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All Jupiter Broadcasting Shows

Updated 6 days ago

Technology
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Every audio version of Jupiter Broadcasting's productions.

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Every audio version of Jupiter Broadcasting's productions.

iTunes Ratings

63 Ratings
Average Ratings
62
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Must subscribe!

By Batezippi2011 - Dec 01 2013
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Lots of tech news and fun topics!

Best In Class

By Aptgetmoo - Dec 01 2011
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Hands down the best balance of knowledge transfer and entertainment. Keep up the great work guys!

iTunes Ratings

63 Ratings
Average Ratings
62
1
0
0
0

Must subscribe!

By Batezippi2011 - Dec 01 2013
Read more
Lots of tech news and fun topics!

Best In Class

By Aptgetmoo - Dec 01 2011
Read more
Hands down the best balance of knowledge transfer and entertainment. Keep up the great work guys!
Cover image of All Jupiter Broadcasting Shows

All Jupiter Broadcasting Shows

Latest release on Jan 17, 2020

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Every audio version of Jupiter Broadcasting's productions.

Rank #1: Everyday ZFS | TechSNAP 401

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Jim and Wes sit down to bust some ZFS myths and share their tips and tricks for getting the most out of the ultimate filesystem.

Plus when not to use ZFS, the surprising way your disks are lying to you, and more!

Links:

  • ZFS - Ubuntu Wiki — ZFS is a combined file system and logical volume manager designed and implemented by a team at Sun Microsystems led by Jeff Bonwick and Matthew Ahrens.
  • Performance tuning - OpenZFS — Make sure that you create your pools such that the vdevs have the correct alignment shift for your storage device's size. if dealing with flash media, this is going to be either 12 (4K sectors) or 13 (8K sectors).

Apr 11 2019

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Rank #2: Linux Action News 52

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Fedora fights for the user, Ubuntu Flavors draw the line, and why we're worried small distributions are starting to collapse.

May 06 2018

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Rank #3: Stratis Pulls it All Together | LINUX Unplugged 270

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Red Hat developer Andy Grover joins us to discuss Stratis Storage, an alternative to ZFS on Linux and its recent milestone.

Also Google subtracts Plus, some KDE and GNOME news, and a bit of forgotten Linux history.

Oct 09 2018

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Rank #4: Gangster Government | Unfilter 286

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Trump’s gut punching at the NATO summit, North Korea is throwing around the “gangster” label, and Paul Manafort is really screwed while Cohen plays ball.

The crew is back together for another roadshow edition.

Jul 11 2018

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Rank #5: Universal Basic Disruption | User Error 51

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It’s a special all #AskError episode! A hypothetical Linux world, the future of welfare, tech disruption, and terrible email addresses.

Plus Distrowatch rankings, and a crucial seasonal question.

Oct 26 2018

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Rank #6: Bob’s Dozen Russians | Unfilter 287

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The world melts down after Trump meets with Putin, but we’ll focus on the substance of the meeting and the possibly positive developments… And of course a bit of the reaction!

Plus highlights from Peter Strzok’s testimony, your everyday cyber attacks, and much more!

Jul 18 2018

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Rank #7: Kremlin Script Kiddies | Unfilter 282

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We try to get to the root of what Russia actually hacked, cover the whiplash from the North Korea news since last week, and serve up some cold cyber analysis.

May 30 2018

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Rank #8: Peering Into the Future | LUP 256

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A major Internet monopoly might just be on the edge of cracking thanks to free software, a bit of initiative, and a lot of gumption. We'll follow up on a major experiment we kicked off last week.

Plus SUSE is sold again, Linux on the Nintendo Switch just got way better, Mint has a new release, we look at elementary OS Juno's first beta, and we cover a ton of community news.

Jul 04 2018

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Rank #9: Year of the Linux Desktop | LUP 247

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Ubuntu and Fedora have new releases, and our early impressions are great. We’ll share the features that we think make these distros some of the best Linux desktop releases ever.

