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LSE: Public lectures and events

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Rank #12 in Courses category

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

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203 Ratings
Average Ratings
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11

Uneven Excelence

By Slanebrain - Jan 09 2020
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The good podcasts are stratospheric but I’m afraid that the others . . . .

Engaging Thoughtful Content

By SlipperySnake321 - Oct 28 2019
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Access to thoughtful experts, great questions, and overall a great learning opportunity. Thank you!

iTunes Ratings

203 Ratings
Average Ratings
140
30
14
8
11

Uneven Excelence

By Slanebrain - Jan 09 2020
Read more
The good podcasts are stratospheric but I’m afraid that the others . . . .

Engaging Thoughtful Content

By SlipperySnake321 - Oct 28 2019
Read more
Access to thoughtful experts, great questions, and overall a great learning opportunity. Thank you!
Cover image of LSE: Public lectures and events

LSE: Public lectures and events

Latest release on Jun 03, 2020

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

Rank #1: The Meritocracy Trap [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Daniel Markovits | Merit is not a genuine excellence but rather a pretence, constructed to rationalise an offensive distribution of advantage. Merit, in short, is a sham. The meritocratic ideal—that social and economic rewards should track achievement rather than breeding—anchors the self-image of the age. Aristocracy has had its day, and meritocracy is now a basic tenet of civil religion in all advanced societies. Meritocracy promises to promote equality and opportunity by opening a previously hereditary elite to outsiders, armed with nothing save their own talents and ambitions. But today, middle-class children lose out to rich children at school, and middle-class adults lose out to elite graduates at work. At the same time, meritocracy entices an anxious and inauthentic elite into a pitiless, lifelong contest to secure income and status through its own excessive industry. In spite of its promises, meritocracy in fact installs a new form of aristocracy, purpose-built for a world in which the greatest source of income and wealth is not land but human capital and free labor. And merit is not a genuine excellence but rather—like the false virtues that aristocrats trumpeted in the ancien régime—a pretense, constructed to rationalize an offensive distribution of advantage. Daniel Markovits is Guido Calabresi Professor of Law at Yale Law School and Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Private Law. Markovits works in the philosophical foundations of private law, moral and political philosophy, and behavioral economics. He publishes in a range of disciplines, including in Science, The American Economic Review, and The Yale Law Journal. Markovits’s latest book, The Meritocracy Trap, places meritocracy at the center of rising economic inequality and social and political dysfunction. The book takes up the law, economics, and politics of human capital to identify the mechanisms through which meritocracy breeds inequality and to expose the burdens that meritocratic inequality imposes on all who fall within meritocracy’s orbit. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is the Sir Anthony Atkinson Chair in Economics and Director of STICERD. This event is the Morishima Lecture. This lecture series is held in honour of Professor Michio Morishima (1923-2004), Sir John Hicks Professor of Economics at LSE and STICERD's first chairman. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy.

May 08 2019

1hr 31mins

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Rank #2: Capital and Ideology [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Thomas Piketty | In the epic successor to one of the most important books of the century, Thomas Piketty challenges us revolutionize how we think about politics, ideology, and history. Join us for this event at which Thomas will discuss his new book, Capital and Ideology. LSE alumnus Thomas Piketty (@PikettyLeMonde) is Professor at EHESS and at the Paris School of Economics. He is the author of numerous articles published in journals such as the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Journal of Political Economy, the American Economic Review, the Review of Economic Studies, Explorations in Economic History, Annales: Histoire, Sciences Sociales, and of a dozen books. He has done major historical and theoretical work on the interplay between economic development, the distribution of income and wealth, and political conflict. In particular, he is the initiator of the recent literature on the long run evolution of top income shares in national income (now available in the World Inequality Database). These works have led to radically question the optimistic relationship between development and inequality posited by Kuznets, and to emphasize the role of political, social and fiscal institutions in the historical evolution of income and wealth distribution. He is also the author of the international best-seller Capital in the 21st Century. To pre-order a copy of Thomas' new book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Capital and Ideology. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWealth

Feb 06 2020

1hr 32mins

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Rank #3: Game Theory and Politics [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Bernhard von Stengel
Professor Bernhard von Stengel | Game theory is the 'science of interaction'. This talk will explain some insights of game theory and apply them to current politics. Of course politicians play games. They offer cheap promises that they think they don't have to fulfil. Such as a "simple" in-out referendum on EU membership. That game plan went wrong. Game theory could have helped, with tools for thinking ahead and concepts of strategy. Game theory can also help explain the incentive problems of climate change and reasons for democratic deadlock. This talk will highlight some uses and mis-uses of game theory and decision theory with examples from politics. Bernhard von Stengel (@bvonstengel) is Professor of Mathematics at the London School of Economics which he joined in 1998, after studies in Germany and the USA. He is a former Vice President for Communications of the Game Theory Society, scientific chair of their 5th World Congress in 2016, and currently Deputy Head (Research) of the LSE Department of Mathematics. His research is on mathematical and computational questions of game theory. Jan van den Heuvel (@JanvadeHe) is Head of the Department of Mathematics at LSE. The Department of Mathematics (@LSEMaths) is internationally recognised for its teaching and research in the fields of discrete mathematics, game theory, financial mathematics and operations research. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGameTheory

Feb 20 2020

1hr 30mins

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Rank #4: The Future of Capitalism [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Sir Paul Collier | Following the publication of his latest book, The Future of Capitalism, Paul Collier will discuss this book and his wider work. Paul Collier is Professor of Economics and Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government and a Professorial Fellow of St Antony’s College. From 1998–2003 he took a five-year Public Service leave during which he was Director of the Research Development Department of the World Bank. He is currently a Professeur invité at Sciences Po and a Director of the International Growth Centre. He has written for the New York Times, the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. His research covers the causes and consequences of civil war; the effects of aid and the problems of democracy in low-income and natural resources rich societies; urbanisation in low-income countries; private investment in African infrastructure and changing organisational cultures. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy. Founded in 1978 by the renowned Japanese economist Michio Morishima, with donations from Suntory and Toyota, we are a thriving research community within the LSE.

Oct 12 2018

1hr 18mins

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Rank #5: From “having” to “being”: self worth and the current crisis of American society [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Michèle Lamont | This lecture will diagnose the challenges of neoliberal American society: the pitfalls of the American dream across classes, hardened group boundaries, and the need to invent new narratives of hope. Michèle Lamont (@mlamont6) is Professor of Sociology and of African and African American Studies, Harvard University. Rebecca Elliott is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology, LSE. Established in 1904, the Department of Sociology @LSEsociology at LSE is committed to empirically rich, conceptually sophisticated, and socially and politically relevant research and scholarship. Building upon the traditions of the discipline, we play a key role in the development of the social sciences into the new intellectual areas, social problems, and ethical dilemmas that face our society today. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBJSAL This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.

