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Rank #178 in Books category

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Get Booked

Updated 9 days ago

Rank #178 in Books category

Arts
Books
Fiction
Read more

Get Booked is a weekly show of personalized book recommendations.

Read more

Get Booked is a weekly show of personalized book recommendations.

iTunes Ratings

376 Ratings
Average Ratings
302
42
10
10
12

Love it but audio is horrible

By Rachelsife - Nov 27 2019
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I absolutely love this podcast. I’ve gotten such good recommendations from them. However, I knocked off two stars because I cannot believe how bad the audio quality is. One mic is obviously lesser than the other and I’m constantly blasting my volume for one of the hosts and then lowering it for the other. This is a podcast... audio quality is EVERYTHING. Great content but sometimes it’s just too annoying to listen to. Please invest in a better mic

Love this!

By 718_kc - Mar 15 2019
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Making my way through back catalogue and found lots of great reads. Thanks for great podcast!

iTunes Ratings

376 Ratings
Average Ratings
302
42
10
10
12

Love it but audio is horrible

By Rachelsife - Nov 27 2019
Read more
I absolutely love this podcast. I’ve gotten such good recommendations from them. However, I knocked off two stars because I cannot believe how bad the audio quality is. One mic is obviously lesser than the other and I’m constantly blasting my volume for one of the hosts and then lowering it for the other. This is a podcast... audio quality is EVERYTHING. Great content but sometimes it’s just too annoying to listen to. Please invest in a better mic

Love this!

By 718_kc - Mar 15 2019
Read more
Making my way through back catalogue and found lots of great reads. Thanks for great podcast!

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Get Booked

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Get Booked is a weekly show of personalized book recommendations.

129: #129: Somebody's Dead So That's Awkward

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Apr 26 2018

47mins

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Get Booked Ep. #78: All Mysteries, All Thrillers, All the Time

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Amanda, Jenn, and guest expert Katie discuss mysteries and thrillers! This episode is sponsored by Start Up by Doree Shafrir and Perfect by Cecilia Ahern.

Apr 25 2017

58mins

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128: #128: Nonfiction Galore

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Jenn is joined by Kim Ukura and Alice Burton, hosts of the For Real podcast, for a special nonfiction-themed episode!

This episode is sponsored by Rebound by Kwame Johnson and the Bruno Johnson Series by David Putnam.

Enter our mystery giveaway!

Questions

1. Hi there,

This never-ending winter has me looking forward to the vacation I've planned for this June and I have visions of laying on the beach for days at a time with a good book. I'm not worried about being able to find good vacation reading material for myself, but my wife is a much pickier reader. Can you help me find a book that will keep her entertained so I can relax with my own book? She loves nonfiction and particularly enjoys heavy topics like the holocaust, dictatorships, and cults. Recent reads she has enjoyed include Blitzed: Drugs in the Third Reich by Norman Ohler and Without You, There is No Us: Undercover Amongst the Sons of North Korea's Elite by Suki Kim. I recently put The Road to Jonestown and Lilac Girls in her hands, but neither of those worked for her.

Thanks in advance for your help!

Best,

--Brianna

2. I'm a single woman in my mid-30s and, while I am fine with my single status and enjoying my life as it is, almost all of my friends are partnering off and having children. I was feeling blue about it until I read Rebecca Traister's All the Single Ladies and Kate Bolick's Spinster, and am now looking for more reads that celebrate single women, especially single women without children. I'm looking specifically for books with female protagonists who get to enjoy a happy ending without being coupled off or having kids, or where the happy ending is not focused on coupledom (though it's fine if there's a relationship in the story). I read all fiction genres except horror and I also enjoy nonfiction, especially memoirs and biographies.

Thanks in advance. I love the podcast!

--Rebecca

3. Hi Amanda and Jenn!

I just have to say y'all are the best, and I love this podcast so much. My to be read list grows every day (mostly because I just discovered this podcast so I am just binging my way through it :))

I have a request for a book for my boyfriend. He likes to read, but he's a really slow reader (this was my way of saying, he likes to read but doesn't read a lot, you know?), and we just moved in together and I noticed that almost all of his books are by straight white males. My new years resolution is to get him only books by...not straight white males.

So. He likes fantasy and science fiction. (He loved the Name of the Wind, I think he liked Game of Thrones.) But I've already recommended him Octavia Butler, and N.K. Jemisin is on my to-read list.

He also LOVES true crime and nonfiction/historical-ish books, like Devil in the White City. (I also already got him Killers of the Flower Moon before I made my resolution. Whoops.)

Any recommendations are so welcome, in these genres or feel free to go crazy.

Best,

--Rachael

4. I've been feeling the inadequacy of my high school level American History education lately, as I've been listening to a lot of podcasts that have happened to bring up Asian American historical events that I realize I know very little about. I would like to brush up on my Asian American history in general but I don't know where to start. Do you have any nonfiction recs in this area, both in the overview theme and more specific and particular events and ethnic groups? Thank you much!

--Rayne

5. I am getting very interested in language itself. This began with just loving novels with beautiful and pithy prose (so rec's in that vein are certainly welcome). Now I'm increasingly interested in linguistics and philology. While I'm so far fascinated by Steven Pinker's "The Language Instinct", I am hoping for books (nonfiction, memoirs, essay collections, or even novels) more welcoming to the lay linguist. For instance, Bill Bryson's "The Mother Tongue" is very much the sort of thing I'm hoping for more of, and I am currently working through and enamored by Jhumpa Lahiri's beautiful "In Other Words". So, where do I go when I finish that one? Thanks y'all!

--Noah

6. Hi-ya!

I am trying to be a less stupid white person. Recently I have read Between the World and Me by Ta-Nahisi Coates, the March series by Congressman John Lewis, and the quite excellent satire, I Am Not Sidney Poitier by Percival Everett. I loved them all, and would like to read more like them. I am planning to read more satires like Welcome to Braggsville, The Sellout, and Blackass, but are there other books on race that you can recommend, fiction or nonfiction? I would especially love some gems from the past that I may have missed, or something written by a woman!

Many thanks!!

--K

Books Discussed

Not So Stories edited by David Thomas Moore

Bastard Out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison

Bachelor Nation by Amy Kaufman

My Grandfather Would Have Shot Me by Jennifer Teege

Five Days at Memorial by Sheri Fink

Death in the Air: The True Story of a Serial Killer, the Great London Smog, and the Strangling of a City by Kate Winkler Dawson

Bachelor Girl by Betsy Israel (trigger warning: discussion of rape)

The Extra Woman by Joanna Scutts

I Can Barely Take Care of Myself by Jen Kirkman

The Grace of Kings by Ken Liu

The Poisoner’s Handbook by Deborah Blum

Black Dahlia, Red Rose: The Crime, Corruption, and Cover-Up of America’s Greatest Unsolved Murder by Piu Eatwell

The Making of Asian America by Erika Lee

The Song Poet by Kao Kalia Yang

Asian American Dreams: The Emergence of an American People by Helen Zia

“Stories of Your Life” from Stories of Your Life and Others by Ted Chiang

Proust and the Squid by Maryanne Wolf

The Adventure of English: The Biography of a Language by Melvyn Bragg

Eloquent Rage by Brittney Cooper

The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson

From #blacklivesmatter To Black Liberation by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

Apr 19 2018

1hr 6mins

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142: #142: High Stakes With Eye Shadow

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Amanda and Jenn discuss mystery audiobooks, sea otters, fun sci-fi, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by Suicide Club by Rachel Heng and Chica Chocolate.

Questions

1. Hello there!

I’m going on a road trip with my husband and in-laws in August and would love to listen to a family-friendly mystery audiobook. Murder is ok as long as it’s not too gruesome and please no sex!

I love your show so much and look forward to listening every week!

Thanks so much for your time,

--Lacey

2. Dear Jenn and Amanda,

I am going to Kyuquot British Columbia for a kayaking trip in August and would love any reading recommendations for books about this area or sea otters. I am currently reading Heart Berries by Terese Marie Mailhot and have read The Forest Lover by Susan Vreeland. I work from home and your podcast is my treat for when I can take it a little bit easier at work.

Thanks,

--Erin

3. Hi, I’d love book recommendations for if you loved the guardians of the galaxy movies. Fun sci-fi with great characters. I’ve already enjoyed Long way to a small angry planet. Also sorry if this has been asked before. Thanks :)

--Teghan

AND

One of my favorite books in recent years is "The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet" and its sequel. I love the colorful characters, the themes of found family and searching for your place in the world, and the general feeling that everybody is just kinder and more open-minded in the future. Most of all I just find the mellow slice-of-life tone really relaxing to read after a long stressful day. Although I loved the rich sci-fi worldbuilding in this series, I'm open to reading books with a similar tone in other settings and genres.

--Tracey

4. I have recently gotten very interested in the ideas behind and process of translating. It started with the release of Emily Wilson’s translation of The Odyssey and the surrounding media buzz. Follow that up with a conversation about ASL interpreting, some Jhumpa Lahiri, and an internet rabbit hole about Harry Potter books in translation, and I want to deep dive into something about a literary translator, whether it be fiction, memoir, non-fiction, whatever. I’m finding it difficult to look up suggestions on the internet because the results tend to either be the works in translation themselves or how-to type guides, which just isn’t quite what I’m looking for.

Thank you!

--Carol

5. Hi ladies:

I'm looking for angry women book recommendations. I want to read a book that centers a woman speaking on the things that make them angry. Fiction/non-fiction will do. Bonus points for books in translation.

Thanks in advance,

an angry woman

6. Hey Y'all,

I'm a college student studying English and therefore spend a large amount of time reading intense literary books, which don't get me wrong, is the light of my soul. However, now that summer is here some of my favorite recreational books to read are ones that include a complicated villain romance. I know it's completely cliche, but it never fails to hit the spot when I'm looking for something light. Two of my favorites are Warner from the Shatter Me series and Rhys from A Court of Thorns and Roses. I'm completely fine with anything YA, but would be interested if there's this type of relationship dynamic in adult fiction and a queer twist on the relationship would be much appreciated if you could think of anything.

Best,

--Sunnie

7. Hello! I realized recently I deeply enjoy books and media about groups of people who support and have a deep and unconditional love for each other, especially in abnormal circumstances. Some examples of this I particularly loved are the Harry Potter books and A Little Life, and the shows Sense8 and Orphan Black. I prefer literary fiction, science fiction, and contemporary YA, and I also prefer if there are queer people in a book. What are some other books with tight, loving groups and found families? Thank you!

--Ellie

Books Discussed

Dread Nation by Justina Ireland

The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett

Death Below Stairs by Jennifer Ashley

The Unexpected Inheritance of Inspector Chopra by Vaseem Khan

Haunting of Vancouver Island by Shanon Sinn

Return of the Sea Otter by Todd McLeish

Space Opera by Catherynne M. Valente

The Wrong Stars by Tim Pratt

Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers

The World Between Two Covers by Ann Morgan

An Unnecessary Woman by Rabih Alameddine

The Woman Upstairs by Claire Messud

Excellent Women by Barbara Pym

Eloquent Rage by Brittney Cooper

The Captive Prince trilogy by C.S. Pacat

The Professional by Kresley Cole, rec’d by Trisha and Jess

Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

Hunger Makes the Wolf by Alex Wells

Aug 02 2018

53mins

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Get Booked Ep. #17: Saddled With a Murdress

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Amanda and Jenn recommend literary mysteries, fantasy romance, self-help for creative types, and more on this week's Get Booked.
This episode is sponsored by Book Riot's Steamy Reading Box and Book Riot Live.

Feb 25 2016

58mins

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Get Booked Ep. #76: Really, Really, Really Problematic

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Amanda and Jenn discuss deeply messed up books, body positive reads, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked. This episode is sponsored by Falling Hard by Stacy Finz and Book Riot Insiders.

Apr 12 2017

49mins

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200: Bonus: Un-Recommendable Books

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In this special bonus episode, Amanda and Jenn recommend some of their favorite books that are otherwise impossible to recommend.

This episode is sponsored by our Mystery/Thriller GiveawayBlinkist, and Libro.fm.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

Amazing librarian Stephanie makes an amazing Get Booked spreadsheet!

BOOKS DISCUSSED

Love and Trouble by Claire Dederer (tw sexual assault)

The Vagina Bible by Dr. Jen Gunter

Somewhere in the Middle by Deborah Francisco Douglas

The Legend of Pradeep Mathew by Shehan Karunatilaka

How to Behave Badly in Elizabethan England by Ruth Goodman

Clandestine in Chile by Gabriel Garcia Márquez

Summer Cooking by Elizabeth David

Meeting Faith by Faith Adiele

Witches, Sluts, Feminists by Kristen J. Sollee

Star Trek The Next Generation: Dark Mirror by Diane Duane

Guano by Louis Carmain, translated by Rhonda Mullins

Red or Dead by David Peace

Sep 30 2019

50mins

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Sex and Drugs and the Rocky Horror Picture Show

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Amanda and Jenn recommend horror, Nancy Drew read-a-likes for grownups, and more on this week's Get Booked.
This episode is sponsored by Burning Glass by Kathryn Purdie and A Study in Charlotte by Brittany Cavallaro.

Mar 10 2016

1hr

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140: #140: Drinking Tea and Saying Rude Things Nicely

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Amanda and Jenn discuss fiction about the Azores, wine books, lighter reads, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by Recommended and Book Riot Insiders.


Questions

1. Hello! My husband and I will be traveling to the Azores in September 2018 and I would love to get my hands on a “page turner” that takes place on one of the islands. I love historical fiction, murder mysteries, contemporary fiction, and non fiction (as long as it reads like a novel). I’m good with 300-500 pages but I like to keep things moving so over 500 seems like homework to me. No issues with triggers. I love your podcast and can’t wait to hear what you come up with!

