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The Real Fast Spanish Tips Podcast

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Education
Language Learning
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Learn Real Spanish Fast and Stay Motivated

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Learn Real Spanish Fast and Stay Motivated

iTunes Ratings

49 Ratings
Average Ratings
28
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5
4
4

Great

By Gregpierko1966 - Nov 02 2016
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Best podcast for learning Spanish

Spanish Learner

By Charlie 5001 - Sep 12 2014
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What a great podcast! Que bueno! Andrew really understands the spirit of a good podcast.

iTunes Ratings

49 Ratings
Average Ratings
28
8
5
4
4

Great

By Gregpierko1966 - Nov 02 2016
Read more
Best podcast for learning Spanish

Spanish Learner

By Charlie 5001 - Sep 12 2014
Read more
What a great podcast! Que bueno! Andrew really understands the spirit of a good podcast.

Best weekly hand curated episodes for learning

Cover image of The Real Fast Spanish Tips Podcast

The Real Fast Spanish Tips Podcast

Latest release on Jan 21, 2016

Best weekly hand curated episodes for learning

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 1 day ago

Rank #1: Tips 111: Common Spanish Verbs – 6 Uses for the Verb “Acabar”

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Can you explain when you use “to end” and “to finish” in English? If so, you can apply the idea to the Spanish verbs “acabar” and “terminar”. 

This week’s Spanish theory episode is dedicated to the common spanish verb “acabar”.

In many of the examples in today’s podcast the Spanish verb “terminar” and “acabar” are interchangeable. But, just like in English, there are a few situations when you can only use one or the other.

In today’s podcast you will find out how to use ‘acabar’ in a conversation and some of it’s important uses with Spanish prepositions. If you have any questions, you can leave them below.

If you want to be conversational in Spanish, check out The Real Fast Spanish School. In the school,  you can access all of the training at Real Fast Spanish designed to help you reach a conversation level of Spanish as effectively as possible.

Examples from today’s podcast:

I finish work at 5 – Termino mi trabajo a las 5.

I finish work at 5 – Acabo mi trabajo a las 5.

I don’t like how the movie ends – No me gusta cómo acaba la película.

Sofia and I are ended – Sofia y yo hemos acabado.

The word ‘university’ ends in the letter D – La palabra ‘universidad’ acaba en la letra D.

The dinner ended in drinks until 3 am – La cena acabó en copas hasta las 3 de la madrugada.

My trip to Europe ended in Paris – Mi viaje a Europa acabó en París.

I just finished my homework – acabo de terminar mis deberes.

She just called the doctor – Ella acaba de llamar al médico.

I just do not understand – No acabo de entenderlo.

Guys just don’t understand women – Los chicos no acaban de entender las mujeres.

He ended up working at McDonalds – Él acabó trabajando en McDonalds.

After much sacrifice and dedication, he ended up being a very famous actor – Después de mucho sacrificio y dedicación, él acabó siendo actor muy famoso.

My boss ended the discussion by slamming a fist on the table – Mi jefe acabó con la discusión en un golpe en la mesa.

Police ended the drug problem in my neighborhood – la policía acabó con el problema de la droga en mi barrio.

Teacher comments ended my hopes of passing the exam – Los comentarios del profesor acabaron con mis esperanzas de aprobar el examen.

How else can you use the Spanish verb “acabar” in a conversation?

The post Tips 111: Common Spanish Verbs – 6 Uses for the Verb “Acabar” appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Jun 18 2015

12mins

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Rank #2: Tips 041: 3 Common Ways To Use “Llevar” In A Conversation

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The word “llevar” is one of the most versatile words in the Spanish language. There are 23 uses for “llevar” listed in my Spanish to Spanish dictionary.

But in today’s episode of the podcast, we will be looking at 3 common uses. We will look at one, in particular, that is extremely useful for getting to know someone.

I have had a few questions from subscribers recently that have asked for me to cover this tricky word. It is very similar to the word ‘poner‘ which has a lot of different uses as well. Of course, you don’t need to know all 23 the uses of ‘llevar’. But you should get to know the 3 that we are going to look at today.

Other episodes mentioned:

Examples from the episode:

To take away – Para llevar.

To take away or to eat here – Para llevar o para tomar aquí.

To eat here – Para tomar aquí.

I can’t carry anything else – No puedo llevar nada más.

You have to carry a lot of water – Tienes que llevar mucha agua.

To wear clothes – Llevar ropa.

She is always wearing fashionable clothing – Ella siempre lleva ropa de moda.

I think it’s important that people wear clothes for the situation – Creo que es importante que la gente lleva ropa por la situación.

In fashion – de moda.

Fashion label clothing – Ropa de marca.

Do you like to wear fashionable clothes – ¿Te gusta llevar ropa de marca?

It depends on the situation. When I go out I like to wear brand clothes but at home I tend to wear unbranded clothes. – Depende de la situación. Cuando salgo me gusta llevar ropa de marca, pero en casa suelo llevar ropa de marca blanca.

Off label – marca blanca.

How long have you been learning Spanish? – ¿Cuánto tiempo llevas aprendiendo español?

I have been learning spanish for 2 years – Llevo aprendiendo español durante dos años.

How long have you been working at the school – ¿Cuánto tiempo llevas trabajando en la escuela?

I have been living in Melbourne for 12 years – Llevo viviendo en Melbourne doce años.

I have been living in Melbourne since 2002 – Llevo viviendo en Melbourne desde 2002.

To have been doing something for a long time – llevar mucho tiempo haciendo algo.

Quote for today:

“No pienses tanto solo dejate llevar” – Don’t over think it, just go with the flow.

How can you use “llevar” in a sentence?

The post Tips 041: 3 Common Ways To Use “Llevar” In A Conversation appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Oct 16 2014

11mins

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Rank #3: Tips 055: Pretérito Indefinido – The Simple Spanish Past Tense

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This week on the Real Fast Spanish Tips podcast we will be looking at another Spanish past tense.

This Spanish past tense is called ‘Pretérito Indefinido’ or ‘Pasado Indefinido’.

As well as introducing a new past tense, we introduce a new guest. The new guest on the podcast is a friend of mine from Barcelona, Maria Piñero.

As Maria is from Barcelona, it means she can speak Catalan as well as Spanish.

I want to keep things simple, so for starters, I’m going to avoid asking Maria to show us her Catalan. But if we have enough requests from the listeners we might preview some Catalan in an upcoming episode.

I’m excited to have another guest from Spain to help us develop our skills further. Maria has a lot tutoring experience in Spanish and provides a great opportunity for some more Spanish conversation practice.