Oct 25 2018

1hr 32mins

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Rank #6: Is Progressive Capitalism an Answer to America's Problems? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Joseph E. Stiglitz | We all have the sense that our economy tilts toward big business, but a few corporations have come to dominate entire sectors, contributing to skyrocketing inequality and slow growth. Too many have made their wealth through exploitation of others rather than through wealth creation. Professor Joseph Stiglitz will argue that we need to exploit the benefits of markets while taming their excesses, making sure that markets work for people and not the other way around. Joseph E. Stiglitz (@JosephEStiglitz) is University Professor at Columbia University, the winner of the 2001 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics, and a lead author of the 1995 IPCC report, which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. At Columbia, Stiglitz co-chairs the Committee on Global Thought and is founder and co-president of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue. His latest book, People, Power, and Profits: Progressive Capitalism for an Age of Discontent, was released in April. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to People, Power, and Profits: Progressive Capitalism for an Age of Discontent. Nicholas Stern is Chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government at LSE. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. witter Hashtag for this event: #LSEUSStiglitz This event is part of the LSE US Centre's Phelan Family Lecture series. Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Is Progressive Capitalism an Answer to America's Problems? Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Dec 04 2019

1hr 27mins

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Rank #7: LSE IQ Ep 21 | Can we afford our consumer society? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Rebecca Elliott, Professor Ian Gough, Dr Rodolfo Leyva | Welcome to LSE IQ, the monthly podcast from the London School of Economics and Political Science. This is the podcast where we ask some of the leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. For this LSE IQ we have something slightly different for you – an 'live' episode recorded in front of an audience at LSE at the beginning of November 2018. Economic growth has helped millions out of poverty. The jobs it creates mean rising incomes and consumers who buy more. This drives further growth and higher living standards, including better health and education. Yet WWF, the World Wildlife Fund, has recently warned that exploding human consumption is the driving force behind unprecedented planetary change, through increased demand for energy, land and water. Plastics and microplastics are filling our oceans and rivers and entering the food chain. The production of goods and services for household use is the most important cause of greenhouse gas emissions. The textile industry is responsible for depleting and polluting water resources and committing human rights abuses against its workers. It is also a major source of greenhouse gases, and three fifths of all clothing produced ends up in incinerators or landfills within a year of being made. For this episode of LSE IQ Jo Bale and Sue Windebank ask, 'Can we afford our consumer society?'. This episode features: Dr Rebecca Elliott, Assistant Professor, LSE’s Department of Sociology; Professor Ian Gough, Visiting Professor at LSE’s Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion and an Associate at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment; and Dr Rodolfo Leyva, LSE Fellow in LSE’s Department of Media Communications. For further information about the podcast visit lse.ac.uk/iq and please tell us what you think using the hashtag #LSEIQ.

Dec 19 2018

1hr 11mins

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Rank #8: Narrative Economics [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Robert Shiller | Join us to hear from Nobel Prize winning economist and New York Times bestselling author Robert Shiller who will in this lecture talk about his new book which argues that looking at viral stories’ impact on the economy - an approach he coined as “narrative economics” - gives forecasters better tools for predicting a recession. Robert J. Shiller is Sterling Professor of Economics, Department of Economics and Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, and Professor of Finance and Fellow at the International Center for Finance, Yale School of Management. He received his B.A. from the University of Michigan in 1967 and his Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1972. He has written on financial markets, financial innovation, behavioral economics, macroeconomics, real estate, statistical methods, and on public attitudes, opinions, and moral judgments regarding markets. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences jointly with Eugene Fama and Lars Peter Hansen in 2013. This event marks the publication of Shiller's new book Narrative Economics. Ricardo Reis is the A W Phillips Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics. He is a consultant to central banks around the world, and is former the chief editor of the Journal of Monetary Economics. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) is a research centre that brings together a group of world class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and help design policies to alleviate it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEShiller Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Narrative Economics.

Sep 06 2019

1hr 17mins

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Rank #9: A Short History of Europe [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Sir Simon Jenkins | Simon Jenkins discusses his latest book, A Short History of Europe and the lessons to be learned from European history. Simon Jenkins is a Guardian columnist, author and BBC broadcaster. Simon Glendinning (@lonanglo) is Head of the European Institute and Professor in European Philosophy. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

Feb 12 2019

1hr 24mins

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Rank #10: LSE Festival 2019 | How to Remain Sane in the Age of Populism [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Elif Shafak | Until not so long ago, some parts of the world—namely, the West— were thought to be solid, steady, stable. Other parts of the world—namely, the non-West— were thought to be liquid, not yet settled. Since 2016 it has become increasingly clear to citizens across the world that there are no solid and in fact, we are all living in liquid times. Fear, anger, anxiety, resentment… emotions guide and misguide politics. The more “informed” we are the less we know. The less we know the less we understand. And the less we understand the bigger our fears. How can we remain sane in the age of populism? Should we retreat into tribes of our own and try to feel more secure there; should we create new tribes, or should we, and can we, find a way beyond tribalism? Elif Shafak (@Elif_Safak) Elif Shafak is an award-winning British-Turkish novelist and the most widely read female author in Turkey. She writes in both Turkish and English, and has published seventeen books, eleven of which are novels. Her work has been translated into fifty languages. Shafak holds a PhD in political science and she has taught at various universities in Turkey, the US and the UK, including St Anne's College, Oxford University, where she is an honorary fellow. She is a member of Weforum Global Agenda Council on Creative Economy and a founding member of ECFR (European Council on Foreign Relations). An advocate for women's rights, LGBT rights and freedom of speech, Shafak is an inspiring public speaker and twice a TED Global speaker, each time receiving a standing ovation. Shafak contributes to major publications around the world and she has been awarded the title of Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres. In 2017 she was chosen by Politico as one of the twelve people who would make the world better. She has judged numerous literary prizes and is chairing the Wellcome Prize 2019. Jonathan White (@JonathanPJWhite) is Deputy Head of the European Institute and Professor in Politics at LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.

Feb 27 2019

57mins

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Rank #11: Future Politics: living together in a world transformed by tech [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Jamie Susskind | Jamie Susskind will discuss the publication of his latest book, Future Politics: Living Together in a World Transformed by Tech. At this event, Jamie will discuss how digital technology, from AI to virtual reality, will transform politics and society. He will mention how digital technology will be used to exert control by the state and by big tech firms. This talk will challenge the audience to rethink the meaning of democracy and justice, freedom and equality, power, and property. The great political debate of the last century was about how much of our collective life should be determined by the state and what should be left to the market and civil society. In the future, the question will be how far our lives should be directed and controlled by powerful digital systems - and on what terms? Jamie Susskind (@jamiesusskind) is an author, speaker, and practising barrister. A past Fellow of Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, he studied history and politics at Magdalen College, Oxford, graduating first in his year before turning to the law. Tony Travers is the Associate Dean of LSE’s School of Public Policy and a Professor in the Department of Government. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSETech

Nov 06 2018

1hr 29mins

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Rank #12: COVID-19 and its Impact on Euro Atlantic Security [Audio]

