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LSE: Public lectures and events

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

iTunes Ratings

188 Ratings
Average Ratings
131
28
13
8
8

Uneven Excelence

By Slanebrain - Jan 09 2020
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The good podcasts are stratospheric but I’m afraid that the others . . . .

Engaging Thoughtful Content

By SlipperySnake321 - Oct 28 2019
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Access to thoughtful experts, great questions, and overall a great learning opportunity. Thank you!

iTunes Ratings

188 Ratings
Average Ratings
131
28
13
8
8

Uneven Excelence

By Slanebrain - Jan 09 2020
Read more
The good podcasts are stratospheric but I’m afraid that the others . . . .

Engaging Thoughtful Content

By SlipperySnake321 - Oct 28 2019
Read more
Access to thoughtful experts, great questions, and overall a great learning opportunity. Thank you!
Cover image of LSE: Public lectures and events

LSE: Public lectures and events

Latest release on Jan 09, 2020

Read more

The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

Rank #1: The Coddling of the American Mind [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Jonathan Haidt | A timely investigation into the new safety culture in universities and the dangers it poses to free speech, mental health, education, and ultimately democracy. This event marks the launch of Jonathan's new book, The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure. Jonathan Haidt (@JonHaidt) is a social and cultural psychologist and the Thomas Cooley Professor of Ethical Leadership at New York University's Stern School of Business. He is the author of The Righteous Mind and The Happiness Hypothesis. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is currently Professor of Behavioural Science at the LSE. He is Head of Department in Psychological and Behavioural Science and Director of LSE's Executive MSc Behavioural Science. LSE's Behavioural Science Hub (@LSEBehavioural) is a collaboration across the School in all things behavioural. Its two main goals are to provide a platform to highlight existing behavioural science related activities at LSE and further develop the capacity for top quality research into human behaviour. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHaidt Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at The Coddling of the American Mind. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Nov 23 2018

1hr 24mins

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Rank #2: LSE Festival 2019 | The Haunting of Neo-liberalism [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Robert Eaglestone, Professor Simon Glendinning, Professor Maja Zehfuss | Marx famously wrote of the spectre of communism haunting Europe in the nineteenth century, and the end of the Cold War might be considered to mark its exorcism. But has communism really been laid to rest? Despite the fall of the Berlin Wall, Derrida certainly thought not. He argued that in the ‘new world disorder’, ideologies like neo-liberalism were enmeshed with communism, haunted by the spectre of communisms yet to come. Is Derrida’s analysis still applicable to the post-9/11 world? And have new spectres appeared in our midst? Robert Eaglestone (@BobEaglestone) is Professor of Contemporary Literature and Thought at Royal Holloway, University of London. Simon Glendinning(@lonanglo) is Professor of European Philosophy, London School of Economics. Maja Zehfuss is Professor of International Politics, University of Manchester Danielle Sands (@DanielleCSands) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy & Lecturer in Comparative Literature and Culture, Royal Holloway, University of London. This event is co-organised by the European Institute and the Forum for Philiosophy. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Forum for Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #New WorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. From time to time there are changes to event details so we strongly recommend that if you plan to attend this event you check back on this listing on the day of the event.

Feb 28 2019

54mins

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Rank #3: The Meritocracy Trap [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Daniel Markovits | Merit is not a genuine excellence but rather a pretence, constructed to rationalise an offensive distribution of advantage. Merit, in short, is a sham. The meritocratic ideal—that social and economic rewards should track achievement rather than breeding—anchors the self-image of the age. Aristocracy has had its day, and meritocracy is now a basic tenet of civil religion in all advanced societies. Meritocracy promises to promote equality and opportunity by opening a previously hereditary elite to outsiders, armed with nothing save their own talents and ambitions. But today, middle-class children lose out to rich children at school, and middle-class adults lose out to elite graduates at work. At the same time, meritocracy entices an anxious and inauthentic elite into a pitiless, lifelong contest to secure income and status through its own excessive industry. In spite of its promises, meritocracy in fact installs a new form of aristocracy, purpose-built for a world in which the greatest source of income and wealth is not land but human capital and free labor. And merit is not a genuine excellence but rather—like the false virtues that aristocrats trumpeted in the ancien régime—a pretense, constructed to rationalize an offensive distribution of advantage. Daniel Markovits is Guido Calabresi Professor of Law at Yale Law School and Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Private Law. Markovits works in the philosophical foundations of private law, moral and political philosophy, and behavioral economics. He publishes in a range of disciplines, including in Science, The American Economic Review, and The Yale Law Journal. Markovits’s latest book, The Meritocracy Trap, places meritocracy at the center of rising economic inequality and social and political dysfunction. The book takes up the law, economics, and politics of human capital to identify the mechanisms through which meritocracy breeds inequality and to expose the burdens that meritocratic inequality imposes on all who fall within meritocracy’s orbit. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is the Sir Anthony Atkinson Chair in Economics and Director of STICERD. This event is the Morishima Lecture. This lecture series is held in honour of Professor Michio Morishima (1923-2004), Sir John Hicks Professor of Economics at LSE and STICERD's first chairman. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy.

