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The Real Fast Spanish Tips Podcast

Updated 3 days ago

Education
Language Learning
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Learn Real Spanish Fast and Stay Motivated

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Learn Real Spanish Fast and Stay Motivated

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24
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4
3
2

Great

By Gregpierko1966 - Nov 02 2016
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Best podcast for learning Spanish

Spanish Learner

By Charlie 5001 - Sep 12 2014
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What a great podcast! Que bueno! Andrew really understands the spirit of a good podcast.

iTunes Ratings

40 Ratings
Average Ratings
24
7
4
3
2

Great

By Gregpierko1966 - Nov 02 2016
Read more
Best podcast for learning Spanish

Spanish Learner

By Charlie 5001 - Sep 12 2014
Read more
What a great podcast! Que bueno! Andrew really understands the spirit of a good podcast.

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The Real Fast Spanish Tips Podcast

Updated 3 days ago

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Learn Real Spanish Fast and Stay Motivated

Rank #1: Tips 111: Common Spanish Verbs – 6 Uses for the Verb “Acabar”

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Can you explain when you use “to end” and “to finish” in English? If so, you can apply the idea to the Spanish verbs “acabar” and “terminar”. 

This week’s Spanish theory episode is dedicated to the common spanish verb “acabar”.

In many of the examples in today’s podcast the Spanish verb “terminar” and “acabar” are interchangeable. But, just like in English, there are a few situations when you can only use one or the other.

In today’s podcast you will find out how to use ‘acabar’ in a conversation and some of it’s important uses with Spanish prepositions. If you have any questions, you can leave them below.

If you want to be conversational in Spanish, check out The Real Fast Spanish School. In the school,  you can access all of the training at Real Fast Spanish designed to help you reach a conversation level of Spanish as effectively as possible.

Examples from today’s podcast:

I finish work at 5 – Termino mi trabajo a las 5.

I finish work at 5 – Acabo mi trabajo a las 5.

I don’t like how the movie ends – No me gusta cómo acaba la película.

Sofia and I are ended – Sofia y yo hemos acabado.

The word ‘university’ ends in the letter D – La palabra ‘universidad’ acaba en la letra D.

The dinner ended in drinks until 3 am – La cena acabó en copas hasta las 3 de la madrugada.

My trip to Europe ended in Paris – Mi viaje a Europa acabó en París.

I just finished my homework – acabo de terminar mis deberes.

She just called the doctor – Ella acaba de llamar al médico.

I just do not understand – No acabo de entenderlo.

Guys just don’t understand women – Los chicos no acaban de entender las mujeres.

He ended up working at McDonalds – Él acabó trabajando en McDonalds.

After much sacrifice and dedication, he ended up being a very famous actor – Después de mucho sacrificio y dedicación, él acabó siendo actor muy famoso.

My boss ended the discussion by slamming a fist on the table – Mi jefe acabó con la discusión en un golpe en la mesa.

Police ended the drug problem in my neighborhood – la policía acabó con el problema de la droga en mi barrio.

Teacher comments ended my hopes of passing the exam – Los comentarios del profesor acabaron con mis esperanzas de aprobar el examen.

How else can you use the Spanish verb “acabar” in a conversation?

The post Tips 111: Common Spanish Verbs – 6 Uses for the Verb “Acabar” appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Jun 18 2015

12mins

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Rank #2: Tips 004: An Introduction To The 7 Principles Of Conversation Hacking

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In this episode of the Real Fast Spanish Tips Podcast I introduce the 7 principles of conversation hacking.

Conversation hacking is one of the best techniques I know to get to a conversational level in Spanish as fast as possible. If you are learning Spanish and haven’t reached a conversational level yet then it is worth reviewing the principles of the conversation hacking method.

Quote from the podcast episode:

“Love without conversation is impossible.” – Mortimer Adler (1902 – 2001)

In This Tip, You Will Hear About:

  • 2 Approaches you can take to learn a language – read more here
  • The 7 Principles Of Conversation Hacking:
  1. Fluency is not the goal
  2. Not all words are created equally – spanish frequency study
  3. Not all grammar rules are created equally – see grammar hacking rules
  4. Total vocabulary and total grammar does not equal effective usable vocabulary and grammar
  5. Listening comprehension is improved by active listening and context – active listening course
  6. Spanish pronunciation requires focus on a few distinct sounds
  7. Conversational skills in general need to be developed

Conversation exchange websites:

http://www.italki.com/

https://www.verbling.com/

http://www.conversationexchange.com/

If you want to learn more check out the conversation hacking guide here.

The guide includes:

  • Top 1000 words for conversation hacking spanish
  • 13 Spanish grammar hacking sentences
  • Sounds to focus on for pronunciation
  • Conversational skills questions and tips
  • Language learning mindset tips

The post Tips 004: An Introduction To The 7 Principles Of Conversation Hacking appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Jun 07 2014

27mins

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Rank #3: Tips 015: A Hack For The Past

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There are lots of ways to talk about the past in Spanish. In today’s episode of the Real Fast Spanish tips podcast you will learn about a hack for talking about actions that have occurred in the past.

This hack for talking about the past is in fact one of the common Spanish grammar hacking sentences. For conversation hackers it is worth knowing about this past tense conjugation to help keep a conversation going if you don’t know all of the spanish past conjugations.

At the start of this episode I mentioned a common mistake for english speakers. This common mistake is that we tend to translate the word “another” to “un otro” in Spanish. This is a common mistake worth avoiding if you can because it tends to annoy native speakers and it is easy to correct if you are a way of it.

