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LSE: Public lectures and events

Updated 6 days ago

Rank #9 in Courses category

Education
Courses
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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

Read more

The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

iTunes Ratings

183 Ratings
Average Ratings
128
26
13
8
8

Engaging Thoughtful Content

By SlipperySnake321 - Oct 28 2019
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Access to thoughtful experts, great questions, and overall a great learning opportunity. Thank you!

Many eye-opening, mind-expanding lectures by a great variety of speakers from around the world

By Listener Erik - May 17 2011
Read more
I am so glad LSE's live lectures and events podcasts are back!

iTunes Ratings

183 Ratings
Average Ratings
128
26
13
8
8

Engaging Thoughtful Content

By SlipperySnake321 - Oct 28 2019
Read more
Access to thoughtful experts, great questions, and overall a great learning opportunity. Thank you!

Many eye-opening, mind-expanding lectures by a great variety of speakers from around the world

By Listener Erik - May 17 2011
Read more
I am so glad LSE's live lectures and events podcasts are back!

Listen to:

Cover image of LSE: Public lectures and events

LSE: Public lectures and events

Updated 6 days ago

Read more

The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

The Coddling of the American Mind [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Jonathan Haidt | A timely investigation into the new safety culture in universities and the dangers it poses to free speech, mental health, education, and ultimately democracy. This event marks the launch of Jonathan's new book, The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure. Jonathan Haidt (@JonHaidt) is a social and cultural psychologist and the Thomas Cooley Professor of Ethical Leadership at New York University's Stern School of Business. He is the author of The Righteous Mind and The Happiness Hypothesis. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is currently Professor of Behavioural Science at the LSE. He is Head of Department in Psychological and Behavioural Science and Director of LSE's Executive MSc Behavioural Science. LSE's Behavioural Science Hub (@LSEBehavioural) is a collaboration across the School in all things behavioural. Its two main goals are to provide a platform to highlight existing behavioural science related activities at LSE and further develop the capacity for top quality research into human behaviour. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHaidt Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at The Coddling of the American Mind. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Nov 23 2018

1hr 24mins

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Adam Smith: what he thought, and why it matters [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Jesse Norman MP | At a time when economics and politics are both increasingly polarized between left and right, this book, Adam Smith: What He Thought, and Why it Matters, which Jesse Norman will discuss at this event, returns to intellectual first principles to recreate the lost centre of public debate. It offers a Smithian analysis of contemporary markets, predatory capitalism and the 2008 financial crash; it addresses crucial issues of inequality, human dignity and exploitation; and it provides a compelling explanation of why Smith is central to any attempt to defend and renew the market system. Jesse Norman MP (@Jesse_Norman) studied at Oxford, before completing a Masters and PhD in Philosophy at University College London. Before entering politics, he ran an educational project in Communist Eastern Europe and was a Director at Barclays. He has also been an Honorary Fellow at UCL, a Governor of the National Institute for Economic and Social Research, and a Visiting Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford. His previous books include a celebrated study of Edmund Burke. He currently serves as Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for the Department for Transport. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.

Jul 09 2018

1hr 3mins

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LSE IQ Ep 21 | Can we afford our consumer society? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Rebecca Elliott, Professor Ian Gough, Dr Rodolfo Leyva | Welcome to LSE IQ, the monthly podcast from the London School of Economics and Political Science. This is the podcast where we ask some of the leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. For this LSE IQ we have something slightly different for you – an 'live' episode recorded in front of an audience at LSE at the beginning of November 2018. Economic growth has helped millions out of poverty. The jobs it creates mean rising incomes and consumers who buy more. This drives further growth and higher living standards, including better health and education. Yet WWF, the World Wildlife Fund, has recently warned that exploding human consumption is the driving force behind unprecedented planetary change, through increased demand for energy, land and water. Plastics and microplastics are filling our oceans and rivers and entering the food chain. The production of goods and services for household use is the most important cause of greenhouse gas emissions. The textile industry is responsible for depleting and polluting water resources and committing human rights abuses against its workers. It is also a major source of greenhouse gases, and three fifths of all clothing produced ends up in incinerators or landfills within a year of being made. For this episode of LSE IQ Jo Bale and Sue Windebank ask, 'Can we afford our consumer society?'. This episode features: Dr Rebecca Elliott, Assistant Professor, LSE’s Department of Sociology; Professor Ian Gough, Visiting Professor at LSE’s Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion and an Associate at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment; and Dr Rodolfo Leyva, LSE Fellow in LSE’s Department of Media Communications. For further information about the podcast visit lse.ac.uk/iq and please tell us what you think using the hashtag #LSEIQ.

Dec 19 2018

1hr 11mins

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Texas, Trump and the Future of America [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Lawrence Wright | Come learn about the most controversial state in America and what it tells us about Donald Trump and the future of the US. This event marks the publications of Lawrence's new book, God Save Texas: A Journey into the Future of America. Lawrence Wright (@lawrence_wright) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, screenwriter, playwright and a staff writer for The New Yorker magazine. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The United States Centre (@LSE_US) at LSE is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America.

May 15 2018

1hr 22mins

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Future Politics: living together in a world transformed by tech [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Jamie Susskind | Jamie Susskind will discuss the publication of his latest book, Future Politics: Living Together in a World Transformed by Tech. At this event, Jamie will discuss how digital technology, from AI to virtual reality, will transform politics and society. He will mention how digital technology will be used to exert control by the state and by big tech firms. This talk will challenge the audience to rethink the meaning of democracy and justice, freedom and equality, power, and property. The great political debate of the last century was about how much of our collective life should be determined by the state and what should be left to the market and civil society. In the future, the question will be how far our lives should be directed and controlled by powerful digital systems - and on what terms? Jamie Susskind (@jamiesusskind) is an author, speaker, and practising barrister. A past Fellow of Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, he studied history and politics at Magdalen College, Oxford, graduating first in his year before turning to the law. Tony Travers is the Associate Dean of LSE’s School of Public Policy and a Professor in the Department of Government. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSETech

Nov 06 2018

1hr 29mins

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The Bullshitisation of the Economy Has Only Just Begun: pointless labour, digitisation, and the revolt of the caring classes [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor David Graeber | The proliferation of useless forms of employment in the professional-managerial sector has placed enormous pressure on the caring professions, leading to a major social conflagration. David Graeber (@davidgraeber) is Professor of Anthropology at the LSE and author of Bullshit Jobs: a Theory. Deborah James is Professor of Anthropology at the LSE. LSE Anthropology @LSEAnthropology is world famous and world leading. We are ranked top Anthropology department in the Guardian League Tables 2018. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGraeber This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.