May 08 2019

1hr 31mins

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Rank #4: Good Economics for Hard Times [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Esther Duflo | Join us for the Stamp Memorial Lecture which will be delivered by the 2019 joint winner of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences Esther Duflo who will be speaking about her new book Good Economics for Hard Times: Better Answers to Our Biggest Problems. Most of the issues that tear us apart today (from trade to immigration to Brexit) are, fundamentally, economic issues, but no one seems to be willing to listen to economists any more. In this lecture, based on her forthcoming book with Abhijit Banerjee with the same title, Professor Duflo will outline how a humane economics, that puts the individual and its wants and needs at the centre of its intellectual project, can guide a better conversation on the core problems that our generations need to resolve, from climate change, to nationalist rivalries, to the rise in inequality. Esther Duflo is the Abdul Latif Jameel Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics in the Department of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a co-founder and co-director of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL). In her research, she seeks to understand the economic lives of the poor, with the aim to help design and evaluate social policies. She has worked on health, education, financial inclusion, environment and governance. Professor Esther Duflo’s first degrees were in history and economics from Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris. She subsequently received a Ph.D. in Economics from MIT in 1999. Duflo has received numerous academic honors and prizes including the 2019 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences (awarded jointly with Abhijit Banerjee and Michael Kremer), the Princess of Asturias Award for Social Sciences (2015), the A.SK Social Science Award (2015), Infosys Prize (2014), the David N. Kershaw Award (2011), a John Bates Clark Medal (2010), and a MacArthur “Genius Grant” Fellowship (2009). With Abhijit Banerjee, she wrote Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty, which won the Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award in 2011 and has been translated into more than 17 languages. Duflo is the Editor of the American Economic Review, a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy. To pre-order a copy of Esther's new book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Good Economics for Hard Times. Robin Burgess is Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE and Director of the International Growth Centre. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEStamp This lecture is in memory of Josiah Charles Stamp who obtained a degree in economics from LSE in 1916. His thesis was published as British Incomes and Property in 1916 and launched his academic career. In 1919 he served on the Royal Commission on Income Tax and in the same year he joined Nobel Industries Ltd as secretary and director from which Imperial Chemical Industries later developed. In 1926 he became the president of the executive of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway and two years later he was appointed director of the Bank of England. He also served as a governor and vice chairman of LSE. Stamp also held lectureships in economics at several universities, including Cambridge, Oxford and Liverpool. In 1938 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Stamp of Shortlands, Kent. Stamp died on 16 April 1941. In 1942 a trust was set up jointly by the Bank of England, the London Midland and Scottish Railway, ICI and the Abbey Road Building Society to pay for the organisation of a Stamp memorial lecture.

Nov 05 2019

1hr 16mins

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Rank #5: A Short History of Europe [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Sir Simon Jenkins | Simon Jenkins discusses his latest book, A Short History of Europe and the lessons to be learned from European history. Simon Jenkins is a Guardian columnist, author and BBC broadcaster. Simon Glendinning (@lonanglo) is Head of the European Institute and Professor in European Philosophy. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

Feb 12 2019

1hr 24mins

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Rank #6: Texas, Trump and the Future of America [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Lawrence Wright | Come learn about the most controversial state in America and what it tells us about Donald Trump and the future of the US. This event marks the publications of Lawrence's new book, God Save Texas: A Journey into the Future of America. Lawrence Wright (@lawrence_wright) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, screenwriter, playwright and a staff writer for The New Yorker magazine. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The United States Centre (@LSE_US) at LSE is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America.

May 15 2018

1hr 22mins

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Rank #7: Capitalism, Alone: the future of the system that rules the world [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Branko Milanovic | We are all capitalists now. For the first time in human history, the globe is dominated by one economic system. In his book Capitalism, Alone, which he will discuss in this lecture, economist Branko Milanovic explains the reasons for this decisive historical shift since the days of feudalism and, later, communism. Surveying the varieties of capitalism, he asks: What are the prospects for a fairer world now that capitalism is the only game in town? His conclusions are sobering, but not fatalistic. Branko Milanovic explains how capitalism gets much wrong, but also much right—and it is not going anywhere. Our task is to improve it. Branko Milanovic (@BrankoMilan) is Visiting Presidential Professor and LIS Senior Scholar at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. He will join the International Inequalities Institute at LSE in 2020 as Centennial Professor. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. An economist by training, Dame Minouche Shafik has spent most of her career straddling the worlds of public policy and academia. After completing her BSc in economics and politics at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, she took an MSc in economics at LSE before completing a DPhil in economics at St Antony’s College at the University of Oxford. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWealth This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

Oct 23 2019

1hr 15mins

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Rank #8: Populism: causes and responses [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Michael Ignatieff, Professor Pippa Norris | A populist wave has swept across the democratic world. What are the economic and social causes of this wave, and how should democratic leaders respond? Michael Ignatieff (@M_Ignatieff) is President and Rector of Central European University. Born in Canada, educated at the University of Toronto and Harvard, Michael Ignatieff is a university professor, writer and former politician. Between 2006 and 2011, he served as an MP in the Parliament of Canada and then as Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada and Leader of the Official Opposition. He is a member of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and holds thirteen honorary degrees. Between 2012 and 2015 he served as Centennial Chair at the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs in New York. Between 2014 and 2016 he was Edward R. Murrow Chair of the Press, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. Pippa Norris (@PippaN15) is a comparative political scientist who has taught at Harvard for more than a quarter century. She is ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney, the Paul F. McGuire Lecturer in Comparative Politics at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, and Director of the Electoral Integrity Project and Co-Director of the TrustGov Project. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPopulism

Sep 19 2019

1hr 39mins

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Rank #9: From “having” to “being”: self worth and the current crisis of American society [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Michèle Lamont | This lecture will diagnose the challenges of neoliberal American society: the pitfalls of the American dream across classes, hardened group boundaries, and the need to invent new narratives of hope. Michèle Lamont (@mlamont6) is Professor of Sociology and of African and African American Studies, Harvard University. Rebecca Elliott is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology, LSE. Established in 1904, the Department of Sociology @LSEsociology at LSE is committed to empirically rich, conceptually sophisticated, and socially and politically relevant research and scholarship. Building upon the traditions of the discipline, we play a key role in the development of the social sciences into the new intellectual areas, social problems, and ethical dilemmas that face our society today. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBJSAL This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.

Oct 25 2018

1hr 32mins

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Rank #10: The Bullshitisation of the Economy Has Only Just Begun: pointless labour, digitisation, and the revolt of the caring classes [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor David Graeber | The proliferation of useless forms of employment in the professional-managerial sector has placed enormous pressure on the caring professions, leading to a major social conflagration. David Graeber (@davidgraeber) is Professor of Anthropology at the LSE and author of Bullshit Jobs: a Theory. Deborah James is Professor of Anthropology at the LSE. LSE Anthropology @LSEAnthropology is world famous and world leading. We are ranked top Anthropology department in the Guardian League Tables 2018. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGraeber This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.

