a platform to highlight existing behavioural science related activities at LSE and further develop the capacity for top quality research into human behaviour. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHaidt Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at The Coddling of the American Mind. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Nov 23 2018

1hr 24mins

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Rank #2: Capitalism, Alone: the future of the system that rules the world [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Branko Milanovic | We are all capitalists now. For the first time in human history, the globe is dominated by one economic system. In his book Capitalism, Alone, which he will discuss in this lecture, economist Branko Milanovic explains the reasons for this decisive historical shift since the days of feudalism and, later, communism. Surveying the varieties of capitalism, he asks: What are the prospects for a fairer world now that capitalism is the only game in town? His conclusions are sobering, but not fatalistic. Branko Milanovic explains how capitalism gets much wrong, but also much right—and it is not going anywhere. Our task is to improve it. Branko Milanovic (@BrankoMilan) is Visiting Presidential Professor and LIS Senior Scholar at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. He will join the International Inequalities Institute at LSE in 2020 as Centennial Professor. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. An economist by training, Dame Minouche Shafik has spent most of her career straddling the worlds of public policy and academia. After completing her BSc in economics and politics at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, she took an MSc in economics at LSE before completing a DPhil in economics at St Antony’s College at the University of Oxford. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWealth This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

Oct 23 2019

1hr 15mins

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Rank #3: Good Economics for Hard Times [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Esther Duflo | Join us for the Stamp Memorial Lecture which will be delivered by the 2019 joint winner of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences Esther Duflo who will be speaking about her new book Good Economics for Hard Times: Better Answers to Our Biggest Problems. Most of the issues that tear us apart today (from trade to immigration to Brexit) are, fundamentally, economic issues, but no one seems to be willing to listen to economists any more. In this lecture, based on her forthcoming book with Abhijit Banerjee with the same title, Professor Duflo will outline how a humane economics, that puts the individual and its wants and needs at the centre of its intellectual project, can guide a better conversation on the core problems that our generations need to resolve, from climate change, to nationalist rivalries, to the rise in inequality. Esther Duflo is the Abdul Latif Jameel Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics in the Department of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a co-founder and co-director of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL). In her research, she seeks to understand the economic lives of the poor, with the aim to help design and evaluate social policies. She has worked on health, education, financial inclusion, environment and governance. Professor Esther Duflo’s first degrees were in history and economics from Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris. She subsequently received a Ph.D. in Economics from MIT in 1999. Duflo has received numerous academic honors and prizes including the 2019 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences (awarded jointly with Abhijit Banerjee and Michael Kremer), the Princess of Asturias Award for Social Sciences (2015), the A.SK Social Science Award (2015), Infosys Prize (2014), the David N. Kershaw Award (2011), a John Bates Clark Medal (2010), and a MacArthur “Genius Grant” Fellowship (2009). With Abhijit Banerjee, she wrote Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty, which won the Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award in 2011 and has been translated into more than 17 languages. Duflo is the Editor of the American Economic Review, a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy. To pre-order a copy of Esther's new book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Good Economics for Hard Times. Robin Burgess is Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE and Director of the International Growth Centre. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEStamp This lecture is in memory of Josiah Charles Stamp who obtained a degree in economics from LSE in 1916. His thesis was published as British Incomes and Property in 1916 and launched his academic career. In 1919 he served on the Royal Commission on Income Tax and in the same year he joined Nobel Industries Ltd as secretary and director from which Imperial Chemical Industries later developed. In 1926 he became the president of the executive of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway and two years later he was appointed director of the Bank of England. He also served as a governor and vice chairman of LSE. Stamp also held lectureships in economics at several universities, including Cambridge, Oxford and Liverpool. In 1938 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Stamp of Shortlands, Kent. Stamp died on 16 April 1941. In 1942 a trust was set up jointly by the Bank of England, the London Midland and Scottish Railway, ICI and the Abbey Road Building Society to pay for the organisation of a Stamp memorial lecture.

Nov 05 2019

1hr 16mins

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Rank #4: Texas, Trump and the Future of America [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Lawrence Wright | Come learn about the most controversial state in America and what it tells us about Donald Trump and the future of the US. This event marks the publications of Lawrence's new book, God Save Texas: A Journey into the Future of America. Lawrence Wright (@lawrence_wright) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, screenwriter, playwright and a staff writer for The New Yorker magazine. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The United States Centre (@LSE_US) at LSE is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America.