Oct 17 2018

1hr 12mins

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The Great Delusion: liberal dreams and international realities [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor John Mearsheimer | In this lecture John Mearsheimer explains why US foreign policy so often backfires and what can be done to set it straight. John Mearsheimer is the R. Wendell Harrison Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is now in its 91st year, making it one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. They are ranked 5th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2018 tables for Politics and International Studies. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGreatDelusion

Jan 17 2019

1hr 31mins

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Paul Dolan: happy ever after [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Paul Dolan, Professor Tali Sharot | Paul Dolan launches his new book, Happy Ever After, exploring the narratives society installs in us, using good evidence to debunk bad stories. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the LSE where he currently serves as head of the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. Tali Sharot is a Professor Cognitive Neuroscientist at the Department of Experimental Psychology, University College London, where she is the director of the Affective Brain Lab. Julia Black is Professor of Law at the Department of Law, LSE. PBS@LSE (@PsychologyLSE @LSEBehavioural) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world.

Jan 24 2019

1hr 23mins

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A Short History of Europe [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Sir Simon Jenkins | Simon Jenkins discusses his latest book, A Short History of Europe and the lessons to be learned from European history. Simon Jenkins is a Guardian columnist, author and BBC broadcaster. Simon Glendinning (@lonanglo) is Head of the European Institute and Professor in European Philosophy. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

Feb 12 2019

1hr 24mins

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Capitalism, Alone: the future of the system that rules the world [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Branko Milanovic | We are all capitalists now. For the first time in human history, the globe is dominated by one economic system. In his book Capitalism, Alone, which he will discuss in this lecture, economist Branko Milanovic explains the reasons for this decisive historical shift since the days of feudalism and, later, communism. Surveying the varieties of capitalism, he asks: What are the prospects for a fairer world now that capitalism is the only game in town? His conclusions are sobering, but not fatalistic. Branko Milanovic explains how capitalism gets much wrong, but also much right—and it is not going anywhere. Our task is to improve it. Branko Milanovic (@BrankoMilan) is Visiting Presidential Professor and LIS Senior Scholar at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. He will join the International Inequalities Institute at LSE in 2020 as Centennial Professor. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. An economist by training, Dame Minouche Shafik has spent most of her career straddling the worlds of public policy and academia. After completing her BSc in economics and politics at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, she took an MSc in economics at LSE before completing a DPhil in economics at St Antony’s College at the University of Oxford. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWealth This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

Oct 23 2019

1hr 15mins

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The Levelling: what's next after globalisation [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Michael O'Sullivan | The liberal, globalised world order is withering according to Michael O'Sullivan in his new book The Levelling: What's Next After Globalization which he will talk about in this lecture. The levelling is the process of ironing out imbalances like indebtedness and inequality, and proposing new ideas and frameworks to kickstart the next world order. The Levelling will involve the levelling of political accountability and responsibility between political leaders and “the people”, the levelling of institutional power—away from central banks and defunct twentieth-century institutions such as the WTO and IMF and toward new treaties (on risk and monetary policy) and new institutions (for example, a truly effective and powerful climate body and an institution or agreement that oversees cybersecurity). It will also involve the levelling out of wealth between rich and poor countries and between the very rich and “the rest,” preferably with “the rest” enjoying both better organic growth and a greater share of this growth. Then the levelling out of power between nations and regions is what the concept of the multipolar world is about, and within it, different regions will have different reserves of power. Michael O’Sullivan, is the former chief investment officer at Credit Suisse. Michael joined Credit Suisse in July 2007 from State Street Global Markets. Prior to joining Credit Suisse, Michael spent over ten years as a global strategist at a number of sell-side institutions and has also taught finance at Princeton and Oxford Universities. He was educated at University College Cork in Ireland and Balliol College in Oxford, where he obtained M.Phil and D.Phil degrees as a Rhodes Scholar. He was an independent member of Ireland's National Economic Social Council from 2011 to 2016 Thomas Sampson is an Associate Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSELevelling

Jun 27 2019

1hr 25mins

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LSE Festival 2018 | The Future of Ageing [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Rebeca Aldunate, Nicci Gerrard, Professor Michael Murphy, Jane Vass | With the average life expectancy increasing from 66.7 in 1942 to 81.25 in 2017, and set to continue, population ageing is poised to become one of the most significant social transformations of the 21st century. This panel discusses how ageing could come to dominate the giant issue of health and social care, and potentially all areas of the welfare state. Rebeca Aldunate is Director of the Biotechnology School, Faculty of Science at Universidad Santo Tomás, Chile. Nicci Gerrard (@FrenchNicci) is the co-author, with Sean French, of the bestselling Nicci French psychological thrillers and has written six novels under her own name, including The Winter House and Missing Persons. She was on the staff of The Observer for many years and still writes for that paper, in 2016 winning the Orwell Prize for 'Exposing Britain's Social Ills'. She is also a co-founder of John’s Campaign, that fights for more compassionate care in hospital for people with dementia, and a humanist celebrant. Michael Murphy is Professor of Demography in the Department of Social Policy at LSE, having joined the School in 1980. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, the United Kingdom's national academy for the humanities and the social sciences. He has acted as an adviser to UK and US Governments, and international organisations, such as EU, UN and OECD. His current research areas include demographic modelling of ageing and mortality trends, social care and living arrangements and well-being of older people. Jane Vass is Director of Policy and Research at Age UK since April 2015. Prior to this Jane was Head of Public Policy at Age UK from 2012, having joined Age UK’s predecessor, Age Concern England as Financial Services Policy Adviser in 2006. Carrie Friese (@CarrieFriese) is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at LSE. Her research is in medical sociology and science and technology studies, with a focus on reproduction across humans and animals. Update, Wednesday 21 February: Due to unforeseen circumstances, Olivia Casanueva and Joanna Latimer are no longer able to speak at this event, but we are delighted to be joined by Rebeca Aldunate.

