Cover image of Mastering Nutrition
(288)
Alternative Health
Health & Fitness

Mastering Nutrition

Updated 3 days ago

Alternative Health
Health & Fitness
Read more

Hi, I'm Chris Masterjohn and I have a PhD in Nutritional Sciences. I am an entrepreneur in all things fitness, health, and nutrition. In this show I combine my scientific expertise with my out-of-the-box thinking to translate complex science into new, practical ideas that you can use to help yourself on your journey to vibrant health. This show will allow you to master the science of nutrition and apply it to your own life like a pro.

Read more

Hi, I'm Chris Masterjohn and I have a PhD in Nutritional Sciences. I am an entrepreneur in all things fitness, health, and nutrition. In this show I combine my scientific expertise with my out-of-the-box thinking to translate complex science into new, practical ideas that you can use to help yourself on your journey to vibrant health. This show will allow you to master the science of nutrition and apply it to your own life like a pro.

iTunes Ratings

288 Ratings
Average Ratings
248
20
8
6
6

Excellent content

By AZ2020 - Jan 20 2018
Read more
Packed with so much information about nutrition, thank you.

Great Detail

By Z Health - Aug 25 2017
Read more
A lot of info it would take months to look up. Well done.

iTunes Ratings

288 Ratings
Average Ratings
248
20
8
6
6

Excellent content

By AZ2020 - Jan 20 2018
Read more
Packed with so much information about nutrition, thank you.

Great Detail

By Z Health - Aug 25 2017
Read more
A lot of info it would take months to look up. Well done.
Cover image of Mastering Nutrition

Mastering Nutrition

Latest release on Feb 21, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 3 days ago

Rank #1: Nutrition in Neuroscience Part 1 | Mastering Nutrition #53

Podcast cover
Read more

Nutrition has a HUGE impact on your brain!

Everything in your brain is something you ate, something you made from something you ate, or, in a few cases, something your mother ate. Nutrition impacts your mental and emotional health, the function of your five senses, and your conscious and unconscious control over your body movements.

Join me as I lead you in a safari through the textbook, “Neuroscience,” pointing out along the way all the interesting connections to nutrition. Listen in for part 1 on the basic cellular functions of neurons!

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

To get all four episodes RIGHT NOW, ad-free, and with transcripts, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

00:37 Cliff Notes

14:55 The primary type of cell in the nervous system is the neuron.

16:32 Glial cells are the assistants of the nervous system.

17:22 Cells in the nervous system are polarized.

18:54 Mitochondria are typically only located at the synapse of neurons and in the middle of photoreceptors; creatine is important for transporting energy in a cell where ATP production is highly polarized.

26:43 Sources of creatine

28:13 Brief overview of how to support methylation

31:06 The polarization of astrocytes and the obligate need for glucose in the brain

37:33 Electrical signaling, resting membrane potential, depolarization, threshold potential, hyperpolarization, and the importance of sodium, potassium, and chloride

45:13 How to get enough sodium, chloride, and potassium in the diet

53:51 The sodium-potassium ATPase uses ATP to pump three sodium ions out of the cell and two potassium ions into the cell, so magnesium and all of the nutrients involved in energy metabolism are important.

58:44 How action potentials propagate

01:03:40 Myelin and the importance of cholesterol

01:06:53 Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder of cholesterol synthesis that results in neurological problems that are corrected by dietary cholesterol.

01:09:32 Calcium acts as a second messenger in the nervous system, and the cytosolic calcium concentration has to be kept very low for this to work, which requires ATP energy.

01:14:22 Other roles of calcium in the nervous system

01:15:34 Sufficient dietary calcium and ATP energy are needed to support the second messenger roles of calcium.

Jan 11 2019

1hr 24mins

Play

Rank #2: Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, March 4, 2019 | Mastering Nutrition #63

Podcast cover
Read more

On March 4, members of the CMJ Masterpass joined me in a live Zoom meeting to ask me anything about nutrition, and here’s the full recording!

We talk about things like:

  • How much spinach, broccoli, and kale is too much?
  • Can frozen vegetables be trusted for their folate?
  • Do cooked legumes lose folate when frozen?
  • I go on an extended rant about the harm done by exaggerating the harms of synthetic folic acid.
  • We use labs to identify a probable genetic defect in glutathione synthesis.
  • When to think about supplementing with calcium.
  • When a drug makes histamine intolerance and blood sugar dysregulation collide.
  • My thoughts on root canals.
  • Should you take leucine to gain muscle mass, or just eat protein?
  • A GREAT discussion on how our detoxification system evolved to handle fruits and vegetables, and why eating them can help us out through the principle of "hormesis."
  • Could low LDL levels compromise female fertility?

All this and much more!

If you’d like to participate in the next Q&A, consider joining the CMJ Masterpass. Use this link to get a 10% lifetime discount: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass/masteringnutrition

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

AMA About Nutrition Show Notes

00:40 Cliff Notes

03:44 Introduction

06:48 How much spinach, broccoli, and kale is too much? And why frozen vegetables cannot be trusted as a source of folate.

12:21 Do cooked legumes lose folate when frozen?

16:09 The difference between folic acid and folate, including a rant about the over exaggeration of the harms of folic acid.

34:02 Thoughts on myasthenia gravis and Epstein-Barr virus?

35:20 In the context of hemochromatosis and iron overload, why would ferritin be low when transferrin saturation is high?

43:04 What to do when the lab says that your pyroglutamate levels are the highest that they've ever seen? Could it be a glutathione synthetase deficiency?

52:43 Can you use a high GGT, gamma-glutamyltransferase, to indicate that the body is trying to make more glutathione?

54:40 What if taking collagen at night causes you to wake up and pee?

01:00:08 Does high serum B12 have any relation to cancer?

01:05:06 Should you take a calcium supplement if dietary calcium intake is low, blood calcium is normal, PTH is midrange, and vitamin D is 48 nanograms per milliliter?

01:11:07 What does it mean when after taking a drug, histamine intolerance and blood sugar dysregulation collide?

01:15:53 What are my thoughts on root canals?

01:25:58 What do I think of Layne Norton's suggestion to take 3 grams of leucine with every meal?

01:30:00 Are liver pills really as good as eating cooked liver?

01:34:08 How much vitamin C should be taken with a standard daily dose of collagen?

01:37:41 What do I think causes fibromyalgia?

01:41:33 Is folate also unstable in frozen liver, or does it just apply to greens?

01:42:37 Is there a potential for adverse effects for someone who supplements with 5 or 10 milligrams of folic acid or methylfolate based on a heterozygous MTHFR SNP?

02:00:05 What to do when serum magnesium is high, but the magnesium doesn't make it into the cells.

02:05:00 Any recommendations on increasing DHEA?

02:05:29 Are thyroid nodules similar to goiter in some cases?