May 15 2018

1hr 22mins

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Rank #5: A Short History of Europe [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Sir Simon Jenkins | Simon Jenkins discusses his latest book, A Short History of Europe and the lessons to be learned from European history. Simon Jenkins is a Guardian columnist, author and BBC broadcaster. Simon Glendinning (@lonanglo) is Head of the European Institute and Professor in European Philosophy. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

Feb 12 2019

1hr 24mins

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Rank #6: LSE IQ Ep 21 | Can we afford our consumer society? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Rebecca Elliott, Professor Ian Gough, Dr Rodolfo Leyva | Welcome to LSE IQ, the monthly podcast from the London School of Economics and Political Science. This is the podcast where we ask some of the leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. For this LSE IQ we have something slightly different for you – an 'live' episode recorded in front of an audience at LSE at the beginning of November 2018. Economic growth has helped millions out of poverty. The jobs it creates mean rising incomes and consumers who buy more. This drives further growth and higher living standards, including better health and education. Yet WWF, the World Wildlife Fund, has recently warned that exploding human consumption is the driving force behind unprecedented planetary change, through increased demand for energy, land and water. Plastics and microplastics are filling our oceans and rivers and entering the food chain. The production of goods and services for household use is the most important cause of greenhouse gas emissions. The textile industry is responsible for depleting and polluting water resources and committing human rights abuses against its workers. It is also a major source of greenhouse gases, and three fifths of all clothing produced ends up in incinerators or landfills within a year of being made. For this episode of LSE IQ Jo Bale and Sue Windebank ask, 'Can we afford our consumer society?'. This episode features: Dr Rebecca Elliott, Assistant Professor, LSE’s Department of Sociology; Professor Ian Gough, Visiting Professor at LSE’s Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion and an Associate at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment; and Dr Rodolfo Leyva, LSE Fellow in LSE’s Department of Media Communications. For further information about the podcast visit lse.ac.uk/iq and please tell us what you think using the hashtag #LSEIQ.

Dec 19 2018

1hr 11mins

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Rank #7: The Meritocracy Trap [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Daniel Markovits | Merit is not a genuine excellence but rather a pretence, constructed to rationalise an offensive distribution of advantage. Merit, in short, is a sham. The meritocratic ideal—that social and economic rewards should track achievement rather than breeding—anchors the self-image of the age. Aristocracy has had its day, and meritocracy is now a basic tenet of civil religion in all advanced societies. Meritocracy promises to promote equality and opportunity by opening a previously hereditary elite to outsiders, armed with nothing save their own talents and ambitions. But today, middle-class children lose out to rich children at school, and middle-class adults lose out to elite graduates at work. At the same time, meritocracy entices an anxious and inauthentic elite into a pitiless, lifelong contest to secure income and status through its own excessive industry. In spite of its promises, meritocracy in fact installs a new form of aristocracy, purpose-built for a world in which the greatest source of income and wealth is not land but human capital and free labor. And merit is not a genuine excellence but rather—like the false virtues that aristocrats trumpeted in the ancien régime—a pretense, constructed to rationalize an offensive distribution of advantage. Daniel Markovits is Guido Calabresi Professor of Law at Yale Law School and Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Private Law. Markovits works in the philosophical foundations of private law, moral and political philosophy, and behavioral economics. He publishes in a range of disciplines, including in Science, The American Economic Review, and The Yale Law Journal. Markovits’s latest book, The Meritocracy Trap, places meritocracy at the center of rising economic inequality and social and political dysfunction. The book takes up the law, economics, and politics of human capital to identify the mechanisms through which meritocracy breeds inequality and to expose the burdens that meritocratic inequality imposes on all who fall within meritocracy’s orbit. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is the Sir Anthony Atkinson Chair in Economics and Director of STICERD. This event is the Morishima Lecture. This lecture series is held in honour of Professor Michio Morishima (1923-2004), Sir John Hicks Professor of Economics at LSE and STICERD's first chairman. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy.

May 08 2019

1hr 31mins

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Rank #8: The Bullshitisation of the Economy Has Only Just Begun: pointless labour, digitisation, and the revolt of the caring classes [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor David Graeber | The proliferation of useless forms of employment in the professional-managerial sector has placed enormous pressure on the caring professions, leading to a major social conflagration. David Graeber (@davidgraeber) is Professor of Anthropology at the LSE and author of Bullshit Jobs: a Theory. Deborah James is Professor of Anthropology at the LSE. LSE Anthropology @LSEAnthropology is world famous and world leading. We are ranked top Anthropology department in the Guardian League Tables 2018. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGraeber This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.