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Speaker(s): General Sir James Everard, Dr Nathalie Tocci, Peter Watkins | COVID-19 will have more than just a major impact on social and economic life. It threatens to reshape the global security environment and the Euro Atlantic world that emerged in 1989. An expert panel will discuss the future of NATO and the critical US/Europe security partnership from which the western alliance draws its strength. James Everard served as the Deputy Chief of Defence Staff for Military Strategy and Operation (UK), Commander UK Field Army and finally as the Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Europe (NATO).
Nathalie Tocci (@NathalieTocci) is Director of the Istituto Affari Internazionali and is special adviser to the EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs Josep Borrell. Peter Watkins is an Associate Fellow for Chatham House and a Visiting Senior Fellow with LSE IDEAS. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. This event in the series has been organised by LSE IDEAS. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

May 21 2020

1hr 30mins

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Rank #13: Populism: causes and responses [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Michael Ignatieff, Professor Pippa Norris | A populist wave has swept across the democratic world. What are the economic and social causes of this wave, and how should democratic leaders respond? Michael Ignatieff (@M_Ignatieff) is President and Rector of Central European University. Born in Canada, educated at the University of Toronto and Harvard, Michael Ignatieff is a university professor, writer and former politician. Between 2006 and 2011, he served as an MP in the Parliament of Canada and then as Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada and Leader of the Official Opposition. He is a member of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and holds thirteen honorary degrees. Between 2012 and 2015 he served as Centennial Chair at the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs in New York. Between 2014 and 2016 he was Edward R. Murrow Chair of the Press, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. Pippa Norris (@PippaN15) is a comparative political scientist who has taught at Harvard for more than a quarter century. She is ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney, the Paul F. McGuire Lecturer in Comparative Politics at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, and Director of the Electoral Integrity Project and Co-Director of the TrustGov Project. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPopulism

Sep 19 2019

1hr 39mins

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Rank #14: An IMF for the 21st Century [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor José Antonio Ocampo | This talk by José Antonio Ocampo will look at the different dimensions of IMF reform on the occasion of its 75th anniversary: the role of the international monetary system, global macroeconomic cooperation, prevention and management of crises, and the governance of the system. It will be based on his book, Resetting the International Monetary (Non)System. José Antonio Ocampo is Professor at Columbia University SIPA and a member of the Board of Directors at the Colombian Central Bank. Jean-Paul Faguet (@jpfaguet) is Professor of the Political Economy of Development at LSE, and Co-Programme Director of the MSc in Development Management. The Department of International Development (@LSE_ID) promotes interdisciplinary postgraduate teaching and research on processes of social, political and economic development and change. The Latin America and Caribbean Centre (@LSE_LACC) opened in January 2016 to serve as a focal point for LSE’s research and public engagement with Latin America and the Caribbean, the Centre builds upon the School’s long and important relationship with the region. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIMFReforms

Dec 05 2019

1hr 23mins

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Rank #15: LSE Festival 2019 | The Haunting of Neo-liberalism [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Robert Eaglestone, Professor Simon Glendinning, Professor Maja Zehfuss | Marx famously wrote of the spectre of communism haunting Europe in the nineteenth century, and the end of the Cold War might be considered to mark its exorcism. But has communism really been laid to rest? Despite the fall of the Berlin Wall, Derrida certainly thought not. He argued that in the ‘new world disorder’, ideologies like neo-liberalism were enmeshed with communism, haunted by the spectre of communisms yet to come. Is Derrida’s analysis still applicable to the post-9/11 world? And have new spectres appeared in our midst? Robert Eaglestone (@BobEaglestone) is Professor of Contemporary Literature and Thought at Royal Holloway, University of London. Simon Glendinning(@lonanglo) is Professor of European Philosophy, London School of Economics. Maja Zehfuss is Professor of International Politics, University of Manchester Danielle Sands (@DanielleCSands) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy & Lecturer in Comparative Literature and Culture, Royal Holloway, University of London. This event is co-organised by the European Institute and the Forum for Philiosophy. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Forum for Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #New WorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. From time to time there are changes to event details so we strongly recommend that if you plan to attend this event you check back on this listing on the day of the event.

Feb 28 2019

54mins

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Rank #16: National Populism: the revolt against liberal democracy [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Matthew Goodwin | Matthew Goodwin will present his new guide to one of the most urgent political phenomena of our time: the rise of national populism. Matthew J Goodwin (@GoodwinMJ) is Professor of Politics, University of Kent and Senior Visiting Fellow, Chatham House. Francisco Panizza is Professor in Latin American and Comparative Politics in the LSE Department of Government. The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is home to some of the most internationally respected experts in politics and government; producing influential research that has a global impact on policy, and delivering world-class teaching to our students. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEDemocracy This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.

Oct 22 2018

1hr 28mins

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Rank #17: The Great Delusion: liberal dreams and international realities [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor John Mearsheimer | In this lecture John Mearsheimer explains why US foreign policy so often backfires and what can be done to set it straight. John Mearsheimer is the R. Wendell Harrison Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is now in its 91st year, making it one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. They are ranked 5th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2018 tables for Politics and International Studies. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGreatDelusion

Jan 17 2019

1hr 31mins

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Rank #18: Radical Uncertainty: decision making for an unknowable future [Audio]

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Speaker(s): John Kay, Professor Lord King | Two leading economists discuss decision making in conditions of radical uncertainty, where we can neither imagine all possible outcomes nor assign probabilities to future events. Uncertainty surrounds all the big decisions we make in our lives. How much should we pay into our pensions each month? Should we take regular exercise? Expand the business? Change our strategy? Enter a trade agreement? Take an expensive holiday? We do not know what the future will hold. But we must make decisions anyway. So we crave certainties which cannot exist and invent knowledge we cannot have. But humans are successful because they have adapted to an environment that they understand only imperfectly. Throughout history we have developed a variety of ways of coping with the radical uncertainty that defines our lives. Mervyn King and John Kay, authors of a new book on decision making in conditions of radical uncertainty, will draw on biography, history, mathematics, economics and philosophy to highlight the most successful - and most short-sighted - methods of dealing with an unknowable future. They will argue that contemporary approaches to dealing with uncertainty rely on a false understanding of our power to make predictions, leading to many of the problems we experience today. This event marks the publication of Radical Uncertainty: Decision-making for an unknowable future by Mervyn King and John Kay. To pre-order a copy of this book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Radical Uncertainty: Decision-making for an unknowable future. John Kay is a Fellow of St John's College, Oxford and has held professorial appointments at the University of Oxford, London Business School and LSE. Mervyn King was Governor of the Bank of England from 2003 to 2013 and is currently Professor of Economics and Law at New York University and School Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it.

Mar 10 2020

1hr 20mins

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Rank #19: Paul Dolan: happy ever after [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Paul Dolan, Professor Tali Sharot | Paul Dolan launches his new book, Happy Ever After, exploring the narratives society installs in us, using good evidence to debunk bad stories. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the LSE where he currently serves as head of the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. Tali Sharot is a Professor Cognitive Neuroscientist at the Department of Experimental Psychology, University College London, where she is the director of the Affective Brain Lab. Julia Black is Professor of Law at the Department of Law, LSE. PBS@LSE (@PsychologyLSE @LSEBehavioural) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world.

