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Something Wild

Updated 8 days ago

Rank #108 in Government category

Government
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iTunes Ratings

41 Ratings
Average Ratings
31
4
3
2
1

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By skkkllhhjj - Aug 20 2019
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I love these and I wish they were longer - like a 1/2 hour

Good and getting better!

By Jo33746 - Jul 06 2017
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A fun and nerdy nature walk. Friendly and informative, something I regularly look forward to.

iTunes Ratings

41 Ratings
Average Ratings
31
4
3
2
1

More

By skkkllhhjj - Aug 20 2019
Read more
I love these and I wish they were longer - like a 1/2 hour

Good and getting better!

By Jo33746 - Jul 06 2017
Read more
A fun and nerdy nature walk. Friendly and informative, something I regularly look forward to.
Cover image of Something Wild

Something Wild

Latest release on Jan 09, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 8 days ago

Rank #1: Something Wild: How Scatter Hoarders Prepare for Winter

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You may be familiar with hoarders (not the TV show, but same idea). In nature, a hoarder will hide food in one place. Everything it gathers will be stored in a single tree or den. But for some animals one food cache isn't enough. We call them scatter hoarders. A "scatter hoarder" hides food in a bunch of different places within its territory. The gray squirrel is a classic example, gathering acorns and burying them in trees or in the ground. Not all squirrels are hoarders. Red squirrels are "larder hoarders." If you've ever been walking through the woods and a red squirrel starts screaming at you, it's defending its one and only stash. The same goes for chipmunks and white-footed mice. The gray squirrel isn't alone in the practice of scatter hoarding. Blue jays and gray jays will spend the summer accosting hikers, filling itself with as much granola or fruit as it can. They bring their bounty back into the forest and glue the food into crevices of the trees with its saliva. I know, who

Aug 16 2019

4mins

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Rank #2: Something Wild: Do Mosquitos Like You Better?

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We often think of the “food chain” in the natural world in linear terms: this eats that, which in turn, is eaten by the other. But today’s subject proves that chain is a little more like a web. The species we’re talking about today feeds on the most dangerous game, the apex of apex predators…us. And the species that prey on us? Mosquitos, of course! We recently spoke with Sarah MacGregor, an entomologist and founder of Dragon Mosquito Control, help us learn more about them. We often think about mosquitos with a capital-M, as if there is just one kind of mosquito. But there’s actually lots of different species. MacGregor has counted over 45 species in New Hampshire with different habits and different habitats. There’s the house mosquito, the salt marsh mosquito, tree-hole mosquitos, rock pool mosquitos and cattail mosquitos among many others. While these common names refer to where you might find these insects, they also refer to distinct species of mosquito. It may be poor consolation

Apr 26 2019

20mins

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Rank #3: Something Wild: What Happens to Trees in Drought?

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The specter of drought is often raised in these early days of summer. And for good reason, though water levels have returned to normal around the New Hampshire, state officials are still warning residents to remain cautious after last summer drought. And while we often fret about the health of our lawns and our gardens, Dave (from the Forest Society) wanted to address drought resistance among his favorite species, trees. So, we all know that trees need water to survive. Basically the many leaves on a given tree have these pore-like holes called stomates that leak moisture into the surrounding air. As that vapor exits the tree through the leaves it draws more water up through the trunk and branches, like through a bundle of straws. Harnessing the power of the sun, trees break apart that water into its constituent hydrogen and oxygen molecules; forming glucose with the hydrogen and exhaling the oxygen into the atmosphere. The glucose is what fuels growth in the tree, from buds to bark to

Jul 05 2019

5mins

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Rank #4: Something Wild: Why Are Peepers So Loud?

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It’s an unmistakable sound. One that elicits memories, sights and scents of events long ago. It recalls the joy of youth, the possibility of a spring evening. But it can also incite insomnia and the blind rage that accompanies it. Pseudacris crucifer is better known as the spring peeper, and for most people it is a more welcome harbinger. These remarkable frogs spend the winter under leaf litter in a state if suspended animation. Once overnight temperatures are regularly in the forties, they start thawing out and begin singing. So that ringing chorus is a signal that we’re finally shedding winter’s icy grip. We dare to hope that we’ve seen our last nor’easter of the season; and that warmer and greener days are close at hand. That hope manifests around the state on Facebook and Twitter (#peepers) – though not Instagram because photos of this tiny frog are elusive. It’s fun to watch the state gradually thaw from south to north, vicariously through social media. Posts always pop up first

Mar 29 2019

5mins

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Rank #5: Something Wild: Is this Salamander a Plant or Animal? Yes.