Oct 17 2018

1hr 12mins

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Rank #11: Is the Presidency of Donald Trump a Political Aberration? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Stephen Skowronek | The presidency of Donald Trump is so readily labeled "not normal" and "off-the charts" that it is hard to think of it any other way. Stephen Skowronek examines long-running patterns in the politics of presidential leadership to sort out what is new, and what is not, in the Trump phenomenon. In Skowronek hands presidential history is not a gauzy backdrop to something anomalous, but a critical source of insight into contemporary American politics. Stephen Skowronek is the Pelatiah Perit Professor of Political and Social Science at Yale University. He has published extensively on the development of American national Institutions and on the American presidency. His books include The Politics Presidents Make, Presidential Leadership in Political Time, and most recently, with Karen Orren, The Policy State: An American Predicament. He is currently the Winant Visiting Professor of American Government at the Rothermere American Institute in Oxford. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States.

May 02 2019

1hr 27mins

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Rank #12: LSE Festival 2018 | The Future of Ageing [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Rebeca Aldunate, Nicci Gerrard, Professor Michael Murphy, Jane Vass | With the average life expectancy increasing from 66.7 in 1942 to 81.25 in 2017, and set to continue, population ageing is poised to become one of the most significant social transformations of the 21st century. This panel discusses how ageing could come to dominate the giant issue of health and social care, and potentially all areas of the welfare state. Rebeca Aldunate is Director of the Biotechnology School, Faculty of Science at Universidad Santo Tomás, Chile. Nicci Gerrard (@FrenchNicci) is the co-author, with Sean French, of the bestselling Nicci French psychological thrillers and has written six novels under her own name, including The Winter House and Missing Persons. She was on the staff of The Observer for many years and still writes for that paper, in 2016 winning the Orwell Prize for 'Exposing Britain's Social Ills'. She is also a co-founder of John’s Campaign, that fights for more compassionate care in hospital for people with dementia, and a humanist celebrant. Michael Murphy is Professor of Demography in the Department of Social Policy at LSE, having joined the School in 1980. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, the United Kingdom's national academy for the humanities and the social sciences. He has acted as an adviser to UK and US Governments, and international organisations, such as EU, UN and OECD. His current research areas include demographic modelling of ageing and mortality trends, social care and living arrangements and well-being of older people. Jane Vass is Director of Policy and Research at Age UK since April 2015. Prior to this Jane was Head of Public Policy at Age UK from 2012, having joined Age UK’s predecessor, Age Concern England as Financial Services Policy Adviser in 2006. Carrie Friese (@CarrieFriese) is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at LSE. Her research is in medical sociology and science and technology studies, with a focus on reproduction across humans and animals. Update, Wednesday 21 February: Due to unforeseen circumstances, Olivia Casanueva and Joanna Latimer are no longer able to speak at this event, but we are delighted to be joined by Rebeca Aldunate.

Feb 22 2018

59mins

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Rank #13: Work Smarter Not Harder: hacks to take you a long way at work [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Saj Jetha | Understand how to ‘hack’ work and be the best you can with Saj Jetha, founder of the multi-award winning The Smarty Train and author of The Smarts: Big Little Hacks to Take You a Long Way at Work. Enjoy a jargon-free insight into 'hacks' which can boost your performance and that of those around. Discover how the award-winning techniques covered in The Smarts can make a real impact in your work life, whether you’re an intern, are moving to the next challenge in your career, or are the CEO. Saj will not only explain the power of these ‘hacks’, but will also immerse you in a series of tantalising experiments showing how small changes can make a big difference to your workplace performance. Saj Jetha (@thesmartytrain) is an economist and founder of The Smarty Train, a training and talent advisory described as ‘The Secret Cinema of Training’. He has worked with tens of thousands of people at major corporations worldwide like Accenture, BP, EY, HSBC and Deliveroo. Saj is also a trustee of The University of London Convocation and was recently awarded Freedom of the City. He is an alumnus of UCL and LSE. Alexander (Sandy) Pepper is Professor of Management Practice, Department of Management, LSE. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management studies.

Feb 04 2019

1hr 14mins

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Rank #14: Narrative Economics [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Robert Shiller | Join us to hear from Nobel Prize winning economist and New York Times bestselling author Robert Shiller who will in this lecture talk about his new book which argues that looking at viral stories’ impact on the economy - an approach he coined as “narrative economics” - gives forecasters better tools for predicting a recession. Robert J. Shiller is Sterling Professor of Economics, Department of Economics and Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, and Professor of Finance and Fellow at the International Center for Finance, Yale School of Management. He received his B.A. from the University of Michigan in 1967 and his Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1972. He has written on financial markets, financial innovation, behavioral economics, macroeconomics, real estate, statistical methods, and on public attitudes, opinions, and moral judgments regarding markets. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences jointly with Eugene Fama and Lars Peter Hansen in 2013. This event marks the publication of Shiller's new book Narrative Economics. Ricardo Reis is the A W Phillips Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics. He is a consultant to central banks around the world, and is former the chief editor of the Journal of Monetary Economics. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) is a research centre that brings together a group of world class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and help design policies to alleviate it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEShiller Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Narrative Economics.

Sep 06 2019

1hr 17mins

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Rank #15: Learning from Data: the art of statistics [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor David Spiegelhalter | In his new book, The Art of Statistics, David Spiegelhalter guides us through the essential principles we need in order to derive knowledge from data, showing us why data can never speak for itself. He explains the basic concepts, from regression to P-values (without using mathematics), and introduces the intellectual ideas that underpin statistics. Drawing on numerous real world examples, he shows us how statistics can help us determine the luckiest passenger on the Titanic, whether serial killer Harold Shipman could have been caught earlier, and if the skeleton in the Leicester car park really was Richard III. Sir David Spiegelhalter is a British statistician and Chair of the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication in the Statistical Laboratory at the University of Cambridge. Spiegelhalter is one of the most cited and influential researchers in his field, and was elected as President of the Royal Statistical Society for 2017-18. Fiona Steele is a Professor of Statistics and Deputy Head of the Department of Statistics at LSE. Fiona first joined in LSE in 1996 as Lecturer in Statistics and Research Methodology. She then worked at the Institute of Education, University of London 2001-2005, followed by the University of Bristol 2005-2013 where she was Professor of Social Statistics and Director of the Centre for Multilevel Modelling. She returned to LSE in 2013. The Department of Statistics (@StatsDeptLSE) offers a vibrant research environment and a comprehensive programme of undergraduate and postgraduate degrees.