A few examples:

I have another example – Tengo otro ejemplo

I have another thing – Tengo otra cosa

I would like to speak about another thing – Quiero hablar de otra cosa

I want to learn another language – Quiero aprender otra idioma

In today’s episode we talk about the past perfect if you want to use the past perfect you need to become familar with the verb “haber”

“Haber” is conjugated as follows:

I have – Yo he
You have – Tu has
He has / She has – El / Ella ha
We have – Nosotros hemos
You-all have – Vosotros habeis
They have – Ellos / Ellas han

The next thing you need to know is have to form the past participle:

– Ar verbs

Hablar – Hablado
Estudiar – Estudiado
Encontrar – Encontrado

– Er and Ir verbs

Comer – Comido (Eaten)
Querer – Querido (Wanted)
Vivir – Vivido (Lived)
Poder – Podido (Abled)
Ir – Ido (Been/Went/Gone)

The present perfect can now be used:

I have spoken – He hablado
I have eaten – He comido
I have lived – He vivido
I have studied – Has estudiado
I have found – Ha encontrado

Here are a few irregular past participles you should know:

Decir – Dicho (Said)
Hacer – Hecho (Done)
Ver – Visto (Seen)

The Spanish grammar hacking sentence:

I have eaten the apple – Me he comido la manzana

The appropriate use of the present perfect:

Today, I have eaten an apple – Hoy, me he comido la manzana.

This week, I have done many things – Esta semana, he hecho muchas cosas.

This weekend, I spoke with my friends – Este fin de semana, he hablado con mis amigos

Starting to form some ideas in the past to tell stories, here is the example from today’s podcast:

What did you do on the weekend ? – ¿Que has hecho el fin de semana?

I did a lot of things – He hecho muchas cosas.

My girlfriend and I went to the market – Mi novia y yo hemos ido al mercado

My girlfriend bought some things – Mi novia ha comprado algunas cosas.

She bought a new dress and shoes – Ella ha comprado un nuevo vestido y los zapatos.

Later, we bought some food for dinner – Después, hemos comprado comida para la cena.

Another thing, I found a very interesting book. But I didn’t buy it because it was very expensive – Otra cosa, he encontrado un libro muy interesante. Pero no he comprado el libro porque es muy caro.

Also, we went to the cinemas and we saw a movie – También, hemos ido al cine y hemos visto una película.

This episodes quote:

“Cada vez que conoces a alguien tu vida cambia y, tanto si te gusta como si no, nosotros nos hemos encontrado; yo he entrado en tu vida y tú en la mía.” – Federico Moccia (Esta noche dime que me quieres)

In today’s topic we talked about one of the grammar hacking sentences. To see the others check out  the conversation hacking guide.

How can you use today’s tip to talk about the past?

The post Tips 015: A Hack For The Past appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Jul 17 2014

17mins

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Rank #4: Tips 005: Your First 10 Spanish Words

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In this episode of the Real Fast Spanish Tips Podcast I introduce the first 10 words of the conversation hacking high frequency vocabulary.

These first ten words are chosen based on the a combination of frequency, utility and my own personal experience with using the language during my Spanish adventures.

Quote from the podcast episode:

“Pero no hablar contigo es como tener el mismo mal día, una y otra vez.” – Carolina Pineda

In this tip, you will learn about:

  • The new routine for the podcast
  • The first important 10 Spanish words
  • Basic verb conjugations
# Español English 1 yo I 2 querer to want 3 este this 4 sí yes 5 no no 6 poder to be able to 7 hablar to speak 8 encontrar to find 9 tener to have 10 necesitar to need

Examples from the episode:

– First person conjugation of “Querer”: Quiero (I want)

– Yo quiero este (I want this)

– Yo quiero esto (I want this unknown gender for this)

– Quiero este (drop the pronoun “yo”)

– No quiero este (I don’t want this)

– Hablo Español (I speak Spanish)

– No hablo Español (I don’t speak Spanish)

– No puedo hablar Español (I can’t speak Spanish)

– No necesito este (I don’t need this)

– Quiero encontrar este (I want to find this)

– No puedo encontrar este (I can’t find this)

If you want to learn more check out the conversation hacking guide here.

The guide includes:

  • Top 1000 words for conversation hacking spanish
  • 13 Spanish grammar hacking sentences
  • Sounds to focus on for pronunciation
  • Conversational skills questions and tips
  • Language learning mindset tips

The post Tips 005: Your First 10 Spanish Words appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Jun 12 2014

12mins

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Rank #5: Tips 097: Common Spanish Verbs – 7 Uses for the Word “Llegar”

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In this week’s theory podcast we take a close look at the verb “llegar”.

“Llegar” is a common Spanish verb and generally gets used correctly by native English students but there are more ways to use this verb than what you may expect. 

In today’s podcast I have broken out the use of “llegar” into two categories: literal and figurative use of the idea.

What do I mean? Well, “llegar” means to arrive, you can, therefore, use it when literally arriving at a destination or at a given time. But, you can also use “llegar” when arriving at a conclusion, an agreement, a deal or to become something.

Check out today’s podcast for all of the examples for the use of “llegar” and leave a comment below if you have any questions or you know some other uses of “llegar” and want to add to the conversation.

Also, in today’s tip, I make a big announcement. I have changed the way the courses are offered at Real Fast Spanish. Now all of the courses are in one place. This month, I’m launching the Real Fast Spanish School. The school will be an online membership and when you sign up you will have access to everything! This means you will have access to every course produced at Real Fast Spanish.

Now you don’t have to choose between courses as you will have access to everything. Instead, you need to decide if you would like a curriculum based on the principles discussed at Real Fast Spanish and in the podcast. If you are interested, you can sign up for the school here: Real Fast Spanish School.

Other episodes mentioned in this tip: 

Examples from the episode:

The train arrived at the station – El tren llegó a la estación.

I will arrive in Madrid on Tuesday – Llegaré a Madrid el martes.

To be early – Llegar pronto.

To be on time – Llegar a tiempo.

To be late – Llegar tarde.

I’m sorry for being late – Lo siento por llegar tarde.

The time has arrived to tell me the truth – Llegó la hora de decirme la verdad.

Come to think / Conclude – Llegar a pensar.

You might think that it is worth studying another language – Se podría llegar a pensar que vale la pena estudiar otro idioma.

To become (slowly or over a long difficult path) – Llegar a ser.

The pain becomes unbearable – El dolor llega a ser insoportable.

To close a deal – Llegar a cerrar un trato.

After a while, they came to close a deal – Después de mucho tiempo, llegaron a cerrar un trato.

To compromise, reach an agreement – Llegar a un acuerdo.