Jan 24 2019

1hr 23mins

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Post COVID-19 Futures of the Urbanising World [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Creighton Connolly, Professor Roger Keil, Dr Deirdre McKay, Dr Rita Padawangi | What is the relationship between urbanisation and infectious disease? How do cities and their hinterlands respond to the COVID-19 pandemic? What is the role of civil society in tackling the livelihood challenges in urban and rural areas during the pandemic? This panel will explore the impact of COVID-19 on changing relationships between cities and their hinterlands in global urbanisation processes, and the position of cities, small towns and rural areas in thinking about post COVID-19 urban futures, with particular emphasis on Southeast Asia. Creighton Connolly (@Creighton88) is Senior Lecturer in Development Studies and the Global South in the School of Geography at the University of Lincoln. He researches urban political ecology, urban-environmental governance and processes of urbanization and urban redevelopment in Southeast Asia, with a focus on Malaysia and Singapore. He is editor of Post-Politics and Civil Society in Asian Cities, and has published in a range of leading urban studies and geography journals. Roger Keil (@rkeil) is Professor at the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University in Toronto. He researches global suburbanization, urban political ecology, cities and infectious disease, and regional governance. Keil is the author of Suburban Planet and editor of Suburban Constellations. A co-founder of the International Network for Urban Research and Action (INURA), he was the inaugural director of the CITY Institute at York University and former co-editor of the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research. Deirdre McKay (@dccmckay) is Reader in Social Geography and Environmental Politics at Keele University, and Chair of the Association of Southeast Asian Studies UK (ASEAS UK). Dr McKay’s research draws on both social/cultural geography and social anthropology to explore people's place-based experiences of globalisation and development. Her fieldwork is in areas of the global South and also with migrant communities from developing areas who have moved into the world's major cities. Much of her work has been conducted with people who originate in indigenous villages in the northern Philippines. Rita Padawangi (@ritapd) is Senior Lecturer at Singapore University of Social Sciences. Her research interests include the sociology of architecture, social movements and participatory urban development. She co-coordinates the Southeast Asia Neighbourhoods Network (SEANNET), an initiative for urban studies research and teaching, funded by the Henry Luce Foundation through the International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS). She is the editor of the Routledge Handbook of Urbanization in Southeast Asia. Hyun Bang Shin (@urbancommune) is Director of the Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre, and Professor of Geography and Urban Studies in the Department of Geography and Environment. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. The Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre (@LSESEAC) is a multidisciplinary Research Centre of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). It develops and fosters academic and policy-oriented research, drawing on a rich network of experts across disciplines at LSE and beyond, while serving as a globally recognised hub for promoting dialogue and engagement with Southeast Asia and the world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Jun 03 2020

1hr 32mins

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COVID-19 and Illicit Markets [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Naomi Burke-Shyne, Jason Eligh, Gabriel Feltran, Kasia Malinowska, Alexander Söderholm | The potential impact of COVID-19 on economic markets is well known and widely discussed. But what about the markets we know less about, namely illicit markets? Drug markets, policymakers and people who use drugs are facing an unprecedented situation. Join this discussion - a blend of on-the-ground narratives and broader policy perspectives - to hear how we might best respond. Naomi Burke-Shyne (@NaomiSBS) is the Executive Director of Harm Reduction International. She has more than 10 years of international experience at the intersection of harm reduction, HIV and human rights. She is a member of the Strategic Advisory Group to the UN on HIV and Drug Use, a member of the Global Fund Technical Review Panel for Human Rights and Gender, and a member of the World Health Organization Guidelines Group on 'Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances'. Jason Eligh (@JasonEligh) is a Senior Expert at the Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime. He is an illicit drug market and policy analyst who has researched, developed and led technical cooperation and assistance initiatives addressing illicit drugs across African and Asian geographies. His current work focuses on understanding the contexts and characteristics influencing drug use behaviours and the structural resilience of drug trade environments, particularly as these factors relate to the development and sustainability of harm. Gabriel Feltran is a professor in the Department of Sociology at the Federal University of São Carlos in Brazil, and currently Senior Researcher at the Brazilian Centre for Planning and Analysis (CEBRAP). His current research looks at criminal groups and illegal markets in Brazil, focussing on collective action, marginalized groups and "the criminal world" in São Paulo. Kasia Malinowska (@OSFKasia) is the director of the Global Drug Policy Program at the Open Society Foundations. She previously led the Open Society’s International Harm Reduction Development program, which supports the health and human rights of people who use drugs. She publishes regularly on drug policy as it relates to women, social justice, health, human rights, civil society, and governance, and she co-authored Poland’s first National AIDS program and has helped formulate policy in international organisations. Alexander Söderholm (@AlexSoderholm) is the Policy Coordinator of the LSE International Drug Policy Unit (IDPU), and the Managing Editor of the Journal of Illicit Economies and Development. He is currently a PhD Candidate in Social Policy at the LSE with a research project titled 'Drugs, Livelihoods, and Development: The Role of Illicit Markets in Determining Development Outcomes'. He has also worked with the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in Iran and has conducted research and policy work in a number of countries, such as Thailand, Myanmar, South Africa, Colombia, and Brazil, on issues related to illicit markets and sustainable development. John Collins (@JCollinsIDPU) is Executive Director of the LSE’s International Drug Policy Unit (IDPU), a Fellow of the LSE US Centre and a Distinguished Visiting Fellow of the Yale Centre for the Study of Globalization. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Illicit Economies and Development (JIED), an Open Access journal published by LSE Press.

Jun 02 2020

1hr 34mins

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COVID-19 and Africa: pandemics and global politics [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Assis Malaquias, Elizabeth Sidiropoulos, Dr Folashadé Soulé | A panel of leading African commentators will reflect on the global response to the health dimensions of the pandemic in Africa. Our speakers will look at what the global response to the pandemic tells us about the emerging multi-polar world, the role of cooperation and collective action in this emerging multi-polarity, the impact of US-China competition and the significance for African states as autonomous actors in this changing global context. Assis Malaquias is Professor and Chair of the Department of Global Studies and Maritime Affairs at the California State University (Maritime). Elizabeth Sidiropoulos is the Chief Executive of the South African Institute of International Affairs. Folashadé Soulé is a Senior Research Associate in International Relations at the University of Oxford (Blavatnik School of Government). Chris Alden is Co-Director of the Global South Unit and Professor in International Relations at LSE. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Jun 01 2020