Mar 27 2019

1hr 28mins

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Rank #16: The Almighty Dollar [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dharshini David | The dollar is the lifeblood of globalisation: China holds billions in reserve for good reason. Greenbacks, singles, bucks or dead presidents, call them what you will, $1.2 trillion worth are floating around right now – and half the dollars in circulation are actually outside of the USA. But what is really happening as these billions of dollars go around the world every day? By following $1 from a shopping trip in suburban Texas, via China’s Central Bank, Nigerian railroads, the oil fields of Iraq and beyond, The Almighty Dollar answers questions such as: why is China the world’s biggest manufacturer – and the US its biggest customer? Is free trade really a good thing? Why would a nation build a bridge on the other side of the globe? Dharshini David (@DharshiniDavid) is an economist and broadcaster. From 2009 she fronted Sky News’ daily financial coverage and copresented Sky News Tonight. Keyu Jin (@KeyuJin) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics and a member of the Centre for Macroeconomics and Centre for Economic Performance. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.

Mar 08 2018

1hr 1min

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Rank #17: LSE Festival 2019 | Populism and Religion in the West [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Tobias Cremer, Dr Zubaida Haque | In an apparently ever-less-religious West, how has Christian identity, however indirectly, been used as a focal point for populist discontent? Tobias Cremer (@cremer_tobias) is a PhD candidate at the Department of Politics and International Studies (POLIS) at Peterhouse, Cambridge. Funded by the Economic and Social Research Council his doctoral research focuses on the relationship between religion and the new wave of right-wing populism in Western Europe and North America. In particular, the project aims to understand the ways in which traditionally secularist right-wing populist parties are seeking to employ Christian symbols and language as cultural identity markers, and how believers and Church authorities are reacting to such co-optation attempts. Zubaida Haque (@Zubhaque) is the Deputy Director at The Runnymede Trust with a strong research and policy background in educational attainments, ethnic minorities and employment, equality within prisons, integration and extremism. She has worked for several government departments, think tanks and universities and has directly been involved in several national panels and commissions including two government-sponsored reviews of the ‘race riots’ in Britain. She has made regular appearances on Channel 4 News, Newsnight, BBC Breakfast, Sky News and Victoria Derbyshire as well as national and local radio stations. James Walters (@LSEChaplain) is the founding director of the LSE Faith Centre and leads its work in promoting religious literacy and interfaith leadership among the LSE’s global student body, in government and to the wider public. He is a Senior Lecturer in Practice at the LSE Marshall Institute for Philanthropy and an affiliated faculty member at the Department for International Development. He has recently published Loving Your Neighbour in an Age of Religious Conflict: A New Agenda for Interfaith Relations. LSE Religion and Global Society is a partnership between the LSE Faith Centre and LSE Institute of Global Affairs. Unfortunately due to unforeseen circumstances Anne Applebaum is no longer able to speak at this event. We apologize for any inconvenience caused. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.

Mar 02 2019

1hr 14mins

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Rank #18: Marx at 201: the legacy of Karl Marx for the contemporary study of law, politics and society [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Bob Jessop, Professor Costas Lapavitsas, Professor Peter Ramsay, Professor Lea Ypi | Are we all Marxists now? Which of Marx’s ideas remain relevant, which redundant? Join leading scholars to address Marx’s legacy at 201. Are we all Marxists now? The question may sound strange but the virtues of the German philosopher are now extolled in the most unlikely of places. If this may be partly explained by the recent flurry of biographies and anniversaries – 2017 saw anniversaries of Das Kapital and the Russian Revolution, 2018 the bicentenary of his birth - the extraordinary growth of interest in Marx since the financial crisis seems undeniable. Socialism is even a talking point in the United States of America. and yet, the world looks as far removed from any communist utopia as could be imagined. Capitalism has accelerated; neoliberalism remains dominant, social democracy largely in retreat. If the political and ideological ascendency of capital has been fractured in the recent period, this seems predominantly to have benefitted the Right, leading to fears that a very different spectre from the one envisaged by Marx may now be haunting Europe, and the globe. Now therefore seems an opportune moment to reflect on the legacy of Karl Marx for the contemporary study of law, politics and society. Why is his influence so pervasive and resilient? Which ideas remain relevant, which redundant? The purpose of this event is to explore these questions with leading scholars from across different disciplines: economics, political theory, sociology and law. Bob Jessop is Professor of Sociology at the University of Lancaster. Costas Lapavitsas (@C_Lapavitsas) is Professor of Economics at SOAS. Peter Ramsay (@PeterRamsay2011) is Professor of Law at LSE. Lea Ypi (@lea_ypi) is Professor in Political Theory at LSE. Mike Wilkinson is Associate Professor of Law at LSE. LSE Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world's top law schools with an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and legal research.