The most important thing in a relationship is being able to compromise – Lo más importante en una relación es la capacidad de llegar a un acuerdo

How else can you use “llegar” in a Spanish sentence?

The post Tips 097: Common Spanish Verbs – 7 Uses for the Word “Llegar” appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Apr 30 2015

16mins

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Rank #6: Tips 049: The Past Imperfect

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This week on the Real Fast Spanish Tips podcast we will be looking at the past imperfect tense.

There are many different past tenses in Spanish. And as you build your knowledge you will need to become familiar with, at least, the most common ones.

One of the first recommendations that I give to developing Spanish students is that should always look to improve their vocabulary before their grammar. When you know more vocabulary you can express and understand more ideas. But, we are now at tip number 49, which means we should be adding more grammar to your Spanish toolkit.

Another one of the recommendations that I like to give is that Spanish students should first become familiar with the present perfect tense. I talked about his in tip number 15 A Hack For The Past.

The reason I suggest that Spanish students become familiar with the present prefect tense is that it is easy to form. And once you how you can always use it if you can remember how to conjugate the verb in any of the other past tenses. But if you are comfortable with the present prefect tense then it’s time to get to know the past imperfect.

There are a few rules for using the past imperfect tense. But the general rule you need to know is that it is used when there is no defined start and end time for the action in the past.

To explain further, the past imperfect tense is used in three common examples:

1. Talking about things that ‘used’ to happen in the past. These are things that may have happened habitually.

2. Talking about what happened within a set time frame.

3. Setting the scene as in a novel.

Examples from the episode:

The past imperfect of ‘hablar’:

I spoke – Yo hablaba.

You spoke – Tú hablabas.

He spoke – Él hablaba.

We spoke – Nosotros hablábamos.

You-all spoke – Vosotros hablabais.

They spoke – Ellos hablaban.

The past imperfect of ‘vivir’:

I lived – Yo vivía.

You lived – Tú vivías.

He lived – Él vivía.

We lived – Nosotros vivíamos.

You-all lived – Vosotros vivíais.

They lived – Ellos vivían.

What time were we going to meet tonight? – ¿A que hora íbamos a quedar esta noche?

I thought that we were going to meet at six – Pensaba que íbamos a quedar a las seis.

It was a dark night – Era una noche oscura.

It was raining – Estaba lloviendo.

Sliced bread – Pan bimbo.

You can get access to the podcast transcripts and english translations here.

This week in the culture section:

Arantxa recommended a Spanish movie this week called Fermat’s Room. And she recommended this movie because the director is one of here close friends.

You can get access to the movie here with SBS on-demand, it is an Australian international cultural television station.

How else you can you use the past imperfect in Spanish?

The post Tips 049: The Past Imperfect appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Nov 13 2014

12mins

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Rank #7: Tips 055: Pretérito Indefinido – The Simple Spanish Past Tense

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This week on the Real Fast Spanish Tips podcast we will be looking at another Spanish past tense.

This Spanish past tense is called ‘Pretérito Indefinido’ or ‘Pasado Indefinido’.

As well as introducing a new past tense, we introduce a new guest. The new guest on the podcast is a friend of mine from Barcelona, Maria Piñero.

As Maria is from Barcelona, it means she can speak Catalan as well as Spanish.

I want to keep things simple, so for starters, I’m going to avoid asking Maria to show us her Catalan. But if we have enough requests from the listeners we might preview some Catalan in an upcoming episode.

I’m excited to have another guest from Spain to help us develop our skills further. Maria has a lot tutoring experience in Spanish and provides a great opportunity for some more Spanish conversation practice.

Now, with introductions aside, we can start to look at today’s discussion topic.

A few weeks ago we introduced the ‘past imperfect‘ Spanish tense. In tip number 15 ‘A Hack For The Past‘, we introduced the ‘present perfect’ tense. Make sure you know these two tenses first. So if you need to do some revision head back before continuing on. If you are happy with those tenses then you can look at the ‘Pretérito Indefinido’ tense or Spanish past simple tense.

Unlike the ‘past imperfect’ tense, the past simple tense is used for describing events that have a defined beginning and end.

If an event happened last week and it represented a specific moment in time you will use the past simple tense. If the event happened repeatedly in the past and had no defined start and finish you use the past imperfect tense.

And sometimes you will need to use the two tenses in combination. We will look at a few cases of this in the podcast.

Examples from the episode:

The past simple conjugation of ‘hablar’:

I spoke – Yo hablé.

You spoke – Tú hablaste.

He spoke – Él habló.

We spoke – Nosotros hablamos.

You-all spoke – Vosotros hablasteis.

They spoke – Ellos hablaron.

The past simple conjugation of ‘comer’:

I ate – Yo comí.

You ate – Tú comiste.

He ate – Él comió.

We ate – Nosotros comimos.

You-all ate – Vosotros conisteis.

They ate – Ellos comieron.

The past simple conjugation of ‘decir’:

I said – Yo dije.

You said – Tú dijiste.

He said – Él dijo.

We said – Nosotros dijimos.

You-all said – Vosotros dijisteis.

They said – Ellos dijeron.

She told me that… – Me dijo que…

I told her that … – Le dije que…

You told me…. – Me dijiste…

I met a guy and his name was Jose – Conocí un hombre y su nombre era Jose.

Last week, I was at the movies and the movie was very entertaining – La semana pasada estuve en el cine y la pelicula era muy entretenida.

Asian – Asiático.

Cinnamon – Canela.

You can get access to the Spanish podcast transcripts and English translations here.

The post Tips 055: Pretérito Indefinido – The Simple Spanish Past Tense appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Dec 04 2014

11mins

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Rank #8: Tips 088: How to Make Your Spanish Conversations Less Awkward

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What are your conversations like in Spanish? Do they flow? or do they stall?

Being a great conversationalist in your first language doesn’t come easily—so how then can you be great in your second language? 

Learning how to have flowing conversations isn’t something that can be learnt overnight. It takes years of practice. But, it is something you should always be striving to improve.

Having said that, there are some tips and tactics that you can use to give you conversations an instant boost.