Plus some important community news, some Darktable tips for beginners, and some select clips from this year’s LinuxFest Northwest.

May 02 2018

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Rank #10: Space Gray Handcuffs | Coder Radio 333

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iPad Pro is a great machine for people that don’t want to get too much work done.

But ultimately this week’s episode is about the guys catching up after a long couple weeks apart.

Links:

  • Ferrite Recording Studio — Ferrite is the tool many podcasters and journalists reach for when they’re away from the studio.
  • ‎LumaFusion video editor — Pro video editing and effects
  • Michael Dominick on Twitter — "Was running out of drive storage on my desktop, so I did the unthinkable @ChrisLAS. I opened it up and installed an additional HDD! What madness is that? #CoderRadio"

Nov 27 2018

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Rank #11: Logs and Metrics and Traces, Oh My! | TechSNAP 372

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Netflix has learned the hard way how to utilize all the logs, we cover their lessons in their journey to build a fully observable system.

Plus the Lazy State FPU bug that cropped up this week, backdoored Docker images, your questions, and more!

Jun 14 2018

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Rank #12: elementary OS and OpenMediaVault | Choose Linux 1

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We kick off a brand new show with a discussion about Jason's elementary OS community challenge. Then we get into the pros and cons of setting up your own NAS with OpenMediaVault.

Plus, find out more about your hosts and what we have in store for future episodes.

Links:

  • Introducing The Elementary OS 5 Linux Community Challenge — The basic premise of the elementary OS Challenge is simple: ditch Windows, macOS or your current Linux OS of choice and exclusively use elementary OS 5 Juno as your daily driver for two weeks. Explore the curated AppCenter and the bundled software to get all of your working and playing done. For email, for music, for coding, for gaming, for whatever.
  • Elementary OS Challenge: Let's Talk About Dark Themes — Like every other deliberate choice the elementary OS developers make (such as minimizing windows), the absence of an optional dark mode reflects their clear and unwavering vision of what a desktop experience should be.
  • openmediavault — openmediavault is the next generation network attached storage (NAS) solution based on Debian Linux. It contains services like SSH, (S)FTP, SMB/CIFS, DAAP media server, RSync, BitTorrent client and many more. Thanks to the modular design of the framework it can be enhanced via plugins.

Jan 23 2019

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Rank #13: Practically Perfect Predictions | LINUX Unplugged 335

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Find out what's happening in 2020 before it happens. Our crew returns from the future with predictions so perfect you could bet some Dogecoin on it.

Special Guests: Alex Kretzschmar and Brent Gervais.

Links:

Jan 07 2020

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Rank #14: This is How You Should Store Your Data | Ask Noah Show 87

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This is How You Should Store Your Data | Ask Noah Show 87

In this episode your calls drove the show and that's the show we set out to do! We talk storage, LVM, hard disk configuration, SteamOS, troubleshoot an OBS box, and still find time break the news about the new and best way to listen to The Ask Noah Show live!

-- The Cliff Notes --

For links to the articles and material referenced in this week's episode check out this week's page from o our podcast dashboard!

This Episode's Podcast Dashboard

Phone Systems for Ask Noah provided by Voxtelesys

-- Stay In Touch --

Find all the resources for this show on the Ask Noah Dashboard

Ask Noah Dashboard

Need more help than a radio show can offer? Altispeed provides commercial IT services and they’re excited to offer you a great deal for listening to the Ask Noah Show. Call today and ask about the discount for listeners of the Ask Noah Show!

Altispeed Technologies

Contact Noah

asknoah [at] jupiterbroadcasting.com

-- Twitter --

Sep 25 2018

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Rank #15: Understand The Hype | User Error 50

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It seems to be all about Plasma these days so we want to know if the hype is justified. We have a couple of great #AskError questions, and wonder whether we are heading for a tech dystopia.

Plus the heaviest of all subjects rears its head again this week.