02:06:23 Is it a problem if arginine, citrulline, and beta-alanine are elevated in the Genova ION Profile while supplementing with beta-alanine and citrulline malate?

02:08:56 A discussion of plant polyphenols and hormesis.

02:20:22 Is it safe to take creatine when nursing?

02:29:02 Is vitamin E supplementation harmful if you have a GSTP1 polymorphism?

02:33:25 Could low LDL levels compromise female fertility?

Mar 30 2019

2hr 54mins

Play

Rank #3: Living With MTHFR | 46

Podcast cover
Read more

MTHFR is an enzyme that allows folate (vitamin B9) to support the cellular process of methylation, which is important for the synthesis of creatine and phosphatidylcholine, the regulation of gene expression, neurotransmitter metabolism, and dozens of other processes. There are two common polymorphisms that decrease its activity, A1298C and C677T, with C677T having the stronger effect. Genetic decreases in MTHFR activity are associated with cardiovascular disease, neurologic and psychiatric disorders, pregnancy complications and birth defects, and cancer.

While discussions of these polymorphism tend to focus on repleting methyl-folate, this should only be a small piece of the puzzle. The bigger pieces of the puzzle are restoring choline, creatine, and glycine. 

In this episode, I describe how the methylation system works, how it's regulated, and how it's altered with MTHFR variations. I then use this to develop a detailed dietary strategy and an evaluative strategy to make sure the dietary strategy is working.

Show notes coming soon!

This episode is brought to you by Ample Meal. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides a balance of fat, protein, and carbohydrate, plus all the vitamins and minerals you need in a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. The protein is from whey and collagen. The fat is from coconut oil and macadamia nut oil. The carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals come exclusively from food sources like sweet potatoes, bananas, cocoa powder, wheat and barley grass, and chlorella. I use Ample on Mondays when I have 12 hours of appointments with breaks no longer than 15 minutes. It keeps my brain going while I power through the long day, never letting food prep make me late for an appointment. Head to amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

Aug 12 2017

2hr 1min

Play

Rank #4: Kresser/Kahn Vegan Debate on Joe Rogan: My Post-Game Analysis

Podcast cover
Read more

Please head on over to the YouTube video and like it, share it, or comment on it to help me promote this! 

It would also be great if you're on Twitter if you could like, retweet, or reply to the tweet about the analysis.

The links mentioned in the podcast can all be found in the description of the YouTube video.

Enjoy!

Oct 04 2018

1hr 17mins

Play

Rank #5: Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, Feb 1, 2019

Podcast cover
Read more

Here’s the recording of the February 1 Ask Me Anything!

30 CMJ Masterpass subscribers sat in on a Zoom session with me last Friday and asked me whatever they wanted about nutrition.

We talk about bone meal for calcium, K2 and heart palpitations, low white blood cell counts, lowering anxiety at night and getting better deep sleep, probiotic cycling, fat intake and familial hypercholesterolemia, negative consequences of taking baking soda too much for too long and what to do instead, the lymphatic system and fat metabolism, intolerances to food and supplements, electrolytes after sauna use, heart rate variability, SIBO, H. pylori, protein on keto, hair mineral analysis, SpectraCell, and more.

Listen in to hear my answers!If you’d like to participate in the next Q&A, consider joining the CMJ Masterpass. Use this link to get a 10% lifetime discount: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass/masteringnutrition

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

Ask Me Anything Show Notes

13:20 Alternative bone meal powders to Whole Bone Calcium from Traditional Foods Market

15:54 Nutritional causes of low white blood cell count and possible solutions

18:09 Supplements that may lower anxiety at night and improve heart rate variability during sleep

24:40 Brands, forms, and dosage recommendations for nicotinamide riboside and nicotinamide mononucleotide

27:08 Dosage recommendations for berberine

27:50 Supplements that may increase deep sleep

31:18 Brands and dosage recommendations for CBD oil

31:31 Probiotics brand and cycling recommendations

33:19 Is Theracurmin as effective as Meriva Curcumin for arthritis?

39:19 Best clinical way to monitor COMT function if you have already tested for SNPs

43:10 How would you address normal TSH but low T4?

47:38 Should you be more concerned about overall fat intake or saturated fat intake with familial hypercholesterolemia?

50:59 Concerns about long-term bicarbonate supplementation and other suggestions for raising pH

58:08 Could magnesium hydroxide be absorbed via skin and cause hypermagnesemia?

58:40 The relationship between Lp(a) and cardiovascular disease

01:00:23 The role of the lymphatic system in fat metabolism

01:01:41 If your cholesterol is high, how do you avoid having a large burden of oxidized LDL?

01:08:16 Bovine colostrum for those with dairy sensitivities, and what to do about food sensitivities in general

01:17:24 Heart palpitations as a result of vitamin K2 supplementation and whether increasing calcium intake could help

01:21:10 Best formula and dosage of no-carb electrolytes to take at night to optimize sleep, especially after sauna use

01:22:35 Can a low-carb diet cause waking up in the middle of the night?

01:30:24 Why would a male have low blood levels of calcium?

01:32:21 What to do about low cortisol

01:33:19 What supplements would you recommend for a ketogenic diet?

01:35:09 Recommended brands of resveratrol and whether or not you should take resveratrol

01:38:55 Recommendations for treating SIBO and H. Pylori

01:44:26 What do you think about taking clomid to boost testosterone?

01:44:38 How do you determine if you’re getting enough protein?

01:48:14 Avmacol and sulforaphane

01:50:22 How to address edema

01:55:07 What do you think of alternative testing like hair mineral analysis or SpectraCell?

01:57:49 How to lower your calcium score

02:01:45 Recommendations on magnesium supplements and dosage

02:04:09 How to improve LDL receptor activity

02:05:48 Is milk thistle beneficial?

02:06:16 Do you have any concerns with taking 400 milligrams of phosphatidylserine supplements before bed to lower cortisol?

02:06:33 What would cause low platelet count, and how would you fix it?

02:06:53 Recommendations for peripheral neuropathy

02:08:22 What are your top three non-nutrient factors that prevent beta-oxidation or ketogenesis?

Feb 09 2019

2hr 20mins

Play

Rank #6: Creatine: Far More Than a Performance Enhancer

Podcast cover
Read more
Creatine, best known for its ability to build muscle and enhance athletic performance, is also critical for digestion, mental health, protecting your hearing, and keeping your skin vibrant and youthful.    From among the various options for creatine supplementation, I recommend Optimized Nutrition micronized creatine powder. If you are using creatine while traveling, try Optimized Nutrition creatine caps. Click here for the only searchable database of the creatine content of foods on the internet. It has over 140 entries! This episode is brought to you by Paleovalley. I use their beef sticks as a convenient yet nutritious snack. They are made from 100% grass-fed beef and preserved through traditional fermentation. The fermentation makes them more digestible and gives them a fresher mouthfeel and texture compared to most other meat snacks I’ve tried, which tend to be too dry for me to fully enjoy. They also have a grass-fed organ complex that contains a blend of liver, heart, kidney, and brain, all stuffed into gel caps for those who can’t bring themselves to eat these incredibly nutritious meats with a fork. Head to paleovalley.com and enter the promo code masterjohn at checkout for 30% off your order. This is a huge savings available for only a limited time. You can get 30% off everything on the site, ordering as much as you want, but only for the duration of the next three podcast episodes. Check it out now to make sure you get your discount!  