In today’s podcast I talk about a technique that comes straight out of my conversation hacking course—Zero To Conversational which you can access in the Real Fast Spanish School.

In Zero To Conversational, I break down the key elements of taking your Spanish from zero to conversational in the most effective way. This includes using techniques that encourage Spanish conversations to grow and develop.

The technique I introduce in today’s podcast is called “Reverse and Add”. The reverse and add technique does two things:

  1. It helps a conversation to grow by avoiding road blocks.
  2. It helps you get used to spanish word order and remember verb conjugations.

Try today’s technique for yourself. Use the “Reverse and Add” technique in a few Spanish conversations this week and let me know how it worked for you.

Examples from this episode:

Did I tell you that I went to the cinema on the weekend? – ¿Te he dicho que fui al cine el fin de semana?

Yes you told me that you went to the cinema on the weekend. – Si me has dicho que fuiste al cine el fin de semana.

Yes, you did tell me that you went to the cinema on the weekend and told me you were going to see Almodóvar’s latest film. Did you like it? – Sí me has dicho que fuiste al cine el fin de semana y me dijo que ibas a ver la última película de Almodóvar, ¿te gustó?

What movie did you see? – ¿Qué película viste?

Do you realize it’s my birthday today? – ¿Te das cuenta de que es mi cumpleaños hoy?

Yes, I realize it’s your birthday today. How are you going to celebrate it? – Sí me doy cuenta de que es tu cumpleaños hoy. ¿Cómo vas a celebrarlo?

How else can you use the “Reverse and Add” technique to improve your Spanish conversations?

The post Tips 088: How to Make Your Spanish Conversations Less Awkward appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Mar 30 2015

17mins

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Rank #9: Tips 109: How to Use the Spanish Verb “Hay”

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“Hay” is a unique Spanish verb. It is related to the verb “haber” or commonly referred to as the impersonal form of “haber”.

In today’s podcast, you will learn how to use the verb “hay” in the past, present and future. You will also learn how to use the impersonal phrase with the verb “hay” to express obligation. 

Check out today’s podcast for all of the details. If you have any questions or thoughts you can leave a comment below.

If you want to be conversational in Spanish, check out The Real Fast Spanish School. In the school,  you can access all of the training at Real Fast Spanish designed to help you reach a conversation level of Spanish as effectively as possible.

Examples from today’s podcast:

There is a lot of noise here – Hay mucho ruido aquí.

Is there a good place to eat around here? – ¿Hay un buen lugar para comer por aquí?

Is there a good place to drink something around here? – ¿Hay un buen lugar para tomar algo por aquí?

Is there a good place to speak around here? – ¿Hay un buen lugar para hablar por aquí?

There was a party in the apartment upstairs last night anoche. It was very noisy. – Hubo una fiesta en el piso de arriba anoche. Fue muy ruidosa.

Last week there was a day I’m never going to forget – La semana pasada hubo un día que nunca voy a olvidar.

When I was little there were very fun moments – Cuando era pequeño había momentos muy divertidos.

We laughed at a joke that there was between us – Nos reímos de una broma que había entre nosotros.

Next week there will be a church wedding – La semana que viene habrá una boda en la iglesia.

In the future there will be cars that can fly – En el futuro habrá coches que pueden volar.

One must not tell lies – No hay que decir mentiras.

If one wants to speak Spanish one has to practice every day – Si se quiere hablar español hay que practicar todos los días.

Other episodes mentioned in this podcast:

How else can you use the Spanish verb “hay” in a conversation?

The post Tips 109: How to Use the Spanish Verb “Hay” appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Jun 11 2015

12mins

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Rank #10: Tips 075: The 4 Past Spanish Translations of ‘Was’

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One long term ongoing test for english students learning Spanish is the difference between ‘ser’ and ‘estar’. For me these two words remind me of studying physics—as you move up the levels they keep telling you to forget the previous rules you have already learned.

As if these two words weren’t confusing enough, you also have to adapt to a number of different ways of talking about the past in Spanish. What this means is that the translation of ‘was’ can present a challenge.

In today’s spanish theory podcast, we are focusing on the 4 possible past spanish translations of was. I’m going to give a number of examples of each to test and reinforce your knowledge.

The four possible translations of ‘I was’ in Spanish are:

Fui – The indefinido of ser.

Era – The imperfect of ser.

Estuve – The indefinido of estar.

Estaba – The imperfect of estar.

Here is the list of conjugations of ser in the past simple:

Past simple of Ser
I was
Fui
You were
Fuiste
He / She was
Fue
We were
Fuimos
You-all were
Fuisteis
They were
Fueron

Here is the list of conjugations of ser in the past imperfect:

Imperfecto of Ser
I was
Era
You were
Eras
He / She was
Era
We were
Éramos
You-all were
erais
They were
eran

Here is the list of conjugations of estar in the past simple:

Past simple of Estar
I was
Estuve
You were
Estuviste
He / She was
Estuvo
We were
Estuvimos
You-all were
Estuvisteis
They were
Estuvieron

Here is the list of conjugations of estar in the past imperfect:

Imperfecto of Estar
I was
Estaba
You were
Estabas
He / She was
Estaba
We were
Estábamos
You-all were
Estabais
They were
Estaban

If you really want to get the most out of today’s podcast, write out a few examples of your own to help embed what you have learned in your long term memory.

Podcast episodes mentioned in this podcast:

Examples form today’s episode:

Last week I went to a party and it was a lot of fun – La semana pasada fui a una fiesta y fue muy divertida.

When I was young I used to swim a lot – Cuando era pequeño nadaba mucho.

Last week I was really busy – La semana pasada estuve muy ocupado.

I met a girl last week and she was very pretty – Conocí a una chica la semana pasada y ella era muy guapa.

Yesterday, I was at home alone when all of sudden I heard a noise – Ayer, estaba solo en casa cuando de repente oí un ruido.

In 2003, despite my money problems I was able to survive. It was thanks to a good friend who helped me – En 2003, a pesar de mis problemas de dinero pude sobrevivir. Fue gracias a un buen amigo que me ayudó.