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So much of New Hampshire’s natural beauty is obvious; from the top of a mountain trail, from the shore of a lake or pond, even from your kitchen window. You barely have to open your eyes to see it. But take a closer look, and beauty gives way to scientific wonder. That wonder may be inspired by the boiling of watery maple sap to sweet liquid sunshine; or by the majesty of an osprey wresting a writhing fish from a river. But keep an ear out this spring and you may witness wonder on molecular level! Listen for something you only hear this time of year, the first shrill of the spring peepers. That’s your cue. It might be raining a little – or a lot…it’s definitely above freezing – around 43-degrees. It’s time to grab a flashlight and head for the nearest vernal pool. Vernal pools, of course, are depressions that collect snowmelt and the run-off of early spring rain. Despite the cool waters, they are hot beds of tiny, easily overlooked activity this time of year. One salamander in

Mar 15 2019

5mins

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Rank #6: Something Wild: Smell that Olfactory

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We know…we’ve been remiss, and it’s time to talk about the elephant in the room. Something Wild, as you know, is a chance to take a closer look at the wildlife, ecosystems and marvelous phenomena you can find in and around New Hampshire. But over the years there is one species in New Hampshire that we haven’t spent much time examining. A species, I think that has been conspicuous in its absence. Humans. So we’re grabbing the bull by the horns and digging in to a complex species that is an important part of the ecosystem. And we thought we’d start with a particular trait that’s been with us almost since the beginning: olfaction. The sense of smell among other sensory systems are relatively unchanged throughout mammalian history. As Nate Dominy, professor of anthropology and biological sciences at Dartmouth, says, “a lot of the traits we see in mammals are retention of those basic traits.” Dominy suggested our olfactory sense was really important to our proto-mammalian ancestors. Picture

Aug 02 2019

5mins

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Rank #7: Something Wild: First Bitten

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First Bitten is our periodic series at Something Wild where we study the people who study nature, and what set them on the path to do that. And this time around our two subjects under the microscope trace their love of nature back to their parents's nurture, specifically their fathers. Ron Davis grew up in Brooklyn, New York. Not a place known for for its lakes or streams or for vast expanses of wilderness; not a place you'd expect to find a future biologist. But that's where he started, "and because of the Second World War my love of nature became greatly enhanced." While Davis credits the advent of World War Two with his passion for the natural world, the retired biology professor from University of Maine, Orono points out that much of the thanks actually goes to his father. "He was a retail businessman and moved his family out of Brooklyn to the Catskill Mountains because there was a threat that the Germans might be bombing New York." So Davis found himself, a city kid, suddenly in

Jun 21 2019

5mins

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Rank #8: Something Wild: NH Brooks Brook Trout

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The foam formed eddies on the surface of the pool as Stevens Brook rushed down and through this particular crook in the waterway in the shadow of route-89 in East Sutton, New Hampshire. Something Wild paused here recently to talk fish with author and fish historian, Jack Noon, who is unapologetic about naming his favorite fish. The eastern brook trout is that for a smattering of reasons. First it’s a family thing. Noon, learned to fish at the elbow of his grandfather, who had a clear preference for brook trout. But it’s the trout’s habitat – cold, clear, unpolluted water; that Noon says, “makes them the perfect symbol for New Hampshire past and responsible environmental policies. They’re just an absolutely beautiful fish. And they’re a native fish, too!” Of course “native” is often a matter of perspective. By one calculation, there are no fish species that are native to the Granite State. The evidence seems to confirm that the mile-thick ice-sheet that encased New England 12,000 years

Jun 07 2019

5mins

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Rank #9: Something Wild: N.H.'s Wildest Neighborhood ... Peatlands

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Here at Something Wild we love all things wild (even blackflies !) but sometimes it can be helpful to look beyond a single species and consider how many species interact within a given environment. In our periodic series, New Hampshire’s Wild Neighborhoods, we endeavor to do just that and this time we’re looking at peatlands. Our Sherpa today is Ron Davis, a retired professor of ecology, limnology and wetland science from the University of Maine, Orono. Peatlands, as you might have guessed are classified by the mat of peat at its heart. Peat is formed from dead organic matter (leaves, branches, dead bugs, etc.), but that organic matter is only partly decomposed because there is no oxygen in the mat, or the water that you often find in such locations. The two most prominent kinds of peatlands in New Hampshire are bogs and fens. Davis explains that, “bogs are rather infertile environments. The plants that grow in them barely hold on and eke out an existence and grow very, very slowly.”

May 24 2019

12mins

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Rank #10: Something Wild: Eye of the Turtle

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New Hampshire benefits from the presence of seven different turtle species. This week on Something Wild we’re taking a closer look at two of the most common species you can find all over the state: painted turtles and snapping turtles. First off, we have to acknowledge that turtles are amazing, they’re like living fossils. Artist-naturalist David Carrol, has has spent a lifetime studying turtles describes them as "evolutionarily conservative." He said, "they go back to about 200-220 million years ago, and they have hardly changed at all over that entire frame. Meanwhile, flowering plants for example didn’t appear until about 150-thousand years ago." Carroll says that if you found your self on Pangea 200 million years ago you would have no trouble recognizing our turtles ancestors. These days they tend to be a little smaller. Snappers are easily identified because it looks like a lizard stole a turtle shell. They’ve got these long necks, long tails and a brutish head with a pointed

Jul 19 2019

4mins

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