Mar 27 2019

1hr 32mins

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Rank #19: LSE Festival 2018 | What's Love Got to Do with It? Loneliness, Relationships and Wellbeing [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Paul Dolan | Loneliness is one of the giant issues we are facing as a society today. Our relationships with other people are fundamental to our wellbeing, but what kinds of relationships make us happy or miserable? How should individuals decide when to ‘make or break’ a relationship? Why is the term love often misunderstood and misconstrued? How do social policies influence people’s relationships, such as by encouraging marriage and discouraging divorce – and how should they, if at all? Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at LSE, Director of Executive MSc Behavioural Science and Head of the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. There are two main themes to Paul’s work: Developing measures of happiness and subjective wellbeing that can be used in policy and by individuals looking to be happier; and considering ways in which the lessons from the behavioural sciences can be used to understand and change individual behaviour, and to add to the evidence base in this regard. He uses a range of data and methods to address these issues, and to better integrate them e.g. surveys, big data, lab studies, and field experiments. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book, Happiness by Design and the forthcoming The Narrative Trap, in which he talks about how the stories we tell about how we ought to live our lives harm us. Suzi Godson (@suzigodson) is a psychologist and journalist. She has been The Times sex and relationships columnist for fifteen years and is the author of several award winning books. She is currently conducting a longitudinal PhD study exploring the impact of midlife divorce on women with adult children. Last September she launched the multi award winning MeeTwo app, a safe, scalable, early intervention solution to the growing problem of adolescent anxiety. MeeTwo helps teenagers to talk about difficult things and encourages young people to help themselves, by helping each other. MeeTwo is free to use and is available on the App Store and Google Play

Feb 24 2018

1hr

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Climate Litigation: achievements and challenges [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Randall Abate, Dr Emily Barritt, Tessa Khan, Professor Hari Osofsky, Professor Jaqueline Peel, Dr Joana Setzer, Megan Bowman | Climate change litigation continues to expand across jurisdictions as a tool to strengthen climate action. But are courts prepared to protect the rights of future generations, wildlife and natural resources – collectively referred to as “the voiceless” - from the impacts of global climate change? This panel brings together leading scholars and practitioners in the field of climate litigation to discuss the potential and challenges for the law in addressing climate change. Randall Abate is Professor in the Department of Political Science and Sociology, Monmouth University. Emily Barritt (@emilymbarritt) is Lecturer in Tort Law and the Co-Director of the Transnational Law Institute at Kings College London. Megan Bowman is Associate Professor in Law, King’s College London, The Dickson Poon School of Law. Tessa Khan is a lawyer with the Urgenda Foundation and co-founder of the Climate Litigation Network. Hari Osofsky (@HariOsofsky) is Dean of Penn State Law and the Penn State School of International Affairs. Jaqueline Peel is Professor of Law, University of Melbourne. Joana Setzer (@JoanaSetzer) is Research Fellow, Grantham Research Institute, LSE. Veerle Heyvaert is Professor of Law, LSE. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEClimateLitigation This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

Jan 09 2020

1hr 34mins

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Old Friends, New Beginnings: building another future for the EU-UK partnership [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Ursula von der Leyen | Join us for a lecture by Ursula von der Leyen, LSE alumna and President of the European Commission. Prior to her current position she was Germany's Minister of Defence, a position she held from 2013-19. Before she was appointed Minister of Defence, she served as Federal Minister of Labor and Social Affairs since November 2009. From 2005 to 2009, she was Federal Minister for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth. Dr von der Leyen (@vonderleyen) studied at Göttingen and Münster, Hanover Medical School and the London School of Economics and Political Science. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England.

Jan 08 2020

51mins

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An IMF for the 21st Century [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor José Antonio Ocampo | This talk by José Antonio Ocampo will look at the different dimensions of IMF reform on the occasion of its 75th anniversary: the role of the international monetary system, global macroeconomic cooperation, prevention and management of crises, and the governance of the system. It will be based on his book, Resetting the International Monetary (Non)System. José Antonio Ocampo is Professor at Columbia University SIPA and a member of the Board of Directors at the Colombian Central Bank. Jean-Paul Faguet (@jpfaguet) is Professor of the Political Economy of Development at LSE, and Co-Programme Director of the MSc in Development Management. The Department of International Development (@LSE_ID) promotes interdisciplinary postgraduate teaching and research on processes of social, political and economic development and change. The Latin America and Caribbean Centre (@LSE_LACC) opened in January 2016 to serve as a focal point for LSE’s research and public engagement with Latin America and the Caribbean, the Centre builds upon the School’s long and important relationship with the region. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIMFReforms

Dec 05 2019

1hr 23mins

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Is Progressive Capitalism an Answer to America's Problems? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Joseph E. Stiglitz | We all have the sense that our economy tilts toward big business, but a few corporations have come to dominate entire sectors, contributing to skyrocketing inequality and slow growth. Too many have made their wealth through exploitation of others rather than through wealth creation. Professor Joseph Stiglitz will argue that we need to exploit the benefits of markets while taming their excesses, making sure that markets work for people and not the other way around. Joseph E. Stiglitz (@JosephEStiglitz) is University Professor at Columbia University, the winner of the 2001 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics, and a lead author of the 1995 IPCC report, which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. At Columbia, Stiglitz co-chairs the Committee on Global Thought and is founder and co-president of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue. His latest book, People, Power, and Profits: Progressive Capitalism for an Age of Discontent, was released in April. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to People, Power, and Profits: Progressive Capitalism for an Age of Discontent. Nicholas Stern is Chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government at LSE. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. witter Hashtag for this event: #LSEUSStiglitz This event is part of the LSE US Centre's Phelan Family Lecture series. Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Is Progressive Capitalism an Answer to America's Problems? Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Dec 04 2019

1hr 27mins

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January 31, 1953 and 9/11: living with risk [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Paul Embrechts | In its broad interpretation, “risk” is omnipresent in modern society. What does science, in particular mathematics, have to offer in a societal discourse on the topic? During the night of January 31 - February 1, 1953, a heavy winter storm battered the coastal areas of South West Holland and South East England killing over 2000 people. As a consequence, the Dutch started their famous Delta project. Paul Embrechts will discuss some of the scientific discourse related to the ensuing dike building process. The Twin Towers attack of 9/11 yields a very different kind of risk which will be contrasted with the flood event. Some methodological links to the financial crisis of 2006-2008 will be highlighted. The talk concludes with a discussion on the public communication and understanding of risk and the need for more interdisciplinary research. Paul Embrechts is Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at the ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich) where he taught insurance and financial mathematics. Jan van den Heuvel (@JanvadeHe) is Head of the Department of Mathematics at LSE. The Department of Mathematics is internationally recognised for its teaching and research in the fields of discrete mathematics, game theory, financial mathematics and operations research. Twitter Hashtag for this