At first I thought it was really boring but later it was much better – Al principio pensé que era muy aburrido, pero más tarde fue mucho mejor.

Well, it was a new dress – Bueno, era un vestido nuevo.

I had to go to class last night. The class was at 9 – Tuve que ir a clase anoche. La clase fue a las 9.

On Sunday, I was speaking with my mum for 3 hours – El domingo estuve hablando con mi madre durante 3 horas.

Last time I saw them, they were on the table – La última vez que las vi, estaban sobre la mesa.

I remember before she found her new job, she was very unhappy – Me acuerdo que antes de encontrar su nuevo trabajo, ella estaba muy descontenta.

When were you in class? – ¿Cuando estuviste en clase?

It was tuesday – Fue el martes.

My ex-housemate was never ready on time – Mi ex-compañero de casa nunca estaba listo a tiempo.

My great grandparents were from Scotland – Mis bisabuelos eran de Escocia.

What are some other examples of the spanish translations of was?

The post Tips 075: The 4 Past Spanish Translations of ‘Was’ appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Feb 12 2015

13mins

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Rank #11: Tips 003: The Third And Final D Of Language Learning

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In this episode of the Real Fast Spanish Tips Podcast I discuss the last and final D of language learning.

When you are struggling to execute, when you are trying to propel your spanish forward and not seeing results it could be that you haven’t applied the third D of language learning.

Quote from the podcast episode:

“God provides the wind, but man must raise the sails.” – St. Augustine (354 – 430 AD)

In This Tip, You Will Hear About:

  • How the third D could be the missing link between theory and achieving your goals in Spanish
  • What can happen if you don’t apply the third D of language learning
  • A simple tip for implementing the third D from a polygot friend

4 tips to implement if you are having trouble executing the third D:

  1. If you are having trouble with doing then take another look at definition
  2. If you have a good definition of what you are trying to achieve have another look at desire
  3. Take a look at will power theory:
  1. Start forming action habits – starting doing something for your spanish everyday

My doing challenge to you is to have a look at my recent post on the English-Spanish cognates.

Find 5 words that haven’t used before and use them on another spanish student, a friend or record it into a computer. Leverage this small action to grow into bigger things.

The post Tips 003: The Third And Final D Of Language Learning appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

May 28 2014

10mins

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Rank #12: Tips 019: 3 Ways To Use “Lo” In A Sentence

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In the latest episode of the Real Fast Spanish tips podcast, we will be looking at a common Spanish word that can be used in a number of different contexts.

One of the reasons that this word causes students trouble is that it can mean slightly different things in different scenarios. But is a high use word that comes up often so it is worth getting to know.

But, before I talk about the uses of “lo” in this episode I mention some of the more colloquial phrases that I have been learning recently with some of my friends here in Spain. And these colloquial expressions mentioned in this episode all relate to milk.

The phrases:

Hoy va a ser la leche

Literal: Today is going to be the milk

Actual: Today is going to be awesome.

Ir a toda leche

Literal: To go to all milk or to go to all the milk

Actual: To be going at top speed (all engines firing)

Tener mala leche

Literal: To have bad milk

Actual: To have a bad temper

Estar de mala leche

Literal: To be of bad milk

Actual: To be in a bad mood

¡Qué mala leche!

Literal: What bad milk!

Actual: To have bad luck

Back to the theoretical topic for this episode and moving on the uses of “lo”.

Examples from today’s episode:

I buy a book – Compro un libro

I buy it – Lo compro

I have a car – Tengo un coche

I have it – Lo tengo

I want the food – Quiero la comida

I want it – La quiero

I want to buy a book – Quiero comprar un libro

I want to buy it – Lo quiero comprar

or

I want to buy it – Quiero comprarlo

I like to eat chicken – Me gusta comer el pollo

I like to eat it – Me gusta comerlo

or

I like to eat it – Lo me gusta comer

Do you know? – Sabes?

I know – Yo sé

I know it – Yo lo sé

That which is good – Lo bueno

That which is the best – Lo mejor

That which is the same – Lo mismo

What, that, that which – Lo que

What I want is to speak Spanish – Lo que quiero es hablar Español

I know what you want to do – Yo sé lo que quieres hacer

I know that you want to do something – Yo sé que quieres hacer algo

This episodes quote:

“Merece lo que sueñas.” – Octavio Paz

How else could you use “lo” in a sentence?

The post Tips 019: 3 Ways To Use “Lo” In A Sentence appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Jul 31 2014

14mins

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Rank #13: Tips 047: 10 Common Ways To React In Spanish

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As you build your Spanish knowledge you will find yourself reacting to lots of different scenarios. Each scenario will require it’s own vocabulary and a different set of reactions.

In today’s podcast we will look at some useful ways to react in Spanish.

The reactions that we discuss in today’s podcast fall into two categories: negative and positive.

If someone you are practicing with has told you something sensitive, it is worth using the most appropriate reaction. If you don’t you could confuse the speaker or worse offend them.

When I was beginning I found myself always looking for different ways to express myself. My Spanish friends would always have something interesting to share and I only felt that I had one standard response. Que intersante!

With only one response in my bag of tricks I didn’t think I was very ‘intersante’. Therefore, I want to arm you with a few more responses that you can use as you find yourself chatting to a range of unique people each with their own unique stories.

The reactions that we discuss in today’s podcast are:

How interesting! – ¡Qué interesante!
That’s good! – ¡Qué bien!
How lucky! – ¡Qué suerte!
How fun! – ¡Qué divertido!

What a pain! – ¡Qué rollo!
What a pity! – ¡Qué pena!
What a mess! – ¡Qué lío!
How awful! – ¡Qué horror!

Oh dear! – ¡Vaya!

I’m fed up – Estoy harto.
I’m fed up with… – Estoy harto de…

The song mentioned this week was:

Los Refrescos – Aquí No Hay Playa.

The Spanish culture reference for today:

Moderna De Pueblo – http://www.modernadepueblo.com/.

You should check out “Los 3 Reyes Hipsters” and “Anglicismos Everywhere“.