Now, with introductions aside, we can start to look at today’s discussion topic.

A few weeks ago we introduced the ‘past imperfect‘ Spanish tense. In tip number 15 ‘A Hack For The Past‘, we introduced the ‘present perfect’ tense. Make sure you know these two tenses first. So if you need to do some revision head back before continuing on. If you are happy with those tenses then you can look at the ‘Pretérito Indefinido’ tense or Spanish past simple tense.

Unlike the ‘past imperfect’ tense, the past simple tense is used for describing events that have a defined beginning and end.

If an event happened last week and it represented a specific moment in time you will use the past simple tense. If the event happened repeatedly in the past and had no defined start and finish you use the past imperfect tense.

And sometimes you will need to use the two tenses in combination. We will look at a few cases of this in the podcast.

Examples from the episode:

The past simple conjugation of ‘hablar’:

I spoke – Yo hablé.

You spoke – Tú hablaste.

He spoke – Él habló.

We spoke – Nosotros hablamos.

You-all spoke – Vosotros hablasteis.

They spoke – Ellos hablaron.

The past simple conjugation of ‘comer’:

I ate – Yo comí.

You ate – Tú comiste.

He ate – Él comió.

We ate – Nosotros comimos.

You-all ate – Vosotros conisteis.

They ate – Ellos comieron.

The past simple conjugation of ‘decir’:

I said – Yo dije.

You said – Tú dijiste.

He said – Él dijo.

We said – Nosotros dijimos.

You-all said – Vosotros dijisteis.

They said – Ellos dijeron.

She told me that… – Me dijo que…

I told her that … – Le dije que…

You told me…. – Me dijiste…

I met a guy and his name was Jose – Conocí un hombre y su nombre era Jose.

Last week, I was at the movies and the movie was very entertaining – La semana pasada estuve en el cine y la pelicula era muy entretenida.

Asian – Asiático.

Cinnamon – Canela.

You can get access to the Spanish podcast transcripts and English translations here.

The post Tips 055: Pretérito Indefinido – The Simple Spanish Past Tense appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Dec 04 2014

11mins

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Rank #4: Tips 051: 3 Spanish Phrases With The Verb ‘Poner’

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‘Poner’ is one of a small list of Spanish verbs with a huge assortment of common uses. There are 28 uses for “poner” listed in my Spanish to Spanish dictionary.

Some uses of ‘poner’ are more frequent than others. In today’s podcast, I will look a few of the most useful contexts for this common verb. 

Like many words in the Spanish language there are more situations to use ‘poner’ than you can poke a stick at. But clichéd introductions aside.

It is a really useful verb and sometimes if you want to get to conversational level of Spanish it is worth slowing down to speed up. That means dissecting one word at a time. Becoming really comfortable with just one word’s uses inside and out. And then moving on.

Sometimes, it is better to go 5 miles deep and 1 inch wide than 1 inch deep and 5 miles wide. Wow, I’m really in a cliché mood today. But, hopefully the point is clear. Being conversational in Spanish means knowing a few common words really well than a lot of less frequent words poorly.

Examples from today’s podcast:
She puts the clothes on the shelf – Ella pone la ropa en la estantería.

I thought I put my keys on the table – Pensaba que puse las llaves en la mesa.

Get me a beer – Ponme una cerveza.

Get me a beer, please – Ponme una cerveza, por favor.

Get me a tortilla, please – Ponme una tortilla, por favor.

It makes me happy – Me alegro.

It makes me happy (content) – Me pone contento.

It makes me happy to spend time with my friends – Me pone contento pasar tiempo con mis amigos.

They make me sad – Me ponen triste.

Always the end of the year (New Years Eves) makes me sad – Siempre los fines de año me ponen triste.

It makes me very nervous to fly during a big storm – Me pone muy nervioso viajar en avión durante una tormenta grande.

It makes me nervous to speak in public – Me pone nervioso hablar en público.

Does it make your nervous to speak in public? – ¿Te pone nervioso hablar en público?

It puts me in a good mood – Me pone de buen humor.

When I see your smile, it always puts me in a good mood – Cuando veo tu sonrisa siempre me pone de buen humor.

It puts me in a bad mood – Me pone de mal humor.

It puts me in a bad mood when I have to work late – Me pone de mal humor cuando tengo que trabajar tarde.

You make me nervous with so many questions – Me pones nervioso con tanta pregunta.

To cheat on someone – Poner los cuernos.

I think that my girlfriend is cheating on me – Creo que mi novia me está poniendo los cuernos.

Other episdoes mentioned in this podcast:

Quote for today:

“Tener un secreto tan gordo dentro de mi cerebro me ponía muy nervioso.” – Elvira Lindo (Manoito Gafotas)

How else can you use “poner” in a conversation?

The post Tips 051: 3 Spanish Phrases With The Verb ‘Poner’ appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Nov 20 2014

12mins

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Rank #5: Tips 004: An Introduction To The 7 Principles Of Conversation Hacking

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In this episode of the Real Fast Spanish Tips Podcast I introduce the 7 principles of conversation hacking.

Conversation hacking is one of the best techniques I know to get to a conversational level in Spanish as fast as possible. If you are learning Spanish and haven’t reached a conversational level yet then it is worth reviewing the principles of the conversation hacking method.

Quote from the podcast episode:

“Love without conversation is impossible.” – Mortimer Adler (1902 – 2001)

In This Tip, You Will Hear About:

  • 2 Approaches you can take to learn a language – read more here
  • The 7 Principles Of Conversation Hacking:
  1. Fluency is not the goal
  2. Not all words are created equally – spanish frequency study
  3. Not all grammar rules are created equally – see grammar hacking rules
  4. Total vocabulary and total grammar does not equal effective usable vocabulary and grammar
  5. Listening comprehension is improved by active listening and context – active listening course
  6. Spanish pronunciation requires focus on a few distinct sounds
  7. Conversational skills in general need to be developed

Conversation exchange websites:

http://www.italki.com/

https://www.verbling.com/

http://www.conversationexchange.com/

If you want to learn more check out the conversation hacking guide here.

The guide includes:

  • Top 1000 words for conversation hacking spanish
  • 13 Spanish grammar hacking sentences
  • Sounds to focus on for pronunciation
  • Conversational skills questions and tips
  • Language learning mindset tips

The post Tips 004: An Introduction To The 7 Principles Of Conversation Hacking appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Jun 07 2014

27mins

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Rank #6: Tips 097: Common Spanish Verbs – 7 Uses for the Word “Llegar”

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In this week’s theory podcast we take a close look at the verb “llegar”.