Dec 04 2019

1hr 24mins

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Europe 2020: the European year in review [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Swati Dhingra, Dr Spyros Economides, Dr Sara Hagemann, Professor Sara Hobolt | 2019 has been a momentous year for Europe, and 2020 promises more of the same. This public discussion will take stock of political, economic, and social events in Europe and the European Union during this past year and try to look forward to the next. Panelists will touch on issues such as the EP and national elections, the new leaders of EU institutions, Brexit, the European economy, Europe’s relationship with the US, and a number of others. Swati Dhingra (@swatdhingraLSE) is Associate Professor in Economics, Department of Economics, LSE. Spyros Economides is Associate Professor in International Relations and European Politics, European Institute, LSE. Sara Hagemann (@sarahagemann) is Academic Director, School of Public Policy, LSE. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is Sutherland Chair in European Institutions, Department of Government, LSE. Chris Anderson (@soccerquant) is Professor in European Politics and Policy at LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEurope

Dec 03 2019

1hr 29mins

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Understanding Chilean Unrest: inequalities, social conflict and political change in contemporary Chile [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Emmanuelle Barozet, Dr Diana Kruger | Why has Chile been experiencing its larger protests since the return to democracy? What is behind the demands of its citizens? It’s been just over a month of continuous protests in Chile. What began as a challenge to metro fare hikes has become a general outcry, questioning structural inequalities in Chile. Traditionally perceived as the most stable country in the Latin American region, Chile is now challenging the way its model has worked in the last 40 years. From how education, housing, pensions, or health services operate, to even change the current constitution inherited from Augusto Pinochet’s dictatorship (1973-1990). Drawing from the researched done by COES, this discussion will examine the causes and consequences of the recent protests, as well as possible routes ahead. Emmanuelle Barozet is a Full Professor at the University of Chile and Associate Researcher of the COES. Diana Kruger is an Associate Professor at Adolfo Ibañez University and Associate Researcher of the COES. Kirsten Sehnbruch (@KirstenSehn) is British Academy Global Professor and Distinguished Policy Fellow at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.

Nov 28 2019

1hr 30mins

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How Freedom of Choice Influences Well-being [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Simona Botti | Does choice freedom always enhance satisfaction? Lab experiments help tackle this question, but when should they be used and how have techniques evolved over time? Hear from Simona Botti, Professor of Marketing at London Business School, as she explores the pros and cons of using lab experiments to explain human behaviour around decision-making and choice. Laboratory experiments are one of the many tools available to researchers to help them understand the consequences of making free choices. They can be used in isolation, or in combination with other methods. Simona will draw on practical examples from her own research into perceived personal control and choice freedom. She will share some of the lessons she has learned and provide insight into how experimental research has evolved over time. Simona Botti is Professor of Marketing at the London Business School. She joined LBS in 2007 after two years as Assistant Professor of Marketing at the S.C. Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University. She received an undergraduate degree in Business Administration from Bocconi University in Milan, Italy, and a MBA and PhD in Marketing from the University of Chicago. Professor Botti’s research focuses on consumer behaviour and decision making, with particular emphasis on the psychological processes underlying perceived personal control and how exercising control (freedom of choice, power, information) influence consumers’ satisfaction and well-being. Her work has been published in leading psychology and consumer behaviour journals, including the Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and Psychological Science. She is Associate Editor at Journal of Consumer Psychology and Journal of Consumer Research. Barbara Fasolo is Associate Professor of Behavioural Science at LSE's Department of Management. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEChoices

Nov 28 2019

1hr 24mins

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From 1919 to 2019: pivotal lessons from Versailles [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Barry Buzan, Professor Margaret MacMillan, Professor David Stevenson, Professor Linda Yueh | A panel of distinguished scholars will here discuss the legacy of the First World War, the Versailles Peace Treaty which followed, and why the treaty has been so hotly debated ever since by critics and defenders alike. This event will also mark the relaunch of John Maynard Keynes’s justly famous The Economic Consequences of the Peace, first published in December 1919 and now republished with a new, definitive introduction by Professor Michael Cox, Director of LSE IDEAS. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to The Economic Consequences of the Peace. Barry Buzan is Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE (formerly Montague Burton Professor); honorary professor at Copenhagen, Jilin, and China Foreign Affairs Universities, and the University of International Relations in Beijing; a Senior Fellow at LSE IDEAS; and a Fellow of the British Academy. Margaret MacMillan became the fifth Warden of St Antony’s College in July 2007, and stepped down in October 2017. Prior to taking on the Wardenship, Professor MacMillan was Provost of Trinity College and professor of History at the University of Toronto. David Stevenson is Professor of International History at LSE. His main fields of interests lie in international relations in Europe during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; origins, course, and impact of the First World War. Linda Yueh (@lindayueh) is Visiting Professor at LSE IDEAS and Chair of the LSE Economic Diplomacy Commission. She is Fellow in Economics at St Edmund Hall, Oxford University and Adjunct Professor of Economics at London Business School as well as Associate Fellow (Global Economy and Finance Department & U.S. and the Americas Programme) at Chatham House and was Visiting Professor of Economics at Peking University. She is a widely published author and Editor of the Routledge Economic Growth and Development book series. Her latest book, The Great Economists: How Their Ideas Can Help Us Today is The Times's Best Business Books of the Year. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEVersailles

Nov 28 2019

1hr 32mins

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French Muslims in Perspective: nationalism, post-colonialism and marginalisation under the Republic [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Fiona Adamson, Dr Joseph Downing | Joseph Downing will present his latest book on Muslims in France in a comparative social, political and media perspective. Fiona Adamson is Reader in International Relations at SOAS. Joseph Downing (@JosephDowning1) is Fellow in Nationalism in the European Institute, LSE and author of French Muslims in Perspective: Nationalism, Post-Colonialism and Marginalisation under the Republic. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to French Muslims in Perspective. Dr. Angelo Martelli is an Assistant Professor in European and International Political Economy in the European Institute at LSE.The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

Nov 27 2019

1hr 26mins

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Universal Basic Income and Universal Basic Services: the case for radical change [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Anna Coote, Professor Louise Haagh | What are the arguments for Universal Basic Income and for Universal Basic Services? How do they relate to each other and what might the difficulties be? Anna Coote is Principle Fellow at the New Economics Foundation. Louise Haagh is Professor in Politics at the University of York. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@rmilibandlse) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.