Feb 22 2018

59mins

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Crashed: how a decade of financial crises changed the world [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Adam Tooze | In September 2008 the Great Financial Crisis, triggered by the collapse of Lehman brothers, shook the world. A decade later its spectre still haunts us. As the appalling scope and scale of the crash was revealed, the financial institutions that had symbolised the West's triumph since the end of the Cold War, seemed - through greed, malice and incompetence - to be about to bring the entire system to its knees. In this talk Adam Tooze will talk about his new book, Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World. Crashed is an analysis of what happened and how we were rescued from something even worse - but at a price which continues to undermine democracy across Europe and the United States. Gnawing away at our institutions are the many billions of dollars which were conjured up to prevent complete collapse. Over and over again, the end of the crisis has been announced, but it continues to hound us - whether in Greece or Ukraine, whether through Brexit or Trump. Adam Tooze (@adam_tooze) is the author of The Deluge and The Wages of Destruction.The Wages of Destruction won the Wolfson Prize for History and the Longman-History Today Book of the Year Prize. He has taught at Cambridge and Yale and is now Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Professor of History at Columbia University. He is an alumnus of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Tim Frost is a Chair of credit asset manager Cairn Capital and a Trustee of Step Change the debt charity. He served in the British Army in Germany and the Falkland Islands and ran a hostel for homeless people before spending 15 years at JP Morgan, where he helped to establish the credit derivatives business. Tim is an Emeritus Governor and alumnus of the London School of Economics and Political Science, and was appointed a Director of the Bank of England in 2012.

Aug 23 2018

1hr 25mins

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The Value of Everything: making and taking in the global economy [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Mariana Mazzucato | In her new book, The Value of Everything, which she will discuss in this lecture, Mariana Mazzucato, argues that if we are to reform capitalism, we urgently need to rethink where wealth comes from. Which activities are creating it, which are extracting it, and which are destroying it? Answers to these questions are key if we want to replace the current parasitic system with a type of capitalism that is more sustainable, more symbiotic: that works for us all. Mariana Mazzucato (@MazzucatoM) is Professor in the Economics of Innovation and Public Value at University College London (UCL) where she is also Founder and Director of the Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose. She is author of the highly-acclaimed book The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs. Private Sector Myths, and winner of the 2014 New Statesman SPERI Prize in Political Economy, the 2015 Hans-Matthöfer-Preis and the 2018 Leontief Prize for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought. She advises policymakers around the world on how to deliver 'smart', inclusive and sustainable growth. She was named as one of the '3 most important thinkers about innovation' in the New Republic. Wouter den Haan is Co-director for the Centre for Macroeconomics and Professor of Economics at LSE. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.

Apr 23 2018

1hr 21mins

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LSE Festival 2018 | What's Love Got to Do with It? Loneliness, Relationships and Wellbeing [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Paul Dolan | Loneliness is one of the giant issues we are facing as a society today. Our relationships with other people are fundamental to our wellbeing, but what kinds of relationships make us happy or miserable? How should individuals decide when to ‘make or break’ a relationship? Why is the term love often misunderstood and misconstrued? How do social policies influence people’s relationships, such as by encouraging marriage and discouraging divorce – and how should they, if at all? Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at LSE, Director of Executive MSc Behavioural Science and Head of the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. There are two main themes to Paul’s work: Developing measures of happiness and subjective wellbeing that can be used in policy and by individuals looking to be happier; and considering ways in which the lessons from the behavioural sciences can be used to understand and change individual behaviour, and to add to the evidence base in this regard. He uses a range of data and methods to address these issues, and to better integrate them e.g. surveys, big data, lab studies, and field experiments. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book, Happiness by Design and the forthcoming The Narrative Trap, in which he talks about how the stories we tell about how we ought to live our lives harm us. Suzi Godson (@suzigodson) is a psychologist and journalist. She has been The Times sex and relationships columnist for fifteen years and is the author of several award winning books. She is currently conducting a longitudinal PhD study exploring the impact of midlife divorce on women with adult children. Last September she launched the multi award winning MeeTwo app, a safe, scalable, early intervention solution to the growing problem of adolescent anxiety. MeeTwo helps teenagers to talk about difficult things and encourages young people to help themselves, by helping each other. MeeTwo is free to use and is available on the App Store and Google Play

Feb 24 2018

1hr

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LSE Festival 2018 | The Future of Work [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Rebecca Campbell, Ruth Reaney, Dr Jamie Woodcock | If William Beveridge was to return to the East End, what would he make of it today? The welfare state has changed significantly in the 75 years since the publication of the Beveridge report, but so has the structure of the economy and the kinds of work that people do today. There is continuity with work, but there is also change: in some ways moving backwards, in other ways radically transforming. This panel session brings together academics from LSE’s Employment Relations and Human Resource Management Faculty Research Group to debate what Beveridge 2.0 would involve for work and how work could change in the future, to provoke a broader discussion on what is happening with work today. Rebecca Campbell is a teacher and graduate researcher in the Department of Management at LSE. Her research focuses on employment and pension decision-making. Ruth Reaney is an LSE Fellow in the Department of Management at LSE. She specialises in work and employment and her current research concerns trade union response to decreasing institutional security. Jamie Woodcock (@jamie_woodcock) is an LSE Fellow in the Department of Management. His current research focuses on the digital economy, the transformation of work, and eSports. Jamie completed his PhD in Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London and has held positions at Goldsmiths, the University of Leeds, the University of Manchester, Queen Mary, NYU London, and Cass Business School. David Marsden is Professor of Industrial Relations in the Department of Management and an Associate in the Labour Markets Research Programme within the Centre for Economic Performance. The Employment Relations and Human Resource Management Faculty Group within LSE’s Department of Management conducts research and teaching in the institutional and strategic context of work and employment. LSE’s Department of Management informs and inspires better management in practice by challenging and extending the understanding of people, teams, organisations and markets, and the economic, psychological, social, political and technological contexts in which they operate worldwide.

Feb 22 2018

56mins

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The Meritocracy Trap [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Daniel Markovits | Merit is not a genuine excellence but rather a pretence, constructed to rationalise an offensive distribution of advantage. Merit, in short, is a sham. The meritocratic ideal—that social and economic rewards should track achievement rather than breeding—anchors the self-image of the age. Aristocracy has had its day, and meritocracy is now a basic tenet of civil religion in all advanced societies. Meritocracy promises to promote equality and opportunity by opening a previously hereditary elite to outsiders, armed with nothing save their own talents and ambitions. But today, middle-class children lose out to rich children at school, and middle-class adults lose out to elite graduates at work. At the same time, meritocracy entices an anxious and inauthentic elite into a pitiless, lifelong contest to secure income and status through its own excessive industry. In spite of its promises, meritocracy in fact installs a new form of aristocracy, purpose-built for a world in which the greatest source of income and wealth is not land but human capital and free labor. And merit is not a genuine excellence but rather—like the false virtues that aristocrats trumpeted in the ancien régime—a pretense, constructed to rationalize an offensive distribution of advantage. Daniel Markovits is Guido Calabresi Professor of Law at Yale Law School and Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Private Law. Markovits works in the philosophical foundations of private law, moral and political philosophy, and behavioral economics. He publishes in a range of disciplines, including in Science, The American Economic Review, and The Yale Law Journal. Markovits’s latest book, The Meritocracy Trap, places meritocracy at the center of rising economic inequality and social and political dysfunction. The book takes up the law, economics, and politics of human capital to identify the mechanisms through which meritocracy breeds inequality and to expose the burdens that meritocratic inequality imposes on all who fall within meritocracy’s orbit. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is the Sir Anthony Atkinson Chair in Economics and Director of STICERD. This event is the Morishima Lecture. This lecture series is held in honour of Professor Michio Morishima (1923-2004), Sir John Hicks Professor of Economics at LSE and STICERD's first chairman. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy.

