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(9)
Science

Planet Earth

Updated 4 days ago

Science
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We bring you the highlights of NERC's Planet Earth Podcast

Read more

We bring you the highlights of NERC's Planet Earth Podcast

iTunes Ratings

9 Ratings
Average Ratings
6
1
1
0
1

Amzing, authentic, informative listen!!

By BryskiB - Feb 08 2012
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The fact that these guys are on location when recording this is so reassuringly real! I love hearing them crunching across a pebble beach or the echo of humans speaking in a laboratory while they discuss, in concise detail and with genuine enthusiasm, the latest discoveries and breakthroughs in a plethora of different fields of nature and science.

iTunes Ratings

9 Ratings
Average Ratings
6
1
1
0
1

Amzing, authentic, informative listen!!

By BryskiB - Feb 08 2012
Read more
The fact that these guys are on location when recording this is so reassuringly real! I love hearing them crunching across a pebble beach or the echo of humans speaking in a laboratory while they discuss, in concise detail and with genuine enthusiasm, the latest discoveries and breakthroughs in a plethora of different fields of nature and science.

Listen to:

Cover image of Planet Earth

Planet Earth

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

We bring you the highlights of NERC's Planet Earth Podcast

Rank #1: Climate tipping points, basking sharks, primates - Planet Earth Podcast - 13.01.08

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This week in the Planet Earth Podcast: why understanding where plankton congregates can help us protect basking sharks and other marine creatures; how primates planning ahead tells us about our own intelligence; and how to predict dangerous climate tipping points.

Jan 08 2013

19mins

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Rank #2: The deep sea, ancient proteins, Arctic research - Planet Earth Podcast - 11.10.11

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This week in the Planet Earth Podcast - how scientists find out about life in the oceans' deepest trenches; how identifying proteins from 50 milion year old reptile skin could help us store radioactive waste; and studying the effects of climate change in the Arctic.

Oct 13 2011

20mins

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Rank #3: Oil palm plantations and coral reefs - Planet Earth Podcast - 10.09.09

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Coral reefs are among the most beautiful habitats in the world. As well as being rich in biodiversity, they're vital for the local economies that depend on them for fishing, tourism or protection from storms.While most of us are aware that ocean acidification is bad for coral reefs, scientists are now finding that coral communities are facing other threats from climate change.Richard Hollingham meets three coral reef experts to find out more - not in some tropical paradise but in the basement of a 1960s towerblock at the University of Essex.Later in the programme we hear from two insect experts at the University of Cambridge, who explain why it might be wise for oil palm producers to nurture patches of rainforest close to and among their plantations.We also find out why scientists think an asteroid caused the extinction of the dinosaurs, rather than huge volcanoes, why global warming could lead to more male turtles than female turtles and how household waste is being linked with pollution in rivers.

Sep 09 2010

56mins

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Rank #4: Red squirrels and a tropical Antarctica - Planet Earth Podcast - 10.12.09

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Red squirrels used to be the most common squirrel in Britain. But since the grey squirrel was introduced from the USA as an illegal immigrant in the late 1800s, their numbers have nose-dived. This is partly because the greys out-compete red squirrels for food: they feed on the ground and can digest unripe acorns, which red squirrels can't. But it's not just food; grey squirrels brought a deadly virus with them, which has hit red squirrel populations hard. Sue Nelson goes to a National Trust wood near Liverpool, one of the last red squirrel strongholds in the country, to find out how they have coped with the virus. Later Richard Hollingham goes to Glasgow to find out how scientists know what Antarctica's climate was like 50 million years ago. Even though it was in the same place as it is now, temperatures on the continent were surprisingly different from what they are today.

Dec 09 2010

17mins

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Rank #5: Bumblebee declines, microbes, and amazing birds - Planet Earth Podcast - 11.06.17

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This week in the Planet Earth Podcast - what UK farmers are doing to protect the country's vanishing bumblebees, butterflies and other pollinating insects; how scientists are trying to figure out how many types of microbes there are on our planet and why they all matter; and why birds are more amazing than we ever imagined.

Jun 17 2011

20mins

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Rank #6: Arctic Expedition Special - Planet Earth Podcast - 10.12.08

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In this podcast Richard Hollingham reports from an unusual and somewhat cold location - onboard the British Antarctic Survey's RRS James Clark Ross which was stuck in the ice for two weeks 1000 kilometres from the North Pole. He talks to researchers on the ship about their work, finds out exactly how dangerous polar bears can be and hears what it's like to dive in freezing cold waters. He also learns that the Arctic isn't the desolate, barren place you might at first imagine. No, it's full of life. Not just big stuff like bears, seals and gulls, but algae and microorganisms that literally keep our planet alive.

Dec 07 2010

19mins

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Rank #7: Fish poo, dead whales, and the Japan earthquake - Planet Earth Podcast - 11.03.23

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This week in the Planet Earth Podcast: how the famous White Cliffs of Dover could be made of fish poo (at least partially), why one researcher is so interested in dead whales, and why the Japan earthquake was so powerful and devastating. Join Richard Hollingham and Sue Nelson to find out more...

Mar 23 2011

20mins

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Rank #8: Rip Currents and Carbon Capture - Planet Earth Podcast - 11.07.12

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This week, why understanding rip currents at Perranporth in north Cornwall could help save lives; how exactly does carbon capture and storage (CCS) work and how can scientists be sure that carbon will be stored forever?