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

Dec 21 2017

1hr 33mins

Play

Rank #7: What to Do About High Cholesterol | 38

Podcast cover
Read more

If you're concerned about your cholesterol, or confused about what to do, this episode is for you. In this episode, I list the four key factors that control blood cholesterol levels and outline the simplest dietary or lifestyle changes we can make to have the biggest impact.

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter "Chris" at checkout to get 15% off your order as long as the final price is over $75 and you order fewer than 40 pounds of meat. You can use "Chris" to get the same discount twice.

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more: 

00:33 Cliff notes; 09:22 Targeting the low-hanging fruit; 11:50  The total-to-HDL-C ratio as a fingerprint of low LDL receptor activity; 13:20  Other markers such as particle size, particle count, and ApoB as fingerprints of low LDL receptor activity; 16:30  The four factors that control the LDL receptor; 18:50  Intracellular free cholesterol (effects of dietary fiber, cholestyramine, statins, and polyunsaturated fatty acids or PUFAs); 20:37  Thyroid hormone (effects of micornutrients, body fat, and carbohydrate intake); 23:50  Insulin (via PCSK9, effects of the fasting-feeding cycle and carbohydrate intake); 27:00  Inflammation (via PCSK9, effects of acute infection and chronic inflammation); 29:15  Practical approaches to maximizing LDL receptor activity; 29:22  Nutrient-dense whole food diets; 34:00  Thyroid disorder; 37:15   Adrenal stress, circadian stress, inflammatory stress; 39:05  Insulin resistance, body composition, and fatty liver disease; 42:00  Weight loss will improve insulin sensitivity, and for many a low-carb diet is a tool to achieve that, but in an insulin-sensitive person, carbohydrate stimulation of insulin has a powerful beneficial effect on LDL receptor activity; 46:20  Inflammation and PCSK9; 47:00  C-Reactive Protein levels, body composition, diet quality, and exercise; 49:25  Replacing fat with carbohydrate.

Mar 19 2017

58mins

Play

Rank #8: Ask Us Anything About Sports Nutrition with Chad Macias, Danny Lennon, and Alex Leaf, May 25, 2019 | Mastering Nutrition #68

Podcast cover
Read more

On May 25, members of the CMJ Masterpass joined me, Chad Macias, Danny Lennon, and Alex Leaf in a live Zoom meeting to ask us anything about sports nutrition, and here’s the full recording!

We talk about things like:

  • Is there a risk of depleting histidine with beta-alanine supplementation?
  • What’s the best form of fuel to use during a workout? Candy, or something else?
  • Nutritional strategies for recovery from soft tissue injuries to muscles, tendons and ligaments from lifting?
  • Is AMPK the primary regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle, and does it matter?
  • Can riboflavin help with exercise performance?
  • Why the post-workout anabolic window DOES matter, and why you should NOT eat too much protein BEFORE lifting.
  • Take BCAAs, or just eat protein?
  • Should athletes cycle caffeine, and does it matter if they are fast or slow oxidizers?
  • Nitric oxide: does it have important effects by modifying proteins, rather than just affecting blood flow?
  • Is it delayed-onset muscle soreness if it happens all the time? Or is it a pathology?
  • Transdermal carnosine (Lactigo) for fibromyalgia, the role of glutamate and neurotoxicity in fibromyalgia and delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and my own experience with using high blood glutamate to identify how acidity was wrecking me after workouts.
  • Maximizing muscle growth and optimizing performance on a low-protein diet.
  • Best time to take Tru Niagen (nicotinamide riboside) and TMG (trimethylglycine), especially the purpose of increasing exercise tolerance.
  • How important are refeeds for dieters?
  • Carbohydrate periodization for endurance athletes?
  • Is there any value to training low during those times where you depend on glucose to either try to train your body to better tap into limited glycogen stores or to try to create a better aerobic response?
  • Besides leucine, what could help increase protein synthesis to prevent sarcopenia in older adults who strength-train regularly? 
  • For muscle growth, what generally applies to everyone?

All this and much more!

If you’d like to participate in the next Q&A, consider joining the CMJ Masterpass. Use this link to get a 10% lifetime discount: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass/masteringnutrition

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

02:54 Is there a risk of depleting histidine with beta-alanine supplementation?

08:40 What’s the best form of fuel to use during a workout. Candy, or something else?

19:17 Nutritional strategies for recovery from soft tissue injuries to muscles, tendons and ligaments from lifting?

22:55 Is AMPK the primary regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle or are there other important pathways that need to be considered and which can be targeted by nutrition in addition to endurance training?

28:43 Can riboflavin help with exercise performance?

39:30 Why the post-workout anabolic window DOES matter.

44:26 Does the form of HMB matter?

49:07 Why you should NOT eat too much protein BEFORE lifting.

54:34 Take BCAAs, or just eat protein?

59:13 Summarizing the things that help with muscle growth.

1:00:28  How should caffeine be cycled if being used to enhance weightlifting performance and/or weight loss? Is there a difference for fast or slow metabolizers of caffeine?

1:04:25 More on caffeine

1:09:30 Caffeine for weightlifters

1:14:30  Nitric oxide: does it have important effects by modifying proteins, rather than just affecting blood flow?

1:20:42 Is it delayed-onset muscle soreness if it happens all the time? Or is it a pathology?

1:24:34 Transdermal carnosine (Lactigo) for fibromyalgia. My own experience with using high blood glutamate to identify how acidity was wrecking me after workouts.

1:30:04 The role of extracellular glutamate and neurotoxicity driving DOMS and fibromyalgia. 

1:31:46 Recommendations for maximizing muscle growth and optimizing performance on a low-protein diet.

1:41:59 Best time to take Tru Niagen (nicotinamide riboside) and TMG (trimethylglycine) especially the purpose of increasing exercise tolerance.

1:52:24 How important are refeeds for dieters?

1:54:42 Carbohydrate periodization for endurance athletes.

1:59:12 Is there any value to training low during those times where you depend on glucose to either try to train your body to better tap into limited glycogen stores or to try to create a better aerobic response?

2:08:27 Besides leucine, what could help increase protein synthesis to prevent sarcopenia in older adults who strength-train regularly?

Oct 23 2019

2hr 28mins

Play

Rank #9: The Carnivore Debate Part 2 | Mastering Nutrition #70

Podcast cover
Read more

In part 2 of The Carnivore Debate, we cover the philosophy of the carnivore diet and the potential pitfalls of carnivore and keto.