Oct 12 2018

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Rank #16: Bunk Beds | Jupiter Extras 9

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What should have been an innocent question about bunk beds turned into the longest ever User Error out take.

Here is the unedited version of a segment on User Error 73. There is some bad language.

Aug 30 2019

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Rank #17: Linux Action News 136

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The first desktop Office 365 app arrives, Ubuntu commits to current and future Raspberry Pi boards, and why the near-term future of Linux gaming looks a bit rocky.

Plus, our concerns with Google's clever long-term Fuchsia strategy.

Links:

Dec 15 2019

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Rank #18: 2019-12-06 | Linux Headlines 63

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Dec 06 2019

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Rank #19: Interactive Investigations | Coder Radio 373

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We debate the best way to package scripting language apps then explore interactive development and the importance of a good shell.

Plus npm bans terminal ads, what comes after Rust, and why Mike hates macros.

Links:

  • Feedback: Getting started on .NET? — My question is what is the easiest route to get started in .net development? When I looked online there are several different languages that can be used from C# ,F#, ASP.NEt among others. In your personal experience what is the easiest way to get started on this path?
  • Feedback: Questioning Rust — [...] The primary issue here is that most of the work to prove that safety (beyond "trust me" blocks) is pushed onto the developer instead of having the compiler insert protections surmised from uses of the data structures outlined in the source code.  After all, it can only prove what it is shown, not what it assumes.
  • Feedback on Mike and Macros — I'd also love to hear more about what you dislike about macros. Personally, I view Rust's macro system as one of its biggest selling points. I've written more than a few macros myself and, every time, they've simplified my code in ways I couldn't have managed without them. Perhaps more importantly, I've also noticed that many of my favorite crates make heavy use of macros—and doing so lets them expose a much more ergonomic API.
  • The Imposter's Handbook by Rob Conery — You've had to learn on the job. New languages, new frameworks, new ways of doing things - a constant struggle just to stay current in the industry. This left no time to learn the foundational concepts and skills that come with a degree in Computer Science.
  • npm Bans Terminal Ads — After last week a popular JavaScript library started showing full-blown ads in the npm command-line interface, npm, Inc., the company that runs the npm tool and website, has taken a stance and plans to ban such behavior in the future.
  • Apple wants to remove scripting languages from macOS — Scripting language runtimes such as Python, Ruby, and Perl are included in macOS for compatibility with legacy software. In future versions of macOS, scripting language runtimes won’t be available by default, and may require you to install an additional package. If your software depends on scripting languages, it’s recommended that you bundle the runtime within the app
  • Building Standalone Python Applications with PyOxidizer — Python hasn't ever had a consistent story for how I give my code to someone else, especially if that someone else isn't a developer and just wants to use my application.
  • Traveling Ruby: self-contained, portable Ruby binaries — Traveling Ruby lets you create self-contained Ruby app packages for Windows, Linux and OS X.
  • ruby-packer — Packing your Ruby application into a single executable.

  • fogus: Notes on Interactive Computing Environments — Your programming environments should be an active partner in the act of creating systems.

  • Tim Ewald - Clojure: Programming with Hand Tools — For most of human history, furniture was built by hand using a small set of simple tools. This approach connects you in a profoundly direct way to the work, your effort to the result. This changed with the rise of machine tools, which made production more efficient but also altered what's made and how we think about making it in in a profound way. This talk explores the effects of automation on our work, which is as relevant to software as it is to furniture, especially now that once again, with Clojure, we are building things using a small set of simple tools.
  • Things You Didn't Know About GNU Readline — GNU Readline is an unassuming little software library that I relied on for years without realizing that it was there. Tens of thousands of people probably use it every day without thinking about it. If you use the Bash shell, every time you auto-complete a filename, or move the cursor around within a single line of input text, or search through the history of your previous commands, you are using GNU Readline.
  • bpython — A fancy curses interface to the Python interactive interpreter
  • pry — Pry is a runtime developer console and IRB alternative with powerful introspection capabilities. Pry aims to be more than an IRB replacement. It is an attempt to bring REPL driven programming to the Ruby language.