Jul 12 2011

18mins

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Rank #9: Bees and sex, acid rain's legacy, cold water corals - Planet Earth Podcast - 12.08.14

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This week in the Planet Earth Podcast: sex and the survival of honey bee colonies; why rivers are still recovering from the legacy of acid rain; and collecting coral from the Atlantic seabed.

Aug 15 2012

21mins

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Rank #10: Cold water corals, meteorites, new greenhouse gases - Planet Earth Podcast - 12.05.23

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This week in the Planet Earth Podcast - scientists describe why the planet's least understood but most diverse species of coral is under threat. Also, what the meteorite strike that wiped the dinosaurs out would've been like; and why co2 isn't the only greenhouse gas we should be worried about.

May 23 2012

20mins

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Rank #11: Carbon capture and storage, floods, CryoSat-2 - Planet Earth Podcast - 11.03.09

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This week in the Planet Earth Podcast: how carbon capture and storage works and why it's here to stay, the effect of floodplains on water pollution, and how exactly do you measure the thickness of polar ice from space? A pub isn't an obvious place for a discussion about taking carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and storing it in rocks deep underground, but the venue for this week's Planet Earth Podcast isn't any old pub. This pub is set into the sandstone rock in the centre of Nottingham and is the perfect place to demonstrate exactly how the technology works. Richard Hollingham visits Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem to see for himself...

Mar 09 2011

20mins

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Rank #12: The Earth's magnetic field, snow, and Chernobyl - Planet Earth Podcast - 11.04.08

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This week in the Planet Earth Podcast: how scientists plan to measure the Earth's magnetic field from space, why one researcher is in the frozen town of Churchill in northern Canada, and how the Chernobyl disaster still affects Northern Ireland 25 years on.

Apr 07 2011

20mins

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Rank #13: Engineering the climate to tackle climate change - Planet Earth Podcast - 11.09.14

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This week in the Planet Earth Podcast: in a geoengineering special edition, we take a closer look at some of the technologies we may have to resort to using to avert dangerous climate change.

Sep 14 2011

21mins

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Rank #14: The Ozone Hole, Starlings in Fair Isle, Forest Fires - Planet Earth Podcast - 11.11.22

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This week in the Planet Earth Podcast - Richard Hollingham talks to one of the scientists behind the discovery of the ozone hole to find why it's still there; how research on starlings on an island famous for its sweaters could help bird conservationists; and why forest fires in North America affect people thousands of miles away in Europe.

Nov 22 2011

20mins

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Rank #15: Drought and record rainfall, indoor avalanches - Planet Earth Podcast - 12.05.10

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This week in the Planet Earth Podcast: researchers explain why, despite record rainfall, England is in drought. Later, how scientists are using indoor avalanches to figure out where to put buildings and roads. Finally, news of ice loss in Antarctic, and the benefits of bat dung.

May 09 2012

20mins

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Rank #16: Where do all the salmon go, and making CO2 bricks - Planet Earth Podcast - 11.08.12

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This week in the Planet Earth Podcast, how scientists are using fish scales to figure out why the UK salmon population is falling; and how carbon dioxide emissions from power stations could be used to make household bricks.

Aug 12 2011

17mins

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Rank #17: Neanderthal mammoth hunters in Jersey - Planet Earth Podcast - 11.11.02

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This week in the Planet Earth Podcast: Richard Hollingham meets scientists and archaeologists who are working to preserve one of the most important Neanderthal settlements in north-west Europe to find out how they lived; later on, he visits the local primary school to find out what schoolchildren make of the Neanderthals.

Nov 02 2011

19mins

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Rank #18: Microscopic plants, using volcanic ash for dating - Planet Earth Podcast - 12.04.25

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This week in the Planet Earth Podcast - we take a closer look at tiny marine plants, which underpin the entire marine food chain and play a vital role in the Earth's climate. Also, how scientists are using volcanic ash called tefra to tell how people may have responded to rapid environmental changes in the recent past.

Apr 25 2012

18mins

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Rank #19: Romans recycling, dinosaur colour, gravity mission - Planet Earth Podcast - 11.02.10

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This week in the Planet Earth Podcast - how the Romans recycled glass, dinosaur colour, and what Europe's gravity mission tells us about ocean currents. Did you know that the height of the world's oceans can vary by as much as 200 metres? These huge differences depend almost entirely on very slight changes in gravity across the world. Sue Nelson goes to the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton to find out more. We also hear that even the Romans recycled glass. But were they being green, or did they have other reasons? Richard Hollingham goes to Norwich to meet the archaeologists with the answer. Finally, what colour do you think dinosaurs were? Until now artists have been free to paint them whatever colour they felt like. But not anymore - scientists now have a way of figuring out what colour they were. Richard goes to Bristol University to get the low-down from one of the scientists at the forefront of this research.

Feb 10 2011

21mins

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Rank #20: Plastics in the oceans and tracking satellites - Planet Earth Podcast - 10.10.08

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Scientists recently found plastics floating in some of the most remote and inaccessible seas in the world - just off the coast of Antarctica. Although it clearly looks ugly in such a pristine environment, scientists are more concerned about the major role plastics play in moving alien species around the world. Richard Hollingham goes to the north Norfolk coast to speak to an expert on ocean plastics from the British Antarctic Survey to find out more. Later, Sue Nelson goes to the Natural Environment Research Council's Space Geodesy Facility at Herstmonceux in Sussex to find out how it uses lasers to pinpoint satellites.

Oct 07 2010

19mins

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