Thank you,

–Robin

2. I really want to get a book for a friend of mine before I leave town. I don’t know when I will see her next after I leave so I am anxious to get it right! I sneakily asked her about her favourite books and, after the usual “how could I ever choose”, this was her response:

Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, The Secret Garden, Authors: Jane Austen, Neil Gaiman, Patrick Rothfuss

I look forward to your response!!!!

–Kate

3. Hi there! Thank you for the show and all of your wonderful recommendations! I am hoping you can help me out with what might be a niche request – I would love to read something that includes an interracial, interfaith relationship or family. It does not need to be any specific race/ethnicity or faiths, but if it can include these two components, that would be great – either fiction or non-fiction is great. Thank you!

–Emma

4. Hi Ladies,

I’m looking for recs for my Mom. She’s a voracious mystery reader: she flies through books very quickly. I gave her Flavia de Luce after loving it (and hearing about it through you!) and she finished the series in about a week and asked me for more. I shared a recent episode with her where you recommended IQ, and she loved that as well: she read both of those, and we’re back at square one.

She’s read a lot of the huge names (full leather bound collection of Agatha Christies, loves Rex Stout and other classics, read all of the Costco-display level best sellers like Sue Grafton, JD Robb, Robert Galbraith, Janet Evanovich, Clive Cussler, etc)

Her other favorite series is the Dresden Files: I think she likes rogue type main characters who work alone and stories set in richly written worlds/cities. She likes more mystery than thriller, although she enjoys it when they intermix.

Thanks for all you do! I look forward to each Thursday (and now so does my Mom) 🙂

–Lauren

5. Hey Ladies! I love wine, but I’m much more of a connoisseur of quantity, not quality. A big fan of Cardbordeaux! I’d like to know more about wine and what makes wine “good.” Can you recommend any readable non-fiction (or fiction if it’s very informative) about wine that isn’t too pretentious?

–Bess

6. I was talking with my sister recently and she mentioned that I should read books that aren’t so dark and heavy. Having a bit of time to think about it, she is right and I need to lighten up my reading. Do you or your listeners have any ideas as to make my reading not so heavy? Some of the books that I have enjoyed are A Town Like Alice, Jane Eyre, Outlander, Burial Rites, Crime and Punishment, Alias Grace, To Kill A Mockingbird, All Quiet on the Western Front, A Tale of Two Cities, Station Eleven, A Discovery of Witches, the Harry Potter series, among others.

–Melissa

7. I recently read a book that totally blew my mind – I’m Thinking Of Ending Things by Iain Reid. It had such an effect on me that I immediately re read it .

I’m looking for similar books….unsettling, creepy and with an overwhelming sense of “something’s not right here” dread.

I already read Bird Box, Head Full Of Ghosts and House Of Leaves.

Please help this fellow book nerd. Thanks, and Stay awesome.

–Holly

Books Discussed

The Tethered Mage by Melissa Caruso

Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton

Chi’s Sweet Adventure by Konami Kanata

Yotsuba&! by Kiyohiko Azuma

The Winter Queen by Boris Akunin, translated Andrew Bromfield

Death at the Water’s Edge by Miriam Winthrop

The Stone Raft by Jose Saramago

Shades of Milk and Honey by Mary Robinette Kowal

Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik (tw: scenes of domestic violence/physical child abuse)

Wrong to Need You by Alisha Rai

Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng

The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey

Magic Bites (Kate Daniels #1) by Ilona Andrews

Cork Dork by Biana Bosker

The Billionaire’s Vinegar by Benjamin Wallace

84 Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff

Witchmark by CL Polk

We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

How to Be a Good Wife by Emma Chapman

Jul 19 2018

50mins

Play

Get Booked Ep. #14: OMG I LOVE READING

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Jenn and Amanda recommend diverse classics, quiet middle America stories, and more! This episode is sponsored by Murder on Wheels by Lynn Cahoon and Penguin Random House Audio

Feb 04 2016

54mins

Play

198: This One Is The Queerest

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Amanda and Jenn discuss queer reads, graphic novels, management advice, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by our Mystery/Thriller giveawayAll That’s Dead by Stuart McBride, and Loki: Where Mischief Lies by Mackenzi Lee, read by Oliver Wyman.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

Here’s to the Ladies: Stories of the Frontier Army by Carla Kelly (rec’d by Kate)

Boom Town by Sam Anderson (rec’d by Miranda)

I Contain Multitudes by Ed Yong (rec’d by Miranda)

How Not To Be Wrong by Jordan Ellenberg (rec’d by Miranda)

Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho (rec’d by Miranda)

Uprooted by Naomi Novik (rec’d by Miranda)

The Tairen Soul series by C. L. Wilson (rec’d by Victoria)

QUESTIONS

1. So I’m from Australia and it’s currently winter where I am in August at the moment but in October that’s when it’ll be spring and I’m going on vacation to somewhere where it’s sunny, hot and relaxing atmosphere!

I was hoping you girls could recommend me some books to bring for the trip

Summer books are good, I also like thriller and horror, weird for summer but oh well!

I like authors like Taylor Jenkins Reid

No YA if you can

-Tamika

2. Time Sensitive: My son is turning 15 next week and I always get him a book (or five) for his birthday. This past year, he’s really been into graphic novels: he loved Scott Pilgrim (and the movie) and having read The Watchmen myself some years ago, I gave him a copy and he loved it. We have Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman and Marvel 1602 in the house (which I have not yet read yet), but I am looking for some other graphic novels he might enjoy. Any suggestions?

-Neda

3. Hello Get Booked friends! Last year I was #blessed to get a job at my dream company, and am currently moving from entry-level to mid-career level responsibilities (aka “Big Kid stuff” as I like to think to stave off imposter syndrome). I have such a supportive work community as I grow into these new responsibilities, but I am wondering if you could recommend books (fiction or non-fiction) with practical advice for women stepping into leadership and “big-girl” responsibilities for the first time. I’ve read Lean In, You are a Badass, and a lot of Brene Brown, and tested the waters of some general business books, but I’d love the practical, Millennial perspective of women moving from entry-level to a management role (and managing people) for the first time.

-Lauren

4. Aloha Ladies!

This podcast has been a godsend for me as I’ve recently rediscovered my love for books after a long hiatus. With my re-entry into the world of bibliophiles, my best friend and I created a long-distance book club (Hawaii to Boston!) with some other wonderful women who were interested. I’ve never been part of a book club before and am so nervous about picking an interesting read that will spark discussion. There are no restrictions on genre, author, etc., but I would prefer to select a book that’s written by a woman. My personal preferences lean heavily towards fantasy (not sure that’s the best for a group), true crime and mystery/thrillers. Any suggestions for books that will drive thought-provoking discussion would be greatly appreciated!

Many Mahalos!

-Christina

5. Hello! I have a wonderful colleague who is preparing to adopt a child from Colombia. She doesn’t know a great deal yet, but knows that the child will be around 8-10 years old. I would love to get her some books that they could read aloud together. My colleague and her family are all currently taking Spanish classes, and the child will be in the process of learning English. Any thoughts on a good read that might help to ease the adjustments that will be happening in some small way? Thanks so much, for this and for your great recs in general!

-DK

6. hi, i’ve been a fan for a while and so i’m looking for recommendations by authors who are not from the u.s., or more specifically just anything from the other side of the world. i have so little international books, it feels like i’m limiting myself to one country, one kind of book. i recently read “gumiho” by kat cho, which i really liked, and am reading “i am not your perfect mexican daughter” by erika sanchez, a book which i’m relating to a lot since i am latinx. some books i really like/love are “the rest of us just live here” by patrick ness, “eliza and her monsters” by francesca zappia, and any series/book that rick riordan has worked on or presented. i’m open to any genre though i have a tendency to like books that mix the real world with a bit of fantasy/supernatural. bonus if there is lgbt and mental illness rep in the book.

-Ru

7. I am looking for a new book/books to read after finishing the books by Nina LaCour. I like books with queer characters (especially wlw and trans characters) set in western cities (LA, San Francisco, Seattle, Portland) where the city plays a big part of the book. I have read “Little and Lion” “Juliet takes a breath” and “when dimple met rishi”

Love the show! Thanks so much

-Joelle

BOOKS DISCUSSED

Confessions of Frannie Langton by Sara Collins (tw: slavery and violence inherent therein, harm to children, rape, incest)

Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures by Emma Straub (tw: depression, suicide)

Lazarus Vol 1 by Greg Rucka, Michael Lark

Pretty Deadly by Kelly Sue DeConnick, Emma Ríos (cw: nudity/prostitution)

No Hard Feelings by Liz Fosslien and Molly West Duffy

Ask A Manager by Alison Green (and the online columns!)

An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

The Light Brigade by Kameron Hurley (tw: torture, harm to children, gore)

Juana and Lucas by Juana Medina

Lupe Vargas and Her Super Best Friend / Lupe Vargas y Su Super Mejor Amiga by Amy Costales, Alexandra Artigas

Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata, transl. by Ginny Tapley Takemori

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Passing Strange by Ellen Klages

About a Girl (Metamorphoses #3) by Sarah McCarry

Sep 19 2019

46mins

Play

146: #146: Southern Women Fight the Patriarchy

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Amanda and Jenn discuss romantic comedies, books about strong women, non-murdery true crime, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by Sadie by Courtney Summers, Mirage by Somaiya Daud, and Chica Chocolate.

Feedback

For Bess who wants full cast audiobooks: Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo both have great full cast recordings and I think they would work well for someone who liked His Dark Materials.

--Insider Sibyl

For the same person, anything by Tamora Pierce. At least one of her books was specifically written for audio and at least some were done by the company Full Cast Audio, who frankly has a lot of good middle grade fantasy stuff.

--Insider Alanna

Questions

1. Hello!

I’m a huge fan of your podcast! I was hoping you could help me find some books to get me through a sort of stressful time. For the next two months I’m going to be working three jobs in two states - with 7 hours of travel each way when I switch states every week! I’m hoping to find some lighthearted yet well-written romantic comedies to help me de-stress during the long bus rides.

I am open to almost any genre, as long as it’s smartly written. I love Jane Austen (though not Austen retellings unless they involve zombies), Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, Eleanor Oliphant, and This is Where I Leave You. Stardust is my favorite Neil Gaiman novel. I was less keen on Attachments and Eligible because they felt a bit heavy handed/cheesy.

It’s been tough to find the right balance of lighthearted without being too sugary, so I would love any suggestions!

Thanks!

--Andrea

2. Hello, ladies!

I'm looking for a book about strong women that has a specific flavor to it. I can't describe it exactly, but books that have that feeling that I've read are The Help and Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistlestop Cafe. I love books that focus on women's relationships with each other, bonus points if it's historical fiction. Thanks in advance!

--Therese

3. Hi,

My mother retired a couple of years ago, and has been using some of her newfound free time to read a lot more. I am one of her main sources of reading recommendations, and am wondering if there is some stuff out there that I am missing that she might love. My recommendations tend to mostly be SFF, historical fiction, and non-fiction, with some YA that usually overlaps with SFF or historical. She also reads mysteries, but I am not looking for recommendations in that genre at this time.

One of my main goals in my recommendations has been writer and character diversity: there are enough recommendation lists out there of books by straight white guys. We are also both white women, so I feel that it is important for us to educate ourselves on the stories and perspectives of people different from ourselves.

Now, I am going to give a lot of examples of books she has read, because I worry about getting a recommendation back of something she has read. Of the books I have recommended, she has loved The Night Circus, A Tale for the Time Being, The Queen of the Night, Bad Feminist/ Difficult Women, The Signature of All Things, Tears We Cannot Stop, Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell, Books and Islands in Ojibwe Country, What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours, and Homegoing. She has also really liked books by Nnedi Okorafor, Connie Willis, Donna Tartt, Ruta Sepetys, Elizabeth Wein, Kate Atkinson, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Junot Diaz, Stacey Lee, Carlos Ruiz Zafron, and Ursula Le Guin, as well as You Can’t Touch My Hair, The Library at Mount Char, Never Let Me Go, Swing Time, Greenglass House, We Need New Names, Americanah, Lab Girl, Another Brooklyn, Garden of Evening Mists, and Kindred.

Books she just liked: Station Eleven, An Unnecessary Woman, Rise of the Rocket Girls, Everything Leads to You, Ninefox Gambit, Bone Witch, and Boy, Snow, Bird.

Books already on my suggestion list: Shrill, Radium Girls, I contain Multitudes, Behold The Dreamers, Pushout: the Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools, The New Jim Crow, Men Explain things to me, Pachinko, Inferior: How Science got Women Wrong, The Cooking Gene, the Winged Histories, The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead, The Hate U Give, Infomocracy, Citizen by Claudia Rankine, How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America, Uprooted, Speak by Louisa Hall, The Fifth Season, Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self, George by Alex Gino, Monster by Walter Dean Myers, Too Like the Lightning, Electric Arches, Labyrinth Lost, N.K. Jemisin, Zen Cho, and Jesmyn Ward.

I would prefer backlist recommendations I may have missed, as I am pretty good at keeping up with new releases and determining if they seem interesting to either one or both of us.

Thanks!

--Mary

4. Hi! I'm wanting to read more fantasy and sci fi books as they're two of my favorite genres even though I haven't read a ton of books from either. I grew up reading Harry Potter. I've recently read The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss and Assassin's Apprentice by Robin Hobb, and mostly enjoyed them but I was very disappointed in the lack of female characters. I would love to read a fantasy or scifi book where several of the main characters are women, and that isn't graphically violent and doesn't include explicit sex scenes. I've read and enjoyed the first two books in the Southern Reach trilogy by Jeff Vandermeer (reading 3 now) and Jasper Fforde's Thursday Next series. Thanks!!