  • Ammonite — Ammonite lets you use the Scala language for scripting purposes: in the REPL, as scripts, as a library to use in existing projects, or as a standalone systems shell.

  • rebel-readline — A terminal readline library for Clojure Dialects

  • litecli — A command-line client for SQLite databases that has auto-completion and syntax highlighting.

Sep 02 2019

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Rank #20: GitLab’s CEO | CR 313

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We chat with GitLab’s CEO and co-founder Sid Sijbrandij, about the GitLab model, the changes they’ve made since Microsoft purchased GitHub, his thoughts on that acquisition, and his compelling case for 100% remote work.

Jun 15 2018

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2020-01-17 | Linux Headlines 83

Jan 17 2020

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Infrastructure Engineer: Seth McCombs | Jupiter Extras 47

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Ell and Wes are joined by Infrastructure Engineer Seth McCombs for a chat about how he got started in tech, the hard transition from legacy data centers to the cloud, and why being honest about both success and failure can lead to a better open source community.

Special Guest: Seth McCombs.

Links:

Jan 17 2020

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No, But | User Error 83

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Context switching, improving Linux conferences, a positive approach to life, what makes us cringe, and more.

#ErrorAsk: What's the dumbest idea for an app that you can come up with?

00:03:24 Have you ever met your own doppelganger?
00:06:55 Can you just jump right in to each type of task, or do you have a ritual before?
00:13:12 What’s missing from Linux and open source conferences?
00:23:53 Should you “yes, and” life?
00:33:37 What makes you cringe?

Links:

Jan 16 2020

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Unix Keyboard Joy | BSD Now 333

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Your Impact on FreeBSD in 2019, Wireguard on OpenBSD Router, Amazon now has FreeBSD/ARM 12, pkgsrc-2019Q4, The Joys of UNIX Keyboards, OpenBSD on Digital Ocean, and more.

Headlines

Your Impact on FreeBSD in 2019

It’s hard to believe that 2019 is nearly over. It has been an amazing year for supporting the FreeBSD Project and community! Why do I say that? Because as I reflect over the past 12 months, I realize how many events we’ve attended all over the world, and how many lives we’ve touched in so many ways. From advocating for FreeBSD to implementing FreeBSD features, my team has been there to help make FreeBSD the best open source project and operating system out there.

In 2019, we focused on supporting a few key areas where the Project needed the most help. The first area was software development. Whether it was contracting FreeBSD developers to work on projects like wifi support, to providing internal staff to quickly implement hardware workarounds, we’ve stepped in to help keep FreeBSD innovative, secure, and reliable. Software development includes supporting the tools and infrastructure that make the development process go smoothly, and we’re on it with team members heading up the Continuous Integration efforts, and actively involved in the clusteradmin and security teams.

Our advocacy efforts focused on recruiting new users and contributors to the Project. We attended and participated in 38 conferences and events in 21 countries. From giving FreeBSD presentations and workshops to staffing tables, we were able to have 1:1 conversations with thousands of attendees.

Our travels also provided opportunities to talk directly with FreeBSD commercial and individual users, contributors, and future FreeBSD user/contributors. We’ve seen an increase in use and interest in FreeBSD from all of these organizations and individuals. These meetings give us a chance to learn more about what organizations need and what they and other individuals are working on. The information helps inform the work we should fund.

Wireguard on OpenBSD Router

wireguard (wg) is a modern vpn protocol, using the latest class of encryption algorithms while at the same time promising speed and a small code base.

modern crypto and lean code are also tenants of openbsd, thus it was a no brainer to migrate my router from openvpn over to wireguard.

my setup : a collection of devices, both wired and wireless, that are nat’d through my router (openbsd 6.6) out via my vpn provider azire* and out to the internet using wg-quick to start wg.

running : doubtless this could be improved on, but currently i start wg manually when my router boots. this, and the nat'ing on the vpn interface mean its impossible for clients to connect to the internet without the vpn being up. as my router is on a ups and only reboots when a kernel patch requires it, it’s a compromise i can live with. run wg-quick (please replace vpn with whatever you named your wg .conf file.) and reload pf rules.