May 08 2019

1hr 31mins

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Good Economics for Hard Times [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Esther Duflo | Join us for the Stamp Memorial Lecture which will be delivered by the 2019 joint winner of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences Esther Duflo who will be speaking about her new book Good Economics for Hard Times: Better Answers to Our Biggest Problems. Most of the issues that tear us apart today (from trade to immigration to Brexit) are, fundamentally, economic issues, but no one seems to be willing to listen to economists any more. In this lecture, based on her forthcoming book with Abhijit Banerjee with the same title, Professor Duflo will outline how a humane economics, that puts the individual and its wants and needs at the centre of its intellectual project, can guide a better conversation on the core problems that our generations need to resolve, from climate change, to nationalist rivalries, to the rise in inequality. Esther Duflo is the Abdul Latif Jameel Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics in the Department of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a co-founder and co-director of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL). In her research, she seeks to understand the economic lives of the poor, with the aim to help design and evaluate social policies. She has worked on health, education, financial inclusion, environment and governance. Professor Esther Duflo’s first degrees were in history and economics from Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris. She subsequently received a Ph.D. in Economics from MIT in 1999. Duflo has received numerous academic honors and prizes including the 2019 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences (awarded jointly with Abhijit Banerjee and Michael Kremer), the Princess of Asturias Award for Social Sciences (2015), the A.SK Social Science Award (2015), Infosys Prize (2014), the David N. Kershaw Award (2011), a John Bates Clark Medal (2010), and a MacArthur “Genius Grant” Fellowship (2009). With Abhijit Banerjee, she wrote Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty, which won the Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award in 2011 and has been translated into more than 17 languages. Duflo is the Editor of the American Economic Review, a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy. To pre-order a copy of Esther's new book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Good Economics for Hard Times. Robin Burgess is Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE and Director of the International Growth Centre. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEStamp This lecture is in memory of Josiah Charles Stamp who obtained a degree in economics from LSE in 1916. His thesis was published as British Incomes and Property in 1916 and launched his academic career. In 1919 he served on the Royal Commission on Income Tax and in the same year he joined Nobel Industries Ltd as secretary and director from which Imperial Chemical Industries later developed. In 1926 he became the president of the executive of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway and two years later he was appointed director of the Bank of England. He also served as a governor and vice chairman of LSE. Stamp also held lectureships in economics at several universities, including Cambridge, Oxford and Liverpool. In 1938 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Stamp of Shortlands, Kent. Stamp died on 16 April 1941. In 1942 a trust was set up jointly by the Bank of England, the London Midland and Scottish Railway, ICI and the Abbey Road Building Society to pay for the organisation of a Stamp memorial lecture.

Nov 05 2019

1hr 16mins

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The Future of Capitalism [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Sir Paul Collier | Following the publication of his latest book, The Future of Capitalism, Paul Collier will discuss this book and his wider work. Paul Collier is Professor of Economics and Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government and a Professorial Fellow of St Antony’s College. From 1998–2003 he took a five-year Public Service leave during which he was Director of the Research Development Department of the World Bank. He is currently a Professeur invité at Sciences Po and a Director of the International Growth Centre. He has written for the New York Times, the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. His research covers the causes and consequences of civil war; the effects of aid and the problems of democracy in low-income and natural resources rich societies; urbanisation in low-income countries; private investment in African infrastructure and changing organisational cultures. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy. Founded in 1978 by the renowned Japanese economist Michio Morishima, with donations from Suntory and Toyota, we are a thriving research community within the LSE.

Oct 12 2018

1hr 18mins

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LSE Festival 2018 | Five LSE Giants' Perspectives on Poverty [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Tania Burchardt, Professor Sir John Hills, Professor Stephen P Jenkins, Professor Lucinda Platt | Taking five ‘Giants’ in the study of poverty over the last 100 years, themselves, like Beveridge, authors of influential reports, this event discusses how their thinking articulates with Beveridge’s vision and has advanced our understanding of poverty and how to tackle it. This event focuses on Beveridge’s Giant of ‘want’. It addresses the thinking on poverty of five ‘Giants’ in the study of poverty over the last 100 years, who have been closely associated with LSE and who are themselves authors or co-authors of influential reports: Beatrice Webb, Brian Abel-Smith, Peter Townsend, Amartya Sen and Anthony Atkinson. It explores how their thinking both articulates with the concepts and propositions of Beveridge in his report, and has transformed the ways in which we think about poverty and how to address it. The event draws on the insights of current LSE academics known for their work on poverty and inequality. Lucinda Platt will discuss Beatrice Webb’s ‘Minority Report on the Poor Laws’ of 1909, which was deemed to be highly influential on Beveridge’s thinking and the break with the Poor Laws expressed in his report. John Hills will shed light on the ‘rediscovery of poverty’ marked by the publication of Brian Abel-Smith and Peter Townsend’s 1966 work on ‘The Poor and The Poorest’, the corrective this provided to the somewhat over-optimistic interpretation of the achievements of the welfare state in eliminating poverty, and how it foregrounded Townsend’s subsequent development of the relational and ‘relative’ conception of poverty. Tania Burchardt will analyse the distinctive contribution of Amartya Sen to how we understand poverty across very different contexts, in her consideration of the 2009 Report by the Commission on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress (coauthored with Joseph Stiglitz and Jean-Paul Fitoussi). Finally, Stephen Jenkins will evaluate the significance of the Atkinson Commission’s 2015 Report on Monitoring Global Poverty to how we conceptualize and address poverty in a global context. Tania Burchardt is Director of the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) and an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Policy at LSE. John Hills is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at LSE, co-director of the LSE’s interdisciplinary International Inequalities Institute and is currently Chair of CASE. Stephen P Jenkins is Professor of Economic and Social Policy, in the Department of Social Policy at LSE. Lucinda Platt is Professor of Social Policy and Sociology in the Department of Social Policy at LSE. Lucinda’s research focuses on inequalities, with a particular focus on ethnicity and migration, as well as gender, disability, identity, and child poverty. Paul Gregg is a Professor of Economic and Social Policy, and Director of the Centre for Analysis and Social Policy at the University of Bath.