--Valerie

5. Hi, I'm looking for an audiobook for the Dr. I work for. He and his family with children aging from 18 to 6 years of age travel by car often. I'm looking for an adventure even a true life adventure, that would capture the attention of the children as well as the adults without a lot of swearing as they are a religious family. I know it's last minute. Your help is much appreciated

--Tiffany

6. I need a recommendation to fulfill the Read Harder Challenge #2, a book of true crime. So far a lot of what I'm finding is things about serial killers or school shootings and for various reasons, books about murders, shootings, extreme violence etc are too triggering for me to get into a this point in life. But surely there must be true crime books about other topics? If it were a movie, I'd think something like Oceans 11 or Catch Me if You Can. Books about abductions or kidnapping are okay as long as they aren't too grisly or graphic. Thanks in advance for your help!

--Jessica

7. Greetings, Jenn and Amanda! This is perhaps oddly specific, but I have recently realized that a premise I always love, whether in movie, TV, or books, is “unlikely group stranded together somewhere due to inclement weather.” I have always loved huge snowstorms and the resulting inability to go anywhere or do anything but hang out at home and read. I love seeing or reading about characters in a similar situation. It doesn’t necessarily have to be a snowstorm that’s keeping the characters stranded, but that’s my favorite. I am open to any genre, but prefer romantic or other interesting interpersonal plot points to scary ones (i.e. group of people stranded by snowstorm deals with deranged killer on the loose).

I love your show and I thank you!

--Darcy

Books Discussed

For a Muse of Fire by Heidi Heilig (out Sept 25)

Secondhand Time by Svetlana Alexievich

The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang

Heroine Complex by Sarah Kuhn

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

Girl Waits with Gun by Amy Stewart

The Kindness of Enemies by Leila Aboulela

Bone & Bread by Saleema Nawaz (TW: eating disorder)

The Five Daughters of the Moon by Leena Likitalo

Bannerless by Carrie Vaughn

The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle

The Man Who Loved Books Too Much by Allison Hoover Bartlett

The Orchid Thief by Susan Orlean

Snowspelled by Stephanie Burgis (rec’d by Jess)

The Big Bang Symphony by Lucy Jane Bledsoe

Aug 30 2018

51mins

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147: #147: Authors in a Trench Coat

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Sep 06 2018

54mins

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Get Booked Episode #11: The Night Circus Void

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Amanda and Jenn recommend books to read after college, what to read to fill the void left by The Night Circus, and more. This episode is sponsored by Jakob's Colors by Lindsay Hawdon and the Book Riot Store.

Jan 14 2016

1hr 4mins

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Get Booked Ep. #75: Mortality and Whatnot

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Amanda and Jenn discuss books on grief and mortality, chapter books, personal favorites and more in this week's episode of Get Booked. This episode is sponsored by Only A Mistress Will Do by Jenna Jaxon and The Baker Street Four from Insight Editions.

Apr 04 2017

45mins

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Get Booked Ep. #23: Boyfriend, Spectral or Otherwise

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Amanda and Jenn recommend South American lit, adult fiction for YA lovers, and more on this week's Get Booked!
This episode is sponsored by Rich and Pretty by Rumaan Alam and the Book of the Month Club.

Apr 06 2016

1hr 2mins

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150: #150: Really Interesting Nonsense

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Amanda and Jenn discuss fall mood reading, books about friendship, horror short stories, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by the GCP Clubcar and The Good Demon by Jimmy Cajoleas.

Questions

1. Hi there!

I’m looking for books that hit the sweet spot towards fulfilling my reading challenges for this year.

I’m trying to read at least 75% female authors and at least 75% non-US/UK/Canadian (especially trying to add books from new countries).

Therefore, I’ve been reading a lot of women in translation and finding a lot of great books, but I’ve come to realize that the vast majority of what I’ve been reading are new books from the very late 20th or 21st centuries. So I’m really digging now for recommendations that touch each decade of the 20th century and/or earlier.

Do you have any ideas for books or authors?

Some good books from the last year or two I’ve loved were “Fever Dream” by Samantha Schweblin (Argentina), Han Kang’s books from South Korea, Ali Smith’s Autumn (not helping my goal :), and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

Thanks :)

--Patrik

2. Hello,

I love listening to the show and learning about new books to add to my ever-growing TBR pile. But this request is for my husband. He's lately just gotten back into reading science fiction and I would love to surprise him with a new book for his birthday. He loves science fiction that mixes hard science with a good story. His recent obsession has been the Three Body Trilogy by Cixin Liu; he is also a big Arthur C. Clarke fan. Any recommendations would be appreciated!

--Lee

3. Hello!

I sent in this question a while back but I don’t think it was answered yet, so I thought I’d re-submit.

I’m seeking some eerie, atmospheric books to read this fall and winter. Bonus points for books set in rainy, stormy, dreary places. My most recently read books that fall into this type of category are “Rebecca” and “And Then There Were None,” and “The Woman in Cabin 10.”

I’m open to books from all eras, as well as both YA and adult novels.

Thanks a lot! And I’m sorry if I might have missed this question on a recent show.

--Katie

4. Hello,

My best friend and I no longer live anywhere near each other and may not for many years to come. One way we have maintained our bond is through reading books together. We love contemporary literature especially focused on women's experiences. I am specifically looking for some lovely books about female friendship. As teens we both loved and deeply bonded over the sisterhood of the traveling pants series but I'm now looking for something more geared towards adults and maintaining friendship through the trials of adulthood, including perhaps long distance friendship.

Thank you!

--Rhiannon

5. Hi there! I'm looking for recommendations for my cousin who loves books that look at the world or history honestly, but still make her laugh. Her all-time favorites are The Sellout, The Good Lord Bird, A Confederacy of Dunces, and most recently Less by Andrew Sean Greer.

She keeps asking me for some absurdist satire like those books, except written by and centered on women. I know of no books that fit the bill, especially none that speak to a more diverse experience (i.e., NOT Confessions of a Shopaholic). She's an intellectual, funny woman of color currently living in Europe, and I'd love to send her a couple books to accompany her on her travels. Please help!

--CoCo

6. Recently I’ve gotten into manga and I’ve been really loving the books I’ve been picking up. I’m reading Fullmetal Alchemist at the moment and have become obsessed.

It’s made me realize however how little I’ve read in translation by Japanese authors, and was wondering if you two had any novel recommendations. I read pretty much anything in any genre, so long as it’s engaging and well written I’m happy. Also before you ask I have read some Murakami. He’s a great author, but I’ve had difficulty with how he writes women. Thanks ladies!

--Anonymous

7. Hello! I love your show and all of your recommendations. I have just started reading short story collections and, since I am a fan of horror books, I wonder if y'all would know of any horror short story collections (that are not Stephen King, already have all of those!). Thank you!

--Aldo

Books Discussed

The Tangled Tree by David Quammen

Headscarves and Hymens by Mona Eltahawy

Agua Viva by Clarice Lispector (1970s, Brazil), transl. Stefan Tobler

Angelica Gorodischer (Argentina), Kalpa Imperial, translated by Ursula K. Le Guin

All Systems Red by Martha Wells

Daniel H Wilson (Robopocalypse or Guardian Angels and Other Monsters)

Weathering by Lucy Wood

The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins

She Matters by Susanna Sonnenberg

Rich and Pretty by Rumaan Alam

Severance by Ling Ma

The Merry Spinster by Daniel Mallory Ortberg (published under Mallory Ortberg)

Penance by Kanae Minato, transl by Philip Gabriel

Strange Weather in Tokyo by Hiromi Kawakami, transl. by Allison Markin Powell (rec’d by Pierce Alquist)

North American Lake Monsters by Nathan Ballingrud

Fen by Daisy Johnson

Sep 27 2018

42mins

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Get Booked Episode #4: Haunted by Horror

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This week's episode is about all things horror, with guest Becky Spratford.This episode is sponsored by We'll Never Be Apart by Emiko Jean and the Room movie.

Oct 22 2015

1hr 5mins

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Episode #18: Also, Some Camels

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Amanda and Jenn recommend books about space, modern Westerns, and more on this week's Get Booked.
This episode is sponsored by Burning Glass by Kathryn Purdie and A Study in Charlotte by Brittany Cavallaro.

Mar 03 2016

1hr 4mins

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Get Booked Ep. #98: Plucky Flapper Witch

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Amanda and Jenn discuss creepy reads, social justice ammunition, witchy reads, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked. This episode is sponsored by Girls Made of Glass and Snow by Melissa Bashardoust, Lit Chat from Book Riot and Abrams Noterie, and Brain Rules for Aging Well by John Medina. Subscribe to the podcast via RSS here, or via Apple Podcasts here. The show can also be found on Stitcher here.   Questions 1. Hi, I'm getting married in November after a short engagement but I've already noticed that my fiancé and my mutual male friends have seemingly gone from referring to me by my name to calling me 'his bird' or 'his woman' (f* that s*). Any recommendations on books about maintaining your identity as a real human being after marriage? As a wise woman told me recently, "the only downside to getting married is that you become someone's wife". Cheers! --Nia   2. Hi Amanda and Jenn! I have a travel request. I'm going to Valencia, Spain this fall to visit a friend, and know very little about the region. My favorite way to get to know a new city is through historical fiction. Do you have any recommendations of historical fiction set in or near Valencia? --Ellen   3. I am in the process of ending a relationship of almost twenty years and I am trying to adjust to the idea of living on my own for the first time since my early twenties (I just turned 40). I am looking for books that might help me sort out my feelings about this process. Fiction or non-fiction is fine. I already have All Grown Up by Jami Attenberg on my TBR pile. I don't have kids and don't want them but stories that include kids are okay as long as the main focus is on the the adult. Thanks in advance. --Rachel   4. Hi ladies! We are looking for book recommendations for our co-worker and friend Emily. Her birthday is on October 11th and she is a huge fan of your show (she is the one who introduced each of us to it as well) and of all things books. She loves to read pretty much everything and anything. We would like to get her a book or two for her birthday and would love some recommendations. She really enjoys horror, true crime, mystery, and literary classics. Some books she has recently read and enjoyed are Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty, Insomnia by Stephen King, and The Glass Castle by Jeanette Walls. (The three of us are planning on reading Hex by Thomas Olde Heuvelt per your recommendation from a previous episode, and are very excited by the way). Anything you could recommend would be great! Thanks in advance for your help! --Mallory and Jessica   5. Hey, Initially, I was asking for more books on race by #ownvoices because it's coming up in my classes so often, which are predominately white (and I am as well). What I'm now looking for is maybe some kind of history, memoir/biography, sociological study, really anything, that would be helpful in verbal combat with someone who is essentially the devil's advocate in a comment section, but believes in what he's saying. I know I won't change his mind but I'd like to have history and facts under my belt to help verbally kick his ass and destroy him. This MRA-dude, in a previous class, considered Janie sticking up for herself in Their Eyes Were Watching God 'terribly emasculating' for her husband and an awful thing to do to him. He is also *so sad* by our professor criticizing our country and most of our class agreeing with her (because apparently that's worse than Nazis - I made the mistake of creeping him on Facebook.) I own (but still need to read) They Can't Kill Us All, Rest in Power, and Warriors Don't Cry. I have read 12 Years a Slave, March Trilogy, Between the World and Me, and am anticipating We Were Eight Years in Power. I was originally thinking more along the lines of slavery and civil rights narratives, but now I think a better tactic would be to learn about the history of fascism and the constant fight for social justice. Any help is much appreciated, especially since he's not *technically* a Nazi and I can't just punch him during class. I love the show and have almost made my way through the all of the episodes! --Jane   6. This is a bit of a time sensitive request...One of my best friends has been married just over a year, and has recently found out that her husband wants a divorce. I really want to send her a book to help distract her... Any recommendations? She likes thrillers and YA fantasy. Bonus points if there's a strong feminist and/ or life will go on message. --Tina   7. I'm looking for some good Witch/female awesome themed books to get in the mood for fall and Halloween. I loved "The Discovery of Witches," "Daughter of Smoke and Bone" and "The Night Circus." I'd prefer something in the fantasy realm but am really open to anything I can drink with some hot apple cider! Thank you! --Radhika   Books Discussed Furthermore by Tahereh Mafi Men Explain Things to Me by Rebecca Solnit When Women Were Birds by Terry Tempest Williams The Perfume Garden by Kate Lord Brown The Poem of The Cid by Anonymous Love Warrior by Glennon Doyle Melton Single Carefree Mellow by Katherine Heiny Sing Unburied Sing by Jesmyn Ward Blood of the Dawn by Claudia Salazar Jiménez The Moth Diaries by Rachel Klein Fen by Daisy Johnson White Rage by Carol Anderson The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander Gather the Daughters by Jennie Melamed (trigger warning for everything, basically) The Djinn Falls in Love, edited by Mahvesh Murad and Jared Shurin Brimstone by Cherie Priest Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor

Sep 20 2017

49mins

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209: Emo Heroines

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Jenn and guest Louise Johnson discuss unconventional heroines, cozy Hanukkah stories, children’s books about tolerance, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by Book Riot’s Read Harder 2020 ChallengeSponsored by Voracious and Little, Brown and Company, and Children of Virtue and Vengeance by Tomi Adeyemi, with Fierce Reads.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK & LINKS

Paradox Bound by Peter Cline (rec’d by Stephanie)

Stephanie’s Get Booked spreadsheet: bit.ly/getbookedrecs

The Country of Ice Cream Star by Sandra Newman (rec’d by Stephanie)

The Imperial Radch series by Ann Leckie (rec’d by Stephanie)

The River by Peter Heller (rec’d by Elizabeth and Kayce)

Kicked, Bitten, and Scratched by Amy Sutherland (rec’d by Molly)

Beyond Basketball: Keywords for Success by Mike Krzyzewski and Jamie Krzyzewski Spatola

QUESTIONS

1. Hello Jen and Amanda,

I’m STRUGGLING because everywhere I go right now (shops, bookstagram, etc) I’m seeing Christmas books, which is great except that I can’t relate because I don’t celebrate Christmas. I’m Jewish but surprisingly, there are no ‘cosy cute and fun Hanukkah reads’ readily available to me.