This week we did a longer Spanish conversation and we have made an offer for everybody who wants to follow along to signup for the transcripts. These will include both the English and Spanish translation as well as practice questions to test your knowledge.

You can sign up for the transcripts here.

How else can you react in Spanish?

The post Tips 047: 10 Common Ways To React In Spanish appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Nov 06 2014

12mins

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Rank #14: Tips 103: Common Spanish Verbs – 7 Uses for the Word “Pasar”

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The verb ‘pasar‘ is in the top 10 most common regular Spanish verbs. It occurs frequently, it is useful and easy to conjugate.

But, it is used in a lot of different situations and contexts, which means we still need to set aside some time to take a closer look at this important Spanish verb.

So, in today’s podcast, we are going to look at some of the most common uses of pasar.

Pasar‘ can be used to talk about spending time, asking what about is happening, talking about a change in a situation, as a request to pass something and even to express lack of interest in a topic.

Check out today’s podcast for all of the details. If you have any questions or thoughts you can leave a comment below.

If you want to be conversational in Spanish, check out The Real Fast Spanish School. In the school,  you can access all of the training designed to help you reach a conversation level of Spanish as effectively as possible.

Examples from today’s podcast:

She spends lots of time practicing Spanish – Ella pasa mucho tiempo practicando su español.

She spends lots of time practicing Spanish – Ella pasa mucho tiempo entrenando su voz.

What’s going on? – ¿Qué pasa?

Everything is well – Todo está bien.

All good – Todo bien.

Have a great time – Pásalo bien.

Have a great time on the trip – Pásalo bien el viaje.

Have a great time on the weekend – Pásalo bien el finde.

Have a great time with your brother – Pásalo bien con tu hermano.

Pass me the salt, please – Pásame la sal, por favor.

Although the restaurant is now empty, it will be filled soon – Aunque el restaurante ahora está vacío, pasará a estar lleno muy pronto.

Juan is single but will be married soon – Juan está soltero pero pasará a estar casado pronto.

I don’t care about anything, I couldn’t care less about anything – Paso de todo.

He doesn’t care about anything – Él pasa de todo.

I’m not into the bullfighting – Paso de los toros.

I’m not into sport – Paso del deporte.

Leave me alone – Pasa de mí. (Déjame en paz).

I couldn’t care less about you – Paso de ti.

To pass by – Pasar de largo. (pass without stopping).

I just saw Elena walk right by – Acabo de ver a Elena pasa de largo.

The rice is overcooked – Se me ha pasado el arroz. (The rice has passed to me).

The meat is overcooked – Se me ha pasado la carne. (The meat has passed to me).

It has gone off – Se ha puesto mala. (it has put itself bad).

The rice is going to be overcooked to you – Se te va a pasar el arroz.

Other episodes mentioned in this podcast:

How else can you use the verb “pasar” in a conversation?

The post Tips 103: Common Spanish Verbs – 7 Uses for the Word “Pasar” appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

May 21 2015

15mins

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Rank #15: Tips 105: Common Spanish Verbs – 9 Uses for the Word “Hacer”

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How well can you make do in Spanish? This week, for the theoretical Spanish podcast, you will learn about the uses of the verb ‘hacer’.

Of course, ‘hacer’ doesn’t just mean ‘to make’ or ‘to do’, there are 8 other ways that you can use this common Spanish verb. 

Check out today’s podcast for all of the details. If you have any questions or thoughts you can leave a comment below.

If you want to be conversational in Spanish, check out The Real Fast Spanish School. In the school,  you can access all of the training designed to help you reach a conversation level of Spanish as effectively as possible.

The present conjugation of ‘Hacer’:

I do – Yo hago.

You do – Tú haces.

He does – Él hace.

We do – Nosotros hacemos.

You-all do – Vosotros hacéis.

They do – Ellos hacen.

Examples from today’s podcast:

What did you do on the weekend? – Que hiciste el fin de semana?

I do a lot of exercise – Hago mucho ejercicio.

I tend to make the main lunch two times per week – Suelo hacer la comida dos veces a la semana.

I forgot to make the bed today – Se me ha olvidado hacer la cama hoy.

It is very hot – Hace mucho calor.

It is very cold – Hace mucho frio.

The weather is good today – Hace buen tiempo, hoy.

It is a nice day today – Hace un buen día, hoy

The weather is bad – Hace mal tiempo.

To ask a question – Hacer una pregunta.

I want to ask you a question – Quiero hacerte una pregunta.

They ask me too many questions – Me hacen demasiadas preguntas.

It’s been a long time since we have seen each other – Hace mucho tiempo que no nos vimos.

It’s been a long time since we spoke to each other – Hace mucho tiempo que no nos hablamos.

How long has it been since you were in Spain – ¿Hace cuánto tiempo que estuviste en España?

Hecho – Done, made or fact.

This morning I made a fatal error (or big mistake) – Esta mañana he hecho un error fatal.

A fact – Un hecho.

It is an interesting fact – Es un hecho interesante.

In fact – De hecho.

In fact, it is the most popular place for tourists in Spain – De hecho, es el sitio más popular para los turistas en España.

It makes me happy – Me hace feliz.

What he told me made me happy – Lo que me dijo me hizo feliz.

It’s fun – Es divertido.

It’s funny – Es gracioso.

It’s funny – Es extraño.

It makes me laugh – Me hace gracia.

It amused me – Me hizo gracia.

It is missing to me – Me hace falta.

What do I need today? – ¿Que me hace falta hoy?

I do not need your advice – no me hace falta tu consejo.

He is not paying me any attention – No me hace ni caso (He does not make me any attention).

Other episodes mentioned in this podcast:

How else can you use the verb “hacer” in a conversation?

The post Tips 105: Common Spanish Verbs – 9 Uses for the Word “Hacer” appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

May 28 2015

17mins

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Rank #16: Tips 067: Common Spanish Verbs – 5 Uses For The Word “Dar”

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‘Dar’ is one of a small list of common spanish verbs that will have a big impact on your Spanish.

It is another verb that means a lot of different things in a lot of different contexts. Due to this verb’s frequency in the language, it is worth getting to know “dar” a little better.