1hr 32mins

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COVID-19 Economic Response: a comparative, cross-border perspective [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Reuben Abraham, Dr Ailish Campbell, Rain Newton-Smith, Kazumi Nishikawa | This panel will compare and contrast the economic policy response to COVID-19 undertaken by countries around the world in both developed and emerging economies. It will explore the immediate impact on supply-chains and the outlook for trade and cross-border investment from here. Reuben Abraham (@nebuer42) is CEO of IDFC Foundation and IDFC Institute, a Mumbai based think/do tank focused on state capability and political economy issues. He is a non-resident scholar at the Marron Institute at New York University, and a senior fellow at the Milken Institute in Singapore. In addition, he is a Senior Advisor to Swiss Re and an Honorary Advisor to the New Zealand government at the New Zealand Asia Foundation. Ailish Campbell (@Ailish_Campbell) joined Global Affairs Canada as the Chief Trade Commissioner of Canada and Assistant Deputy Minister in March 2017. She leads a global team that helps Canadian business find new customers, troubleshoot market access, sell their products, and grow their businesses. Ailish also leads work across global trade support services including export finance, foreign investment and responsible business conduct. Previously, she held senior executive positions at Finance Canada, the Business Council of Canada and the Privy Council Office. Ailish began her career in the Canadian federal public service as a trade negotiator on the Doha Round of WTO negotiations. She holds a Doctorate in International Relations from the University of Oxford and is designated as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum. Rain Newton-Smith (@RainNewtonSmith) is the Chief Economist at the Confederation of British Industry. She and her team provide business leaders with advice on the UK economic outlook and global risks. Previously, Rain was head of Emerging Markets at Oxford Economics where she managed a large team of economists and was the lead expert on China. Prior to that, Rain worked on the international forecast for the Monetary Policy Committee at the Bank of England and also led a team with responsibility for developing a risk assessment framework for the UK financial system. Kazumi Nishikawa is Principal Director of Healthcare Industries Division, METI (Ministry of Economy Trade and Industry) of Japan. He is a member of the Global Future Council for Human Enhancement and Longevity, World Economic Forum. Mr Nishikawa has also worked in the Defence Ministry and Cabinet Office. He holds a law degree from the University of Tokyo, an LLM from Northwestern University School of Law, and an LLM in International Studies from Georgetown University Law Center. He is an attorney at Law in New York State, USA. Lutfey Siddiqi (@Lutfeys) is a Visiting Professor-in-Practice at LSE IDEAS, a member of LSE Court and the Advisory Board of LSE Systemic Risk Centre. He is also an Adjunct Professor at the National University of Singapore (Risk Management Institute), and advisory board member of NUS Centre for Governance (CGIO). This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

May 29 2020

1hr 29mins

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Capital Flow Cycles: a long global view [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Carmen M. Reinhart | Join us for the Economica-Phillips Lecture which will be delivered by Carmen M. Reinhart. Carmen M. Reinhart (@carmenmreinhart) is the Minos A. Zombanakis Professor of the International Financial System at Harvard Kennedy School. Carmen has been appointed as the new Vice President and Chief Economist of the World Bank Group, a position she will take up on 15 June. Carmen was Senior Policy Advisor and Deputy Director at the International Monetary Fund and Chief Economist the investment bank Bear Stearns in the 1980s. She serves in the Advisory Panel of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and was a member of the Congressional Budget Office Panel of Economic Advisors. Her work has helped to inform the understanding of financial crises in both advanced economies and emerging markets. Her best-selling book (with Kenneth S. Rogoff) entitled This Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly documents the striking similarities of the recurring booms and busts that have characterised financial history. It has been translated to over 20 languages and won the Paul A. Samuelson Award. Based on publications and scholarly citations, Reinhart is ranked among the top economists worldwide according to Research Papers in Economics (RePec). She has been listed among Bloomberg Markets Most Influential 50 in Finance, Foreign Policy’s Top 100 Global Thinkers, and Thompson Reuters' The World's Most Influential Scientific Minds. In 2018 she was awarded the King Juan Carlos Prize in Economics and NABE’s Adam Smith Award, among others. Francesco Caselli is Norman Sosnow Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE.

May 28 2020

1hr 24mins

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Data–driven Responses to COVID–19: opportunities and limitations [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Seeta Peña Gangadharan, Dr Orla Lynskey, Dr Alison Powell, Dr Edgar Whitley | With many activities moving online, there is growing pressure to implement a range of data–driven responses as “obvious” solutions to various COVID–19 concerns. These range from contact tracing to address the spread of the disease, through the use of AI in the dashboards that allocate health resources to identifying and supporting vulnerable individuals. This panel will review the opportunities and limitations of data–driven responses to COVID–19 from a legal, societal and technical perspective, highlighting the risks of exclusion and discrimination that can arise. Seeta Peña Gangadharan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. She researches data and discrimination and will discuss what data–driven responses all too often leave out including institutional capacity issues and precariously positioned members of society.
Orla Lynskey (@lynskeyo) is an Associate Professor and joined LSE Law in September 2012. Orla conducts research in the fields of technology regulation and digital rights, with her primary focus being on EU data protection and privacy law. She will focus on the safeguards offered by data protection and human rights law for the use of data in pandemics and assess the potential and possible limitations of these safeguards. Alison Powell is Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. She leads the JUST AI initiative in conjunction with the Ada Lovelace Institute and the AHRC. She will reflect on how AI that is ethical, works for the common good and is effectively governed and regulated can operate to address Covid–19 responses, and how issues of vulnerability, solidarity and risk have been reshaped through this crisis. Edgar Whitley is Associate Professor (Reader) of Information Systems at LSE and is a data governance expert and will speak to the challenges of identifying and supporting vulnerable individuals through data sharing in government. Susan Scott is Associate Professor (Reader) of Information Systems in the Department of Management. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

May 28 2020

1hr 16mins

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Addressing the Pandemic: the pharmaceutical challenges [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Kalipso Chalkidou, Dr Panos Kanavos, Professor Margaret Kyle, Professor Ken Shadlen | The panel will examine a range of issues related to the development and use of vaccines and treatments for COVID-19, including the range of incentives for innovation and national approaches to purchasing, price negotiations, and intellectual property and trade policies. Kalipso Chalkidou (@kchalkidou) is the Director of Global Health Policy and a Senior Fellow at the Center for Global Development. Previously, she was the Director of Global Health and Development Group at the Institute of Global Health Innovation, Imperial College London, helping governments build technical and institutional capacity for improving the value for money of their healthcare investment. She is interested in how local information, local expertise, and local institutions can drive scientific and legitimate healthcare resource allocation decisions whilst improving patient outcomes. She has been involved in the Chinese rural health reform and also in national health reform projects in the USA, India, Colombia, Turkey and the Middle East, working with the World Bank, PAHO, DFID and the Inter-American Development Bank as well as national governments. Between 2008 and 2016 she founded and ran NICE International, a non-profit group within the UK’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). Panos Kanavos is Associate Professor of International Health Policy in the Department of Health Policy (LSE), Deputy Director at LSE Health, and Programme Director of the Medical Technology Research Group (MTRG). He is an economist by training, and teaches health economics, pharmaceutical economics and policy, health care financing, health care negotiations, and principles of health technology assessment Margaret Kyle is Chair in Intellectual Property and Markets for Technology at MINES ParisTech. Her research concerns innovation, productivity and competition. She has a number of papers examining R&D productivity in the pharmaceutical industry, specifically the role of geographic and academic spillovers; the firm-specific and policy determinants of the diffusion of new products; generic competition; and the use of markets for technology. Recent work examines the effect of trade and IP policies on the level, location and direction of R&D investment and competition. She also works on issues of innovation and access to therapies in developing countries. Ken Shadlen is Professor of Development Studies and Head of Department in the Department of International Development at LSE. He researches the global politics of intellectual property, with a particular focus on understanding both the drivers of variation in pharmaceutical patent patent systems in developing countries, and the consquences of such variation for biomedical innovation, access to drugs, and health policies. Ernestina Coast is Professor of Health and International Development in the Deptartment of International Development. Her research is multidisciplinary and positioned at an intersection of social science approaches including health, gender and development. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic.