I’m looking for some holiday reads that have that cozy feeling, and are funny and/or heartwarming but NOT centred around Christmas.

Books I like that have a similar vibe are A Christmas Carol, Moominland Midwinter, and most of Hans Christian Andersen’s books. I haven’t really read more contemporary fiction because I just haven’t been able to relate to it, but I would love if you could find something contemporary, bonus points if it actually has a Jewish character (double bonus if it’s written by or about a woman!)

Sorry for the long question! I love your podcast and look forward to seeing your recommendations.

-Diana 🙂

2. Hi all,

I am a philosophy professor at a large public school and I will be teaching a course called Ethics and Disability next semester. I would really like my students to read a #OwnVoices book by an author with either a visible or invisible disability that features a character with a disability. I would prefer a quick read, since the book will be a part of a larger syllabus. Either fiction or nonfiction would be fine!

Thanks so much! I love, love, love the podcast.

All the best,

-Katie

3. Hi Amanda and Jenn,

I love listening to your show and it is often one of the highlights of my week. I have been in a reading funk for a while and am in need of some great recommendations to get me back to my usual book-lovin’ state. In particular, I am in the mood for historical fiction (only not medieval England stuff) and adventure (e.g. superheroes, pirates, swashbucklers, time travelers, etc.). I am partial to gutsy female heroines and read adult, YA, middle-grade, etc. But I’m not in the mood for graphic novels. Bonus points if you have recommendations for series. Thanks! 🙂

-Mona

4. Hello! I discovered this podcast about two months ago and have completely caught up on all episodes. My TBR list has tripled as a result. I love listening and learning about new genres, authors, etc. You ladies make it so enjoyable and your energy is contagious.

I have two requests. The first is for children’s books that introduce children to the fact that families come in all different types. The second is for books about how boys and girls don’t need to only do “boy” things or “girl” things.

My daughter is 4 years old. My husband and I try our best to teach her that “love is love is love” and that boys and girls do not have to only like “boy” things and “girl” things. Lately she has made comments about how boys marrying boys is weird, or that boys can’t do ballet. I really don’t know where she is getting these ideas because I know in our house we don’t believe that. When she does make these comments, we correct her.

My husband I read to her every night. I am hoping for any kind of children’s book that can explain that families come in all types and that boys and girls can do what ever they want. I want my daughter to grow up with an open heart and open mind. Please help. Thank you.

-Autumn

5. Hi Jenn & Amanda!

I love history and especially enjoy reading about strong, smart female leaders and rulers. The vast majority of the books I’ve found are about English and French queens/mistresses/duchesses etc, or occasionally Cleopatra. I’d like to branch out and would love it if you could recommend books about powerful women of Non-European history. Any historical period is fine, although I usually gravitate toward ancient or medieval history. Nonfiction is preferred, but I would be open to well researched historical fiction as well. Thanks for your help!

-Sara

6. Hi there!

I have a major book hangover from Hannah Kent’s “Burial Rites,” and would love to know about more books that are about and/or set in Iceland or Scandinavia more generally.

Time period is not important to me, I’m just fascinated by the landscape and culture. I’ll take fiction and non-fiction alike, as long as it’s interesting.

Apologies if you’ve already answered this question and I’ve just forgotten! I absolutely love your show and thanks for all the work you do at Book Riot!

Hugs,

-Chandra in Minnesota

7. I’m in grad school for teaching languages (English and Spanish) and have taken a few linguistics classes in both languages. I recently read ‘The Schwa Was Here’ by Neal Shusterman and am currently reading Ella Minnow Pea. I would love to know if there are more fiction books out there that play with language, whether with word play like Ella Minnow Pea or through personifying the language, as Mr Shusterman did. Some of my favorite reads are books about books so I would love to expand that to include books about language.

-Kate

BOOKS DISCUSSED

Lighting the Flames by Sarah Wendell

Eva Ibbotson – Madensky Square or A Countess Below Stairs

The Pretty One by Keah Maria Brown

The Million Pieces of Neena Gill by Emma Barton-Smith

Wintersong by S. Jae Jones

The Curious Tale of The Lady Caraboo by Catherine Johnson

When Aidan Became a Brother by Kyle Lukoff

Everything by Susie Day (Pea’s Book of Best Friends)

The Empress by Ruby Lal

The Wife’s Tale by Aida Edemariam

The Greenlanders by Jane Smiley

The Otherlife by Julia Gray

The Moomins by Tove Jansson

Lexicon by Max Barry

A Void by Georges Perec

My Name is Mina by David Almond

Dec 05 2019

43mins

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208: Obsessed With Trees

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Amanda and Jenn discuss what to read after Where The Crawdad Sings, time travel fiction, challenging reads, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by the Read Harder JournalThe Liar’s Daughter by Megan Cooley Peterson, and Care/Of.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

Hex by Thomas Olde Heuvelt (rec’d by Miranda)

Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado (rec’d by Miranda)

QUESTIONS

1. Hi, I was wondering if you had any recommendations for fun murder mystery novels that are well written and not too dark. I did not enjoy Gone Girl because it was too dark. I love Agatha Christie and have read a good portion of her novels. I am looking for new mysteries that are fun. I recently watched the movie “Clue” and something similar in book format would be great ☺️

-Kaitlin

2. Hello! I am hoping you’ll help me with some new book or series ideas for my husband, who is the type of person who will re-read (and re-listen) to the same books over and over… and over. He also tends to read book series geared towards younger readers. Being an elementary school teacher (currently teaching 6th grade), he likes to recommend & talk books with his students. His all-time favorites include Harry Potter, His Dark Materials, and just about everything by Rick Riordan. He’s also enjoyed Game of Thrones, The Iron Druid Chronicles, and the Scythe trilogy by Neal Shusterman. For stand-alone books, Dark Matter & Ready Player One are recent hits. He’s drawn towards multi-book series because of the rich world-building and loves books seeped in mythology.

Plot twist! He also loves U.S. history, particularly about the gold rush and the american revolution. I think he might be into a fantasy adventure with a historical slant. Alexander Hamilton with a talking dog sidekick in a time machine saving the world? He’d probably read that! I’d love to see him continue to explore new worlds, characters, and ideas so the plan is to gift him some new books for the holidays. Thank you so much in advance!

-Katie

3. Hi there!

Every Christmas I give each of my kids a book that reflects something going on in their lives during the past year. Over the years the collection of books for each child has provided great memories of their interests, accomplishments and dreams. When they were younger it was easier to find books about learning to ride a bike, a cookbook about cakes, or a collection of poems about nature. As they have gotten older, their interests have naturally become more narrowed and specific. I’m hoping you can help me find a book for my oldest daughter, who is 19. This past year she completed an internship where she cared for and trained carnivores at a wildlife park and breeding program. She worked daily feeding and tending to lions, tigers, bears and cheetahs. It was amazing to see her growth over the period of the internship, I’ve never seen her more happy, confident or driven. I’d love to find a book for her about a person who has a similar positive experience with wild animals. I’m open to non-fiction or fiction but would mostly hope for something that continues to inspire her as she works toward her college degree in zoology and on to a career in this field. I have done some searching on my own but often recommendations come back for veterinary medicine and I’m hoping for something more specifically related to care and conservation of animals.

Thank you in advance for your recommendations!

-Heather

4. I want to get my mom a book her birthday. She works as a director at a basketball camp and one of her jobs is mentoring and organizing the counsellors. She likes self-help type books and I want to find one that’s about leadership in a summer camp or basketball setting, or about mentoring and working with teenagers or young adults. I love your podcast and listen to it every week!

-Shannon

5. Hi,

I’m looking for a recommendation after finishing reading “Where the crawdads sing” by Delia Owens. I absolutely loved this book, which surprised me as I usually read more plot driven books and don’t usually like descriptions like ” beautiful prose”, “lyrical” and so on. I found myself completely absorbed in the story, loved the language and even underlined some of the sentences. Maybe it’s the introvert in me, but I loved that it didn’t contain too many characters, some I could root for, and most of, all the mother nature. The nature scenes were my favourites to read and get lost in. I am going on a backpacking trip to South America next month and looking for a good read. Can you please recommend something similar? Thanks so much!

-Kat

6. I recently enjoyed 11.22.63 and the Doomsday book and am looking for more good historical time travel fiction. Kindred is already on my to read list and I read the first Outlander book and found it a bit less consensual than I prefer my romances. Any suggestions for entertaining historical time travel books?

-Shaina

7. Each year, I like to tackle a big, scary book—not scary in the sense that the book is frightening (though I’m not opposed to that), more that the book’s physical weight, complexity, and/or subject matter tend to intimidate readers. I’ve previously read Infinite Jest, East of Eden, A Little Life, The Goldfinch, Ulysses, Moby-Dick, etc. I’ve also read shorter work that would qualify, like Joanna Russ’s Female Man. There are a lot of lists on the Internet of the most difficult books, but those lists are largely white and male and I’m looking for something that isn’t. I know I could pick up War and Peace (and probably should read it eventually) but I really want to read as few books by white dudes in 2018 as possible. Can you point me in the direction of heady, challenging doorstopper fiction that meets this criteria? I’m not adverse to any particular genre, I just want to dig into a really difficult book.

Thanks in advance!

-Meredith

BOOKS DISCUSSED

Death by Dumpling by Vivien Chien

Murder in G Major by Alexia Gordon (tw: ableist language and slurs around mental health)

Dread Nation by Justina Ireland

American Hippo by Sarah Gailey

Steve and Me by Terri Irwin

The Daily Coyote by Shreve Stockton

Sum it Up by Pat Summit

Wolfpack by Abby Wambach

Deep Creek by Pam Houston

The Overstory by Richard Powers (tw: suicide)

A Murder in Time by Julie McElwain

Just One Damned Thing After Another by Jodi Taylor

Ducks, Newburyport by Lucy Ellmann

Almanac of the Dead by Leslie Marmon Silko (tw: for everything)

Nov 21 2019

47mins

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207: The Holiday Show

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Amanda and Jenn give book recommendations for holiday gift-giving.

This episode is sponsored by TBRThe Stationery Shop by Marjan Kamali, a heart-rending story of family, love, and fate, available from Gallery Books, and TALION PUBLISHING LLC, publishers of the thrilling Talion Series by J.K. Franko.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

Manazuru and The Briefcase by Hiromi Kawakami (rec’d by Cari and Brooke)

The Housekeeper and the Professor by Yoko Ogawa(rec’d by Cari)

Anything by Haruki Murakami (rec’d by Cari)

The Nakano Thrift Shop by Hiromi Kawakami (rec’d by Brooke)

QUESTIONS

1. My boyfriend says that he is inspired by my quest to read more books in 2019 and wants to follow suit next year. However, he has no idea where to begin. I was hoping to get him some Christmas gifts that could point him in the right direction. I know he likes fantasy and graphic novels, specifically The Adventure Zone and anything Marvel. He’s also a very philosophical mind and loves to read really complicated books about existence and consciousness. Any suggestions would be welcome. Thanks so much!

-Emily

2. Hello! I’m looking for a book for my brother for Christmas! Maybe a comedy mystery? To give you an idea of his style – He likes Terry Pratchett but not Neil Gaiman. He enjoyed the Rivers of London Series and The Bartimaeus Trilogy. He likes authors such as Chris Riddell, Trenton Lee Stewart, Marie Brennan and Scott Westerfeld. It’s been difficult to find something that lines up with his particular brand of dry humour without it going too far and becoming cliché or eye-rolling (e.g. Genevieve Cogman or early Jasper Fforde). Any help would be much appreciated!

-Danielle

3. I’m wanting to get my mom a book for Christmas this year and was not sure how close to the time you want a time sensitive marking, but thought better safe than sorry. My mom’s absolute favorite book series is the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon and she enjoys historical romances. She really likes fantasy like Lord of the Rings and is a major Star Wars fan, although she generally doesn’t read sci fi. Love the podcast and can’t wait to see what you wonderful people come up with.

-Stephanie

4. Every year, from December 1st to 25th I go into full Christmas mode. All my free time goes into Christmas activities, and I only want to read holiday books. It’s silly, I know, but I just like it. It’s not a religious thing for me and I am open to other mid winter holiday tradition stories. I usually reread Christmas passages from novels i’ve marked in the past (I.e., Little House on Prairie Christmas chapters or the Christmas tree story from A Tree Grows in Brooklyn) or end up reading tons of picture books and short stories because that’s what i’ve found easily, but I’d like a novel or two this year. I love historical fiction, middle grade, literary fiction, ya. Do you have any recs for me for December?

-Reading Around the Christmas Tree

5. Ok, so my cousin is turning 15 in January and she loves to read. My plan for her Christmas present this year is getting her different books about growing up, mental health and other topics relevant for starting high school and starting to plan for the future. She loves the Harry Potter series (surprise, surprise), the geek girl series, Divergent series and other fantasy or dystopian books. She isn’t really into heavy romances but doesn’t mind some. I’ve already thought of giving her If you come softly by Jacqueline Woodson

-Hanna

6. Hey bookish friends!

For the Christmas holidays I will be traveling with my boyfriend to stay with his mother in Barcelona. This will be my first international trip. While I am trying to keep my expectations low, I think it could be fun to read a novel that takes place in Spain, maybe even Barcelona. We will be traveling to nearby cities, but staying in Barcelona. Do you have any recommendations for novels that take place preferably in modern Spain with a female protagonist? When I try looking up novels all I find are older historical fictions written by men. Any help is much appreciated.