Oct 17 2018

1hr 12mins

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Rank #9: From “having” to “being”: self worth and the current crisis of American society [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Michèle Lamont | This lecture will diagnose the challenges of neoliberal American society: the pitfalls of the American dream across classes, hardened group boundaries, and the need to invent new narratives of hope. Michèle Lamont (@mlamont6) is Professor of Sociology and of African and African American Studies, Harvard University. Rebecca Elliott is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology, LSE. Established in 1904, the Department of Sociology @LSEsociology at LSE is committed to empirically rich, conceptually sophisticated, and socially and politically relevant research and scholarship. Building upon the traditions of the discipline, we play a key role in the development of the social sciences into the new intellectual areas, social problems, and ethical dilemmas that face our society today. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBJSAL This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.

Oct 25 2018

1hr 32mins

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Rank #10: The Levelling: what's next after globalisation [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Michael O'Sullivan | The liberal, globalised world order is withering according to Michael O'Sullivan in his new book The Levelling: What's Next After Globalization which he will talk about in this lecture. The levelling is the process of ironing out imbalances like indebtedness and inequality, and proposing new ideas and frameworks to kickstart the next world order. The Levelling will involve the levelling of political accountability and responsibility between political leaders and “the people”, the levelling of institutional power—away from central banks and defunct twentieth-century institutions such as the WTO and IMF and toward new treaties (on risk and monetary policy) and new institutions (for example, a truly effective and powerful climate body and an institution or agreement that oversees cybersecurity). It will also involve the levelling out of wealth between rich and poor countries and between the very rich and “the rest,” preferably with “the rest” enjoying both better organic growth and a greater share of this growth. Then the levelling out of power between nations and regions is what the concept of the multipolar world is about, and within it, different regions will have different reserves of power. Michael O’Sullivan, is the former chief investment officer at Credit Suisse. Michael joined Credit Suisse in July 2007 from State Street Global Markets. Prior to joining Credit Suisse, Michael spent over ten years as a global strategist at a number of sell-side institutions and has also taught finance at Princeton and Oxford Universities. He was educated at University College Cork in Ireland and Balliol College in Oxford, where he obtained M.Phil and D.Phil degrees as a Rhodes Scholar. He was an independent member of Ireland's National Economic Social Council from 2011 to 2016 Thomas Sampson is an Associate Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSELevelling

Jun 27 2019

1hr 25mins

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Rank #11: Is Progressive Capitalism an Answer to America's Problems? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Joseph E. Stiglitz | We all have the sense that our economy tilts toward big business, but a few corporations have come to dominate entire sectors, contributing to skyrocketing inequality and slow growth. Too many have made their wealth through exploitation of others rather than through wealth creation. Professor Joseph Stiglitz will argue that we need to exploit the benefits of markets while taming their excesses, making sure that markets work for people and not the other way around. Joseph E. Stiglitz (@JosephEStiglitz) is University Professor at Columbia University, the winner of the 2001 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics, and a lead author of the 1995 IPCC report, which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. At Columbia, Stiglitz co-chairs the Committee on Global Thought and is founder and co-president of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue. His latest book, People, Power, and Profits: Progressive Capitalism for an Age of Discontent, was released in April. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to People, Power, and Profits: Progressive Capitalism for an Age of Discontent. Nicholas Stern is Chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government at LSE. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. witter Hashtag for this event: #LSEUSStiglitz This event is part of the LSE US Centre's Phelan Family Lecture series. Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Is Progressive Capitalism an Answer to America's Problems? Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Dec 04 2019

1hr 27mins

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Rank #12: Adam Smith: what he thought, and why it matters [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Jesse Norman MP | At a time when economics and politics are both increasingly polarized between left and right, this book, Adam Smith: What He Thought, and Why it Matters, which Jesse Norman will discuss at this event, returns to intellectual first principles to recreate the lost centre of public debate. It offers a Smithian analysis of contemporary markets, predatory capitalism and the 2008 financial crash; it addresses crucial issues of inequality, human dignity and exploitation; and it provides a compelling explanation of why Smith is central to any attempt to defend and renew the market system. Jesse Norman MP (@Jesse_Norman) studied at Oxford, before completing a Masters and PhD in Philosophy at University College London. Before entering politics, he ran an educational project in Communist Eastern Europe and was a Director at Barclays. He has also been an Honorary Fellow at UCL, a Governor of the National Institute for Economic and Social Research, and a Visiting Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford. His previous books include a celebrated study of Edmund Burke. He currently serves as Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for the Department for Transport. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.