The research that Dr. Saladino and I discussed with each other before this debate is listed in the show notes -- there are five pages of references!

Here’s what we debated:

  • What exactly is a carnivore diet? Is a 90% meat diet a carnivore diet, a carnivore diet you cheat on, a carnivore-ish diet, or just a meat-heavy omnivorous diet? And why definitions absolutely matter.
  •  Is the carnivore diet ancestral? What can we learn from present-day hunter-gatherers, the archeological record, and our evolutionary history as revealed by our genes? 
  • Who is the carnivore diet for? 
  • To what extent do carnivore and keto overlap?
  • What are the benefits of keto and how broadly applicable are they?
  • What are the potential harms of keto? In particular:
    • acid-base balance
    • thyroid, stress, and sex hormones
    • oxidative stress and glycation
    • sports performance
  • We agree we need to cycle between the fed state and the fasting state. Can the keto diet, designed to mimic fasting-state physiology, provide adequate fed-state signals to keep our body feeling well nourished?
  • Inuit CPT-1a deficiency redux: did a genetic impairment in the ability to make ketones sweep through the Arctic to protect the Inuit from acidosis, or to help them stay warm?

Dr. Saladino completed residency in psychiatry at the University of Washington and is a certified functional medicine practitioner through the Institute for Functional Medicine. He attended medical school at the University of Arizona where he worked with Dr. Andrew Weil focusing on integrative medicine and nutritional biochemistry. Prior to this, Dr. Saladino worked as a physician assistant in Cardiology. It was during this time that he saw first hand the shortcomings of mainstream western medicine with its symptom focused, pharmaceutical based paradigm. He decided to return to medical school with the hope of better understanding the true roots of chronic disease and illness, and how to correct these. He now maintains a private practice in San Diego, California, sees clients from all over the world virtually, and has used the carnivore with hundreds of patients to reverse autoimmunity, chronic inflammation, and mental health issues. When he is not researching connections between nutritional biochemistry and chronic disease, he can be found in the ocean searching for the perfect wave, cultivating mindfulness, or spending time with friends and family. 

Find more of Dr. Paul Saladino on the Fundamental Health podcast and at https://carnivoremd.com

Get my free 9-page guide to optimizing vitamins and minerals on the carnivore diet at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/carnivore

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

Masterjohn and Saladino Show Notes

00:42 Cliff Notes

05:18 Introductions

05:28 What is a carnivore diet?

18:15 Is the ancestral human diet carnivore or omnivore?

50:40 Who is a carnivore diet for?

01:08:03 To what extent do carnivore and keto overlap?

01:10:34 Who is a keto diet for?

01:18:50 Ketogenic diets are only a partial mimic of fasting physiology

01:23:46 Ketones effect on the NAD/NADH ratio 

01:27:31 Ketogenesis has opposite effects in the liver as in the ketone-utilizing tissue.

01:29:31 Ketogenic diets and oxidative stress

01:40:18 Longevity: why you want to cycle between the fasting state and the fed state

01:45:04 Can the ketogenic diet provide a sufficiently robust fed-state signal?

01:53:11 The keto diet and thyroid, stress, and sex hormones

02:10:05 Keto and sports performance

02:18:05 Why do the Inuit have a genetic impairment in making ketones, to protect against acidosis, or to stay warm?

02:35:48 Wrapping up

Nov 24 2019

2hr 41mins

Play

Rank #10: Ask Us Anything About Hormones with Dr. Carrie Jones, May 10, 2019 | Mastering Nutrition #67

Podcast cover
Read more

On May 10, members of the CMJ Masterpass joined me and Dr. Carrie Jones in a live Zoom meeting to ask us anything about hormones, and here’s the full recording!

We talk about things like:

  • What time of day is best to take T4 and/or T3?
  • How to use pregnenolone to manage perimenopausal insomnia?
  • Is insomnia different between people who are and aren't on HRT?
  • Estrogen’s effect on the kynurenine pathway could be keeping you up at night.
  • What about men with high estrogen?
  • Over-the-counter supplements to lower SHBG and increased free testosterone?
  • Mycotoxins
  • Iodine, fatigue, and “detox” reactions.
  • Loss of libido and sexual sensation with the LEEP procedure: could progesterone and vitamin E help? What else?
  • Should I be on testosterone replacement therapy?
  • Supporting hormones with nutrition.
  • Why is early morning waking a characteristic symptom of depression and what other conditions have early waking as a symptom?
  • Causes for night sweats in men?
  • Nutritional advice for breast cancer prevention, and the HRT question.
  • Water retention near menstruation.
  • Why would a woman have no cycle? Why would a woman have an anovulatory cycle?
  • What can be done to reverse hypothyroidism other than taking thyroid hormone?

All this and much more!

If you’d like to participate in the next Q&A, consider joining the CMJ Masterpass. Use this link to get a 10% lifetime discount: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass/masteringnutrition

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

04:20   Introduction

07:55     Guidance on what time of day it is best to take T4 and/or T3?

10:37     The use of pregnenolone to manage perimenopausal symptoms, particularly insomnia

12:30      Insomnia is different between people who are and aren't on HRT?

14:15       Estrogen and kynurenine pathway

19:02       Aromatizing in Men

21:40       Over-the-counter supplements to lower SHBG and increased free T, boron, zinc, various herbs

24:20      Discussion about Mycotoxin.

28:48     Discussions in Iodine and mild fatigue and detox.

35:14     Discussion on soft tissue calcification.

40:40    Discussion on LEEP Procedure

45:53     Discussion on testosterone

54:30     Suggestions on supplements to assist with delayed onset muscle soreness. 

55:48     How does the body make hormones and what nutrients and foods do they need to do this?

59:29     Know more about hormone production.

1:09:00  Why is early morning waking a characteristic symptom of depression and what other conditions have imbalances of early waking as a symptom?

1:17:00   When should you consider increasing progesterone or estrogen.

1:20:30   Causes for night sweats in men.

1:25:00   Dietary nutritional advice for breast cancer prevention, macronutrient ratios, micronutrient intakes, et cetera. Also any thoughts on risks and benefits of HRT in perimenopause relative to breast cancer risk?

1:28:29   Discussions on Methylation

1:34:35   Struggles with water retention around period.

1:39:23   Why would a woman have no cycle? Why would a woman have an anovulatory cycle?

1:45:02   What can be done to reverse hypothyroidism other than taking thyroid medicine? 

Oct 19 2019

2hr 16mins

Play

Rank #11: The Carnivore Debate Part 1 | Mastering Nutrition #69

Podcast cover
Read more

Dr. Paul Saladino, Carnivore MD, and I sit down to talk about the carnivore diet. In part 1, we focus on whether you can get all the vitamins and minerals you need on a carnivore diet, and how to best design a carnivore diet to maximize the nutrition you get.