Nov 26 2019

1hr 26mins

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Understanding Scientific Understanding [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Henk W de Regt | Lakatos Award winner Henk W de Regt will deliver his lecture on his book Understanding Scientific Understanding. The Lakatos Award is given for an outstanding contribution to the philosophy of science, widely interpreted, in the form of a book published in English during the previous five years. Henk W de Regt (@RegtHenk) is Professor of Philosophy of Natural Sciences, Institute for Science in Society, Radboud University Nijmegen. Roman Frigg is Professor of Philosophy in the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, Director of the Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science (CPNSS), and Co-Director of the Centre for the Analysis of Time Series (CATS) at the London School of Economics and Political Science. The Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method (@LSEPhilosophy) at LSE was founded by Professor Sir Karl Popper in 1946, and remains internationally renowned for a type of philosophy that is both continuous with the sciences and socially relevant. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSELakatosAward

Nov 22 2019

1hr 24mins

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Do Clothes Maketh the Human? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Shahidha Bari, Yashka Moore, Professor Heather Widdows | Does fashion allow us to express our individuality or is it a case of the Emperor’s new clothing? Can we judge a book by its cover or is beauty just another manifestation of sexist and racist ideals? Does is even make sense to think of our judgements about beauty as being ethically right or wrong? Whether you wear your heart on your sleeve for fashion or think beauty should be given the boot, join us to discuss the cultural, political, and philosophical dimensions of fashion and beauty. Shahidha Bari (@ShahidhaBari) is Fellow of the Forum for Philosophy and Professor of Fashion Cultures, UAL and author of Dressed. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Dressed. Yashka Moore (@YASHKAMOORE) is a fashion designer. Heather Widdows (@ProfWiddows) is John Ferguson Professor of Global Ethics, University of Birmingham and author of Perfect Me. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Perfect Me. Founded in 1996, the Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) is a non-profit organization that has gained widespread recognition for its work as initiator and sponsor of engaging and thoughtful events that facilitate wider participation in academic philosophy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum

Nov 20 2019

1hr 18mins

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The Future of Football in Europe: access and sustainability [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Alasdair Bell, Umberto Gandini, Ebru Koksal, Gabriele Marcotti | Football is the world’s most popular sport; Europe is the continent with the biggest leagues and home to FIFA and UEFA, the most powerful governing bodies in the sport. A panel of high profile experts from the world of journalism, elite clubs, regulatory bodies, and playing the game will discuss issues of access and equality, financial sustainability, and the best ways of making the game future-proof. Alasdair Bell is Deputy Secretary General of FIFA. Umberto Gandini (@UmbertoGandini) is Vice Chairman of the European Club Association; former CEO of AS Roma and former CEO of AC Milan. Ebru Koksal is Chair of Women in Football and Former FIFA and UEFA Consultant. Gabriele Marcotti (@Marcotti) is Senior Writer for ESPN and a correspondent for Italian sports newspaper Corriere dello Sport. Chris Anderson (@soccerquant) is Professor in European Politics and Policy at LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

Nov 19 2019

1hr 34mins

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Britain and the Welfare State in the 21st Century: a more or less "irresponsible society"? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor John Hills, Dr Sonia Exley, Professor Howard Glennerster | In November 1959, Richard Titmuss, Head of the then Department of Social Science and Administration (now Social Policy) at LSE, gave a lecture on ‘The Irresponsible Society’. In it he pointed to the features of Britain in the late 1950s that added up to irresponsibility: the power of unaccountable financial interests; the way ‘welfare for the better-off’ undermined social security; the view of education simply as economic investment; irresponsible newspapers; and the tolerance of inequality. Sixty years on from the lecture John Hills, Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at LSE will discuss how we might judge today’s society by similar – and new – criteria. John Hills is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy, LSE. Sonia Exley is Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Policy, LSE. Howard Glennerster is Emeritus Professor of Social Policy, LSE. Anne West is Professor of Education Policy in the Department of Social Policy, LSE. The Department of Social Policy (@LSESocialPolicy) provides top quality international and multidisciplinary research and teaching on social and public policy challenges facing countries across the world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIrresponsibleSociety

Nov 14 2019

1hr 31mins

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Despotic Data: how authoritarian regimes are driving technology and innovation [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Noam Yuchtman | Data has become crucial in the production of our goods and services, particularly when it comes to the production of new technology and innovation such as artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML). Access to data is often a bottleneck in the development of AI and ML. Whilst authoritarian regimes are considered to hinder innovation, they benefit from having access to large amounts of data which in the democratic world depends on strict laws and cultural perceptions around privacy. Hear from Noam Yuchtman, recipient of the British Academy’s Global Professorship and Professor of Managerial Economics and Strategy at LSE, as he explains the reasons why authoritarian regimes – such as China – are becoming world leaders in technology, innovation and artificial intelligence. Noam Yuchtman is Professor of Managerial Economics and Strategy at LSE's Department of Management. John Van Reenen (@johnvanreenen) is Ronald Coase Chair in Economics and School Professor, Department of Economics, LSE. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEDespoticData This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