“Llegar” is a common Spanish verb and generally gets used correctly by native English students but there are more ways to use this verb than what you may expect. 

In today’s podcast I have broken out the use of “llegar” into two categories: literal and figurative use of the idea.

What do I mean? Well, “llegar” means to arrive, you can, therefore, use it when literally arriving at a destination or at a given time. But, you can also use “llegar” when arriving at a conclusion, an agreement, a deal or to become something.

Check out today’s podcast for all of the examples for the use of “llegar” and leave a comment below if you have any questions or you know some other uses of “llegar” and want to add to the conversation.

Also, in today’s tip, I make a big announcement. I have changed the way the courses are offered at Real Fast Spanish. Now all of the courses are in one place. This month, I’m launching the Real Fast Spanish School. The school will be an online membership and when you sign up you will have access to everything! This means you will have access to every course produced at Real Fast Spanish.

Now you don’t have to choose between courses as you will have access to everything. Instead, you need to decide if you would like a curriculum based on the principles discussed at Real Fast Spanish and in the podcast. If you are interested, you can sign up for the school here: Real Fast Spanish School.

Other episodes mentioned in this tip: 

Examples from the episode:

The train arrived at the station – El tren llegó a la estación.

I will arrive in Madrid on Tuesday – Llegaré a Madrid el martes.

To be early – Llegar pronto.

To be on time – Llegar a tiempo.

To be late – Llegar tarde.

I’m sorry for being late – Lo siento por llegar tarde.

The time has arrived to tell me the truth – Llegó la hora de decirme la verdad.

Come to think / Conclude – Llegar a pensar.

You might think that it is worth studying another language – Se podría llegar a pensar que vale la pena estudiar otro idioma.

To become (slowly or over a long difficult path) – Llegar a ser.

The pain becomes unbearable – El dolor llega a ser insoportable.

To close a deal – Llegar a cerrar un trato.

After a while, they came to close a deal – Después de mucho tiempo, llegaron a cerrar un trato.

To compromise, reach an agreement – Llegar a un acuerdo.

The most important thing in a relationship is being able to compromise – Lo más importante en una relación es la capacidad de llegar a un acuerdo

How else can you use “llegar” in a Spanish sentence?

The post Tips 097: Common Spanish Verbs – 7 Uses for the Word “Llegar” appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Apr 30 2015

16mins

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Rank #7: Tips 075: The 4 Past Spanish Translations of ‘Was’

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One long term ongoing test for english students learning Spanish is the difference between ‘ser’ and ‘estar’. For me these two words remind me of studying physics—as you move up the levels they keep telling you to forget the previous rules you have already learned.

As if these two words weren’t confusing enough, you also have to adapt to a number of different ways of talking about the past in Spanish. What this means is that the translation of ‘was’ can present a challenge.

In today’s spanish theory podcast, we are focusing on the 4 possible past spanish translations of was. I’m going to give a number of examples of each to test and reinforce your knowledge.

The four possible translations of ‘I was’ in Spanish are:

Fui – The indefinido of ser.

Era – The imperfect of ser.

Estuve – The indefinido of estar.

Estaba – The imperfect of estar.

Here is the list of conjugations of ser in the past simple:

Past simple of Ser
I was
Fui
You were
Fuiste
He / She was
Fue
We were
Fuimos
You-all were
Fuisteis
They were
Fueron

Here is the list of conjugations of ser in the past imperfect:

Imperfecto of Ser
I was
Era
You were
Eras
He / She was
Era
We were
Éramos
You-all were
erais
They were
eran

Here is the list of conjugations of estar in the past simple:

Past simple of Estar
I was
Estuve
You were
Estuviste
He / She was
Estuvo
We were
Estuvimos
You-all were
Estuvisteis
They were
Estuvieron

Here is the list of conjugations of estar in the past imperfect:

Imperfecto of Estar
I was
Estaba
You were
Estabas
He / She was
Estaba
We were
Estábamos
You-all were
Estabais
They were
Estaban

If you really want to get the most out of today’s podcast, write out a few examples of your own to help embed what you have learned in your long term memory.

Podcast episodes mentioned in this podcast:

Examples form today’s episode:

Last week I went to a party and it was a lot of fun – La semana pasada fui a una fiesta y fue muy divertida.

When I was young I used to swim a lot – Cuando era pequeño nadaba mucho.

Last week I was really busy – La semana pasada estuve muy ocupado.

I met a girl last week and she was very pretty – Conocí a una chica la semana pasada y ella era muy guapa.

Yesterday, I was at home alone when all of sudden I heard a noise – Ayer, estaba solo en casa cuando de repente oí un ruido.

In 2003, despite my money problems I was able to survive. It was thanks to a good friend who helped me – En 2003, a pesar de mis problemas de dinero pude sobrevivir. Fue gracias a un buen amigo que me ayudó.

At first I thought it was really boring but later it was much better – Al principio pensé que era muy aburrido, pero más tarde fue mucho mejor.

Well, it was a new dress – Bueno, era un vestido nuevo.

I had to go to class last night. The class was at 9 – Tuve que ir a clase anoche. La clase fue a las 9.

On Sunday, I was speaking with my mum for 3 hours – El domingo estuve hablando con mi madre durante 3 horas.

Last time I saw them, they were on the table – La última vez que las vi, estaban sobre la mesa.

I remember before she found her new job, she was very unhappy – Me acuerdo que antes de encontrar su nuevo trabajo, ella estaba muy descontenta.

When were you in class? – ¿Cuando estuviste en clase?

It was tuesday – Fue el martes.

My ex-housemate was never ready on time – Mi ex-compañero de casa nunca estaba listo a tiempo.

My great grandparents were from Scotland – Mis bisabuelos eran de Escocia.

What are some other examples of the spanish translations of was?

The post Tips 075: The 4 Past Spanish Translations of ‘Was’ appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Feb 12 2015

13mins

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Rank #8: Tips 048: 4 Crucial Steps For Improving Your Listening Comprehension

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As I stood there listening to her, I understood nothing. Not a word. Why after all this time of practicing was my comprehension so poor?

I thought I have failed at Spanish and at life. But after my lowest moment, I learnt one valuable lesson.

I learnt that listening comprehension can be improved. And the best way to improve my listening comprehension was in high stakes scenarios.

Before I go too much further, I need to introduce the most common piece of advice you may hear for improving your listening comprehension. You should use passive listening. This is common advice. It didn’t work for me. Not even a little bit.