We discuss what I consider high-risk nutrients:

  • Vitamin C
  • Folate

And what I consider conditional-risk nutrients:

  • Manganese​ 
  • Magnesium​
  • Vitamin K​ 
  • Potassium​ 
  • Molybdenum​ 

We also chat about some other things:

  • Dioxins in animal foods: a reason for vegetarianism? 
  • The methionine-to-glycine ratio: balancing meat with bones and skin.
  • Did paleo people get nutritional deficiencies?
  • Bioindividuality: why we all have different needs and our needs evolve over time.
  • Diversify to manage risk: does this mean eat plants, or just eat all the parts of an animal?
  • Ketogenic diets and oxidative stress.
  • Do carbohydrates give you more intracellular insulin signaling?
  • Should carnivores eat dextrose powder for carbs?
  • Are today’s hunter-gatherers representative of those from 80,000 years ago?
  • Did the Maasai really mostly eat meat and milk?
  • My open-door helicopter ride in Hawaii.

Dr. Saladino completed residency in psychiatry at the University of Washington and is a certified functional medicine practitioner through the Institute for Functional Medicine. He attended medical school at the University of Arizona where he worked with Dr. Andrew Weil focusing on integrative medicine and nutritional biochemistry. Prior to this, Dr. Saladino worked as a physician assistant in Cardiology. It was during this time that he saw first hand the shortcomings of mainstream western medicine with its symptom focused, pharmaceutical based paradigm. He decided to return to medical school with the hope of better understanding the true roots of chronic disease and illness, and how to correct these. He now maintains a private practice in San Diego, California, sees clients from all over the world virtually, and has used the carnivore with hundreds of patients to reverse autoimmunity, chronic inflammation, and mental health issues. When he is not researching connections between nutritional biochemistry and chronic disease, he can be found in the ocean searching for the perfect wave, cultivating mindfulness, or spending time with friends and family. 

Find more of Dr. Paul Saladino on the Fundamental Health podcast and at https://carnivoremd.com

Get my free 9-page guide to optimizing vitamins and minerals on the carnivore diet at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/carnivore

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

Masterjohn and Saladino Show Notes

2:11 Introductions

6:36 Dioxins in food. 

14:33 Methionine to Glycine ratio.

23:08 Nutritional deficiencies in paleolithic people.

27:09 Bio individuality/diversity

36:07 Deficiencies that arise from eating only muscle meat.

37:26 Vitamin C

44:22 Weston A. Price’s documentation of whale stomach lining and moose adrenal as a source of vitamin C in Arctic diets.

56:03 Ketogenic diets, oxidative stress, and vitamin c. 

58:36 Insulin

1:05:46 Antioxidant status.

1:22:44 Folate.

1:26:05 Riboflavin.

1:30:23 Manganese.

1:32:28 Dextrose powder.

1:37:31 Potassium/sodium.

1:52:37 Hunter gatherer diets now vs. 80 000 years ago.

2:03:05 The Maasai.

2:09:00 Vitamin K

2:19:00 The most radical thing I’ve done recently. 

Nov 23 2019

2hr 24mins

Play

Rank #12: Why You Need Glycine: A Panel Discussion | Mastering Nutrition #49

Podcast cover
Read more

Glycine can you sleep, stabilize your blood sugar, improve your joint health, keep your skin beautiful, and do much more. It's a little amino acid with a big impact on your health.

This episode is a panel discussion between Dr. Chris Masterjohn, Alex Leaf of Examine.Com, and Vladimir Heiskanen, covering everything you need to know about glycine.

The best way to get glycine is from hydrolyzed collagen. Great Lakes offers the best balance of quality, transparency, and price. Vital Proteins, while more expensive, uses enzymatic digestions rather than heat to hydrolyze the collagen, and some people find that their digestion tolerates Vital Proteins but not other brands.

Some people respond better to pure glycine. For these cases I recommend Bulk Supplements pure glycine powder. It has the same sweetness as sugar and can be used as a sweetener.

You can view the show notes for this episode at chrismasterjohnphd.com/49.

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. I wrote this to make everything you could possibly need to measure and manage your nutritional status all one click away. If you purchase it by Wednesday, January 9, you can turn in your proof of purchase at any point in the future while my consultations are available to get $30 back on a single consultation or $100 back on a Health and Wellness Package. Get it now!

This episode is brought to you by Paleovalley. I use their beef sticks as a convenient yet nutritious snack. They are made from 100% grass-fed beef and preserved through traditional fermentation. The fermentation makes them more digestible and gives them a fresher mouthfeel and texture compared to most other meat snacks I’ve tried, which tend to be too dry for me to fully enjoy. They also have a grass-fed organ complex that contains a blend of liver, heart, kidney, and brain, all stuffed into gel caps for those who can’t bring themselves to eat these incredibly nutritious meats with a fork. Head to paleovalley.com and enter the promo code masterjohn at checkout for 30% off your order. This is a huge savings available for only a limited time. You can get 30% off everything on the site, ordering as much as you want, but only for the duration of the next three podcast episodes. Check it out now to make sure you get your discount!

This episode is brought to you by US Wellness Meats. I use their liverwurst as a convenient way to make a sustainable habit of eating a diversity of organ meats. They also have a milder braunschweiger and an even milder head cheese that gives you similar benefits, as well as a wide array of other meat products, all from animals raised on pasture. Head to grasslandbeef.com and enter promo code “Chris” at checkout to get a 15% discount on any order that is at least 7 pounds and is at least $75 after applying the discount but under 40 pounds (it can be 39.99 lbs, but not 40). You can use this discount code not once, but twice!

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Jan 08 2018

1hr 50mins

Play

Rank #13: 003: The Sugar Conspiracy -- Trading One Nutritional Boogeyman for Another

Podcast cover
Read more

In his April 7, 2016 piece in The Guardian, "The Sugar
Conspiracy" Ian Leslie argues that the politics of nutrition has
blinded us to the fact that sugar is more deserving than saturated
fat of the status of dietary arch-villain and that the politics
continue but the status of sugar and saturated fat are starting to
switch. But we need to move beyond nutritional boogeymen, not
switch one for another. Our sense of history and physiology -- key
concepts about the historical role of Ancel Keys, the rate at which
sugar is converted to fat in a process called de novo lipogenesis,
and whether insulin's stimulation of fat storage can offer a
plausible explanation of obesity -- get distorted when we try to
make a public enemy out of sugar, just as they do when we make a
public enemy out of saturated fat. It's time for a more nuanced
view.

Apr 26 2016

27mins

Play

Rank #14: How to Gain Muscle Without Gaining Fat | Chris Masterjohn Lite #56

Podcast cover
Read more

How do you put on muscle without risking gaining fat? You need the right workout, enough protein, and a gentle caloric surplus. Watch the video for more details!

This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition, all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet Use the code LITE5 to get $5 off.