May 26 2020

1hr 28mins

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Responding to a Pandemic: the view from Latin America [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Laura Chinchilla, Ricardo Lagos, Juan Manuel Santos, Dr Ernesto Zedillo | Latin America is being hit by the virus and by a number of adverse economic shocks. How can the region’s democracies preserve both lives and livelihoods? What will be the impact on the region’s already low economic growth and high inequality?
Five former Latin American heads of state bring their knowledge and experience to bear on these difficult questions. Fernando Henrique Cardoso served two terms as President of Brazil from 1995 to 2002, having previously served as a senator, Minister of Foreign Relations and Minister of Finance. Mr Cardoso has been a member of The Elders since the group was founded in 2007, stepping down from a front line role in 2016. Laura Chinchilla (@Laura_Ch) is a political scientist, who graduated from college at the Universidad de Costa Rica. She also holds a Master in Public Policy from Georgetown University. Her election in 2010 for a four year term as President of the Republic of Costa Rica was preceded by a political career which began with her appointment as Minister of Public Security between 1996 and 1998. Between 2002 and 2006 she was elected member of the National Congress. In 2006 she was elected Vice President of Costa Rica, assuming office as the Ministry of Justice at the same time. Ricardo Lagos is the former President of Chile, who held the office from 2000 to 2006. An economist and lawyer by qualification, he worked as an economist for the United Nations from 1976–1984. In the 1990s, R. Lagos served in Chile under President Aylwin and his successor, President Eduardo Frei, as both Education Minister and Minister of Public Works. Juan Manuel Santos (@JuanManSantos) is the former President of the Republic of Colombia, serving two terms, from 2010 to 2018. In 2016 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He is a member of The Elders and a Honorary Graduate of LSE. President Santos studied for a Master of Science in the Department of Economics at LSE in 1975. Ernesto Zedillo was President of Mexico from 1994 to 2000. Dr. Zedillo’s was named Under-Secretary of Planning and Budget Control in the Secretariat of Budget and Planning in 1987, becoming the Secretary of Economic Programming in 1988. In 1992, Dr. Zedillo was appointed Secretary of Education. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy.

May 22 2020

1hr 44mins

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Targeted Lockdowns and the Road to COVID-19 Recovery [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Michael Whinston | This talk will look at how optimal targeted lockdown strategies shift the frontier of society’s choices in this crisis. Michael Whinston is BP Visiting Professor at LSE Economics, and Professor of Economics and Sloan Fellows Professor of Management at MIT. John Sutton is Emeritus Professor of Economics and MSc Economics and Management Programme Director at LSE. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at LSE, is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching.

May 22 2020

1hr 14mins

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COVID-19 and its Impact on Euro Atlantic Security [Audio]

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Speaker(s): General Sir James Everard, Dr Nathalie Tocci, Peter Watkins | COVID-19 will have more than just a major impact on social and economic life. It threatens to reshape the global security environment and the Euro Atlantic world that emerged in 1989. An expert panel will discuss the future of NATO and the critical US/Europe security partnership from which the western alliance draws its strength. James Everard served as the Deputy Chief of Defence Staff for Military Strategy and Operation (UK), Commander UK Field Army and finally as the Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Europe (NATO).
Nathalie Tocci (@NathalieTocci) is Director of the Istituto Affari Internazionali and is special adviser to the EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs Josep Borrell. Peter Watkins is an Associate Fellow for Chatham House and a Visiting Senior Fellow with LSE IDEAS. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. This event in the series has been organised by LSE IDEAS. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

May 21 2020

1hr 30mins

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Assessing the Impact of COVID-19: from mortality to misery? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Paul Dolan, Dr Daisy Fancourt, Lord O'Donnell, Professor Carol Propper | In the current crisis, government policies, such as physical distancing, are paying enormous attention to the mortality risks of COVID-19 to the exclusion of the wellbeing hits borne elsewhere (e.g. mental health, loneliness, domestic violence, child welfare, physical health, and addiction). Is this as it should be when lives are at stake? If not, what can be done to ensure that misery is placed on a more equal footing with mortality? Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is Head of Department in Psychological and Behavioural Science and Director of the EMSc in Behavioural Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After. Daisy Fancourt (@Daisy_Fancourt) is Associate Professor of Psychobiology & Epidemiology and Wellcome Research Fellow in the Psychobiology Group, Department of Behavioural Science & Health at UCL. Daisy studied at Oxford University and King’s College London before completing her PhD in psychoneuroimmunology at UCL. Richard Layard is Emeritus Professor of Economics at LSE. is a labour economist who worked for most of his life on how to reduce unemployment and inequality. He is also one of the first economists to work on happiness, and his main current interest is how better mental health could improve our social and economic life. Gus O'Donnell (@Gus_ODonnell) is chairman of Frontier Economics and the former cabinet secretary and head of the Home Civil Service. Carol Propper is Professor of Economics at Imperial College London. She is an author of an IFS report on the health consequences of responses to COVID-19. Julia Black is currently LSE's Strategic Director of Innovation and a Professor of Law in the Department of Law at LSE. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science.

May 21 2020

1hr 28mins

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Government Assistance to Struggling Businesses in the COVID-19 Crisis [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Erica Bosio, Dr Juanita Gonzalez-Uribe, Professor Dimitri Vayanos | What has been the initial response of governments during the COVID-19 crisis as regards assistance to businesses? How can firms survive during an extensive period of lockdown? What government programmes show promise? This panel will explore the immediate government actions in the early stages of the health crisis and chart a plausible path to the economic recovery phase. This path includes, inter alia, a standstill on insolvency procedures, credit guarantee programmes for business, faster payments on public procurement projects and a likely corporate debt restructuring scheme. Erica Bosio is the Program Manager of the Growth Analytics unit in the Development Economics Vice Presidency of the World Bank. Her work focuses primarily on public procurement. Between 2012 and 2019, she was a member of the Doing Business team leading the research on contract enforcement and the development of the latest indicator on public procurement. Prior to joining the World Bank Group, Erica worked in the arbitration and litigation department of Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton in Milan. She holds a Master of Laws (LL.M.) from Georgetown University and a degree in law from the University of Turin (Italy). Juanita Gonzalez-Uribe is an assistant professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). Her research focuses on entrepreneurship, innovation, and private equity. Her work in these areas has been published in top academic journals including the Review of Financial Studies, and the Journal of Financial Economics. Her work has won several prizes including the Juan Fernandez de Araoz Prize for Best Paper in Corporate Finance, the Coller Prize Award, and the Kauffman Dissertation Award. She has also won several research grants including the NBER Innovation Policy Grant and the NBER Entrepreneurship Grant. Juanita earned a PhD in Finance and Economics from Columbia University, and, a Master in Economics and a Bachelor in Economics and Mathematics from Universidade de los Andes (Colombia). Prior to her PhD studies, Juanita worked as a junior researcher at the Central Bank of Colombia. Dimitri Vayanos is Professor of Finance at the London School of Economics and Political Science, where he also directs the Financial Markets Group and the Paul Woolley Centre for the Study of Capital Market Dysfunctionality. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, a Director and former Managing Editor of the Review of Economic Studies, a Research Fellow at CEPR and a former Director of its Financial Economics program, a Research Associate at NBER, a former Director of the American Finance Association, and a former Head of LSE's Finance Department. Simeon Djankov (@SimeonDjankov) is Co-Director for Policy and Research Fellow at the Financial Markets Group, LSE. He was deputy prime minister and minister of finance of Bulgaria from 2009 to 2013. Prior to his cabinet appointment, Djankov was chief economist of the finance and private sector vice presidency of the World Bank.