The idea of passive listening is that you expose your ears the sounds of Spanish by listening while you go to sleep, wash the dishes or drive to work. Don’t get me wrong, listening in the car is a great way to learn Spanish. But I hit a plateau from hours of passive listening. I couldn’t improve. And when I found myself in a real Spanish conversation I understood almost nothing.

Yet the advice continues. I don’t know why. Maybe it works for some people?

The alternative is active listening. This is where you are forced to actively engage in what you have heard. I designed the course Fluent Spanish Listening with this in mind. But there is one step better than an active listening course.

Have a real conversation with a real person. This is what I call high stakes active listening.

It’s high stakes because there is a lot on the line. Your pride. If you don’t understand then you will look silly. This added element of risk forces you to concentrate and focus. If there isn’t anything on the line, it’s too easy to lose focus.

In today’s podcast episode I’m going to explain the four steps for improving your listening comprehension based on what worked for me.

The four steps are:

0. Learn more Spanish.

1. Practice active listening in high stakes scenarios.

2. Practice active listening in general.

3. Practice passive listening.

“There’s a lot of difference between listening and hearing.” – G.K. Chesterton

How can you improve your listening comprehension?

The post Tips 048: 4 Crucial Steps For Improving Your Listening Comprehension appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Nov 10 2014

20mins

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Rank #9: Tips 109: How to Use the Spanish Verb “Hay”

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“Hay” is a unique Spanish verb. It is related to the verb “haber” or commonly referred to as the impersonal form of “haber”.

In today’s podcast, you will learn how to use the verb “hay” in the past, present and future. You will also learn how to use the impersonal phrase with the verb “hay” to express obligation. 

Check out today’s podcast for all of the details. If you have any questions or thoughts you can leave a comment below.

If you want to be conversational in Spanish, check out The Real Fast Spanish School. In the school,  you can access all of the training at Real Fast Spanish designed to help you reach a conversation level of Spanish as effectively as possible.

Examples from today’s podcast:

There is a lot of noise here – Hay mucho ruido aquí.

Is there a good place to eat around here? – ¿Hay un buen lugar para comer por aquí?

Is there a good place to drink something around here? – ¿Hay un buen lugar para tomar algo por aquí?

Is there a good place to speak around here? – ¿Hay un buen lugar para hablar por aquí?

There was a party in the apartment upstairs last night anoche. It was very noisy. – Hubo una fiesta en el piso de arriba anoche. Fue muy ruidosa.

Last week there was a day I’m never going to forget – La semana pasada hubo un día que nunca voy a olvidar.

When I was little there were very fun moments – Cuando era pequeño había momentos muy divertidos.

We laughed at a joke that there was between us – Nos reímos de una broma que había entre nosotros.

Next week there will be a church wedding – La semana que viene habrá una boda en la iglesia.

In the future there will be cars that can fly – En el futuro habrá coches que pueden volar.

One must not tell lies – No hay que decir mentiras.

If one wants to speak Spanish one has to practice every day – Si se quiere hablar español hay que practicar todos los días.

Other episodes mentioned in this podcast:

How else can you use the Spanish verb “hay” in a conversation?

The post Tips 109: How to Use the Spanish Verb “Hay” appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Jun 11 2015

12mins

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Rank #10: Tips 105: Common Spanish Verbs – 9 Uses for the Word “Hacer”

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How well can you make do in Spanish? This week, for the theoretical Spanish podcast, you will learn about the uses of the verb ‘hacer’.

Of course, ‘hacer’ doesn’t just mean ‘to make’ or ‘to do’, there are 8 other ways that you can use this common Spanish verb. 

Check out today’s podcast for all of the details. If you have any questions or thoughts you can leave a comment below.

If you want to be conversational in Spanish, check out The Real Fast Spanish School. In the school,  you can access all of the training designed to help you reach a conversation level of Spanish as effectively as possible.

The present conjugation of ‘Hacer’:

I do – Yo hago.

You do – Tú haces.

He does – Él hace.

We do – Nosotros hacemos.

You-all do – Vosotros hacéis.

They do – Ellos hacen.

Examples from today’s podcast:

What did you do on the weekend? – Que hiciste el fin de semana?

I do a lot of exercise – Hago mucho ejercicio.

I tend to make the main lunch two times per week – Suelo hacer la comida dos veces a la semana.

I forgot to make the bed today – Se me ha olvidado hacer la cama hoy.

It is very hot – Hace mucho calor.

It is very cold – Hace mucho frio.

The weather is good today – Hace buen tiempo, hoy.

It is a nice day today – Hace un buen día, hoy

The weather is bad – Hace mal tiempo.

To ask a question – Hacer una pregunta.

I want to ask you a question – Quiero hacerte una pregunta.

They ask me too many questions – Me hacen demasiadas preguntas.

It’s been a long time since we have seen each other – Hace mucho tiempo que no nos vimos.

It’s been a long time since we spoke to each other – Hace mucho tiempo que no nos hablamos.

How long has it been since you were in Spain – ¿Hace cuánto tiempo que estuviste en España?

Hecho – Done, made or fact.

This morning I made a fatal error (or big mistake) – Esta mañana he hecho un error fatal.

A fact – Un hecho.

It is an interesting fact – Es un hecho interesante.

In fact – De hecho.

In fact, it is the most popular place for tourists in Spain – De hecho, es el sitio más popular para los turistas en España.

It makes me happy – Me hace feliz.

What he told me made me happy – Lo que me dijo me hizo feliz.

It’s fun – Es divertido.

It’s funny – Es gracioso.

It’s funny – Es extraño.

It makes me laugh – Me hace gracia.

It amused me – Me hizo gracia.

It is missing to me – Me hace falta.

What do I need today? – ¿Que me hace falta hoy?

I do not need your advice – no me hace falta tu consejo.

He is not paying me any attention – No me hace ni caso (He does not make me any attention).

Other episodes mentioned in this podcast:

How else can you use the verb “hacer” in a conversation?

The post Tips 105: Common Spanish Verbs – 9 Uses for the Word “Hacer” appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

May 28 2015

17mins

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Rank #11: Tips 101: Olvidar vs Olvidarse – How to Forget in Spanish

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Is forgetting in Spanish as simple as forgetting in English? If you want to forget in Spanish or at least express the idea, there are three ways you can do it.

This week explore how the verb ‘olvidar’ is used and how the idea of something forgotten in Spanish differs from how we are used to it in English. 

There are 5 main ideas around the use of verb ‘olvidar’ that we explore in today’s Spanish podcast.