To get these episodes free of ads, with transcripts, and weeks or sometimes even months before they are released to the public, along with access to monthly live Q&A sessions, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass. Use the code LITE10 to get 10% off. To make it easier to get the discount, use this link, which has the coupon already activated: https://masterpass.chrismasterjohnphd.com/cmj-masterpass/2200/buy?coupon=LITE10

Aug 02 2018

7mins

Play

Rank #15: What to do about cataracts | Masterjohn Q&A Files #60

Podcast cover
Read more

Question: What to do about cataracts.

Carl Rayner says, "Cataract in one eye becoming noticeable. This eye had a posterior detachment about 11 years ago, which is basically healed. I've been on a low-carb diet for over 40 years. Eat raw cream cheese, eggs, meat and liver. In the past few years, adding fasting and more keto diet. Saw your thoughts about glutathione on the cheat sheet and interview with Wendy Myers. Am I on the right track and what else could I do? Grain intolerant. What testing beyond normal tests might be helpful?"

I believe that cataracts in the eye are largely driven by the glycation of lens proteins. The glycation of lens proteins is largely driven by methylglyoxal, which I did my doctoral dissertation on. In direct contradiction to much of the low-carbohydrate literature, glycation is not all driven by carbs. Methylglyoxal is quantitatively the most important source of advanced glycation end products in the body.

Methylglyoxal can be derived from glucose, or it can be derived from ketones, or it can be derived from protein. No one has ever done a very good study to determine whether you have more methylglyoxal on a ketogenic diet versus a high-carb diet. But there was one poorly designed study where they took a small handful of people. They said, "Here's the Atkins diet, new diet," Or what is it called? Atkins New Diet Revolution or whatever that book was called. They said, "Here, read this, go forth and do it." They went home, presumably they read the book or part of it, and they tried to do it. They came back, they lost weight, they had elevated ketones and guess what? They also had significantly higher methylglyoxal.

Also, everything in the pathway that leads from ketones to methylglyoxal was elevated. I would say the data were very strong that in those people, they had higher levels of methylglyoxal because they had higher ketone levels that were generating it. They went on the Atkins diet, and they worsened their glycation risk by making a lot more of the thing that causes most advanced glycation end products and the thing that is probably overwhelmingly driving cataracts. But they didn't show any health consequences, and they certainly didn't measure cataracts in that study because that wasn't the point of it.

They left more questions than answers. For example, what if they had a control group that lost the same amount of weight on a high-carb diet? My suspicion is that methylglyoxal would have gone up during weight loss but just not as much. I also think that if those people stabilized their new weight and then they worked carbs back into their diet, their methylglyoxal would go back down. In fact, I have a consulting client who developed cataracts that corresponded very well with when he started intermittent fasting. He did have poor glutathione status. We were able to improve his glutathione status, but the cataracts didn't go away.

Todd Becker asks, "How do you test methylglyoxal levels?" You don't. You become a guinea pig in a lab because doing a study on it. That's about it. Look, I'm not against keto and I'm not against intermittent fasting. But if you're specifically talking about dealing with cataracts, you're probably not going to get the cataract to go away, but you probably can stop them from getting worse and stop them from forming. I think intermittent fasting and keto is probably going in the wrong direction.

One thing that I do think, I don't think you're going to measure your methylglyoxal levels, but I think you should test your glutathione levels because glutathione is what detoxifies methylglyoxal. If you listen to my riboflavin podcast, we talked about cataracts being a sign of riboflavin deficiency and also being one of the things that's being investigated for whether riboflavin supplementation can help it.

Why does riboflavin supplementation help that? For the exact same reason as when I went on that big, longwinded answer about glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency at the beginning, the riboflavin is there to boost glutathione recycling. I think the whole story, all these pieces knit together to a very, very, very nice story, clean story saying what you want in your eye to avoid cataracts from forming and getting worse, forming in the first place and getting worse, is you want low levels of methylglyoxal in your lenses. How do you get that? You have very good glutathione status.

The keto thing is a maybe. There's no maybe that maybe keto makes that better, but there's a maybe that maybe keto makes that worse. You can't test the glutathione levels in your lens proteins, but you can test the glutathione levels in your blood. I would use the cheat sheet in a very targeted way for everything that's relevant to your glutathione status. I would follow the recommendations in there about how to boost your glutathione status. I would use your blood levels of glutathione as a metric.

Rather than getting them in the normal range, I would try to get them as high within the normal range as you can, and titrate your approaches according to what works. Test it every couple of months, make one very important change. Well, actually, follow all the steps in optimizing glutathione status right now or all the ones you're willing to do. Follow them for eight weeks, test glutathione status, get a baseline glutathione if you can, but eight weeks of all my suggestions or whatever you're willing to do with them. Retest the glutathione, see if it helped. If it helped, then tweak one thing at a time after that. Do that one thing very consistently and stably for four to eight weeks. Retest glutathione.

Whatever I said for glutathione, also consider maybe supplementing with high-dose riboflavin in there. Maybe 100 milligrams of riboflavin at each meal, I would probably revise my glutathione recommendations in the cheat sheet to include that as a possibility. Yeah, optimize against glutathione and consider riboflavin supplementation. Be very open-minded about the carbs, the keto and the fasting because those might be great for many things, but they're definitely not optimal for glutathione and methylglyoxal. Thanks, Carl.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019 If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

Feb 11 2020

7mins

Play

Rank #16: What can be done nutritionally to specifically improve antiviral immunity?

Podcast cover
Read more

Question: What can be done nutritionally to specifically improve antiviral immunity?

Certainly, the fat-soluble vitamins, vitamins A and D, both important. Lauric acid as a fat. Coconut oil might be a good fat choice for the fat in your diet. Monolaurin would be a very good choice for a supplement. Lauricidin is the best monolaurin to take, 3 to 10 grams a day. Be careful of your bowel tolerance, spread it out among your meals, and cut back if it starts to loosen your stool.

Elderberry, which has mostly been studied in the context of flu, that probably has good antiviral properties.

Garlic. Garlic appears to require very high doses if you're just taking a garlic extract. If you're taking stabilized allicin, 180 micrograms a day is good. But you could raise the question what if you're missing on some of the other important compounds in the garlic. I'll debate with some of my friends about that, but what's really been tested is 180 micrograms of stabilized allicin.

Then zinc for sure in the immune response is super important.

Then you get back to nutrient density. Although I'd give special importance to vitamins A and D, arachidonic acid just mentioned, zinc and copper, both, and then those supplements. If you're missing any one particular nutrient, then you're going to wind up with a specific vulnerability that will persist until you fix that one nutrient. Thanks, anonymous.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

Feb 11 2020

2mins

Play

Rank #17: 004: What I've Been Eating And How I Get It

Podcast cover
Read more

I am often asked what I eat, so here is my answer. To
simultaneously meet the goals of productivity, fat loss, and good
nutrition over the last few months, I get most of my food through
Thrive Market and Whole Foods via Instacart, use Epic Liver Bites,
Kettle and Fire broth, fresh meats, eggs, cheese, starches cooked
in big batches, and supplemental fruits and vegetables. I also
discuss how I have been maintaining protein and calories for fat
loss and use MyFitnessPal to track my calories, and how that has
helped me sleep.