May 19 2020

1hr 40mins

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COVID-19: the economic policy response [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Adnan Khan, Professor Ricardo Reis, Professor Silvana Tenreyro | This panel will review the challenges that both advanced and developing countries face around the COVID-19 pandemic crisis. The virus and the resulting lockdown are a tremendous adverse shock to the economy. Policy must respond to save lives and to prevent lasting damage to livelihoods and productivity. This panel will review the challenges that both advanced and developing countries face, and suggest some feasible ways forward. Adnan Khan (@adnanqk) is Professor in Practice at LSE's School of Public Policy. Before joining the School of Public Policy and STICERD, Professor Khan served as Research and Policy Director at the International Growth Centre at the LSE for ten years. During 2018-19, he was a Visiting Lecturer of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. Ricardo Reis (@R2Rsquared) is the Arthur Williams Phillips Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. Recent honors include the 2016 Bernacer prize for best European economist under the age of 40 working in macroeconomics and finance, and the 2017 Banque de France / Toulouse School of Economics junior prize in monetary economics, finance, and bank supervision for a researcher of any nationality based in Europe. Professor Reis is an academic consultant at the Bank of England and the Federal Reserve system, he directs the ESRC Centre for Macroeconomics in the UK, is a recipient of an ERC grant from the EU, and serves on the council or as an advisor of multiple organisations. Silvana Tenreyro is Professor in Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE and an external member of the Monetary Policy Committee at the Bank of England. She obtained her MA and PhD in Economics from Harvard University. Before joining the Bank, she was co-Director and Board member of the Review of Economic Studies and Chair of the Women’s Committee of the Royal Economics Society. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

May 18 2020

1hr 34mins

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The Great Reversal in the Time of COVID-19 [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Thomas Philippon, Dr Angelo Martelli | In his new book, which he will talk about at this event, Thomas Philippon argues that many key problems of the American economy are due not to the flaws of capitalism or the inevitabilities of globalisation but to the concentration of corporate power. By lobbying against competition, the biggest firms drive profits higher while depressing wages and limiting opportunities for investment, innovation, and growth. How is COVID-19 affecting these patterns? Thomas Philippon (@ThomasPHI2) is the Max L. Heine Professor of Finance at the Stern School of Business at New York University. His new book is The Great Reversal: How America Gave Up on Free Markets. You can order the book (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Angelo Martelli (@angelo_martelli) is Assistant Professor in European and International Political Economy in the European Institute at LSE. Piroska Nagy Mohacsi (@NagyMohacsi) is Programme Director in the Institute of Global Affairs (IGA) This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the European Institute, the Institute of Global Affairs and the LSE School of Public Policy. The next event in this series will take place at 4pm on 18 May on COVID-19: the economic policy response. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.

May 13 2020

1hr 29mins

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Transboundary Crisis Management in Europe in the Wake of COVID-19 [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Arjen Boin, Dr Lydie Cabane, Professor Martin Lodge, Professor Nick Sitter | COVID-19 represents a critical transboundary crisis: it knows no territorial boundaries, and it fundamentally challenges the boundaries of state action. Many national responses to the pandemic have caused transboundary crises in themselves. Given this fundamental challenge, what are the emerging lessons for political crisis leadership? What can we say about the resilience of liberal democratic political systems? And what lessons can be drawn for multi-level crisis management? This event brings together leading experts to consider lessons for political leadership in crisis, the future nature of multi-level crisis management in Europe as well as the wider challenges presented by the pandemic for the legitimacy of liberal democratic political systems. Arjen Boin (@arjenboin) is Professor of Public Institutions and Governance at the Institute of Political Science, Leiden University. Professor Boin is a leading expert in crisis management and leadership. Lydie Cabane (@CabaneLydie) is an Assistant Professor in Governance of Crises at the Institute for Security and Global Affairs at Leiden University, with an interdisciplinary background in sociology and political science. Martin Lodge (@MartinLodge) is Professor of Political Science and Public Policy in the Department of Government at LSE and co-director of carr. He also coordinated the TransCrisis project. Nick Sitter (@SitterNick) is Professor of Public Policy at the CEU, Professor of Political Economy at the BI Norwegian Business School, and a Research Associate at LSE's Centre for Analysis of Risk and Regulation. Nick holds a PhD, MSc and BSc (Econ) from the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is a leading authority on populism and democratic backsliding in the EU. Andrea Mennicken (@mennicken) is Associate Professor of Accounting and co-director of carr. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. The Department of Accounting (@LSE_Accounting) is one of the leading groups in the world for teaching and research on the economic, institutional and organisational aspects of accounting and financial management. The Centre for Analysis of Risk and Regulation (@carr_LSE) is an interdisciplinary research unit, whose core intellectual work focuses on the organisational and institutional settings for risk management and regulatory practices. The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is a world-leading centre for study and research in politics and government. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

May 13 2020

1hr 33mins

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Behavioural Science in the Context of Great Uncertainty [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Nick Chater, Professor Liam Delaney, Professor Paul Dolan, Professor Ulrike Hahn, Dr Grace Lordan | The impacts of COVID-19 and how we deal with them hinge on how politicians, firms and the public respond. What lessons can we learn from behavioural science about how we act in a time of crisis characterised by great uncertainty? What lessons can behavioural science learn about how it can be best placed to provide guidance in an uncertain world? Answers to these questions are crucial to not only mitigating the impacts of COVID-19 but also to dealing better with future crises, not only caused by viruses but also by other shocks. Nick Chater (@NickJChater) is Professor of Behavioural Science, University of Warwick. He is on the advisory board to the Behavioural Insights Team. Liam Delaney (@LiamDelaneyEcon) is Professor of Behavioural Science at University College Dublin and has been advising the Irish Government on its response to COVID-19. He will be joining LSE later this year. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is Head of Department in Psychological and Behavioural Science and Director of the EMSc in Behavioural Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After. Ulrike Hahn is Professor of Psychological Science at Birkbeck College. She has been at the forefront of attempts to reconfigure behavioural science to deal with COVID-19. Grace Lordan (@GraceLordan_) is Associate Professor in Behavioural Science and the founding Director of The Inclusion Initiative at LSE. Julia Black is currently LSE's Strategic Director of Innovation and a Professor of Law in the Department of Law at LSE. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. The next event in this series will take place at 4pm on 13 May on Transboundary Crisis Management in Europe in the Wake of COVID-19. The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world.