On today’s podcast, I’m doing another solo round. Which is great because it gives me an opportunity to follow up tip number 51 on the verb “poner“.

In a similar set of phrases to that of “poner”, “dar” provides an opportunity to talk about how certain situations affect our emotions. It’s the translation of “that makes me … sad, happy, nervous, afraid”. In english certain things “make” us feel a certain way, in spanish those things “poner” or “dar” us a certain way.

I’m also going to cover, one of my favourite phrases in Spanish due to it’s poetic feel.

If you have any questions about the use of “dar” let us know in the comments below.

Examples from today’s podcast:

This year I’m going to give more money to charity – Este año voy a dar más dinero a la caridad.

Can you give me some advice? – ¿Me puedes dar un consejo?

It gives me equal (I don’t mind) – Me da igual.

Do you prefer meat or fish – ¿Prefieres la carne o el pescado?

It makes me nervous to speak in public – Me pone nervioso hablar en público.

Fear – Miedo.

I’m afraid to speak in public – Me da miedo hablar en público.

Embarrassment / shame – Vergúenza.

That makes me embarrassed – Me da vergüenza.

What a pity! – ¡Que pena!

I’m sad to leave – Me da pena irme.

It makes me sad to see the old man alone in the park – Me da pena ver al viejo solo en el parque.

To give birth – Dar a luz.

She is about to give birth – Ella está a punto de dar a luz.

To realise something – Darse cuenta de.

I just realised that I have forgot my wallet – Acabo de darme cuenta de que he olvidado mi cartera.

In that moment I realised I had a big problem – En ese momento me di cuenta que tenía un gran problema.

Other episodes mentioned in this podcast:

Quote for today:

“Pues habían vivido juntos lo bastante para darse cuenta de que el amor era el amor en cualquier tiempo y en cualquier parte, pero tanto más denso cuanto más cerca de la muerte.” – Gabriel García Márquez.

How else can you use “dar” in a conversation?

The post Tips 067: Common Spanish Verbs – 5 Uses For The Word “Dar” appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Jan 15 2015

11mins

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Rank #17: Tips 057: How To Use The Spanish Conditional Tense

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Do you know how to express would, could and should in Spanish?

In this tip we will be looking at the Spanish conditional tense. We will give a few examples of how to form this conjugation. And we will give a few common situations where the conditional tense should be used.

The two big positives of this Spanish tense: it’s relatively easy to form and it’s relatively easy to use.

The negatives are that it can be a little bit tongue twisty. And there are some situations where it gets complicated to use.

But, in general, the use of Spanish conditional tense is very similar English. For example, I would like to travel, could you help me?, etc.

I often say to Spanish students that they should focus on vocabulary ahead of grammar. But, as you work your way to a conversational level, today’s tense will be extremely useful.

It is useful because you can ask about peoples dreams and desires. This is a great conversation starter because everybody has a dream or a desire.

If you can use today’s tense well you can open up a whole range of topics with the people you find to practice with.

Other podcast episodes mentioned in today’s tip:

Examples from the episode:

The Spanish conditional conjugation of ‘gustar’:

I would like – Me gustaría.

You would like – Te gustaría.

He would like – Le gustaría.

We would like – Nos gustaría.

You-all would like – Os gustaría.

They would like – Les gustaría.

We would like to travel – Nos gustaría viajar.

The conditional conjugation of ‘comer’:

I would eat – Yo comería.

You would eat – Tú comerías.

He would eat – Él comería.

We would eat – Nosotros comeríamos.

You-all would eat – Vosotros comeríais.

They would eat – Ellos comerían.

The conditional conjugation of ‘poder’:

I could – Yo podría.

You could – Tú podrías.

He could – Él podría.

We could – Nosotros podríamos.

You-all could – Vosotros podríais.

They could – Ellos podrían.

I could do this – Yo podría hacer esto.

I could do something – Yo podría hacer algo.

Spiritual retreat – Retiro Espiritual.

I would like to see animals from a far – Me gustaría ver a los animales de lejos.

Crutches, Pause words – Muletas.

You can get access to the Spanish podcast transcripts and English translations here.

How else could you use the Spanish conditional tense?

The post Tips 057: How To Use The Spanish Conditional Tense appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Dec 11 2014

12mins

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Rank #18: Tips 007: How To Use Verbs Like Gustar To Express Your Ideas

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Verbs like gustar operate in a group of their own. In this episode of the podcast, I discuss ‘gustar’, other similar verbs and how they are used.

This theoretical Thursday builds on last week’s tip including more useful vocabulary that can be used for conversational Spanish. The verbs discussed fit in well with the conversation hacking framework as they are included in the top 1000 most useful Spanish words.

Spanish verbs, in general, can be categorised into two groups of three.

Group 1:

  • Ar verbs
  • Er verbs
  • Ir verbs

Group 2:

  • Normal verbs
  • Verbs like Gustar (discussed in this tip)
  • Reflexive verbs (coming in a later episode)

Verbs discussed in the episode:

  • Gustar – Is pleasing to (to like)
  • Costar – Is costly to (to cost)
  • Doler – Is painful to (to hurt)
  • Importar – Is important to (to matter)
  • Parecer – Is seeming to (to seem)

Indirect object pronouns explained in the episode:

  • Me – Me
  • Te –You
  • Le – Him / Her
  • Nos – Us
  • Os – You-all
  • Les – Them

Examples from the episode:

  • Me gusta la comida – I like the food
  • No me gusta la comida – I don’t like the food
  • Me gusta hablar – I like to speak
  • Me gustan los colores – I like the colours
  • Me cuesta hablar – I find it difficult to speak
  • Me cuesta hablar Español – I find it difficult to speak Spanish
  • Me duele la cabeza – I have a headache
  • Me importa la fiesta – The party is important to me
  • ¿Que te parece la idea? – How does the idea seem to you?
  • Me parece bien – It seems good to me
  • Me parece mal – It seems bad to me

Quote from the podcast episode:
“Me gusta la gente que habla claro desde el principio, que son honestos con lo que sienten, piensan y se muestran tal y como son.” – @BuenaFraseEs

Other verbs that behave in this way are highlighted by using similar definitions as the ones described in this episode in the conversation hacking guide.