Apr 28 2016

29mins

Play

Rank #18: Why You Should Manage Your Riboflavin Status and How to Do It | Mastering Nutrition #58

Podcast cover
Read more

Riboflavin is the ultimate fat-burning nutrient. It makes even a bad MTHFR work right, and it keeps you looking young and beautiful forever.

Here’s everything you need to know about why you should manage your riboflavin status and how to do it.

In this podcast I join with Alex Leaf of Examine.Com. I focus on what riboflavin is and what it does, while Alex focuses on riboflavin supplements.

Going into this podcast I changed my mind about three important things:

  • While I had always discussed riboflavin as relevant to methylation and MTHFR, I had kept it in the back seat in my methylation protocol. Half way through recording this podcast I realized that it really deserves a front seat in my MTHFR protocol. In fact, it may be the case that there’s nothing wrong with the common MTHFR polymorphisms at all and that they only appear to hurt MTHFR activity because most of us aren’t getting enough riboflavin. And why aren’t we? Liver. Liver. We just have to eat liver.
  • In Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet, I had included HDRI’s erythrocyte glutathione reductase activity test as test for assessing riboflavin status. After doing the research for this podcast, I am now convinced that this test is only reliable as a marker of riboflavin status when the lab tests the enzyme activity with and without the addition of riboflavin, which HDRI doesn’t do. I will be revising the cheat sheet soon to rely solely on LabCorp’s whole blood riboflavin test for assessing riboflavin status.
  • I have, for years, believed that riboflavin 5’-phosphate (aka, flavin mononucleotide or FMN) supplements are better than plain old riboflavin, especially for people who are hypothyroid or have low adrenal status, since these conditions impair the activation of riboflavin to it’s 5’-phosphate form. After doing the research for this podcast I now believe that for healthy people it makes no difference and that for people with small intestinal pathologies, the cheaper, less fancy, plain old “riboflavin” is likely to be more effective.

In this podcast we being by considering the fictional stories of people who seem to have little in common. We then explain their stories by looking at the signs and symptoms of riboflavin deficiency. We consider the science of what riboflavin is, how it is used by the body, what it does for us, how to have great riboflavin status, and how to become deficient. We round this out with an extensive discussion of riboflavin supplementation.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

This episode is brought to you by Ample. Ample is a meal-in-a-bottle that takes a total of two minutes to prepare, consume, and clean up. It provides the right balance of nutrients needed for a single meal, all from a blend of natural ingredients. Ample is available in original, vegan, and keto versions, portioned as either 400 or 600 calories per meal. I'm an advisor to Ample, and I use it to save time when I'm working on major projects on a tight schedule. Head to https://amplemeal.com and enter the promo code “CHRIS15” at checkout for a 15% discount off your first order.”

In this episode, you will find all of the following and more:

Riboflavin Show Notes

00:37 Introduction

01:46 Three things that I’ve changed my mind about while doing the research for this podcast

04:24 Cliff notes

14:13 Three stories of riboflavin deficiency

18:05 Signs and symptoms of riboflavin deficiency

21:31 Speculative symptoms of suboptimal riboflavin status

23:49 Chemical properties of riboflavin

27:22 Medical applications: infants with jaundice, eye surgery for keratoconus, and treatment of fungal keratitis

30:38 Chemical structure of riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)

33:02 Riboflavin’s roles in the body: energy metabolism, the antioxidant system, methylation, detoxification, and other nutrient interactions

34:03 Riboflavin’s roles in energy metabolism

39:33 How the different macronutrients (carbohydrate, fat, and protein) affect the riboflavin requirement differently

46:05 Riboflavin’s role in the antioxidant system

50:12 Riboflavin’s roles in the methylation system

52:29 Riboflavin’s interactions with other nutrients: vitamin B6, niacin, and iron

55:47 Riboflavin’s roles in detoxification

57:44 Other riboflavin-dependent enzymes include NADPH oxidase, monoamine oxidase, and protein disulfide isomerase.

59:31 The physiology of riboflavin absorption

01:02:31 The physiology of riboflavin utilization and the importance of magnesium, ATP, thyroid hormone, adrenal hormones, and protein

01:06:43 The gold standard marker of riboflavin status is the erythrocyte glutathione reductase activity coefficient (EGRAC).

01:12:11 LabCorp’s whole blood riboflavin test, normalized to the concentration of blood hemoglobin, is the closest commercially available equivalent to the EGRAC.

01:14:02 Why urinary glutaric acid is not a specific marker of riboflavin status

01:14:54 Measuring riboflavin status should be done after an overnight fast, and biotin does not interfere with the test.

01:15:54 How the RDA for riboflavin was established

01:22:02 How much riboflavin is needed to optimize riboflavin status and maximally suppress the EGRAC?

01:27:25 Why high doses of riboflavin might be beneficial in cases of suboptimal magnesium, energy, thyroid, or adrenal status

01:31:04 Dietary sources of riboflavin

01:36:39 Free riboflavin is found in milk, fortified flours, and many riboflavin supplements.

01:38:55 Riboflavin is destroyed by light.

01:41:16 Riboflavin is produced in the colon, but it is unknown how much this contributes to systemic riboflavin status.

01:43:55 Factors that interfere with riboflavin status and utilization

01:51:02 Genetic defects in riboflavin metabolism and transport

01:53:50 How common is riboflavin deficiency and suboptimal riboflavin status?

01:58:36 Riboflavin supplementation for iron deficiency anemia

02:00:29 The relationship between riboflavin and the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and effects on homocysteine and blood pressure

02:09:32 Riboflavin supplementation and exercise performance

02:14:30 Whether or not riboflavin supplementation could impair adaptations to exercise

02:18:25 Riboflavin supplementation for migraines

02:25:06 Rapid fire questions

02:25:21 Does it matter whether we take free riboflavin or riboflavin 5’-phosphate?  

02:26:51 Should riboflavin be taken with food?

02:30:28 How often should you take riboflavin?

02:32:20 Does it matter if you take riboflavin in one dose or divided doses?

02:33:13 Are there any adverse effects of riboflavin supplements?

Feb 16 2019

2hr 45mins

Play

Rank #19: What food supplements and training programs are good for developing muscle mass?

Podcast cover
Read more

Question: What food supplements and training programs are good for developing muscle mass?

Overwhelmingly, what matters for muscle mass is working out, eating enough protein, and eating enough calories. 