Thanks a bunch!

-Barcelona Bookish Adventures

BOOKS DISCUSSED

How to Do Nothing by Jenny Odell

Turbulence & Resistance by Samit Basu

Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

The Loyal League series (An Extraordinary Union #1) by Alyssa Cole

City of Brass (Daevabad Trilogy) by S.A. Chakraborty

If the Fates Allow, edited by Annie Harper

The Lotterys More or Less by Emma Donoghue (rec’d by Tirzah)

(Don’t) Call Me Crazy, edited by Kelly Jensen

Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh

Dog Day by Alicia Gimenez Bartlett, translated by Nicholas Caistor (tw animal abuse)

The Time in Between by Maria Dueñas, transl. by Daniel Hahn

Nov 14 2019

35mins

Play

206: The Golden Girls Meets Dexter

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Amanda and Jenn discuss books about female sociopaths, horror, romance picks, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by TBRFlatiron Books, and Quantum by international bestselling author Patricia Cornwell.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

An Absolutely Remarkable Thing by Hank Green

QUESTIONS

1. Hello Jenn and Amanda!

Thank you so much for all of your recommendations. I find myself looking forward to hearing a new episode all week!

I’ve always wanted to travel to Ireland, but haven’t been able to make it there yet. I was wondering if you could recommend for me a book that will teach me some of the regional history of Ireland, bonus for a multigenerational family saga where someone emigrates to America.

Some books I’ve loved with a similar feel to what I’m looking for are: The Rebels of Ireland by Edward Rutherford, Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett, Mexico or Texas by James Michener and Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt. I enjoy fantasy, police procedurals, steampunk, YA, cozy mysteries and historical fiction, but I’ll read anything you recommend! Extra bonus points for a great audiobook option.

Thanks so much!

-Jennie

2. Hi guys! Thanks so much for this podcast, I love it!

So, I’ve only just recently started reading and watching horror. When I was a kid I was frightened very easily and stayed away from horror entirely, and up until this year I was under the impression I was still easily spooked. Turns out not so much! I have watched so much horror that other people have assured me is the scariest thing they’ve ever seen and I’m just like… uh??? No??? What’s scary???

I watched and read Haunting of Hill House recently and loved both but didn’t so much as feel vaguely unsettled when reading/watching it even in the dead of night. Same goes for It and the other Stephen King books I’ve read, the Quiet Place, and bunch of other horror movies.

I really like Pan’s Labyrinth and all of Del Toro’s films (though again, wasn’t scared), as well as It, and The Haunting of Hill House. I just haven’t been scared. Do you guys know of any books that will just scare the living hell out of me?

I’m really only interested in horror books with some sort of supernatural element by the way, I don’t have much interest in horror rooted in reality. Also, please don’t recommend Bird Box. I haven’t seen or read it, but to be perfectly honest the premise just does not interest me in the slightest.

-Katharine

3. Hello Ladies!

I find myself really wanting to read some sort of romance, but just can’t find the right thing. I really loved Heartless by Marissa Meyer and Simon Versus the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli. I enjoyed Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell. And I tried When Dimple met Rishi by Sandhya Menon, Upside of Unrequited, and Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell, which were okay. I also read The Selection which I did not like. I’ve read several mediocre adult romances (mostly stuff that I got for free, which may be where I’ve gone wrong) and do have Ramona Blue, Song of Achilles, Kiss Quotient, and The Wedding Date on my list (taken from previous recommendations here and on other Book Riot podcasts). I seem to do best when I stick with YA, but would definitely be open things more in the adult realm. Audiobook is a plus. No sexual violence please, I’m okay with passing mention, but nothing explicit on the page.

Thank you! Love the show!

-April

4. Hi ladies! I’ve recently started to dabble in some dark thriller reading, the book that set me on this path was Then She Was Gone by Lisa Jewell. I loved the darkness of the kidnapping and the imprisonment, and the things she forced upon her prisoner (no judgement guys!) and the twists and innerworkings of the antagonist. Also enjoyed The Last Mrs. Parrish by Liv Constantine, where the bad guy got what she wanted and ultimately deserved all at the same time. I think I’m leaning more towards the bad guy winning. After years of reading fluffy, happy romances I’m really enjoying delving into this dark side of books. Not too much into the mystery/detective work aspect but more into reading something that is just so unthinkable and messed up and leaving me shocked due to the unspeakable acts these characters do. I’ve tried the Death of Mrs. Westaway and while it had some aspects I liked, it missed the mark for me. Our Kind of Cruelty by Araminta Hall was an interesting read but kind of fell flat, would’ve liked a bit more action. Also liked The Secrets She Keeps by Michael Robotham. I have the Couple Next Door by Shari Lapena & The Wife Between Us by Greer Hendricks on my to-read list. Thanks!

-Andrea

5. I just finished The Magpie Lord by KJ Charles after having it on my tbr for a long while (from get booked maybe?) and loved it. I think I have also realized a favorite relationship trope and would love some other romance recommendations that feature: a straight laced, discreet, or serious character who “gets in over their head” with a livelier partner who distracts them from work, compels them to be honest, and/or otherwise coaxes them into opening up or stretching boundaries.

(In this book the partner is quite assertive in doing this – A-OK, A+ – but a flirt might do this more subtly as well.)

I’ll certainly be looking into this author further and other examples include Bound with Honor by Megan Mulry. The Ruin of a Rake by Cat Sebastien is also on my radar. I like historical settings obviously, but contemporary might be interesting for a change too. (Don’t know yet if they qualify but The Hating Game and Fight or Flight are also on my radar.)

LGBT or straight is fine but I would prefer a light tone and no trigger warnings. Thank you!

-Jessica

6. Hi!

I’m looking for some funny, witty, dry humor and sarcastic audio books. I have read Heartburn, a gentleman’s guide to vice and virtue, and where’d you go Bernadette. Each of these had me laughing out loud as I walked through the grocery store. I love fiction and would like to stay with that. The more back list the better. I borrow my audio books from the library. Newer books either aren’t available or have a long wait list. I dropped my goodreads list but I’m terrible at tracking with that. I track with your journal but I threw a few of some of my recent books on there.

Thanks so much!!

-Jessica

7. Dark. Creepy. Surreal, but written in plain, clear prose. I love a Southern Gothic. I loved Night Film, Murakami’s After Dark. Also loved The Woman in the Window and all of Gillian Flynn. I don’t mind a dark tale, but prefer to avoid graphic depictions of violence toward women/children/animals.

-Gina

BOOKS

Milkman by Anna Burns

Brooklyn by Colm Toibin

The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson

The Twisted Ones by T. Kingfisher (rec’d by Jess Woodbury)

Wallbanger by Alice Clayton

Odd One Out by Nic Stone

An Elderly Lady is Up to No Good by Helene Tursten, translation by Marlaine Delargy

Tampa by Alissa Nutting (tw: child abuse)

Red, White & Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston

It Takes Two to Tumble by Cat Sebastian

Bridget Jones’s Diary by Helen Fielding

The Wangs Vs. The World by Jade Chang

Ghost Summer by Tananarive Due

The Man in My Basement by Walter Mosley

Nov 07 2019

42mins

Play

205: The Office But With Dead People

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Amanda and Jenn discuss books about ghosts, secret societies, folklore, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by Blind Date With a BookOrdinary Girls by Jaquira Díaz, now available from Algonquin Books, and All This Could Be Yours by Jami Attenberg.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

Last of the Wine by Mary Renault, and really anything by her (rec’d by Scarlett)

Memoirs of Hadrian by Marguerite Yourcenar (rec’d by Scarlett)

Julian by Gore Vidal (rec’d by Scarlett)

The Memoirs of Cleopatra by Margaret George (rec’d by Scarlett)

QUESTIONS

1. My dad retired this year, and previous to 2019 had NEVER READ A BOOK- like, no joke-not even at school! But this year, he started picking up books (3 to be exact) and asked for “a book” for his birthday.

So .. he’s not really sure what he likes in books- he read two memoirs (old rock n roll guys) and one hyper local history about the town he grew up in.

He’s probably not a fiction guy, or ready for fiction.

It’s such a clean slate I’m overwhelmed by where to go with this! He likes classic cars, late night tv, SNL, Will Ferrell sense of humor, he worked in television for 40 years, local to both/either Cleveland Ohio and Portland Maine. Not into politics.

A note: I am planning on getting him Kitchen Confidential because I mentioned it to him & he thought that sounded fun.

-Cate

2. Hello! I’m going to try to be as concise as possible with a sensitive ask. My cousin recently confided in me that she has started the transition from male to female. She is in her early 30s, so transition has some unique obstacles, and she has been open about her past struggles with depression and anxiety. So far family has been accepting as she has slowly confided various family members but I’m worried about some of our more religious family. I’ve been looking for books to help me support her as an ally. I have read some intersectional feminist works (Janet Mock and Whipping Girl by Julia Serano) but would like book recommendations more focused on transitioning later in life. I’m hoping for nonfiction but will take fiction as well. I’m a pharmacist so I’m also open to something more academic/scientific too. Thanks for your help!

-Dianna

3. Hey! My English teacher said that if we put in a request here we would get some extra credit. We’re an obnoxious class and she loves this podcast so I thought I’d err on the side of caution. (You’ve responded to a request of hers in an episode before, her name is Kirsten. She was the one with the weird book list). I also would like a book recommendation because my bookshelf has been read and re-read numerous times over. Some of my favorite books are The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, The Chronicles of Narnia, the Ender’s Game series, and those weird Star Trek novels William Shatner wrote. Also if you have any strange, out of place books that don’t really have a spot on bookshelves, that’d be awesome too. Thanks!

-Sam

4. Happy spoopy season! I’m looking for recommendations for fiction with ghosts as main / significant characters or fiction about ghost hunting. I really enjoyed City of Ghosts by V. E. Schwab and I’m interested in reading other books like it. I’m open to YA and adult fiction, although I tend to prefer YA most of the time. Thanks for your help! 👻

-Katie

5. I’m looking for a readalike for one of my favorite video games, Secret World Legends. TL;DR, you swallow a bee, wake up with magical powers, and begin fighting paranormal entities for one of three secret societies (including the modern Knights Templar and Illuminati). It’s set in the real world and you learn a lot about some real-world folklore and mythology while playing it and solving the often difficult investigation missions. I would love something that’s fiction that has this sort of gothic, creepy vibe or not-dry nonfiction about secret societies or the folklore/mythology of New England, Egypt, Transylvania, Japan, or Africa (the places we visit in the game). Thank you!

-Samantha

6. I recently read Convenience Store Woman and fell completely in love with it. The character was incredibly interesting to read about, but I think what I really loved about it was the “everyday life in Japan” aspect of it. It reminded me of another favorite- My year of Meats by Ruth Ozeki, as well as A Tale for the Time Being. I loved how page-turner-y these books were while still allowing space on the page to focus on the food, the sounds, and the intimate details of everyday life in places I don’t live. Any recs like these? Bonus points for more Asian authors in translation, tho doesn’t necessarily need to be Japanese. Double Bonus for magical realism.

-Weatherly

7. Hi ladies,

This has been a dud of a reading year for me so I’ve been hoping to compile a list of books for next year that I will love. Some of the books I’ve read this year and loved include:

With the Fire on High by Elizabeth Acevedo

The Gown by Jennifer Robson

The Astonishing Color of After by Emily X.R Pan

The Girl in the Blue Coat by Monica Hessee

-Lauren

BOOKS DISCUSSED

Bossypants by Tina Fey

If I Understood You Would I Have This Look On My Face by Alan Alda (plus, Clear+Vivid podcast)

Love Lives Here by Amanda Jette Knox (rec’d by Jess)

Sorted by Jackson Bird

She’s Not There by Jennifer Finney Boylan

Wayward Children series (Every Heart a Doorway #1) by Seanan McGuire

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia (tw: self-harm, family violence)

The Afterlife of Holly Chase by Cynthia Hand

The Name of the Star by Maureen Johnson

The Spellbook of Katrina Von Tassel by Alyssa Palombo

The Rook by Daniel O’Malley (tw: graphic violence)

Mãn by Kim Thuy, translated by Sheila Fischman

Revenge by Yoko Ogawa, translated by Stephen Snyder (tw: body horror, graphic violence)

The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth (tw: homophobia)

The Magnolia Sword by Sherry Thomas

Oct 31 2019

46mins

Play

204: Whatever, Parents Are Stupid

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Amanda and Jenn discuss lady scientists, teen superheroes, books on racism, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by our Blind Date with a BookPenguin Teen, and The Best American Short Stories 2019 audiobook, guest edited by Anthony Doerr, series edited by Heidi Pitlor.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

QUESTIONS

1. I am sort of a huge fan of Stephen King novels. Every spooky season I try to make time to read at least one of them. I adore his writing style and his world building. Another big plus for me in his novels specifically are the characters he creates and develops. However, the more I read his work, the more I cringe at some of the blatant sexism/ racism/ homophobia throughout them. I was wondering if you could recommend me some horror/ thriller novels that have the same elements of a King novel, but don’t have any of the other stuff. Bonus points for women authors, LGBT authors, or authors of color.

-Jana

2. Hi Ladies, thanks again for that Dad-book rec! He was not a scared baby deer about a lady author and I was so pumped!

So I’m coming in hot with a specific ask – I am a playwright and currently working on a research based project with high school students. We are collaborating and creating a devised piece about lady scientists! WAHOO!! It’s really cool and I’m looking for some books highlighting these incredible ladies. I am focusing on “The Cosmos” so I have Hidden Figures, Radium Girls, and Rise of the Rocket Girls – I am finding Rise of the Rocket Girls really focuses on the looks and love lives of the ladies and not so much about the barriers that were systematically in place to prevent them or shame them from joining the STEM workforce. I’m also interested in the POC perspective in this area. I’m looking for more lady authors and books that also might appeal to my young adult students.