Firstly we talk about how forgetting is usually something that happens in the past. I forgot to tell you… I forgot what I was going to say…

Then we explore the three common forms the verb ‘olvidar’: normal, reflexive and passive.

Then lastly we talk about how ‘olvidado’ is used in combination with the verb ‘estar’ to talk about ‘something forgotten’.

Check out today’s theory podcast for all of the details. If you have any questions, you can leave a comment below.

If you want to take your spanish to the next level, you can now access all of the training courses at Real Fast Spanish now all in the one place—The Real Fast Spanish School. In the school,  you can access all of the training material focused on helping you reach a conversation level of Spanish using the principles of conversation hacking.

Examples from the episode:

I always forget my mobile – Siempre olvido mi móvil.

Why do I always forget my girlfriend’s birthday – ¿Por qué siempre me olvido del cumpleaños de mi novia?

I forgot the tickets – Olvidé las entradas.

I forgot the tickets – He olvidado las entradas.

I forgot about the tickets – Me olvidé de las entradas.

Did you forget to going to the market? – ¿Te has olvidado de ir al mercado?

I forgot the tickets – Se me olvidaron las entradas.

My English is a little forgotten – Mi inglés está un poco olvidado.

My Spanish is a little forgotten – Mi español está un poco olvidado.

If you want to forget in Spanish, how else can you use ‘olvidar’ or ‘olvidarse’?

The post Tips 101: Olvidar vs Olvidarse – How to Forget in Spanish appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

May 14 2015

10mins

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Rank #12: Tips 103: Common Spanish Verbs – 7 Uses for the Word “Pasar”

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The verb ‘pasar‘ is in the top 10 most common regular Spanish verbs. It occurs frequently, it is useful and easy to conjugate.

But, it is used in a lot of different situations and contexts, which means we still need to set aside some time to take a closer look at this important Spanish verb.

So, in today’s podcast, we are going to look at some of the most common uses of pasar.

Pasar‘ can be used to talk about spending time, asking what about is happening, talking about a change in a situation, as a request to pass something and even to express lack of interest in a topic.

Check out today’s podcast for all of the details. If you have any questions or thoughts you can leave a comment below.

If you want to be conversational in Spanish, check out The Real Fast Spanish School. In the school,  you can access all of the training designed to help you reach a conversation level of Spanish as effectively as possible.

Examples from today’s podcast:

She spends lots of time practicing Spanish – Ella pasa mucho tiempo practicando su español.

She spends lots of time practicing Spanish – Ella pasa mucho tiempo entrenando su voz.

What’s going on? – ¿Qué pasa?

Everything is well – Todo está bien.

All good – Todo bien.

Have a great time – Pásalo bien.

Have a great time on the trip – Pásalo bien el viaje.

Have a great time on the weekend – Pásalo bien el finde.

Have a great time with your brother – Pásalo bien con tu hermano.

Pass me the salt, please – Pásame la sal, por favor.

Although the restaurant is now empty, it will be filled soon – Aunque el restaurante ahora está vacío, pasará a estar lleno muy pronto.

Juan is single but will be married soon – Juan está soltero pero pasará a estar casado pronto.

I don’t care about anything, I couldn’t care less about anything – Paso de todo.

He doesn’t care about anything – Él pasa de todo.

I’m not into the bullfighting – Paso de los toros.

I’m not into sport – Paso del deporte.

Leave me alone – Pasa de mí. (Déjame en paz).

I couldn’t care less about you – Paso de ti.

To pass by – Pasar de largo. (pass without stopping).

I just saw Elena walk right by – Acabo de ver a Elena pasa de largo.

The rice is overcooked – Se me ha pasado el arroz. (The rice has passed to me).

The meat is overcooked – Se me ha pasado la carne. (The meat has passed to me).

It has gone off – Se ha puesto mala. (it has put itself bad).

The rice is going to be overcooked to you – Se te va a pasar el arroz.

Other episodes mentioned in this podcast:

How else can you use the verb “pasar” in a conversation?

The post Tips 103: Common Spanish Verbs – 7 Uses for the Word “Pasar” appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

May 21 2015

15mins

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Rank #13: Tips 050: How To Think In Spanish

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If I could think in Spanish then I could speak in Spanish. If I could think in Spanish then I good do anything in Spanish.

How then can I start to think in Spanish?

There is no secret to thinking in Spanish. You just start.

You don’t need permission. You don’t need a certain level of Spanish. You don’t need a particular set of vocabulary or grammar in your long term memory. You just start.

So what should I think about? There are lots of scenarios you could try. In fact, there are thousands of combinations. Maybe you are trying to get a gig as a wedding singer. Or maybe you lost your pet lizard and need help from the locals in order to find it. You just start.

We all have an inner monologue. Unless, you have a special conditions that doesn’t allow the inner voice to speak. Or maybe you have control over your inner voice that rivals that of a buddhist monk. Either way. You just start.

In today’s episode of the Real Fast Spanish Tips podcast. We will look at the techniques you can use to start thinking in Spanish. We discuss where you could try to think in Spanish and some of the scenarios you could experiment with. But, as I have pointed out already, there is no secret. You just start.

In the podcast, I give you a few scenarios. There are plenty more than this. But this list is to help you start brainstorming:

  1. Ordering food in a cafe
  2. Proposing to someone
  3. Negotiating a deal (buying a car)
  4. A job interview
  5. Asking for a rare book in a rare book bookshop
  6. Explaining to someone why you were eavesdropping (how you going to get out of that one)
  7. Quitting your job (could you do that politely in Spanish, what would you say)
  8. Confronting a jealous lover and explaining that you haven’t been cheating on them. (poner los cuernos) (no te pongo los cuernos)
  9. How about if you are woman and you have to explain to your boyfriend you are pregnant. (would you break the news softly and spread out or are you going to take the bandaid and just rip it off)
  10. How about teasing a secret out of somebody. (how would you gain their trust)

Quote from the episode:

“You can build great wisdom and genius by spending time each day in grateful communion with your inner voice.” – Dr. John F. Demartini

How else can you start thinking in Spanish?

The post Tips 050: How To Think In Spanish appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Nov 17 2014

12mins

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Rank #14: Tips 005: Your First 10 Spanish Words

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In this episode of the Real Fast Spanish Tips Podcast I introduce the first 10 words of the conversation hacking high frequency vocabulary.

These first ten words are chosen based on the a combination of frequency, utility and my own personal experience with using the language during my Spanish adventures.