News Roundup

Amazon now has FreeBSD/ARM 12

AWS, the cloud division of Amazon, announced in December the next generation of its ARM processors, the Graviton2. This is a custom chip design with a 7nm architecture. It is based on 64-bit ARM Neoverse cores.

Compared to first-generation Graviton processors (A1), today’s new chips should deliver up to 7x the performance of A1 instances in some cases. Floating point performance is now twice as fast. There are additional memory channels and cache speed memory access should be much faster.

The company is working on three types of Graviton2 EC2 instances that should be available soon. Instances with a “g” suffix are powered by Graviton2 chips. If they have a “d” suffix, it also means that they have NVMe local storage.

  • General-purpose instances (M6g and M6gd)

  • Compute-optimized instances (C6g and C6gd)

  • Memory-optimized instances (R6g and R6gd)

You can choose instances with up to 64 vCPUs, 512 GiB of memory and 25 Gbps networking.

And you can see that ARM-powered servers are not just a fad. AWS already promises a 40% better price/performance ratio with ARM-based instances when you compare them with x86-based instances.

AWS has been working with operating system vendors and independent software vendors to help them release software that runs on ARM. ARM-based EC2 instances support Amazon Linux 2, Ubuntu, Red Hat, SUSE, Fedora, Debian and FreeBSD. It also works with multiple container services (Docker, Amazon ECS, and Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service).

Announcing the pkgsrc-2019Q4 release

The pkgsrc developers are proud to announce the 65th quarterly release of pkgsrc, the cross-platform packaging system. pkgsrc is available with more than 20,000 packages, running on 23 separate platforms; more information on pkgsrc itself is available at https://www.pkgsrc.org/

In total, 190 packages were added, 96 packages were removed, and 1,868 package updates (to 1388 unique packages) were processed since the pkgsrc-2019Q3 release. As usual, a large number of updates and additions were processed for packages for go (14), guile (11), perl (170), php (10), python (426), and ruby (110). This continues pkgsrc's tradition of adding useful packages, updating many packages to more current versions, and pruning unmaintained packages that are believed to have essentially no users.

The Joys of UNIX Keyboards

I fell in love with a dead keyboard layout.

A decade or so ago while helping a friends father clean out an old building, we came across an ancient Sun Microsystems server. We found it curious. Everything about it was different from what we were used to. The command line was black on white, the connectors strange and foreign, and the keyboard layout was bizarre.

We never did much with it; turning it on made all the lights in his home dim, and our joint knowledge of UNIX was nonexistent. It sat in his bedroom for years supporting his television at the foot of his bed.

I never forgot that keyboard though. The thought that there was this alternative layout out there seemed intriguing to me.

OpenBSD on Digital Ocean

Last night I had a need to put together a new OpenBSD machine. Since I already use DigitalOcean for one of my public DNS servers I wanted to use them for this need but sadly like all too many of the cloud providers they don't support OpenBSD. Now they do support FreeBSD and I found a couple writeups that show how to use FreeBSD as a shim to install OpenBSD.

They are both sort of old at this point and with OpenBSD 6.6 out I ran into a bit of a snag. The default these days is to use a GPT partition table to enable EFI booting. This is generally pretty sane but it looks to me like the FreeBSD droplet doesn't support this. After the installer rebooted the VM failed to boot, being unable to find the bootloader.

Thankfully DigitalOcean has a recovery ISO that you can boot by simply switching to it and powering off and then on your Droplet.

Beastie Bits

Feedback/Questions

  • Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv



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Jan 16 2020

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Compromised Cameras | Self-Hosted 10

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Wyze and Xiaomi suffer major cloud hosted blunders, so Alex tells us about his new fully offline camera security system, tied into Shinobi.