Jul 09 2018

1hr 3mins

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Rank #13: The Great Delusion: liberal dreams and international realities [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor John Mearsheimer | In this lecture John Mearsheimer explains why US foreign policy so often backfires and what can be done to set it straight. John Mearsheimer is the R. Wendell Harrison Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is now in its 91st year, making it one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. They are ranked 5th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2018 tables for Politics and International Studies. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGreatDelusion

Jan 17 2019

1hr 31mins

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Rank #14: The Almighty Dollar [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dharshini David | The dollar is the lifeblood of globalisation: China holds billions in reserve for good reason. Greenbacks, singles, bucks or dead presidents, call them what you will, $1.2 trillion worth are floating around right now – and half the dollars in circulation are actually outside of the USA. But what is really happening as these billions of dollars go around the world every day? By following $1 from a shopping trip in suburban Texas, via China’s Central Bank, Nigerian railroads, the oil fields of Iraq and beyond, The Almighty Dollar answers questions such as: why is China the world’s biggest manufacturer – and the US its biggest customer? Is free trade really a good thing? Why would a nation build a bridge on the other side of the globe? Dharshini David (@DharshiniDavid) is an economist and broadcaster. From 2009 she fronted Sky News’ daily financial coverage and copresented Sky News Tonight. Keyu Jin (@KeyuJin) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics and a member of the Centre for Macroeconomics and Centre for Economic Performance. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.

Mar 08 2018

1hr 1min

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Rank #15: Learning from Data: the art of statistics [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor David Spiegelhalter | In his new book, The Art of Statistics, David Spiegelhalter guides us through the essential principles we need in order to derive knowledge from data, showing us why data can never speak for itself. He explains the basic concepts, from regression to P-values (without using mathematics), and introduces the intellectual ideas that underpin statistics. Drawing on numerous real world examples, he shows us how statistics can help us determine the luckiest passenger on the Titanic, whether serial killer Harold Shipman could have been caught earlier, and if the skeleton in the Leicester car park really was Richard III. Sir David Spiegelhalter is a British statistician and Chair of the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication in the Statistical Laboratory at the University of Cambridge. Spiegelhalter is one of the most cited and influential researchers in his field, and was elected as President of the Royal Statistical Society for 2017-18. Fiona Steele is a Professor of Statistics and Deputy Head of the Department of Statistics at LSE. Fiona first joined in LSE in 1996 as Lecturer in Statistics and Research Methodology. She then worked at the Institute of Education, University of London 2001-2005, followed by the University of Bristol 2005-2013 where she was Professor of Social Statistics and Director of the Centre for Multilevel Modelling. She returned to LSE in 2013. The Department of Statistics (@StatsDeptLSE) offers a vibrant research environment and a comprehensive programme of undergraduate and postgraduate degrees.

Mar 27 2019

1hr 28mins

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Rank #16: The Ethical Human [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Zanna Clay, Dr Simone Schnall, Professor Philip Pettit | Where do our ideas of right and wrong come from? Can the evolutionary processes that produced human beings explain the moral frameworks adopted by human societies? And what can developmental biology tell us about the emergence of ethical behaviour in children? From anthropology to cognitive science, philosophy to evolutionary biology, we shed some light on the complex story of Homo moralis. Zanna Clay is Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Durham University. Simone Schnall is Reader in Experimental Social Psychology, University of Cambridge. Philip Pettit is LS Rockefeller University Professor of Politics and Human Values, Princeton University. Clare Moriarty (@quiteclare) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy. Founded in 1996, the Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) is a non-profit organization that has gained widespread recognition for its work as initiator and sponsor of engaging and thoughtful events that facilitate wider participation in academic philosophy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