Feb 24 2018

1hr 42mins

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January 31, 1953 and 9/11: living with risk [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Paul Embrechts | In its broad interpretation, “risk” is omnipresent in modern society. What does science, in particular mathematics, have to offer in a societal discourse on the topic? During the night of January 31 - February 1, 1953, a heavy winter storm battered the coastal areas of South West Holland and South East England killing over 2000 people. As a consequence, the Dutch started their famous Delta project. Paul Embrechts will discuss some of the scientific discourse related to the ensuing dike building process. The Twin Towers attack of 9/11 yields a very different kind of risk which will be contrasted with the flood event. Some methodological links to the financial crisis of 2006-2008 will be highlighted. The talk concludes with a discussion on the public communication and understanding of risk and the need for more interdisciplinary research. Paul Embrechts is Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at the ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich) where he taught insurance and financial mathematics. Jan van den Heuvel (@JanvadeHe) is Head of the Department of Mathematics at LSE. The Department of Mathematics is internationally recognised for its teaching and research in the fields of discrete mathematics, game theory, financial mathematics and operations research. Twitter Hashtag for this

Dec 04 2019

1hr 24mins

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Understanding Chilean Unrest: inequalities, social conflict and political change in contemporary Chile [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Emmanuelle Barozet, Dr Diana Kruger | Why has Chile been experiencing its larger protests since the return to democracy? What is behind the demands of its citizens? It’s been just over a month of continuous protests in Chile. What began as a challenge to metro fare hikes has become a general outcry, questioning structural inequalities in Chile. Traditionally perceived as the most stable country in the Latin American region, Chile is now challenging the way its model has worked in the last 40 years. From how education, housing, pensions, or health services operate, to even change the current constitution inherited from Augusto Pinochet’s dictatorship (1973-1990). Drawing from the researched done by COES, this discussion will examine the causes and consequences of the recent protests, as well as possible routes ahead. Emmanuelle Barozet is a Full Professor at the University of Chile and Associate Researcher of the COES. Diana Kruger is an Associate Professor at Adolfo Ibañez University and Associate Researcher of the COES. Kirsten Sehnbruch (@KirstenSehn) is British Academy Global Professor and Distinguished Policy Fellow at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.

Nov 28 2019

1hr 30mins

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How Freedom of Choice Influences Well-being [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Simona Botti | Does choice freedom always enhance satisfaction? Lab experiments help tackle this question, but when should they be used and how have techniques evolved over time? Hear from Simona Botti, Professor of Marketing at London Business School, as she explores the pros and cons of using lab experiments to explain human behaviour around decision-making and choice. Laboratory experiments are one of the many tools available to researchers to help them understand the consequences of making free choices. They can be used in isolation, or in combination with other methods. Simona will draw on practical examples from her own research into perceived personal control and choice freedom. She will share some of the lessons she has learned and provide insight into how experimental research has evolved over time. Simona Botti is Professor of Marketing at the London Business School. She joined LBS in 2007 after two years as Assistant Professor of Marketing at the S.C. Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University. She received an undergraduate degree in Business Administration from Bocconi University in Milan, Italy, and a MBA and PhD in Marketing from the University of Chicago. Professor Botti’s research focuses on consumer behaviour and decision making, with particular emphasis on the psychological processes underlying perceived personal control and how exercising control (freedom of choice, power, information) influence consumers’ satisfaction and well-being. Her work has been published in leading psychology and consumer behaviour journals, including the Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and Psychological Science. She is Associate Editor at Journal of Consumer Psychology and Journal of Consumer Research. Barbara Fasolo is Associate Professor of Behavioural Science at LSE's Department of Management. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEChoices

Nov 28 2019

1hr 24mins

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From 1919 to 2019: pivotal lessons from Versailles [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Barry Buzan, Professor Margaret MacMillan, Professor David Stevenson, Professor Linda Yueh | A panel of distinguished scholars will here discuss the legacy of the First World War, the Versailles Peace Treaty which followed, and why the treaty has been so hotly debated ever since by critics and defenders alike. This event will also mark the relaunch of John Maynard Keynes’s justly famous The Economic Consequences of the Peace, first published in December 1919 and now republished with a new, definitive introduction by Professor Michael Cox, Director of LSE IDEAS. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to The Economic Consequences of the Peace. Barry Buzan is Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE (formerly Montague Burton Professor); honorary professor at Copenhagen, Jilin, and China Foreign Affairs Universities, and the University of International Relations in Beijing; a Senior Fellow at LSE IDEAS; and a Fellow of the British Academy. Margaret MacMillan became the fifth Warden of St Antony’s College in July 2007, and stepped down in October 2017. Prior to taking on the Wardenship, Professor MacMillan was Provost of Trinity College and professor of History at the University of Toronto. David Stevenson is Professor of International History at LSE. His main fields of interests lie in international relations in Europe during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; origins, course, and impact of the First World War. Linda Yueh (@lindayueh) is Visiting Professor at LSE IDEAS and Chair of the LSE Economic Diplomacy Commission. She is Fellow in Economics at St Edmund Hall, Oxford University and Adjunct Professor of Economics at London Business School as well as Associate Fellow (Global Economy and Finance Department & U.S. and the Americas Programme) at Chatham House and was Visiting Professor of Economics at Peking University. She is a widely published author and Editor of the Routledge Economic Growth and Development book series. Her latest book, The Great Economists: How Their Ideas Can Help Us Today is The Times's Best Business Books of the Year. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEVersailles

Nov 28 2019

1hr 32mins

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French Muslims in Perspective: nationalism, post-colonialism and marginalisation under the Republic [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Fiona Adamson, Dr Joseph Downing | Joseph Downing will present his latest book on Muslims in France in a comparative social, political and media perspective. Fiona Adamson is Reader in International Relations at SOAS. Joseph Downing (@JosephDowning1) is Fellow in Nationalism in the European Institute, LSE and author of French Muslims in Perspective: Nationalism, Post-Colonialism and Marginalisation under the Republic. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to French Muslims in Perspective. Dr. Angelo Martelli is an Assistant Professor in European and International Political Economy in the European Institute at LSE.The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

Nov 27 2019

1hr 26mins

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Universal Basic Income and Universal Basic Services: the case for radical change [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Anna Coote, Professor Louise Haagh | What are the arguments for Universal Basic Income and for Universal Basic Services? How do they relate to each other and what might the difficulties be? Anna Coote is Principle Fellow at the New Economics Foundation. Louise Haagh is Professor in Politics at the University of York. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@rmilibandlse) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.