The post Tips 007: How To Use Verbs Like Gustar To Express Your Ideas appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Jun 19 2014

13mins

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Rank #19: Tips 087: Spanish Prepositions of Position (Part 2 of 2)

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In this podcast episode you will learn the second half of the prepositions of position. This episode is part 2 of a two part series and follows on from the last theoretical episode.

In last week’s theory episode we looked at how to say above and under as well out or outside and in or inside in Spanish.

This week we are looking at how to say besides, behind, in front of, close, far and in between.

Make sure you choose a few examples from today’s tip and use them with a fellow Spanish student, a teacher or a spanish native.

Examples for today: 

The Other Side of the Bed – El otro lado de la cama (movie Rom-Com).

My apartment is next to a disco (or nightclub) – Mi piso está al lado de una discoteca.

On one hand the fried chips are delicious, on the other hand they aren’t healthy – Por un lado patatas fritas son muy ricas, por otro lado no son saludables.

After the concert we went to a bar – Tras el concierto fuimos a un bar.

After the concert we went to a bar – Después del concierto fuimos a un bar.

Behind the clouds is the sun – Tras las nubes está el sol.

The sun is behind the clouds – El sol está detrás de las nubes.

The parking is behind the building – El aparcamiento está detrás del edificio.

I have a garden out back, I have a back garden – Tengo un jardín atrás.

I can’t see it because it is hidden behind – No lo puedo ver porque está escondido atrás.

I’m not going to say anything in front of her – No voy a decir nada delante de ella.

He took one step forward and two steps back – Él dio un paso adelante y dos pasos atrás.

There is a fountain in front of the house – Hay una fuente en el frente de la casa.

There is a fountain in front of the house – Hay una fuente en frente de la casa.

There is a fountain in front of the house – Hay una fuente enfrente de la casa.

That man is the head of the company – Ese hombre está al frente de la empresa.

The market is close to my house – El mercado está cerca de mi casa.

The airport is far from here – El aeropuerto está lejos de aquí.

The airport is far from here? – ¿El aeropuerto está lejos de aquí?

There is a desert between the two towns – Hay un desierto entre los dos pueblos.

How else can you use these prepositions of position in a sentence?

The post Tips 087: Spanish Prepositions of Position (Part 2 of 2) appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Mar 26 2015

13mins

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Rank #20: Tips 009: Para Ser – In Order To Be

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In this episode of the Real Fast Spanish Tips Podcast you will get to hear a fresh approach to an old problem.

Words such as ‘ser’ vs ‘estar’ and ‘por’ vs ‘para’ tend to cause a lot of confusion. One of the reasons that I believe these words tend to cause so much confusion is that they are always taught side by side. Meaning that when you learn these words you tend to be given a list of situations that ‘ser’ should be used and another set of situations where ‘estar’ should be used at the same time and then later you need to recall these two lists in order to apply the right word.

When you reach a higher level of Spanish these words tend to become more intuitive, so in this episode I’m going cover these words in a different way in an effort to help you get to an intuitive level faster.

Rather than list them side by side with a set of rules, in this episode we introduce only ‘ser’ and ‘para’ and a set of common expressions that will allow you to express your ideas without the need to refer to a set of rules.

I will cover ‘estar’ and ‘por’ in a later episode.

So for this tip you will learn:

  • Some common expressions for using para
  • Some common expressions for using ser
  • Some expressions that combine Spanish-English cognates and a passive voice with ser
  • How to state your country of origin and a tip for working out the gender of your country.

Mentioned in this episode:

– For more information on the etymology for ‘ser’ and ‘estar’ in Spanish and ‘to be’ in english have a look at this interesting article on Wikipedia on ‘Romance Copula

– A reference to the Spanish-English cognates post – 1001 Spanish-English cognates

– For the gender exercise head over to https://translate.google.com/ and use the sentence “She is American” or replace american with your country of choice to determine the proper gender of your country.

Expression examples from the episode:

For me – Para mí

For you – Para ti

It’s for me – Es para mí

It’s not for your, it’s for me – No es para ti, es para mí

It’s not for him, it’s for me – No es para él, es para mí

It’s not for her, it’s for me – No es para ella, es para mí

The food is not for her, it’s for me – La comida no es para ella, es para mí

I have food for you – Tengo comida para ti

I have something for you – Tengo algo para ti

I have food for you for tonight – Tengo comida para ti para esta noche

It’s possible – Es posible

It’s interesting – Es interesante

It’s horrible – Es horrible

It’s important – Es importante

For me it is interesting – Para mí es interesante

For me it is not necesario – Para mí no es necesario

For me it is interesting – Para mí es interesante

In order to have money – Para tener dinero

In order to have money you need to find a job – Para tener dinero necesitas encontrar un trabajo

In order to find a job you need an education – Para encontrar trabajo necesitas una educación

In order to speak Spanish you need to practice – Para hablar español necesitas practicar

In order to have a conversation you need to practice – Para tener una conversación necesitas practicar español

The man leaves for the restaurante – El hombre sale para el restaurante

The man leaves for Madrid – El hombre sale para Madrid

I’m Australian – Soy Australiano

I’m from Australia – Soy de Australia

I’m American – Soy Americano

I’m American (female) – Soy Americana

I’m from the United States – Soy de Estados Unidos

I’m Japanese – Soy Japonés

I’m Japanese (female) – Soy Japonesa

I’m from Japan – Soy de Japón

He is English – Él es inglés

She is English – Ella es inglesa

I’m a teacher – Soy maestro

I’m a doctor – Soy medico

In order to be – Para ser

I study in order to be a teacher – Estudio para ser maestro

I study in order to be a doctor – Estudio para ser medico

Quote from this podcast episode:

“No hay mejor momento para ser feliz que ahora mismo” – Unknown Author

How can you use ‘ser’ y ‘para’?

The post Tips 009: Para Ser – In Order To Be appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Jun 26 2014

25mins

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