Quote from the podcast episode:

“Pero no hablar contigo es como tener el mismo mal día, una y otra vez.” – Carolina Pineda

In this tip, you will learn about:

  • The new routine for the podcast
  • The first important 10 Spanish words
  • Basic verb conjugations
# Español English 1 yo I 2 querer to want 3 este this 4 sí yes 5 no no 6 poder to be able to 7 hablar to speak 8 encontrar to find 9 tener to have 10 necesitar to need

Examples from the episode:

– First person conjugation of “Querer”: Quiero (I want)

– Yo quiero este (I want this)

– Yo quiero esto (I want this unknown gender for this)

– Quiero este (drop the pronoun “yo”)

– No quiero este (I don’t want this)

– Hablo Español (I speak Spanish)

– No hablo Español (I don’t speak Spanish)

– No puedo hablar Español (I can’t speak Spanish)

– No necesito este (I don’t need this)

– Quiero encontrar este (I want to find this)

– No puedo encontrar este (I can’t find this)

If you want to learn more check out the conversation hacking guide here.

The guide includes:

  • Top 1000 words for conversation hacking spanish
  • 13 Spanish grammar hacking sentences
  • Sounds to focus on for pronunciation
  • Conversational skills questions and tips
  • Language learning mindset tips

The post Tips 005: Your First 10 Spanish Words appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Jun 12 2014

12mins

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Rank #15: Tips 039: 15 Different Ways To Express Frequency In Spanish

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If you want to express frequency in Spanish then you should get to know at least one of the phrases in today’s podcast.

We are going to look at 15 different ways to express frequency starting from the least, “never ever”, to the most, “every day”.

To start with, if you want to ask someone ‘how often’ you could use:

¿Cada cuánto…?

or

¿Cada cuánto tiempo … ? or

For example:

How often do you practice your Spanish – ¿cada cuanto prácticas tu español?

In the episode I will walk through each one of these phrases and provide an example for each.

Examples from the episode:

Nunca jamas – Absolutely never.

I’m never going to smoke again – Yo nunca jamás voy a fumar otra vez.

Nunca – Never.

I’m never going to speak with him – Nunca voy a hablar con él.

Casi nunca – almost never.

He is a very lazy person, he almost never does anything – Él es una persona muy perezosa, casi nunca hace nada.

De vez en cuando – from time to time.

From time to time it’s important to ask the difficult questions – De vez en cuando es importante hacer las preguntas difíciles.

To ask questions – Hacer preguntas.

A veces – sometimes.

Sometimes I like to break the rules – A veces me gusta romper las reglas.

A menudo – often.

I meet up with my parents often – Quedo con mis padres a menudo / mucho.

Frecuentemente – frequently.

My friend clears up my doubts frequently – Mi amiga me saca de dudas frecuentemente.

To remove doubt – sacar de dudas.

Cada (#) días.

I do exercise every 2 days – Hago ejercicio cada 2 días.

(#) veces al día / a la semana / al mes / al año.

¿Qué tipo de ejercicio?

I walk twice a week and I run twice a week – Camino dos veces por semana y corro dos veces por semana.

Muchas veces – many times.

He arrives late a lot – Él llega tarde muchas veces.

Varias veces – several times.

I have already spoken about this several times – Ya he hablado de esto varias veces.

Algunas veces – at times.

At times I don’t understand anything and at others I understand it all – A veces no entiendo nada y en otros lo entiendo todo.

Casi siempre – Almost Always.

Partying all night is almost always a bad idea – De fiesta toda la noche es casi siempre una mala idea.

Siempre – Always.

Friends for ever – amigos para siempre.

Todos los días – Everyday.

Soler – to tend to.

Do you tend to practice your Spanish everyday – ¿Sueles practicar tu español todos los días?

Yes. I tend to practice my Spanish everyday – Sí. Suelo practicar mi español todos los días.

Todas las semanas – Every week.

I do the shopping every week on saturdays – Hago las compras todas las semanas los sábados.

Quote from the episode:

“Deje cocer a fuego lento unos 20 minutos removiendo de vez en cuando.” which means “Cook on a low heat for 20 minutes, stirring from time to time.”

How can you express frequency in spanish using today’s vocabulary to describe your regular routines?

The post Tips 039: 15 Different Ways To Express Frequency In Spanish appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Oct 09 2014

13mins

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Rank #16: Tips 013: 5 Useful Spanish Reflexive Verbs For Conversation

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Reflexive verbs can cause confusion amongst Spanish students. But they don’t have to.

As a follow up to the previous podcast episodes on Spanish verbs, this episode presents the reflexive form of Spanish verbs. In order to get a good understanding of reflexive verbs, we need to start back a the most basic sentence structure. Have a listen to today’s podcast to see how you can start to use these types of verbs in your Spanish conversations.

In tip number 7, I broke the types of Spanish verbs down into two groups of three.

Group 1:

  • Ar verbs
  • Er verbs
  • Ir verbs

Group 2:

  • Normal verbs
  • Verbs like Gustar (discussed in tip number 7)
  • Reflexive verbs (in today’s tip)

Reflexive verbs are formed when the subject and object of a sentence are the same thing. They could apply whether the subject is a person, place or thing. What you need to know to form reflexive verbs is a different form of Spanish pronoun.

The Spanish pronouns for reflexive verbs are called object pronouns and are as follows:

  • Me – Me
  • Te –You
  • Se – Him / Her
  • Nos – Us
  • Os – You-all
  • Se – Them

As you can see, these are very similar to the indirect object pronouns discussed in the earlier episode for use with verbs like gustar.

One thing to note with Spanish verbs, in general, is that the majority of verbs can be used in both a normal or reflexive form. But it is not worth getting hung up on lots of different verb forms, for conversation hacking, it is worth knowing the high use reflexive verbs first. So become familiar with the verbs discussed in today’s episode before you start to worry about the thousand of reflexive verb possibilities.

Verbs discussed in the episode:

  • Llamarse – To call oneself
  • Irse – To go away / to leave
  • Acordarse – To remember
  • Levantarse – To get out of bed
  • Quejarse – To complain

Examples from the episode:

I speak with you – Yo hablo contigo

I’m hungry – Yo tengo hambre

I like the tapas – Me gustan las tapas

My name is (I call myself) – Me llamo Andrew

How do you call yourself – ¿Cómo te llamas?