Nov 26 2019

1hr 26mins

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Understanding Scientific Understanding [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Henk W de Regt | Lakatos Award winner Henk W de Regt will deliver his lecture on his book Understanding Scientific Understanding. The Lakatos Award is given for an outstanding contribution to the philosophy of science, widely interpreted, in the form of a book published in English during the previous five years. Henk W de Regt (@RegtHenk) is Professor of Philosophy of Natural Sciences, Institute for Science in Society, Radboud University Nijmegen. Roman Frigg is Professor of Philosophy in the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, Director of the Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science (CPNSS), and Co-Director of the Centre for the Analysis of Time Series (CATS) at the London School of Economics and Political Science. The Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method (@LSEPhilosophy) at LSE was founded by Professor Sir Karl Popper in 1946, and remains internationally renowned for a type of philosophy that is both continuous with the sciences and socially relevant. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSELakatosAward

Nov 22 2019

1hr 24mins

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Do Clothes Maketh the Human? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Shahidha Bari, Yashka Moore, Professor Heather Widdows | Does fashion allow us to express our individuality or is it a case of the Emperor’s new clothing? Can we judge a book by its cover or is beauty just another manifestation of sexist and racist ideals? Does is even make sense to think of our judgements about beauty as being ethically right or wrong? Whether you wear your heart on your sleeve for fashion or think beauty should be given the boot, join us to discuss the cultural, political, and philosophical dimensions of fashion and beauty. Shahidha Bari (@ShahidhaBari) is Fellow of the Forum for Philosophy and Professor of Fashion Cultures, UAL and author of Dressed. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Dressed. Yashka Moore (@YASHKAMOORE) is a fashion designer. Heather Widdows (@ProfWiddows) is John Ferguson Professor of Global Ethics, University of Birmingham and author of Perfect Me. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Perfect Me. Founded in 1996, the Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) is a non-profit organization that has gained widespread recognition for its work as initiator and sponsor of engaging and thoughtful events that facilitate wider participation in academic philosophy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum

Nov 20 2019

1hr 18mins

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The Future of Football in Europe: access and sustainability [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Alasdair Bell, Umberto Gandini, Ebru Koksal, Gabriele Marcotti | Football is the world’s most popular sport; Europe is the continent with the biggest leagues and home to FIFA and UEFA, the most powerful governing bodies in the sport. A panel of high profile experts from the world of journalism, elite clubs, regulatory bodies, and playing the game will discuss issues of access and equality, financial sustainability, and the best ways of making the game future-proof. Alasdair Bell is Deputy Secretary General of FIFA. Umberto Gandini (@UmbertoGandini) is Vice Chairman of the European Club Association; former CEO of AS Roma and former CEO of AC Milan. Ebru Koksal is Chair of Women in Football and Former FIFA and UEFA Consultant. Gabriele Marcotti (@Marcotti) is Senior Writer for ESPN and a correspondent for Italian sports newspaper Corriere dello Sport. Chris Anderson (@soccerquant) is Professor in European Politics and Policy at LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

Nov 19 2019

1hr 34mins

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Britain and the Welfare State in the 21st Century: a more or less "irresponsible society"? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor John Hills, Dr Sonia Exley, Professor Howard Glennerster | In November 1959, Richard Titmuss, Head of the then Department of Social Science and Administration (now Social Policy) at LSE, gave a lecture on ‘The Irresponsible Society’. In it he pointed to the features of Britain in the late 1950s that added up to irresponsibility: the power of unaccountable financial interests; the way ‘welfare for the better-off’ undermined social security; the view of education simply as economic investment; irresponsible newspapers; and the tolerance of inequality. Sixty years on from the lecture John Hills, Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at LSE will discuss how we might judge today’s society by similar – and new – criteria. John Hills is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy, LSE. Sonia Exley is Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Policy, LSE. Howard Glennerster is Emeritus Professor of Social Policy, LSE. Anne West is Professor of Education Policy in the Department of Social Policy, LSE. The Department of Social Policy (@LSESocialPolicy) provides top quality international and multidisciplinary research and teaching on social and public policy challenges facing countries across the world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIrresponsibleSociety

Nov 14 2019

1hr 31mins

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Mobilising for Sustainable Peace in Afghanistan: a global mothers' campaign [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Sahraa Karimi, Anne-Claire de Liedekerke, Staffan de Mistura, Rahela Sidiqi, Marika Theros | As talks between the US and Taliban raise hopes for peace in Afghanistan, mothers are mobilising inside and outside the country to hold on to their right to educate their daughters. Sahraa Karimi is a film director living in Afghanistan. She comes from the 2nd generation of refugees who fled Afghanistan for a new life in Iran. Sahraa has received huge acclaim for her fiction feature debut film "Hava, Maryam, Ayesha” that had its world premiere at the recent Venice Film Festival. Shot entirely in Kabul with Afghan actors, the film reflects Karimi’s desire to “go beyond [Western] clichés, and to find new stories, new perspectives” about life as an Afghan woman. Anne-Claire de Liedekerke (@MMM4Mothers) is President of Make Mothers Matter - MMM is an international NGO that believes in the power of mothers to make the world a better place and supports the worldwide campaign in solidarity with Afghan mothers. Staffan de Mistura is Former Under-Secretary-General & UN Special Envoy for Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq and Lebanon. Rahela Sidiqi (@FarkhundaTrust) is Founding Director of Farkhunda Trust for Afghan Women’s Education. Marika Theros (@meeksas) is Research Fellow at the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit, LSE. The Conflict and Civil Society Unit ( @LSE_CCS) builds on the work of the Civil Society and Human Security unit and was renamed in 2017 to reflect the changing focus of the research being undertaken. The core concern of the unit remains the desire to better understand the ways in which ordinary people seek to shape the decisions that affect their lives, with a particular focus on those experiencing conflict, prolonged violence, or war. The Department of International Development (@LSE_ID) was established in 1990 as the Development Studies Institute (DESTIN) to promote interdisciplinary postgraduate teaching and research on processes of social, political and economic development and change. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMothers

Nov 13 2019

1hr 30mins

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Despotic Data: how authoritarian regimes are driving technology and innovation [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Noam Yuchtman | Data has become crucial in the production of our goods and services, particularly when it comes to the production of new technology and innovation such as artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML). Access to data is often a bottleneck in the development of AI and ML. Whilst authoritarian regimes are considered to hinder innovation, they benefit from having access to large amounts of data which in the democratic world depends on strict laws and cultural perceptions around privacy. Hear from Noam Yuchtman, recipient of the British Academy’s Global Professorship and Professor of Managerial Economics and Strategy at LSE, as he explains the reasons why authoritarian regimes – such as China – are becoming world leaders in technology, innovation and artificial intelligence. Noam Yuchtman is Professor of Managerial Economics and Strategy at LSE's Department of Management. John Van Reenen (@johnvanreenen) is Ronald Coase Chair in Economics and School Professor, Department of Economics, LSE. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEDespoticData This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

Nov 13 2019

1hr 26mins

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"We, the People?" Some Thoughts from Our Past on Contemporary European Populism [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Michael Burleigh | What can history contribute to an understanding of contemporary European populism, which is now as much in power as insurgent? Is this just a reprise of what we have seen before, or something that reveals deeper problems with liberal democracy and capitalism in the post-financial crisis era? The lecture will focus on continental Europe with Brexit Britain, joining Putin’s Russia in the second lecture, taking place in January. Professor Michael Burleigh is the first Engelsberg Chair for 2019/20 at LSE IDEAS. Michael is a historian who focuses primarily on Nazi Germany. He is the author of The Third Reich: a new history, which won the 2001 Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction. His most recent book is The Best of Times, the Worst of Times. He has also won a British Film Institute Award for Archival Achievement and a New York Film and Television Festival Award Bronze Medal. Christopher Coker is Director of LSE IDEAS and Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPopulism

Nov 12 2019

1hr 31mins

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Women vs Capitalism: why we can't have it all in a free market economy [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Vicky Pryce | The free market as we know it cannot produce gender equality. This is the bold but authoritative argument of Vicky Pryce, the government’s former economics chief. Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Adviser, Centre for Economics and Business Research and an alumna of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her new book is Women vs Capitalism: Why We Can't Have It All in a Free Market Economy. Vicky's recent posts have included: Senior Managing Director at FTI Consulting; Director General for Economics at the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS); and Joint Head of the UK Government Economics Service where she was responsible for evidence based policy and for encouraging measures that promoted greater productivity in the UK economy. She had previously been Partner and Chief Economist at KPMG and earlier held chief economist positions in banking and the oil sector. Vicky co-founded GoodCorporation, a company set up to promote corporate social responsibility. At various stages in her career she has been on the Council of the Royal Economic Society, on the Council of the University of Kent, on the board of trustees at the RSA, on the Court of the London School of Economics and Political Science, a fellow of the Society of Business Economists, on the Executive Committee and the Council of the IFS, an Academician of the Academy of Social Sciences, a Visiting Professor at the Cass Business School, a Visiting Fellow at Nuffield College, Adjunct Professor at Imperial College and Visiting Professor at Queen Mary, University of London. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Women vs Capitalism: Why We Can't Have It All in a Free Market Economy. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy, LSE. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.

Nov 11 2019

1hr 28mins

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Sovereignty as Responsibility [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Jennifer Welsh | At the annual Martin Wight memorial lecture, Professor Jennifer Welsh will talk about Sovereignty as Responsibility, previewing her new book on this theme. The event will be preceded by a drinks reception from 6.30pm in The Garrick (downstairs). All are welcome. Jennifer M. Welsh is the incoming Canada 150 Research Chair in Global Governance and Security at McGill University (Montreal, Canada). She was previously Professor and Chair in International Relations at the European University Institute (Florence, Italy) and Professor in International Relations at the University of Oxford, where she co-founded the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict. From 2013-2016, she served as the Special Adviser to the UN Secretary General, Ban Ki-moon, on the Responsibility to Protect. Karen E Smith is a Professor of International Relations and Head of the Department of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Director of the European Foreign Policy Unit (within the International Relations Department). The International Relations (IR) Department (@LSEIRDept) is one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. We are ranked 4th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2019 tables for Politics and International Studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWightMemorial

Nov 11 2019

1hr 4mins

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Unbound: how inequality constricts our economy and what we can do about it [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Heather Boushey | Do we have to choose between equality and prosperity? Many think that reducing economic inequality would require such heavy-handed interference with market forces that it would stifle economic growth. Heather Boushey, one of Washington’s most influential economic voices, insists nothing could be further from the truth. Presenting cutting-edge economics with journalistic verve, she shows how rising inequality has become a drag on growth and an impediment to a competitive United States marketplace for employers and employees alike. Boushey makes this case with a clear, accessible tour of the best of contemporary economic research, while also injecting a passion for her subject gained through years of research into the economics of work–life conflict and policy work in the trenches of federal government. Unbound exposes deep problems in the U.S. economy, but its conclusion is optimistic. We can preserve the best of our nation’s economic and political traditions, and improve on them, by pursuing policies that reduce inequality—and by doing so, boost broadly shared economic growth. Heather Boushey (@HBoushey) is President and CEO of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth and former Chief Economist on Hillary Clinton’s transition team. She is the author of Finding Time: The Economics of Work-Life Conflict and coeditor of After Piketty: The Agenda for Economics and Inequality (both from Harvard). The New York Times has called Boushey one of the “most vibrant voices in the field” and Politico twice named her one of the top 50 “thinkers, doers, and visionaries transforming American politics.” Dr Tahnee Ooms (@TahneeOoms) is a researcher at the International Inequalities Institute whose research focusses on how capital incomes feed back into rising overall income and wealth inequality, with a specific focus on the measurement of economic inequality using quantitative methods, and how to shape and communicate findings in a way they can be of practical use for policy and the real world. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.