You want to try and hit 10-20 sets per muscle group per week with eat set hitting within 80% of failure. So, if your doing a set of 8 reps but you could have done 20 reps with your chosen weight, that doesn’t count. You would want to pick a weight that you can lift no more than 10 times. Ideally, you’ll do some sets in the 5-rep range, 10-rep range, and 15-rep range. 

For protein, you probably want to be up around 1 gram per pound of body weight or per pound of target body weight. 

Then calories, you do need a caloric excess, but you don't want to get fat. If you know how many calories you need to be weight-stable, I recommend titrating the calories up 100 calories a day and then track your progress if you are gaining waist circumference. I know this is a little bit harder when you're a woman because you're going to have more fluctuations in water weight, but in terms of simple things to do to track your progress, waist circumference is valuable, and looking in the mirror is valuable.

If you can get an actual Bod Pod or DEXA scan, then that would give you more reliable information. There's a device called Skulpt. It's bioimpedance, I believe, but it's taking it at many different points where you take so much data that it actually becomes pretty accurate, but it's very time-consuming. Anyway, take your choice of what you're going to use to track your progress.

If you're not gaining any fat, you can very slowly add your total calories. If you are gaining fat, you need to cut back on the calories. But you need to have a caloric excess to maximize your muscle gains. That right there is probably 90% of it and anything else is probably completely pointless unless you are a very good athlete, in which case you're going to be looking for what's the next.

This Q&A can also be found as part of a much longer episode, here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/podcast/2019/03/08/ask-anything-nutrition-feb-23-2019

If you would like to be part of the next live Ask Me Anything About Nutrition, sign up for the CMJ Masterpass, which includes access to these live Zoom sessions, premium features on all my content, and hundreds of dollars of exclusive discounts. You can sign up with a 10% lifetime discount here: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/q&a

Jan 31 2020

4mins

Play

Rank #20: Pantothenic Acid, Part 1 (What It Is and Why We Need It) | Mastering Nutrition #64

Podcast cover
Read more

Pantothenic acid is vitamin B5. You use it to make coenzyme A, a molecule that is central to energy metabolism, most famous for forming acetyl CoA, which lies at the intersection of all anabolic (building up) and catabolic (breaking down) reactions.

Alex Leaf and I team up again, this time to tackle B5.

This is what happens when you don’t have enough:

  • You get fatigue apathy, discomfort, uneasiness, or pain.
  • You get numbness and tingling in the hands and feet.
  • You may get depressed, quarrelsome, childish, or want to spend all day in bed.
  • Your pulse gets higher than you’d expect after minor exertion.
  • Your sleep gets trashed.
  • You get muscle cramps and abdominal cramps, you fart more, and when things get real bad you might throw up.

Much of this can be explained by pantothenic acid’s role in working all of this magic:

  • We use it break down fat, protein, and carbohydrate for energy.
  • We use it to synthesize fatty acids, ketones, and cholesterol.
  • We use it to synthesize all of the steroid hormones, including the sex hormones, the glucocorticoids that regulate blood sugar, and the mineralcorticoids that regulate electrolyte balance and blood pressure.
  • We use it to regulate our use of iron properly, including preventing its accumulation in the brain, where it can cause neurological damage.
  • We use it to make melatonin, which tells our body it’s time to sleep.
  • We use it to make acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter involved in learning, memory, and cognitive performance during periods of sustained, focused attention.
  • We use it to make mucin, which lubricates the eyes, ears, nose, mouth, vagina, penis, and internal organs.
  • We use it to regulate the fasting/feeding cycle by flipping on the genes for autophagy during fasting and flipping on the genes for repair and antioxidant defense during feeding.
  • We use it for quite a few other things too, like the detoxification of some drugs; the synthesis of hemoglobin to prevent anemia; switching on the urea cycle to help us burn protein for energy cleanly; using folate to synthesize DNA, all the major vitamin-derived carriers in the system of energy metabolism, and glycine, an amino acid that acts as a calming, sleep-promoting neurotransmitter, stabilizes blood sugar, and supports collagen synthesis to make your bones strong and your skin smooth.

Burning fat only requires 20% more B5 than burning carbs, which is small compared to how these macros affect riboflavin requirements, However, under conditions of stress you can burn carbohydrate without any B5 at all and you cannot do that with fat. In mice with severe deficiencies of coenzyme A, ketogenic diets dramatically worsen the neurological effects of deficiency.

Although pantothenic acid is named for its presence everywhere and in everything using the Greek word “pantos,” and the common dogma is that no one is deficient, Alex and I make the case in this two-part podcast that suboptimal pantothenic acid status might just be the norm.

And the crazy thing? Official recommendations suggest we only need about 5 milligrams per day. In the podcast we discuss why some people might need GRAMS per day.

Plus, why the FOOD forms might be superior to anything you can get in any supplements on the market.

In part 2, to be released on July 5, we’ll cover how to get pantothenic acid in foods, blood tests, and supplements.

This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements' "Living" Collagen. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements has a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, "living" collagen, bone marrow and more... in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/ancestral

In this episode you will find all of the following and more:

00:37 Cliff Notes

14:02 Symptoms of experimentally induced pantothenic acid deficiency

15:57 It is thought that pantothenic acid deficiency doesn’t occur naturally.

18:59 Experiments inducing pantothenic acid deficiency

26:06 Signs and symptoms of suboptimal pantothenic acid status

26:54 Is there pantothenic acid toxicity?

30:52 Hypothetical problems of taking high doses of pantothenic acid

31:53 What pantothenic acid is

35:28 Comparisons to niacin and riboflavin

37:14 Roles of coenzyme A

46:02 Roles of 4’-phosphopantetheine

48:12 Burning fat requires 20% more vitamin B5 than burning carbohydrate; and why in the context of severe deficiency of B5 or impairment in the metabolism of B5 a high-fat diet could have devastating consequences.

53:09 The importance of the ratio of acetyl-CoA to free CoA in regulating many metabolic pathways

01:01:02 There are metabolic disorders, such as fatty acid oxidation disorders, that compromise the pool of coenzyme A.

01:03:03 Synthesis of coenzyme A

01:06:47 How coenzyme A synthesis is regulated

01:11:38 Degradation of coenzyme A

01:15:44 The physiology of pantothenic acid absorption

01:25:29 A 2015 paper showed that 4’-phosphopantetheine can cross cell membranes via passive diffusion.

01:29:00 The physiology of pantothenic acid transport in the blood

01:32:11 Cellular uptake of pantothenic acid from the blood

01:33:21 Tissue distribution of pantothenic acid

01:36:00 There may be a particularly high need for pantothenic acid in adolescence.

01:37:01 Mothers actively transfer pantothenic acid to their fetuses and into their milk at their own expense.

01:39:29 Pharmacokinetics of supplementation

01:48:20 A case for why food is superior to supplements for vitamin B5

01:52:41 Inborn errors of coenzyme A metabolism include pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN).

Jun 19 2019

2hr 15mins

Play