Nov 13 2019

1hr 26mins

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Mobilising for Sustainable Peace in Afghanistan: a global mothers' campaign [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Sahraa Karimi, Anne-Claire de Liedekerke, Staffan de Mistura, Rahela Sidiqi, Marika Theros | As talks between the US and Taliban raise hopes for peace in Afghanistan, mothers are mobilising inside and outside the country to hold on to their right to educate their daughters. Sahraa Karimi is a film director living in Afghanistan. She comes from the 2nd generation of refugees who fled Afghanistan for a new life in Iran. Sahraa has received huge acclaim for her fiction feature debut film "Hava, Maryam, Ayesha” that had its world premiere at the recent Venice Film Festival. Shot entirely in Kabul with Afghan actors, the film reflects Karimi’s desire to “go beyond [Western] clichés, and to find new stories, new perspectives” about life as an Afghan woman. Anne-Claire de Liedekerke (@MMM4Mothers) is President of Make Mothers Matter - MMM is an international NGO that believes in the power of mothers to make the world a better place and supports the worldwide campaign in solidarity with Afghan mothers. Staffan de Mistura is Former Under-Secretary-General & UN Special Envoy for Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq and Lebanon. Rahela Sidiqi (@FarkhundaTrust) is Founding Director of Farkhunda Trust for Afghan Women’s Education. Marika Theros (@meeksas) is Research Fellow at the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit, LSE. The Conflict and Civil Society Unit ( @LSE_CCS) builds on the work of the Civil Society and Human Security unit and was renamed in 2017 to reflect the changing focus of the research being undertaken. The core concern of the unit remains the desire to better understand the ways in which ordinary people seek to shape the decisions that affect their lives, with a particular focus on those experiencing conflict, prolonged violence, or war. The Department of International Development (@LSE_ID) was established in 1990 as the Development Studies Institute (DESTIN) to promote interdisciplinary postgraduate teaching and research on processes of social, political and economic development and change. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMothers

Nov 13 2019

1hr 30mins

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Code and Conduct: the future of legal professions [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Andrew Murray, Dr Orla Lynskey, Dr Eva Micheler, Lord Reed & Richard Susskind | Advances in IT have had a significant impact on lawyering and law. How can we harness the transformative power of digitalisation without sacrificing law’s humanity? In this roundtable discussion, we reflect on information technology’s transformative impact on lawyering and on law. Advances in IT have already had a significant impact on how the legal professions are organised and how justice is dispensed. The rate of change is only likely to increase in the coming decades, potentially transforming the nature of lawyering and of law itself in an irreversible way. This discussion is an opportunity to take stock of past achievements and failures, and to reflect on the fundamental importance of harnessing the transformative power of digitalisation without sacrificing law’s humanity. The discussion will be organised in three themes: IT and transformation of the working environment in legal practice; IT and transformation of adjudicative processes; IT and transformation of access to justice. Christina Blacklaws is the immediate past president of the Law Society and Chair of government technology panels. Veerle Heyvaert is Professor of Law, LSE. Orla Lynskey (@lynskeyo) is Associate Professor, LSE. Eva Micheler is Associate Professor, LSE. Lord Reed is incoming President of the UK Supreme Court. Richard Susskind (@richardsusskind) is Technology Adviser to the Lord Chief Justice. Andrew Murray (@AndrewDMurray) is Professor of Law at LSE’s Department of Law. LSE's Department of Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world’s top law schools. The Department ranked first for research outputs in the UK’s most recent Research Excellence Framework and has consistently been among the top 10 departments to study Law in the world according to the QS World University rankings. Our staff play a major role in helping to shape policy debates and in the education of current and future lawyers and legal scholars from around the world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECodeandConduct

Nov 13 2019

1hr 36mins

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"We, the People?" Some Thoughts from Our Past on Contemporary European Populism [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Michael Burleigh | What can history contribute to an understanding of contemporary European populism, which is now as much in power as insurgent? Is this just a reprise of what we have seen before, or something that reveals deeper problems with liberal democracy and capitalism in the post-financial crisis era? The lecture will focus on continental Europe with Brexit Britain, joining Putin’s Russia in the second lecture, taking place in January. Professor Michael Burleigh is the first Engelsberg Chair for 2019/20 at LSE IDEAS. Michael is a historian who focuses primarily on Nazi Germany. He is the author of The Third Reich: a new history, which won the 2001 Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction. His most recent book is The Best of Times, the Worst of Times. He has also won a British Film Institute Award for Archival Achievement and a New York Film and Television Festival Award Bronze Medal. Christopher Coker is Director of LSE IDEAS and Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPopulism

Nov 12 2019

1hr 31mins

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Women vs Capitalism: why we can't have it all in a free market economy [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Vicky Pryce | The free market as we know it cannot produce gender equality. This is the bold but authoritative argument of Vicky Pryce, the government’s former economics chief. Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Adviser, Centre for Economics and Business Research and an alumna of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her new book is Women vs Capitalism: Why We Can't Have It All in a Free Market Economy. Vicky's recent posts have included: Senior Managing Director at FTI Consulting; Director General for Economics at the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS); and Joint Head of the UK Government Economics Service where she was responsible for evidence based policy and for encouraging measures that promoted greater productivity in the UK economy. She had previously been Partner and Chief Economist at KPMG and earlier held chief economist positions in banking and the oil sector. Vicky co-founded GoodCorporation, a company set up to promote corporate social responsibility. At various stages in her career she has been on the Council of the Royal Economic Society, on the Council of the University of Kent, on the board of trustees at the RSA, on the Court of the London School of Economics and Political Science, a fellow of the Society of Business Economists, on the Executive Committee and the Council of the IFS, an Academician of the Academy of Social Sciences, a Visiting Professor at the Cass Business School, a Visiting Fellow at Nuffield College, Adjunct Professor at Imperial College and Visiting Professor at Queen Mary, University of London. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Women vs Capitalism: Why We Can't Have It All in a Free Market Economy. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy, LSE. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.

Nov 11 2019

1hr 28mins

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Uneven Excelence

By Slanebrain - Jan 09 2020
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The good podcasts are stratospheric but I’m afraid that the others . . . .

Engaging Thoughtful Content

By SlipperySnake321 - Oct 28 2019
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Access to thoughtful experts, great questions, and overall a great learning opportunity. Thank you!