I call you over Skype – Te llamo por Skype

I go to the market – Voy al mercado

I have to … = Tengo que …

I have to leave = Tengo que irme

You have to go = Tienes que irte

I have to go to the market = Tengo que ir al mercado

We agree to speak in private = Acordamos hablar en privado

I agree = Estoy de acuerdo

I don’t remember = No me acuerdo

I lift something from the table = Levanto algo de la mesa

I get myself out of bed = Me levanto de la cama

I don’t want to complain = No quiero quejarme

My friend complains a lot = Mi amigo se queja mucho

It’s better not to complain = Es mejor no quejarse

Quote from the podcast episode:
“Los que se quejan de la forma como rebota la pelota, son aquellos que no la saben golpear.” – José Ingenieros (1877-1925)

Additional Bonus Examples For Extra Practice:

What are they called? – ¿Cómo se llaman?

I leave the house (I am away from home) – Me voy de la casa

I get out of bed at 7 am – Me levanto de la cama a las siete

When are you going to get out of bed? – ¿Cuándo se levanta de la cama?

Why do you complain? – ¿Por qué te quejas?

Do you remember when we have to leave? – ¿Te acuerdas cuando nos tenemos que ir?

Verbs that are reflexive end in “se” in the conversation hacking guide you can see the verbs mentioned in this episode with the (se) in brackets and the alternative meaning in English also highlighted in brackets.

How else can you use these reflexive verbs?

The post Tips 013: 5 Useful Spanish Reflexive Verbs For Conversation appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Jul 10 2014

15mins

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Rank #17: Ya vs Todavía – How to Use These Useful Spanish Words

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When and how should you use ya vs todavía?

These two Spanish words often get introduced together because they both relate to time. Specifically, they add emotion when discussing deadlines.

In this article (and podcast) you will discover some useful distinctions that will help you to better understand these two common Spanish adverbs

Before I get to the main topic, if you would like to learn more about important Spanish vocabulary, check out the Conversation Hacking Guide on shortcutting conversational Spanish.

To introduce the main topic, first consider two simple example questions in English:

Have you done your homework?

Have you done your homework already?

Take a look at these two questions and really think about how the word ‘already’ modifies the meaning of the second question.

Moreover, if you can grasp the role ‘already’ is playing in the second question, then you will be able to understand how ya and todavía modify Spanish sentences.

When comparing the examples above, you could infer from the second question that the homework should have been done (already) or that there is an element of surprise that the homework has (already) been done. Maybe the person asking the question is not happy about the situation. Or alternatively, they might be surprised, it depends on their tone.

In Spanish the possible translations of ya and todavía are as follows:

English: Already, before, by now and now.
Español: Ya.

English: Still, yet.
Español: Todavía.

So which translation is appropriate and when?

You need to consider two decisions:

  1. Whether the idea you want to express is about something that has happened in the past or continues in the present.
  2. Whether the idea is negative or positive.

For these two considerations, you now have four possible Spanish sentence structures for ya and todavía:

  Positivo Negativo Ya Ya + pasado Ya + no + presente Todavía Todavía + presente Todavía + no + pasado/presente

Each of these quadrants represents a form of use for ya vs todavía.

The past forms (ya + pasado, todavía + no + pasado) often gets used with the present perfect tense, for details on using the present perfect check out 8 phrases that trigger the present perfect tense.

To help you understand these ideas, here are a bunch of examples. For an explanation of each, check out the podcast episode associated with this post—you can listen in the iTunes store or click the play button here:

Examples from the episode:

Have you done your homework already? – ¿Ya has hecho los deberes?

Yes have I have done my homework – Sí, ya he hecho los deberes.

No I haven’t yet done my homework – No, todavía no he hecho los deberes. (no, todavía no)

Have you already seen x-men? – ¿Ya has visto x-men?

Yes I have already seen x-men – Sí ya he visto x-men.

No I still haven’t seen x-men – No, todavía no he visto x-men.

I haven’t eaten – No he comido.

I haven’t eaten yet – Todavía no he comido.

To do the shopping – Ir de compras.

Have you done the shopping already? – ¿Ya has ido de compras?

Yes I have already done the shopping – Sí, he ido de compras.

No I haven’t yet done the shopping – No, todavía no he ido de compras. No, todavía no.

Are you happy? – ¿Estas contento?

I’m still not happy – Todavía no estoy contento.

Do you still live with your parents? – ¿Todavía vives con tus padres?

Yes I still live with my parents – Sí todavía vivo con mis padres.

No I don’t live with my parents anymore, I live with my girlfriend – No ya no vivo con mis padres, vivo con mi novia.

I’m not hungry, yet I could eat something – No tengo hambre, pero puedo comer algo.

I want it right now – Ya lo quiero.

I leave right now – Ya me voy.

Now I understand – Ya entiendo.

Yes I know – Ya lo sé.

Yeah we’ll see – Ya veremos.

Since – Ya que.

Let me know – Ya me dices.

Get out of here! – ¡Anda ya!

That’s it! – ¡Ya está!

Quote from the episode:

“Ya que la casa se quema, calentémonos en ella” – Spanish Proverb

How else could you use ya vs todavía?

The post Ya vs Todavía – How to Use These Useful Spanish Words appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Sep 11 2014

18mins

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Rank #18: Tips 107: 8 Uses of Ser and Estar with Adjectives

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The uses of Ser and Estar are an important part of Spanish that you should always be revising.

In today’s podcast, you will learn about one specific part: the uses of ser and estar with adjectives.
As a reminder, ‘ser’ tends to imply a permanent feature and ‘estar’ tends to imply a temporary feature. Keep this in mind as you listen to the examples for today.

Examples from today’s podcast:

Elena is a good person, she always gives to the poor – Elena es buena, ella siempre da a los pobres.

This wine is of high quality – Este vino es muy bueno.

This gazpacho tastes great / amazing – Este gazpacho está buenísimo.

The boy is very attractive. He is tall, dark and his body is incredible – El chico está muy bueno. Es alto, moreno y el cuerpo está increíble.

I don’t like your friend he is a bad (person) – No me cae bien tu amigo, él es malo.

The Paella is cheap because it is low quality – La paella es barata porque es muy mala.

Sonia has spent all day in bed she is very sick – Sonia ha pasado todo el día en la cama, ella está muy mala.

This chicken is bad, I don’t like it – Este pollo está malo, no me gusta.

Christy Walton is the richest women in the world – Christy Walton es la mujer más rica del mundo.

The churros are so good – Los churros están tan ricos.

Your sister is very intelligent – Tu hermana es muy lista.

I’m still not ready. I need five more minutes – Todavía no estoy listo. Necesito 5 minutes más.

My car is green – Mi coche es verde.

Paco es green, he needs to keep learning – Paco está verde, tiene que seguir aprendiendo.