Thank you so much and big love from Philly!!

-Stephanie

3. Hello! Can you rec me some YA superhero stories with diverse casts that aren’t by Marvel or DC? Ensemble cast preferred–things like Young Justice, Young Avengers, or Teen Titans, but not those things! Comic books or novels are both fine. Thank you!

-Anne

4. Please help me find a book for my mom. She’s trying to be woke, but is having problems understanding. For instance, she doesn’t understand how slavery of black people in the U.S. could still affect anyone today and doesn’t grasp all of the institutional racism that still occurs today. Perhaps an #OwnVoices book could help her grasp the issues that people who aren’t white and/or straight face.

-Lacey

5. Hi!

I’m Brazilian, and love to read about latinx lives in North America — Colombian, Porto Rican, Mexican, Cuban, Dominican, Haitian, you name it —, mainly because I enjoy seeing what other latinx cultures have in common with Brazilian culture, and also because it is the closest to my culture I can find. I have never found a Brazilian immigrant in entertainment, be it books, tv shows, movies or broadway shows. As much as I love reading about my latinx siblings, I can’t help but feel a little bit left out, since Brazil is the only country in Latin America that speaks Portuguese. If you could, I would love to read a book, preferably YA but I’d love anything really, with a Brazilian character whose culture is important to them.

Thank you so much,

-Maria

6. I love listening to your weekly podcast. I hope this is a new-ish question for you both. I have surprisingly enjoyed books where the author goes on a trip that is physically or emotionally draining. Throughout their journey they discover new things about themselves and discuss the aspects of humans that need to explore and push themselves. I loved both Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer and A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson. Both books have stuck with me years later. I hope you can help me locate other interesting books along this topic.

Thank so much!

-Nicole

7. My boyfriend and I have recently started reading books together but it has been difficult finding things we both enjoy. He is a fan of fast paced high fantasy stories that have similar lore to Dungeons and Dragons. I prefer more slow-burn, character driven stories that have science fiction themes. We are both fans of Jeff Vandermeer, Dark Matter by Blake Crouch, and The Stand and Pet Semetary by Stephen King. Can you please recommend a science fiction/ fantasy book that has enough action to satisfy my boyfriend and interesting characters that I can enjoy? Thanks in advance!

-Jana

BOOKS DISCUSSED

Mapping the Interior by Stephen Graham Jones

The Book of M by Peng Shepherd

Stephen King Readalikes episode

Women in Science by Rachel Ignotofsky

Promised the Moon by Stephanie Nolen

Renegades by Marissa Meyer

Not Your Sidekick (Sidekick Squad) by CB Lee

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Crow Blue by Adriana Lisboa, transl. by Alison Entrekin

3% on Netflix

The Summer Prince by Alaya Dawn Johnson

Blue Highways by William Least Heat-Moon

Lands of Lost Borders by Kate Harris

Gamechanger by LX Beckett

The Outside by Ada Hoffmann

Oct 24 2019

46mins

Play

203: Not Gonna Tell You How To Feel About Caesar

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Amanda and Jenn discuss poetry, dinosaur books for grown-ups, Roman historical fiction, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by our Blind Date with a Book giveawayQuantum by international bestselling author Patricia Cornwell, and Change is the only Constant by Ben Orlin, in Hardcover from Black Dog and Leventhal.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

Like A Mother: A Feminist Journey Through the Science and Culture of Pregnancy, by Angela Garbes (rec’d by Cameron)

And Now We Have Everything: On Motherhood Before I Was Ready, by Meaghan O’Connell (rec’d by Cameron)

Operating Instructions: A Journal of My Son’s First Years and Some Assembly Required: A Journal of My Son’s First Son by Anne Lamott (rec’d by Cameron)

Origins: How the Nine Months Before Birth Shape the Rest of Our Lives by Annie Murphy Paul (rec’d by Sarah)

Security by Gina Wohlsdorf (rec’d by Ashely)

QUESTIONS

1. Dinosaurs! I’ve recently realized (thanks to having a little one in the house) that the world of dinosaurs has passed me by since my school days. They have feathers‽ There are dinosaurs bigger and meaner than T-rex‽ Brontosaurus exists again‽ Please help fill my knowledge gap with a fun read to catch me up on at least some small part of what I’ve missed in the dinosaur world in the last…*cough*…few years!

-Kayla

2. Hello, my younger sister and I are going on our Birthright trips to Israel this winter, and I’m looking for some great books to read during all the traveling. I would love if I could find a book set in Israel, past or present that I haven’t read yet. When I’m traveling I generally prefer fantasy, science fiction, or mystery, but I will read anything anybody from Book Riot recommends. I really haven’t read any books set in Israel, or inspired by it, so I think anything you suggest will be new to me. Side note, y’all and the entire Book Riot family are awesome!!

-Liza

3. I find myself in the odd position of loving fantasy books about necromancy while also having a phobia of ghosts. I LOVE the Abhorsen books by Garth Nix, and I recently had the opportunity to read an ARC of Twice Dead by Caitlin Seal. They both are perfect examples of the necromantic fantasy that works for me. Do you know of other books that deal with this subject without tropes that will give me horrible nightmares (poltergeists, haunted houses, etc)? Thank you!

-Phasmophic

4. I’m looking for recommendations of poetry or otherwise that is similar to anything by Amanda Lovelace or Rupi Kaur. I’ve already inhaled the newest release by Amanda Lovelace and wouldn’t mind something a little more lighthearted to contrast the heavy topics both authors write about.

Thank you!

-Elin

5. Hi Ladies! I’m wondering if you can suggest some fun action/thriller type audiobooks by people of color – something in the vein of Dan Brown, with some puzzles and some action, but generally just a fun ride. I like to listen to audio books while I work, and these types of books make the day speed by.

Thanks!

-Jaimie

6. Hi! I am currently reading Mary Beard’s SPQR and loving it! I was wondering if you had any recommendations for historical fiction set in ancient Rome or Greece. I’ve read a good amount of fantasy set in those eras, but would love recommendations for something a little more historical and a little less fantasy. Thank you so much!

-Nikita

7. Hello! I’m a big fan of the podcast (and of Book Riot), and I was hoping you could help me out. I don’t read a lot of romance, but I recently read Hot Head by Damon Suede (because I heard about it from you, I think!), and I really liked it. I’m looking for something similar, so I can stop rereading it: LGBTQ (no preference), pining, friends-to-lovers, etc. I would prefer something WITHOUT a ton of homophobia and WITH a happy ending. I’m open to any sub-genre. Sex is fine, but I’m looking for something with a good story, too. Thanks in advance!

-Michelle

BOOKS DISCUSSED

The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs by Stephen Brusatte

The Fossil Hunter by Shelley Emling

To the End of the Land by David Grossman, transl by Jessica Cohen

How to Understand Israel in 60 Days or Less by Sarah Glidden

Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

The Bone Witch series by Rin Chupeco

Wild Embers by Nikita Gill

The Book of Delights by Ross Gay

Warcross by Marie Lu

The Clockwork Dynasty by Daniel H. Wilson

The Ides of March by Thornton Wilder

I, Claudius by Robert Graves

The Lady’s Guide to Celestial Mechanics by Olivia Waite

Red, White & Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston

Oct 17 2019

44mins

Play

202: My Cinnamon Roll Children

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Amanda and Jenn discuss more Halloween reads, asexual representation, solo female travelers, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by Book Riot’s Blind Date with a BookSugar Run by Mesha Maren, now in paperback from Algonquin Books, and Playlist: The Rebels and Revolutionaries of Sound by James Rhodes and illustrated by Martin O’Neill.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

Josh & Hazel’s Guide to Not Dating by Christina Lauren (rec’d by Nicole)

Carol Goodman’s books: Lake of Dead LanguagesSeduction of Water, and Ghost Orchid (rec’d by Laura)

QUESTIONS

1. I’d like to try a steamy romance novel where sex is described. I know very little about this genre and its classification or how to find something I would like. I am currently reading Victoria Dahl’s Taking the Heat but wondering if there are books that don’t use slang for body parts or at least don’t use the word “filthy” to describe sex acts. Is that a thing? I’m intentional with language and I want something more positive. Also, are there romance setups among happily married people? I noticed arranged or forced marriages seems to be a trope, but that really wasn’t what I was after. Maybe what I am looking for is not called a romance novel? Can you recommend a book or even link to help? My searches are not getting me where I want to be.

-Wish I Weren’t Blushing

2. Time Sensitive – Mid-October please

Hello! I’m searching for a book that captures all of the Halloween/fall feelings: chill air, crisp leaves, dark shadows, and just all the pumpkins. I’d love something set around New England during Halloween/autumn in general. Please recommend a novel. I’m open to YA, romance, literary fiction…something with a bit of creep factor without being full blown horror. Books I’ve read like this and loved are Sawkill Girls, The Spellbook of Katrina van Tassel, Devouring Grey, Hocus Pocus, The Hollow/The Haunted, The Children of Night and Nothing series, Practical Magic/Rules of Magic, and The Lantern’s Ember. Please help me find another Halloween book.

-Heather

3. hello! i’ve been craving for some lighthearted witchy reads lately. i’ve read “labyrinth lost” by zoraida córdova, “children of blood and bone” by tomi adeyemi which are great, and have in my tbr pile “the bone witch” and “the heart forger” by rin chupeco. all these titles are pretty dark and, while i love my books that have witches constantly raising the dead, i could really use some bubbly, cute, less ‘everyone is gonna kill me’ witchy reads. (and if you could sprinkle in some lgbt in there, that would be amazing).

-Myra

4. I identify as asexual and don’t often get to see that aspect of myself reflected on the page. I’ve scoured the internet and read everything I could find with ace characters: Let’s Talk About Love, Tash Hearts Tolstoy, The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy to name a few. But the lists are fairly limited. I’m open to books that don’t explicitly use the term “asexual” but that have characters that lend themselves to being read as ace (a favorite of mine is Kaz from Six of Crows, for example). Unfortunately, that’s a very difficult thing to search for. Can you recommend any more books that feature characters I might see myself in? I’m open to any genre. Apologies in advance for the difficult question.

– Teresa

5. Hey!

Love the podcast! I’m graduating from PT school next spring and am considering some solo international travel to celebrate. I’m fairly well-traveled but have never gone on my own so I’m looking for books about solo travel, fiction or non-fiction, particularly by and for women. Does not have to be specific to a certain location as I haven’t decided where I’m going yet (so I wouldn’t turn down recommendations about that, either 🙂 )!

Thanks so much!

-Cassidy

6. I recently read A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles and enjoyed every page of it. Lately I’ve been looking for something similar to read. I really liked the main character’s outlook on life and how he mastered art de vivre. I’d love something that is written as beautifully as this particular book and features a character that knows how to enjoy life (a hedonist if you will).

I’d prefer something contemporary, with lovable characters and I’d rather it didn’t include heavy topics (such as war, assault, etc). I’m fine with murdery stuff though 🙂

My other all time favorite is The Secret History by Donna Tartt, thought I’d mention it to give you a better idea of what kind of writing I enjoy.

Thanks in advance!

Hope you are having a lovely day!

Best,

-Ekaterina

7. I am writing for steampunk book recommendations. I have read most of Gail Carriger’s Parasol Protectorate Series and I’m not sure where to go from there. I read a wide range of genres, alternating between literary fiction, suspense/thriller, fantasy, YA and contemporary fiction. I am open to most anything however shy away from gruesome violent storylines.

Some of my favorite authors are Alexander McCall Smith, Jan Karon, Stephen King and Ann Patchett. The last few books I have enjoyed include The Winter People by Jennifer McMahon, Silver Sparrow by Tayari Jones and Someone Else’s Love Story by Joshilyn Jackson.

I really love books that take place in a small town where everyone gets in to each other’s business yet pull together when one of their own is in need of help.

Thank you in advance for your suggestions.

-Maggie

BOOKS DISCUSSED

The Siren by Tiffany Reisz (TW: rape, grooming, just lots of extremely not ok goings-on with underage people)

The Countess Conspiracy by Courtney Milan (tw: miscarriage)

Rachel Kramer Bussel

The Secret History by Donna Tartt

The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane by Katherine Howe

The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett

Hocus Pocus & The All New Sequel by A.W. Jantha

Every Heart a Doorway by Seanan McGuire

Beneath the Citadel by Destiny Soria

When in Romance episode on asexual characters

A Field Guide to Getting Lost by Rebecca Solnit

Full Tilt by Dervla Murphy

Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain

City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert (rec’d by Nikki and Susie)

Gunpowder Alchemy by Jeannie Lin

The Black God’s Drums by P. Djèlí Clark

Oct 10 2019

50mins

Play

201: My Spook-Meter Is Delicate

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Amanda and Jenn discuss gothic reads, motherhood memoirs, fun sci-fi, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by Read This BookRebel by Marie Lu, and Soho Teen.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

Jane, Unlimited by Kristin Cashore (rec’d by Alicia)

QUESTIONS

1. Hello!

I am looking for a book that gives me the same feeling as The Black Tapes Podcast. Basically, a journalist gets pulled into a dark story dealing with demons that may have turned their attention to her. I read Paul Tremblay’s A Head Full of Ghosts and that was close. Really anything paranormal that’s got a reality spin could work!

-Lora

2.Hello Ladies! Thank you for the show!

As the fall approaches I find myself wanting to wrap up in a blanket and read something spooky. I don’t read much horror and am not even 100% sure that’s the right descriptor for what I mean. I want something to creep me out, but that doesn’t rely on body horror and excessive gore to do it.