May 13 2020

1hr 28mins

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Strategic Leadership in the Time of COVID-19 [Audio]

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Speaker(s): David H. Petraeus, Professor Michael Barzelay, Dr Shirley Yu | General Petraeus will develop his model of strategic leadership, developed during a senior military career and as leader of a large government agency, and what it implies for management in the context of a pandemic. David Petraeus is Partner at KKR and Chairman of the KKR Global Institute. General (Ret) David H. Petraeus (New York) joined KKR in June 2013 and is Chairman of the KKR Global Institute, which supports KKR’s investment committees, portfolio companies, and investors with analysis of geopolitical and macro-economic trends, as well as environmental, social, and governance issues. Prior to joining KKR, David Petraeus served over 37 years in the U.S. military, culminating his career with six consecutive commands, five of which were in combat, including command of coalition forces during the Surge in Iraq, command of U.S. Central Command, and command of coalition forces in Afghanistan. Following his service in the military, Gen. Petraeus served as the Director of the CIA. Michael Barzelay is Professor of Public Management in LSE's Department of Management. His book, Preparing for the Future: Strategic Planning in the U.S. Air Force, won the Louis Brownlow Book Award of the US National Academy of Public Administration. A past consultant for many public officials and organisations, his most recent book is Public Management as a Design-Oriented Professional Discipline. Shirley Yu (@shirleyzeyu) is Senior Visiting Fellow in the Institute of Global Affairs at LSE and an Asia fellow with the Ash Center of Harvard Kennedy School. She has a Ph.D. in political economy from China’s Peking University, and a Master’s degree in Government from Harvard University. She has published three books in Chinese, including On China, by Ambassadors, and the Rise of the RMB and the Fall of the Yen. She also serves as a mentor for Cherie Blair’s Foundation for International Women. Erik Berglof (@ErikBerglof) is Director of the Institute of Global Affairs in LSE's School of Public Policy. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. This event in the series has been organised by the Institute of Global Affairs, the Department of Management and the LSE School of Public Policy. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

May 11 2020

1hr 36mins

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Assessing the Economic Impact of COVID-19 [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Paul De Grauwe, Dr Simeon Djankov, Professor Panos Tsakloglou, Dr Miranda Xafa | What does Europe need to do to recover from the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic? And, what are the implications of the crisis for Greece’s economy, still vulnerable after the debt crisis? This panel will explore the challenges, scenarios and implications of action taken at the European level and how these resonate in terms of domestic strategies in one of the euro-zone’s still most critical economies. What can we expect of the recovery? Paul De Grauwe (@pdegrauwe) is John Paulson Chair in European Political Economy European Institute. Prior to joining LSE, Paul De Grauwe was Professor of International Economics at the University of Leuven, Belgium. He was a member of the Belgian parliament from 1991 to 2003 Simeon Djankov (@SimeonDjankov) is Research Fellow, Financial Markets Group, LSE. He was deputy prime minister and minister of finance of Bulgaria from 2009 to 2013. Prior to his cabinet appointment, Djankov was chief economist of the finance and private sector vice presidency of the World Bank. Panos Tsakloglou is a Professor in the Athens University of Economics and Business, Greece and Visiting Professor at the Hellenic Observatory, LSE. His research focuses on questions related to the redistributive role of the state (inequality, poverty, social exclusion, taxation and transfers in kind) and the labour market. During the period 2012-2014 he was Chairman of the Greek Government’s Council of Economic Advisors and member of the EU Economic and Financial Committee (EFC) and Eurogroup Working Group (EWG) as well as alternate member of Ecofin and Eurogroup. He has also been Social Policy advisor to Prime Ministers G. Papandreou (2010-2011) and L. Papademos (2011-2012) and a member of the EU Economic Policy Committee (EPC, 2010-2011). Miranda Xafa (@MXafa) started her career as an economist at the International Monetary Fund and moved on to senior positions in government and in the financial sector in Athens and London. She served as chief economic advisor to Prime Minister Constantine Mitsotakis in 1991-93 and worked as a market analyst for Salomon Brothers/Citigroup in London for a decade before returning to Washington to serve as a member of the IMF Executive Board in 2004-09. She is currently the CEO of E.F. Consulting Ltd and a senior scholar at the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI). Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics and the Director of the Hellenic Observatory The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute. Backed by its 179-year participation in the country's economic and social life, NBG is one of the leading Greek financial organisations, with strong tradition and noteworthy contribution to the economic and social transformation of Greece. The Bank’s broad customer base, respected brand name, strong market share in deposits and enhanced capital adequacy ratios secure it with the liquidity needed to finance Greek businesses and reflect the long-standing relationship of trust it enjoys with its clientele.

May 07 2020

1hr 28mins

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The Economics of Biodiversity [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Sir Partha Dasgupta | Humanity has prospered immensely in recent decades, but this has been coupled with profound impacts on biodiversity. This presents significant risks to our economies and way of life, as well as those of future generations. Partha Dasgupta is leading an independent, global review on the Economics of Biodiversity, commissioned by HM Treasury. The final Review will report in the autumn, and ahead of the COP15 international biodiversity summit due to take place in Kunming, China, where new long-term biodiversity targets will be agreed, and ahead of the COP26 climate summit. Minouche Shafik will discuss and explore with Professor Dasgupta the sustainability of humanity’s engagement with nature: what we take from it; how we transform what we take from and return to it; why we have disrupted nature’s processes; and what we must do differently to enhance our collective wealth and wellbeing, and that of our descendants. Partha Dasgupta is a pioneer in the field of environmental economics. He is Frank Ramsey Emeritus Professor of Economics at the University of Cambridge and Chair of the Management Board of its Centre for the Study of Existential Risk. He was named Knight Bachelor by the Queen for services to economics in 1992 and is the recipient of numerous prizes including the Blue Planet Prize (2015) which recognises outstanding contributions to the improvement of the global environment. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBiodiversity

May 07 2020

54mins

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COVID-19 and Deglobalisation [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Peter Watkins, Professor Linda Yueh | COVID-19 was a significant supply shock for the global economy, among other things. With nations protecting their borders and even limiting some trade, will this accelerate a move toward deglobalisation? How should countries position themselves in a world where the US and China are also de-coupling? What does it mean for UK foreign and economic policies? Peter Watkins is an Associate Fellow for Chatham House and a Visiting Senior Fellow with LSE IDEAS. Linda Yueh (@lindayueh) is Chair of the LSE Economic Diplomacy Commission and Visiting Professor at LSE IDEAS. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Apr 30 2020

1hr 28mins

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Uneven Excelence

By Slanebrain - Jan 09 2020
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The good podcasts are stratospheric but I’m afraid that the others . . . .

Engaging Thoughtful Content

By SlipperySnake321 - Oct 28 2019
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Access to thoughtful experts, great questions, and overall a great learning opportunity. Thank you!