The apple is unripe – La manzana está verde.

The shirt is black – La camisa es negra.

I’m angry because the house is dirty – Estoy negro porque la casa está negra.

María is very open, she usually speaks to everyone at the party – María es muy abierta, ella suele hablar con todo el mundo en la fiesta.

Who left the door open? – ¿Quien dejó la puerta abierta? (La puerta está abierta)

Andrés is very closed he doesn’t speak to anybody – Andrés es muy cerrado, no habla con nadie.

The restaurant is closed, it normally opens at seven – El restaurante está cerrado, normalmente abre a las siete.

Other episodes mentioned in this podcast:

How else can you ser and estar with adjectives?

The post Tips 107: 8 Uses of Ser and Estar with Adjectives appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Jun 04 2015

13mins

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Rank #19: Tips 037: Expressing Cause And Effect In Spanish

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If you want to know someone well, is it important to discover what motivates him or her? Everybody has a cause and an effect of why they what they do.

In contrast, a scientist always needs to match outcomes to their observations. That’s the whole point of science. Science is always trying to understand the relationship between cause and effect.

If you can understand today’s lesson then you can link cause and effect to understand a range of useful ideas. This includes expressing ideas around the cause and effect of people, science, politics or any other idea.

Whether it is in the classroom or in the laboratory or in a café. Being able to express the relationship between cause and effect is an important tool for your Spanish vocabulary.

There are lots of ways to link cause and effect in English. They can be broken down into two groups. Phrases that link a cause to an effect and phrases that link an effect to a cause.

For example:
1. Phrases that link a cause to an effect:
Accordingly, so, then, thus, consequently, hence, ergo etc.

2. Phrases that link an effect to a cause:
Because, since, seeing that, on account of, for the reason that etc.

In Spanish, there are also a ton of phrases that link cause and effect. But like most things on Real Fast Spanish I look to use conversation hacking principles. This is to reduce the total amount of vocab, expressions and grammar you need to know or remember for a conversation. With this in mind, I’m going to focus on the most useful Spanish phrases for cause and effect.

Therefore, today we are looking at 5 phrases that are extremely useful for linking cause with effect in Spanish.

En consequencia (These phrases link cause to effect):
Asi que
Por ese
Por lo tanto

En causa (These phrases link effect to cause):
Porque
Es que

The last example is very common. It’s used when forming sentences that require a cause to be explained that is often simply an excuse.

Examples form the episode are as follows:

I was hungry so I ate something – He tenido hambre, así que he comido algo.

I was hungry so I ate everything in the house – He tenido mucho hambre, así que he comido toda la comida en la casa.

I was hungry that’s why I ate everything in the house – He tenido mucho hambre, por eso he comido toda la comida en la casa.

This week I was really busy, that’s why I didn’t speak with my parents – Esta semana he estado muy ocupado, por eso yo no he hablado con mis padres.

This week I was really busy, therefore I didn’t speak with my parents – Esta semana he estado muy ocupado, por lo tanto yo no he hablado con mis padres.

I’ve been sick, so I could not go to work – He estado enfermo, por lo tanto no he podido ir a trabajo.

They have discovered life on mars, therefore, we have to rethink our understanding of life in the solar system – Han descubierto vida en Marte, por lo tanto, tenemos que repensar nuestra comprensión de la vida en el sistema solar.

I ate something because I was hungry – He comido algo porque he tenido hambre.

I could not go to work because I have been sick – No he podido ir a trabajo porque he estado enfermo.

Why weren’t you at work this week? – ¿Por qué no has estado en el trabajo esta semana?

It’s that, I was sick – Es que, he estado enfermo.

Why are you late? – ¿Por qué llegas tarde?

I arrive late because my car broke down – Llego tarde porque mi coche se ha roto.

I arrive late because I slept in – Llego tarde porque me he levantado tarde.

I’m sorry, it’s that my car broke down – Lo siento, es que mi coche se ha roto.

I’m sorry, it’s that my alarm clock broke – Lo siento, es que mi despertador se ha roto.

Are you up for going to the movies with us this afternoon – ¿Te apetece ir al cine con nosotros esta tarde?

I’m sorry, I can’t, it’s just that I have to help my dad with the shopping – Lo siento, no puedo, es que tengo que ayudar a mi padre con las compras.

Quote form the episode is as follows:

“El pasado es historia, el futuro es incierto, pero el hoy es un obsequio, por eso se llama presente” – Kung Fu Panda.

How can you use today’s examples to relate cause to effect?

The post Tips 037: Expressing Cause And Effect In Spanish appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Oct 02 2014

17mins

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Rank #20: Tips 079: Quedar vs Quedarse – How to Use this Handy Spanish Verb

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Understanding the differences between verbs such as quedar vs quedarse is a constant challenge for Spanish students.

Not only is ‘quedar’ versatile for it’s use in different contexts, but it changes meaning when it becomes reflexive.

This week’s theory podcast is inspired by one of the Real Fast Spanish tip subscribers. The question came after the last theory podcast on the uses of ‘echar‘.

Today we are going to make a few comparisons for quedar vs quedarse. This verb is another verb that has a number of different meanings depending on the context. But we are going to look at a few of the most common contexts. We are also going to explore how the meaning of the verb changes when it becomes reflexive.

Examples from today’s podcast:

To remain / be left with / to meet up – Quedar.

To stay (in one place) – Quedarse.

Is there any rice left? – ¿Queda arroz?

No there is no rice left – No, no queda arroz.

I don’t have any milk left – No me queda leche.

I don’t like how I’m left with this haircut – No me gusta cómo me ha quedado el corte de pelo.

What time are we going to meet? – ¿A que hora vamos a quedar?

Normally I meet with my parents twice a month – Normalmente quedo con mis padres dos veces al mes.

I met up with my best friend this week – He quedado con mi mejor amigo esta semana.

No, I’m staying here – No, me quedo aquí.

How long are you going to stay? – ¿Cuánto tiempo te vas a quedar?

I have to stay here for 3 hours – Tengo que quedarme durante 3 horas.

I was left flipped out (freaked out) – Me he quedado flipado.

My boss started yelling at me and I was left flipped out (or freaked out) – Mi jefe ha empezado a gritarme y me he quedado flipado.

Other episodes mentioned in this podcast:

How else could you explain the differences for quedar vs quedarse in a conversation?

The post Tips 079: Quedar vs Quedarse – How to Use this Handy Spanish Verb appeared first on Real Fast Spanish.

Feb 26 2015

8mins

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