Plus Chris gets ready for Project Off-Grid's solar upgrade, our new favorite self-hosted SpeedTest app, and a Ring alternative.

Links:

Jan 15 2020

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Linus' Filesystem Fluster | LINUX Unplugged 336

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Linus Torvalds says don't use ZFS, but we think he got a few of the facts wrong. Jim Salter joins us to help us explain what Linus got right, and what he got wrong.

Plus some really handy Linux picks, some community news, and a live broadcast from Seattle's Snowpocalypse!

Special Guest: Jim Salter.

Links:

Jan 14 2020

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Brunch with Brent: Chase Nunes | Jupiter Extras 46

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Brent sits down with Chase Nunes, co-host of Unfilter, Jupiter Broadcasting's former weekly media watchdog. We discuss his beginnings in podcasting and how Unfilter came to be, his contributions to LinuxFest Northwest, his love for Linux in the media broadcasting industry, and his recent 15-month life-changing personal transformation journey.

Chase is a Broadcast Engineer for KOMO-TV 4 ABC in Seattle, and founder of gaming & pinball eSports platform GeekGamer.TV.

Special Guest: Chase Nunes.

Links:

Jan 14 2020

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Linux Action News 140

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Are we overloaded with open source licenses? We consider a simpler future. Results from the Debian init vote are in, and why Amazon's new open source project might be worth checking out.

Plus, our reaction to Google's search ballot scheme launch.

Links:

Jan 12 2020

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2020-01-10 | Linux Headlines 78

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A developer is seeking feedback for a proposed Rust Foundation, Amazon relaunches a machine learning tool, and Linus Torvalds issues a warning against using ZFS.

Links:

Jan 10 2020

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Self-Hosted: Fixing Brent's WiFi | Jupiter Extras 45

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Join Alex and Brent for a chat about upgrading your home network with an eye towards stability, simplicity, and hosting things yourself.

Links:

Jan 10 2020

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2020-01-09 | Linux Headlines 77

Jan 09 2020

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The BSD Hyperbole | BSD Now 332

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Announcing HyperbolaBSD, IPFW In-Kernel NAT setup on FreeBSD, Wayland and WebRTC enabled for NetBSD 9/Linux, LLDB Threading support ready for mainline, OpenSSH U2F/FIDO support in base, Dragonfly drm/i915: Update, and more.

Headlines

HyperbolaBSD Announcement

Due to the Linux kernel rapidly proceeding down an unstable path, we are planning on implementing a completely new OS derived from several BSD implementations.

This was not an easy decision to make, but we wish to use our time and resources to create a viable alternative to the current operating system trends which are actively seeking to undermine user choice and freedom.

This will not be a "distro", but a hard fork of the OpenBSD kernel and userspace including new code written under GPLv3 and LGPLv3 to replace GPL-incompatible parts and non-free ones.

  • Reasons for this include:
    • Linux kernel forcing adaption of DRM, including HDCP.
    • Linux kernel proposed usage of Rust (which contains freedom flaws and a centralized code repository that is more prone to cyber attack and generally requires internet access to use.)
    • Linux kernel being written without security and in mind. (KSPP is basically a dead project and Grsec is no longer free software)
    • Many GNU userspace and core utils are all forcing adaption of features without build time options to disable them. E.g. (PulseAudio / SystemD / Rust / Java as forced dependencies)
    • As such, we will continue to support the Milky Way branch until 2022 when our legacy Linux-libre kernel reaches End of Life.

Future versions of Hyperbola will be using HyperbolaBSD which will have the new kernel, userspace and not be ABI compatible with previous versions.

HyperbolaBSD is intended to be modular and minimalist so other projects will be able to re-use the code under free license.