Oct 24 2019

1hr 26mins

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Rank #17: Work Smarter Not Harder: hacks to take you a long way at work [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Saj Jetha | Understand how to ‘hack’ work and be the best you can with Saj Jetha, founder of the multi-award winning The Smarty Train and author of The Smarts: Big Little Hacks to Take You a Long Way at Work. Enjoy a jargon-free insight into 'hacks' which can boost your performance and that of those around. Discover how the award-winning techniques covered in The Smarts can make a real impact in your work life, whether you’re an intern, are moving to the next challenge in your career, or are the CEO. Saj will not only explain the power of these ‘hacks’, but will also immerse you in a series of tantalising experiments showing how small changes can make a big difference to your workplace performance. Saj Jetha (@thesmartytrain) is an economist and founder of The Smarty Train, a training and talent advisory described as ‘The Secret Cinema of Training’. He has worked with tens of thousands of people at major corporations worldwide like Accenture, BP, EY, HSBC and Deliveroo. Saj is also a trustee of The University of London Convocation and was recently awarded Freedom of the City. He is an alumnus of UCL and LSE. Alexander (Sandy) Pepper is Professor of Management Practice, Department of Management, LSE. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management studies.

Feb 04 2019

1hr 14mins

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Rank #18: Crashed: how a decade of financial crises changed the world [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Adam Tooze | In September 2008 the Great Financial Crisis, triggered by the collapse of Lehman brothers, shook the world. A decade later its spectre still haunts us. As the appalling scope and scale of the crash was revealed, the financial institutions that had symbolised the West's triumph since the end of the Cold War, seemed - through greed, malice and incompetence - to be about to bring the entire system to its knees. In this talk Adam Tooze will talk about his new book, Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World. Crashed is an analysis of what happened and how we were rescued from something even worse - but at a price which continues to undermine democracy across Europe and the United States. Gnawing away at our institutions are the many billions of dollars which were conjured up to prevent complete collapse. Over and over again, the end of the crisis has been announced, but it continues to hound us - whether in Greece or Ukraine, whether through Brexit or Trump. Adam Tooze (@adam_tooze) is the author of The Deluge and The Wages of Destruction.The Wages of Destruction won the Wolfson Prize for History and the Longman-History Today Book of the Year Prize. He has taught at Cambridge and Yale and is now Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Professor of History at Columbia University. He is an alumnus of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Tim Frost is a Chair of credit asset manager Cairn Capital and a Trustee of Step Change the debt charity. He served in the British Army in Germany and the Falkland Islands and ran a hostel for homeless people before spending 15 years at JP Morgan, where he helped to establish the credit derivatives business. Tim is an Emeritus Governor and alumnus of the London School of Economics and Political Science, and was appointed a Director of the Bank of England in 2012.

Aug 23 2018

1hr 25mins

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Rank #19: Populism: causes and responses [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Michael Ignatieff, Professor Pippa Norris | A populist wave has swept across the democratic world. What are the economic and social causes of this wave, and how should democratic leaders respond? Michael Ignatieff (@M_Ignatieff) is President and Rector of Central European University. Born in Canada, educated at the University of Toronto and Harvard, Michael Ignatieff is a university professor, writer and former politician. Between 2006 and 2011, he served as an MP in the Parliament of Canada and then as Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada and Leader of the Official Opposition. He is a member of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and holds thirteen honorary degrees. Between 2012 and 2015 he served as Centennial Chair at the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs in New York. Between 2014 and 2016 he was Edward R. Murrow Chair of the Press, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. Pippa Norris (@PippaN15) is a comparative political scientist who has taught at Harvard for more than a quarter century. She is ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney, the Paul F. McGuire Lecturer in Comparative Politics at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, and Director of the Electoral Integrity Project and Co-Director of the TrustGov Project. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPopulism

Sep 19 2019

1hr 39mins

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Rank #20: Future Politics: living together in a world transformed by tech [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Jamie Susskind | Jamie Susskind will discuss the publication of his latest book, Future Politics: Living Together in a World Transformed by Tech. At this event, Jamie will discuss how digital technology, from AI to virtual reality, will transform politics and society. He will mention how digital technology will be used to exert control by the state and by big tech firms. This talk will challenge the audience to rethink the meaning of democracy and justice, freedom and equality, power, and property. The great political debate of the last century was about how much of our collective life should be determined by the state and what should be left to the market and civil society. In the future, the question will be how far our lives should be directed and controlled by powerful digital systems - and on what terms? Jamie Susskind (@jamiesusskind) is an author, speaker, and practising barrister. A past Fellow of Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, he studied history and politics at Magdalen College, Oxford, graduating first in his year before turning to the law. Tony Travers is the Associate Dean of LSE’s School of Public Policy and a Professor in the Department of Government. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSETech

Nov 06 2018

1hr 29mins

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