Books I’ve enjoyed in the past with this general feeling include We Have Always Lived in the Castle, the Fireman, Frankenstein, One Bloody Thing After Another, The Hellbound Heart.

I did not like Bird Box or Final Girls and generally haven’t enjoyed Stephen King’s work. I don’t generally like to read true crime & I don’t think I’m looking for something that falls in the thriller category.

Please no books that contain sexual assault.

Thanks!

-April

3.Hi! I am traveling to Prague on October 11th while I’m visiting my motherland, Poland, and I was wondering if you knew any books that are set in Prague where the city is very present. I know Lani Taylor has a trilogy set there so I would love to hear any other suggestions. Preferably adult but if the YA is great with no romance as a main plot, that would be good too. Thank you so much!

-Fabiola

4. Okay, I’ve got a tough one for ya. I’ve been searching for books that have a certain atmosphere and tone. Think Rebecca or In a Lonely Place. I love dark midcentury writing and also grim gothic atmospheres. I’ve read much of Hughes’ and Highsmith’s backlists not to mention those of other authors I discovered reading the Women Crime Writers of the 1940s/50s anthologies (which I loved). I’m looking for something a little different than traditional hard boiled noir. I’m more of a psychological suspense fan. I guess I’m just in love with the quaint old time-y writing of the 40s, 50s and 60s and looking for new discoveries. Bonus points if the novel is set on dark windy coastal shores.

Thank you in advance and for all the great recommendations I’ve gotten from you all in the past!

-Lisa

5. Amanda and Jenn,

I have been listening to the show since 2018 when I was off-work due to a work-related injury, and I listened to the entire backlist in a few months. I went on to devour All the Books, SFF Yeah!, Read or Dead, Hey YA, and their respective backlists- needless to say, I am a fan. My TBR thanks you both (as well your colleagues)!

QUESTION: I am treating myself to a birthday request. After wracking my brain for what I finally wanted to ask, I decided I am looking for a traditional slasher in an isolated location; think along the lines of the “Scream” movies, and the show “Harper’s Island”. I recently read “Ten” by Gretchen McNeil, and that really scratched the itch. Anything you could suggest would be very much appreciated!

BONUS: My favourite month for themed reading is October, I love all the autumn feels of doing Halloween/creepy/scary reading. Already on the list are “Rebecca” by Daphne du Maurier (with my book club), “Sawkill Girls” by Claire Legrande, “Practical Magic” by Alice Hoffman, “The Murders of Molly Southborne” by Tade Thompson. As well as potentially “Hex” by Thomas Heuvelt, and “Let the Right One In” by John Ajvide Lindqvist. Any favourites you might have for some October reading would be great, as my October reading may or may not trail into November!

I wanted to share my Goodreads, but alas, it is not up-to-date. I know my question was really specific, but just for clarity, I read across all genres, but I do not particularly love historical fiction. I am also working two jobs, and recently started my Masters degree, so I don’t have a ton of time for huge tomes.

Thank-you so much for the work you do, and taking my TBR and love of reading to the next level! 🙂

Sincerely,

-Kachina Wicks

6. I just found out I’m pregnant with my first child, and even though I wanted and tried for this, I find myself terrified. I’m worrying about all the things—my risk of miscarriage, being pregnant, childbirth, parenting— I’m just a ball of anxiety. I have just about every pregnancy book ever written, but do you have any memoirs, Mary Roach-esque nonfiction about the science of pregnancy, or happy fiction about pregnancy/parenting an infant?

-Kaitlyn

7. Hi ladies!

I recently started listening and stumbled upon your episode about Fifth Element-ish sci-fi. I took your book rec for The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet and absolutely loved it (bought the second and third books already). I’d love more recommendations that follow along the same lines, specifically the space setting and character development.

Thanks,

-Lizzy

BOOKS DISCUSSED

Ring by Koji Suzuki, transl by Robert B. Rohmer and Glynne Walley

The Last Days of Jack Sparks by Jason Arnopp (rec’d by Liberty)

The Moth Diaries by Rachel Klein

His Hideous Heart, edited by Dahlia Adler

The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera, transl. by Michael Henry Heim

The Book of Blood and Shadow by Robin Wasserman

Bitter Orange by Claire Fuller

The Unicorn by Iris Murdoch

The Hunger by Alma Katsu

Moon of the Crusted Snow by Waubgeshig Rice

The Blue Jay’s Dance by Louise Erdrich

Motherhood So White by Nefertiti Austin

Finder by Suzanne Palmer

The Wrong Stars (Axiom #1) by Tim Pratt

Oct 03 2019

45mins

Play

200: Bonus: Un-Recommendable Books

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In this special bonus episode, Amanda and Jenn recommend some of their favorite books that are otherwise impossible to recommend.

This episode is sponsored by our Mystery/Thriller GiveawayBlinkist, and Libro.fm.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

Amazing librarian Stephanie makes an amazing Get Booked spreadsheet!

BOOKS DISCUSSED

Love and Trouble by Claire Dederer (tw sexual assault)

The Vagina Bible by Dr. Jen Gunter

Somewhere in the Middle by Deborah Francisco Douglas

The Legend of Pradeep Mathew by Shehan Karunatilaka

How to Behave Badly in Elizabethan England by Ruth Goodman

Clandestine in Chile by Gabriel Garcia Márquez

Summer Cooking by Elizabeth David

Meeting Faith by Faith Adiele

Witches, Sluts, Feminists by Kristen J. Sollee

Star Trek The Next Generation: Dark Mirror by Diane Duane

Guano by Louis Carmain, translated by Rhonda Mullins

Red or Dead by David Peace

Sep 30 2019

50mins

Play

199: Things Get Weird Dot Tumblr Dot Com

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Amanda and Jenn discuss action heroines, bonkers plotlines, police procedurals, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by our Mystery/Thriller giveawaySlay by Brittney Morris, and the audiobook of Frankly in Love by David Yoon.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor (rec’d by Stephanie)

Commencement by J. Courtney Sullivan (rec’d by Elizabeth)

Tell Me How You Really Feel by Aminah Mae Safi (rec’d by Khadija)

The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron (rec’d by Aleks)

QUESTIONS

1. Greetings, and thanks in advance for expanding my already out of control TBR list! A friend and I just booked a two-week trip to South Korea for early November (leaving 11/3), and I want to do as much research as possible before I go, because I am SUCH a Hermione. I’m looking for books, fiction or non-fiction, that will provide me with context about the culture, history, food, traditions, and/or landscape of South Korea. I already have Wicked Fox and Pachinko on my list. What else can you recommend that will help me learn as much as I can? I’ve never been anywhere in Asia, and I’m so excited to go.

My wheelhouse is pretty broad–I’m a fan of contemporary fiction, sweeping generational sagas, YA, and sci-fi/fantasy (though I’m not so much into high fantasy). For non-fiction I especially love reading memoirs, especially by women and comedians (Bossypants and “Are you Hanging out without Me?” being two of my favorites) and collections of essays.

Thanks so much–I love the podcast and I can’t wait to hear your recommendations.

-Julia

2. Hi Amanda and Jenn!

Over the summer I’ve gotten into a reading kick of books with a certain madcap flair – like everything is bonkers but we’re going with it plotlines.

I think Amanda’s recommendation of The Affair of the Mysterious Letter by Alexis Hall is what set me off so I wanted to ask for more please!

Other books I’ve read in this vein would be: The Parasol Protectorate by Gail Carriger, Good Omens by Gaiman/Pratchett, The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde, The Hitchhiker’s Guide by Douglas Adams – and I’m noticing a British theme here, which is fine to continue or buck!

Thanks in advance.

-Kelly

3. Every year for Hanukkah, I send my friend 8 e-books from Thanksgiving until the last day of the holiday. When Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins came out, we both absolutely loved it and read the rest of the books in the series. At the time, we also liked some of the books by Rainbow Rowell. I’ve had trouble finding another whimsical, fun, romantic, but well written series that has the same energy as the Perkins’ books. Any suggestions? Thank you!

-Malory

4. I am looking for a book for my mom. She really likes fiction about all kinds of sports in which characters overcome hardships and stereotypes. Which is why she loved the Dairy Queen Trilogy by Catherine Gilbert Murdock. She has now read all three books several times and can’t seem to find anything else quite like it. Can you think of anything along these lines? Thank you!

All the best!

-Leah

5. I’m a long time listener to the podcast and have got many many recommendations from you both over the years, but I’ve only now come up with my very own personalised request… I’ve recently realised that I read police (and private detective) procedurals as a kind of comfort read/palate cleanser/go to for when I can’t think of anything else to read, or just can’t get into any other books.

I’ve read loads of Sarah Paretsky, am obsessed with Tana French and recently really enjoyed the first 2 books in Susie Steiner’s DI Manon Bradshaw series, but I’d really love some recs for this kind of thing that isn’t written by a white woman. I already have IQ by Joe Ides on my radar, have read and loved everything by Attica Locke, and have put the Widows of Malabar Hill on my TBR – do you have any other suggestions for me? Bonus points if it’s a long ass series I can really sink my teeth into and keep going back to when all is lost.

I read (and write!) a lot of psychological thrillers so really don’t need any recommendations in that department..it’s police and private eyes I’m after here, I think.

-Annie

6. I’m a relatively new Insider, and have been loving your podcast through the past 5 months. Thank you SO much for making my TBR list super-long, and introducing me to so many books I might never have thought to pick up.

As a side effect of the Read Harder Challenge, I realized that I love books of essays (who knew?!) in addition to my known-favorites of historical fiction, fantasy, murder mystery, and literary fiction.

I just finished reading “Selfish, Shallow and Self-absorbed: 16 Writers on the Decision NOT to have kids”. I had high hopes for this book as a 37 year old veterinarian who has made this decision myself, which tends not to be a popular one with family or peer-group. I was hoping to find my brethren in these essays, but sadly only felt some mild kindred spirits calling from two or three essays.

I was wondering if you might be able to help me find a character who speaks to me through a novel? I will say that the “single and driven” female lead intrigues me, but isn’t me. I’m happily married to a man who also doesn’t want children. Also, I do love kids (and truly enjoy my time with my nephews and god-daughter), so kid-haters are also a strong no.

Some of my favorite characters thus far have been Kinsey Millhone from Sue Grafton’s alphabet series; Lindsay Boxer from the early part of the Women’s Murder Club series by James Patterson, Claire from the Outlander series, and Jo from Little Women.

Thank you in advance!

-Jennie

7. I always wondered why I felt no connection to action heroines. Then I read Sabriel and realized that I prefer down-to-earth, sensible protagonists who have a strong sense of duty. Tiffany Aching is the platonic ideal of this. I also recently loved The Bear and the Nightingale. My preferred genres are science fiction and fantasy. I’ve been especially loving “domestic fantasy” lately that takes place around the home, though a good adventure across dangerous lands is always fun too.

Thank you!

-Julia

BOOKS DISCUSSED

The Hole by Hye-Young Pyun, translated by Sora Kim-Russell

The Birth of Korean Cool by Euny Hong

The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman

Chilling Effect by Valerie Valdes

When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon

Heroine Complex series by Sarah Kuhn

The Flood Girls by Richard Fifield (rec’d by Kathleen)

Check, Please!: Book 1: Hockey, by Ngozi Ukazu

Shinju by Laura Joh Rowland

Rachel Getty & Esa Khattak (The Unquiet Dead #1) by Ausma Zehanat Khan

The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert

The Magnificent Spinster by May Sarton

Sisters of the Winter Wood by Rena Rossner

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

The Tethered Mage by Melissa Caruso

Sep 26 2019

42mins

Play

198: This One Is The Queerest

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Amanda and Jenn discuss queer reads, graphic novels, management advice, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by our Mystery/Thriller giveawayAll That’s Dead by Stuart McBride, and Loki: Where Mischief Lies by Mackenzi Lee, read by Oliver Wyman.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

Here’s to the Ladies: Stories of the Frontier Army by Carla Kelly (rec’d by Kate)

Boom Town by Sam Anderson (rec’d by Miranda)

I Contain Multitudes by Ed Yong (rec’d by Miranda)

How Not To Be Wrong by Jordan Ellenberg (rec’d by Miranda)

Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho (rec’d by Miranda)

Uprooted by Naomi Novik (rec’d by Miranda)

The Tairen Soul series by C. L. Wilson (rec’d by Victoria)

QUESTIONS

1. So I’m from Australia and it’s currently winter where I am in August at the moment but in October that’s when it’ll be spring and I’m going on vacation to somewhere where it’s sunny, hot and relaxing atmosphere!

I was hoping you girls could recommend me some books to bring for the trip

Summer books are good, I also like thriller and horror, weird for summer but oh well!

I like authors like Taylor Jenkins Reid

No YA if you can

-Tamika

2. Time Sensitive: My son is turning 15 next week and I always get him a book (or five) for his birthday. This past year, he’s really been into graphic novels: he loved Scott Pilgrim (and the movie) and having read The Watchmen myself some years ago, I gave him a copy and he loved it. We have Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman and Marvel 1602 in the house (which I have not yet read yet), but I am looking for some other graphic novels he might enjoy. Any suggestions?

-Neda

3. Hello Get Booked friends! Last year I was #blessed to get a job at my dream company, and am currently moving from entry-level to mid-career level responsibilities (aka “Big Kid stuff” as I like to think to stave off imposter syndrome). I have such a supportive work community as I grow into these new responsibilities, but I am wondering if you could recommend books (fiction or non-fiction) with practical advice for women stepping into leadership and “big-girl” responsibilities for the first time. I’ve read Lean In, You are a Badass, and a lot of Brene Brown, and tested the waters of some general business books, but I’d love the practical, Millennial perspective of women moving from entry-level to a management role (and managing people) for the first time.