Nov 08 2019

1hr 24mins

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Tackling Britain's Social Mobility Problem [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Sanchia Berg, Professor Lee Elliot Major | What can we do to improve Britain’s low social mobility - one of the most pressing issues facing young people growing up today? Boris Johnson continues a tradition that has stood for generations. Every Prime Minister since the end of World War Two who has attended an English University has attended just one institution: Oxford. Meanwhile 100,000s of children leave school each year without the basics to get on in life. Britain suffers from low social mobility. But how can we improve it? Our panel will discuss potential solutions, and you the audience will vote on the solution. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Social Mobility And Its Enemies. Sanchia Berg (@Sanchia7) is a senior BBC reporter/correspondent. She works on Radio 4's Today Programme and on BBC2's Newsnight, specialising in Education and Social Affairs. Lee Elliot Major (@Lem_Exeter) is Professor of Social Mobility, University of Exeter and Visiting Senior Fellow, LSE. Stephen Machin (@s_machin_) is Professor of Economics and Director of the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE. CEP (@CEP_LSE) is an interdisciplinary research centre at the LSE. Established by the ESRC in 1990, is now one of the leading economic research groups in Europe. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESocialMobility

Nov 07 2019

1hr 29mins

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Good Economics for Hard Times [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Esther Duflo | Join us for the Stamp Memorial Lecture which will be delivered by the 2019 joint winner of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences Esther Duflo who will be speaking about her new book Good Economics for Hard Times: Better Answers to Our Biggest Problems. Most of the issues that tear us apart today (from trade to immigration to Brexit) are, fundamentally, economic issues, but no one seems to be willing to listen to economists any more. In this lecture, based on her forthcoming book with Abhijit Banerjee with the same title, Professor Duflo will outline how a humane economics, that puts the individual and its wants and needs at the centre of its intellectual project, can guide a better conversation on the core problems that our generations need to resolve, from climate change, to nationalist rivalries, to the rise in inequality. Esther Duflo is the Abdul Latif Jameel Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics in the Department of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a co-founder and co-director of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL). In her research, she seeks to understand the economic lives of the poor, with the aim to help design and evaluate social policies. She has worked on health, education, financial inclusion, environment and governance. Professor Esther Duflo’s first degrees were in history and economics from Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris. She subsequently received a Ph.D. in Economics from MIT in 1999. Duflo has received numerous academic honors and prizes including the 2019 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences (awarded jointly with Abhijit Banerjee and Michael Kremer), the Princess of Asturias Award for Social Sciences (2015), the A.SK Social Science Award (2015), Infosys Prize (2014), the David N. Kershaw Award (2011), a John Bates Clark Medal (2010), and a MacArthur “Genius Grant” Fellowship (2009). With Abhijit Banerjee, she wrote Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty, which won the Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award in 2011 and has been translated into more than 17 languages. Duflo is the Editor of the American Economic Review, a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy. To pre-order a copy of Esther's new book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Good Economics for Hard Times. Robin Burgess is Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE and Director of the International Growth Centre. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEStamp This lecture is in memory of Josiah Charles Stamp who obtained a degree in economics from LSE in 1916. His thesis was published as British Incomes and Property in 1916 and launched his academic career. In 1919 he served on the Royal Commission on Income Tax and in the same year he joined Nobel Industries Ltd as secretary and director from which Imperial Chemical Industries later developed. In 1926 he became the president of the executive of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway and two years later he was appointed director of the Bank of England. He also served as a governor and vice chairman of LSE. Stamp also held lectureships in economics at several universities, including Cambridge, Oxford and Liverpool. In 1938 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Stamp of Shortlands, Kent. Stamp died on 16 April 1941. In 1942 a trust was set up jointly by the Bank of England, the London Midland and Scottish Railway, ICI and the Abbey Road Building Society to pay for the organisation of a Stamp memorial lecture.

Nov 05 2019

1hr 16mins

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This Is Not Propaganda [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Joanna Kavenna, Dr Martin Moore, Peter Pomerantsev | Post-truth, disinformation, bots, trolls, ISIS, Putin, Trump….we live in a world of media manipulation run amock. To understand the new propaganda, and what to do about it, we need to grasp both the cultural and technological dynamics in play, which is what this panel sets out to do. Peter Pomerantsev, author of This is Not Propaganda – Adventures in the War Against Reality will be joined by Joanna Kavenna, author of new tech-dystopian novel Zed, and Dr Martin Moore of Kings College London, author of Democracy Hacked: How Technology is Destabilising Global Politics, to grapple with both the philosophical and computational dramas of the disinformation age. Joanna Kavenna is a British novelist, essayist and travel writer. She is the author of The Ice Museum, Inglorious (which won the Orange Prize for New Writing), The Birth of Love, Come to the Edge and A Field Guide to Reality. Her writing has appeared in the New Yorker, Guardian, Observer, Telegraph, Spectator, London Review of Books and New York Times and she has held writing fellowships at St Antony's College Oxford and St John's College Cambridge. In 2011 she was named as one of the Telegraph's 20 Writers Under 40 and in 2013 was listed as one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists. To pre-order a copy of Joanna's new book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Zed. Martin Moore (@martinjemoore) is Senior Lecturer in Political Communication Education and Director of the Centre for the Study of Media, Communication and Power at King’s College London. Prior to this he was a Senior Research Fellow in the Policy Institute at King’s. Before joining King’s, Martin was the founding director of the Media Standards Trust (MST), an independent charity dedicated to fostering high standards in the news media, from 2006-2015. During this time the MST won a Prospect Think Tank of the Year Award (2011) and a Knight News Challenge award (2008). He completed his doctorate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2004, where he subsequently taught undergraduates in history. Before completing his doctorate, Martin spent over a decade working in media and communications – with the BBC, Channel 4, NTL, AT&T and others. Sophia Gaston (@sophgaston) is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Global Affairs, LSE. She is a social and political researcher, who conducts international projects on public opinion, specialising in both qualitative fieldwork and quantitative analysis. Sophia’s work is especially focused on social and political change, populism, the media and democracy - with a focus on threats to governance in Western nations. She is also an Academic Fellow at the European Policy Centre in Brussels, and the Managing Director of the British Foreign Policy Group. Previously, Sophia was the Director of the Centre for Social and Political Risk, and the Deputy Director and Head of International Research at Demos think tank. She has previously also held research and strategic roles in a range of UK and international NGOs, the civil service, and private sector, including working as a political speechwriter in Premier & Cabinet in Australia. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts.

Nov 05 2019

1hr 25mins

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The Case for the Green New Deal [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Ann Pettifor | To protect the systems that sustain life on earth, we need to do more than just reimagine the economy – we have to change everything. From one of the original thinkers of the program that helped ignite the US Green New Deal campaign, Ann Pettifor explains how we can afford what we can do. We have done it before – and can do it again. Ann Pettifor (@AnnPettifor) is the Director of Prime, an Honorary Research Fellow at City University, a Research Associate at SOAS and a Fellow of the New Economics Foundation. Her new book is The Case for the Green New Deal. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to The Case for the Green New Deal. Sam Fankhauser is Director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPettifor This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

Nov 04 2019

1hr 21mins

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