A simple IPFW In-Kernel NAT setup on FreeBSD

After graduating college, I am moving from Brooklyn, NY to Redmond, WA (guess where I got a job). I always wanted to re-do my OPNsense firewall (currently a HP T730) with stock FreeBSD and IPFW’s in-kernel NAT.

Why IPFW? Benchmarks have shown IPFW to be faster which is especially good for my Tor relay, and because I can! However, one downside of IPFW is less documentation vs PF, even less without natd (which we’re not using), and this took me time to figure this out.

But since my T730 is already packed, I am testing this on a old PC with two NICs, and my laptop [1] as a client with an USB-to-Ethernet adapter.

News Roundup

HEADS UP: Wayland and WebRTC enabled for NetBSD 9/Linux

This is just a heads up that the Wayland option is now turned on by

default for NetBSD 9 and Linux in cases where it peacefully coexists
with X11.

  • Right now, this effects the following packages:
    • graphics/MesaLib
    • devel/SDL2
    • www/webkit-gtk
    • x11/gtk3

The WebRTC option has also been enabled by default on NetBSD 9 for two Firefox versions: www/firefox, www/firefox68

Please keep me informed of any fallout. Hopefully, there will be none.

If you want to try out Wayland-related things on NetBSD 9, wm/velox/MESSAGE may be interesting for you.

LLDB Threading support now ready for mainline

Upstream describes LLDB as a next generation, high-performance debugger. It is built on top of LLVM/Clang toolchain, and features great integration with it. At the moment, it primarily supports debugging C, C++ and ObjC code, and there is interest in extending it to more languages.

In February, I have started working on LLDB, as contracted by the NetBSD Foundation. So far I've been working on reenabling continuous integration, squashing bugs, improving NetBSD core file support, extending NetBSD's ptrace interface to cover more register types and fix compat32 issues and fixing watchpoint support. Then, I've started working on improving thread support which is taking longer than expected. You can read more about that in my September 2019 report.

So far the number of issues uncovered while enabling proper threading support has stopped me from merging the work-in-progress patches. However, I've finally reached the point where I believe that the current work can be merged and the remaining problems can be resolved afterwards. More on that and other LLVM-related events happening during the last month in this report.

OpenSSH U2F/FIDO support in base

Hardware backed keys can be generated using "ssh-keygen -t ecdsa-sk" (or "ed25519-sk" if your token supports it). Many tokens require to be touched/tapped to confirm this step.

You'll get a public/private keypair back as usual, except in this case, the private key file does not contain a highly-sensitive private key but instead holds a "key handle" that is used by the security key to derive the real private key at signing time.

So, stealing a copy of the private key file without also stealing your security key (or access to it) should not give the attacker anything.

drm/i915: Update to Linux 4.8.17

  • drm/i915: Update to Linux 4.8.17
    • Broxton, Valleyview and Cherryview support improvements
    • Broadwell and Gen9/Skylake support improvements
    • Broadwell brightness fixes from OpenBSD
    • Atomic modesetting improvements
    • Various bug fixes and performance enhancements

Beastie Bits

Feedback/Questions

  • Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv

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Jan 09 2020

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Explaining Linux and Open Source as Concepts | Choose Linux 26

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Trying to explain what Linux and open source are can be tricky. We discuss our various approaches, and how they differ depending on the experience of who we are explaining them to.

Jan 08 2020

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2020-01-08 | Linux Headlines 76

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Jan 08 2020

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Practically Perfect Predictions | LINUX Unplugged 335

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Find out what's happening in 2020 before it happens. Our crew returns from the future with predictions so perfect you could bet some Dogecoin on it.

Special Guests: Alex Kretzschmar and Brent Gervais.

Links:

Jan 07 2020

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iTunes Ratings

63 Ratings
Average Ratings
62
1
0
0
0

Must subscribe!

By Batezippi2011 - Dec 01 2013
Read more
Lots of tech news and fun topics!

Best In Class

By Aptgetmoo - Dec 01 2011
Read more
Hands down the best balance of knowledge transfer and entertainment. Keep up the great work guys!