-Lauren

4. Aloha Ladies!

This podcast has been a godsend for me as I’ve recently rediscovered my love for books after a long hiatus. With my re-entry into the world of bibliophiles, my best friend and I created a long-distance book club (Hawaii to Boston!) with some other wonderful women who were interested. I’ve never been part of a book club before and am so nervous about picking an interesting read that will spark discussion. There are no restrictions on genre, author, etc., but I would prefer to select a book that’s written by a woman. My personal preferences lean heavily towards fantasy (not sure that’s the best for a group), true crime and mystery/thrillers. Any suggestions for books that will drive thought-provoking discussion would be greatly appreciated!

Many Mahalos!

-Christina

5. Hello! I have a wonderful colleague who is preparing to adopt a child from Colombia. She doesn’t know a great deal yet, but knows that the child will be around 8-10 years old. I would love to get her some books that they could read aloud together. My colleague and her family are all currently taking Spanish classes, and the child will be in the process of learning English. Any thoughts on a good read that might help to ease the adjustments that will be happening in some small way? Thanks so much, for this and for your great recs in general!

-DK

6. hi, i’ve been a fan for a while and so i’m looking for recommendations by authors who are not from the u.s., or more specifically just anything from the other side of the world. i have so little international books, it feels like i’m limiting myself to one country, one kind of book. i recently read “gumiho” by kat cho, which i really liked, and am reading “i am not your perfect mexican daughter” by erika sanchez, a book which i’m relating to a lot since i am latinx. some books i really like/love are “the rest of us just live here” by patrick ness, “eliza and her monsters” by francesca zappia, and any series/book that rick riordan has worked on or presented. i’m open to any genre though i have a tendency to like books that mix the real world with a bit of fantasy/supernatural. bonus if there is lgbt and mental illness rep in the book.

-Ru

7. I am looking for a new book/books to read after finishing the books by Nina LaCour. I like books with queer characters (especially wlw and trans characters) set in western cities (LA, San Francisco, Seattle, Portland) where the city plays a big part of the book. I have read “Little and Lion” “Juliet takes a breath” and “when dimple met rishi”

Love the show! Thanks so much

-Joelle

BOOKS DISCUSSED

Confessions of Frannie Langton by Sara Collins (tw: slavery and violence inherent therein, harm to children, rape, incest)

Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures by Emma Straub (tw: depression, suicide)

Lazarus Vol 1 by Greg Rucka, Michael Lark

Pretty Deadly by Kelly Sue DeConnick, Emma Ríos (cw: nudity/prostitution)

No Hard Feelings by Liz Fosslien and Molly West Duffy

Ask A Manager by Alison Green (and the online columns!)

An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

The Light Brigade by Kameron Hurley (tw: torture, harm to children, gore)

Juana and Lucas by Juana Medina

Lupe Vargas and Her Super Best Friend / Lupe Vargas y Su Super Mejor Amiga by Amy Costales, Alexandra Artigas

Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata, transl. by Ginny Tapley Takemori

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Passing Strange by Ellen Klages

About a Girl (Metamorphoses #3) by Sarah McCarry

Sep 19 2019

46mins

Play

197: All Kinds of Spooky Spooks

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Amanda and Jenn discuss spooky reads, books for teens, big city stories, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by our Mystery/Thriller giveawayNinth House by Leigh Bardugo, and Yale Needs Women by Anne Gardiner Perkins.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

thelesbianreview.com (rec’d by Anon)

Happy All The Time by Laurie Colwin (rec’d by Kristin)

QUESTIONS

1. I’m new to the podcast so apologies if you’ve gotten a similar email already. I recently finished NK Jemisin’s Broken Earth trilogy and was absolutely staggered by it. But since then I’ve been in a bit of rut; no book seems to catch my interest as my brain yearns for more Broken Earth. I’m looking to light the spark again so this rut doesn’t continue into the upcoming semester of my English M.A. (it would be a shame to read Jane Austen in this state). I’ve always been a fan of sci-fi/fantasy writing, but I think the main reason I fell in love with Jemisin’s writing was more to do with her wonderful character work and narrative structure, and the complexity of the mother-daughter relationship at the center of it. Hope this helps, and thanks a lot!

Best,

-Tom

2. I am a teen in high school looking for something to read this summer break, and I thought this would be a great way to do it! I love Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman’s Good Omens, I love the witty humour and style, and I would love to find something similar. I love books with demons as well. Other stories I love are Neil Gaiman’s Coraline and H.P. Lovecraft stories. I also love horror graphic novels.

Thanks so much!

-Vinny

3. I just finished City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert and really enjoyed reading about a woman moving to New York City in her early twenties and sort of finding herself. I also really loved how this book covered such a long time span, so you really were able to observe the protagonist’s evolution. This story was very relevant to me as I’m in my early twenties and am starting my adulthood life in a new city. I would really love to find another book with similar elements as City of Girls. I enjoyed the period piece, but it doesn’t have to be one. Bonus points if there is a romance subplot of some sort. I’ve already read Sweet Bitter and didn’t enjoy it very much. Other books I’ve enjoyed: Little Fires Everywhere, A Little Life, Wild, Eat Pray Love and Beautiful Boy. Thanks!

-Emily

4. Last semester my brother asked me for reading recommendations for his English high school class. This semester he asked me for more recommendations, but I am stumped. The two books out of the five he enjoyed were Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain and The Dirt by Motley Crue. When I asked him what he enjoyed about the books, he said “because they are real and the drug use lol.” My brother is 17. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

-Jenny

5. Hi Ladies,

I’m a dancer who has sustained a very bad injury. This is put my life in a tailspin to put it simply. Lost my job, lost my chance to move.. waiting to lose all my savings on a surgery that doesn’t even have a date set. It’s been 8 weeks. I’ve got 9+ months more.

I need something to get me through this waiting. What would make you feel better if you couldn’t stand for a year?

Or alternatively, I have roughly 8 months to learn something new. Maybe a book in that vein? I’m very open to suggestions. I’m just kinda… stuck.

I mention I’m a dancer for a reason, please no dance books. It will make me sad or mad. Not the goal.

Thank you. You guys and book riot are my internet home.

-Claire

6. I am looking for books (classics and “future” classics) for a project for my high-school freshman literature class in Mexico City. I have to start the project ASAP and need some help! I would like female authors (Even though I will also accept male authors), books that are around 300-350 pages long, that would interest a fully bilingual teen audience. The project is basically to teach them how to choose a book (I know, the irony…) they would like to read from a list of appropriate titles that I will give them and to read it. I have the following titles already on my list: 1984, Fahrenheit 451, Dracula, The Secret Life of Bees, In the Time of the Butterflies, The Things They Carried, The Good Earth… but I really would like to put together a much longer list so they really have to do a little research before choosing. Hope you can help and thank you! (By the way, listening to your podcast is becoming very expensive for me!!! Thank you for the great recommendations)

-Jennifer

7. Hi 🙂 I’m looking for fun, romp-y, not-sad sci-fi and fantasy by authors of color. I’ve found that whenever I want to read something funny and silly I always end up reaching for white British male authors ( Douglas Adams, Terry Pratchett, Neil Gaiman), and I really think there has to be so much more that I’m missing! Some books I love the feel of are: Good Omens by Terry Pratchett, The Gospel of Loki by Joanne M. Harris, Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones, and Space Opera by Catherynne M. Valente. Bonus points for Black American writers, but any non-white funny fantasy/sci fi author rec I’m into it!

-Weatherly

BOOKS DISCUSSED

Milkman by Anna Burns

The Psychology of Time Travel by Kate Mascarenhas (tw: disordered eating, self-harm, suicidal ideation, hazing)

Sabriel by Garth Nix

Hexed Vol. 1 by Michael Alan Nelson, Emma Rios, Dan Mora

Rules of Civility by Amor Towles

The Group by Mary McCarthy (tw: domestic violence, possibly others)

The Electric Woman by Tessa Fontaine

Wishful Drinking by Carrie Fisher

So Good They Can’t Ignore You by Cal Newport

Subversive Cross-Stitch by Julie Jackson, photographs by Bill Milne

Land of Love and Drowning by Tiphanie Yanique (tw child abuse, incest)

Signal to Noise by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho

Chilling Effect by Valerie Valdes

The Prey of Gods by Nicky Drayden (tw: sexual assault, child abuse)

Sep 12 2019

46mins

Play

196: Pioneer LiveJournal

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Amanda and Jenn discuss fascinating nonfiction, plane reads, pioneer adventures, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by our Mystery/Thriller GiveawayRecommended, and Forged Through Fire by Mark McDonough.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

The Alpennia series by Heather Rose Jones (rec’d by Jen)

Outline Your NovelStructuring Your Novel, and Creating Character Arcs by K. M. Weilan (rec’d by Victoria)

QUESTIONS

1. I love when you guys say that a book gave you a case of the “did you knows” — and I love getting them myself! I’m a huge fan of learning new random facts (whether it be in books, movies, or something I read online) and being able to add information to a conversation that someone wouldn’t normally know anything about. I’ve always wanted to be the person in the room that can tell you something about anything! Is there a book that either of you would say that gave you the BIGGEST case of the did you knows? I’m so excited to hear your suggestions.

Thanks so much! I love the show 🙂

-Hayley

2. I work at a local book store and one of our frequent customers, a 21-year-old female college student, came in wanting a recommendation for a realistic fiction with incidental romance and a decently interesting plot. Unfortunately I couldn’t help her find anything in our store, we have a very small selection, and was curious if you had any suggestions that we could order for her. Some other notes about her, she’s very academic and enjoys reading books about academia or bookish characters. She likes books from any time period as long as it feels authentic and realistic. Good luck!

-Anon

3. Hello! I am a huge fan of your podcast, and am seeking out a recommendation from reading experts like yourselves. I have found myself in somewhat of a reading rut lately, and am having trouble finding the perfect book to keep me fascinated, for I am going on a long trip soon. Reading on planes has always been a struggle for me, because I never seem to get my hands on a book thrilling enough to keep me entertained on long haul flights. I really enjoy books full of mystery, magic, fantasy, love, heartbreak, and characters you wish you could meet in real life. I am also looking for a book with depth and detail to keep my imagination flowing, like playing a movie in my head. I love books with magical illusions, dreams coming to life, or perhaps even a fire breathing dragon to keep things interesting. A story with strong character development is also a must. I love complex and authentic characters who are sure to grab my attention. A few of my favorite reads are:The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern and A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab, Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman, and Vicious by V.E. Schwab. I hope you help me to find a thrilling, romantic, magical book to keep me entertained! Thank you!

-Gigi

4. Ever since you guys talked about The Martian, I’ve been thinking about what it was I loved about it, because it wasn’t quite the same thing you talked about; I’ve landed on “books where there is conflict, action, and life or death stakes but I /don’t/ have to grapple with the problem of human evil”. What I loved about The Martian, and also many of my childhood favorites like Swiss Family Robinson, The Cay, The Hatchet, Z for Zachariah, Invitation To The Game– is people working, alone or together, to survive & build something where circumstance is their primary adversary. Unfortunately, this is a weirdly difficult thing to find in adult literature! A lot of classic man vs nature, like Jon Krakauer and Jack London, can live in my zone but is not very diverse or progressive. On the other hand, I’ve read several books in the last couple years involving teen girls learning to navigate remote and hostile environments where their fathers are evil abusive rapists (My Absolute Darling, The Great Alone, one which I forget the name of but she’s pregnant, the whole books is told in flashbacks, and in the end you find out her dad who kidnapped her is also the father of the baby) and I really do not like that at all.

I would really like to read a book with action! striving! derring-do! problem-solving! optimism! adult complexity and language! a limited number of characters in some kind of physical isolation from the general bulk of society that forces them to think about their surroundings and resources in new and creative ways!

I would strongly prefer no sexual violence at all (Sorry Octavia Butler) and truly minimal reliance on war, injustice, women in unfulfilling marriages, racism, genocide, or imperialism as plot drivers.

Genre is completely open!

-Ella

5. Hi, I am looking for a book for my partner’s birthday. He isn’t a big reader, and it tends to take either a really great story or something that is super detailed in a field he likes to get him hooked – like the book equivalent of falling down a really niche wikipedia wormhole. Recently he read and loved Amy Shira-Teitel’s Breaking the Chains of Gravity and Tim Cope’s On the Trail of Genghis Khan. He is an engineer who loves fixing up cars, imagining epic adventures (and completing a few of them!), and the science and history of flight and space travel. Thank you!!

-Laura

6. I’m a professional 31 y/o woman, single & childless… by choice! I’d love to read something (fiction or non) about someone similar to me! Most of the books I read about women my age who are single/childless have some damage or some situation which causes this “issue”! Don’t get me wrong, I love these women & these books! I’m just struggling to find myself in stories lately!

-Catherine

7. Hello! Love your podcast–I’m always so impressed with your recommendations! I’m interested in books with strong female protagonists that are set in the 1800’s pioneer-ish era. As a kid, I devoured the Laura Ingalls Wilder books and the Dear America book “Across the Wide and Lonesome Prairie” (let’s be real, I adored ALL of the Dear America books). As an adult, I haven’t really read anything that’s set in this same time period except for “The Hunger” which has a supernatural element that I’m not really looking for (it was good, just not what I’m in the mood for at the moment). Any suggestions you have would be much appreciated! Thank you!

-Whitney

BOOKS

On Immunity by Eula Biss

The Nature Fix by Florence Williams

The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides

The Steady Running of the Hour by Justin Go

Sisters of the Winter Wood by Rena Rossner

The Affair of the Mysterious Letter by Alexis Hall

The Andromeda Strain by Michael Crichton

Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers

An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth by Chris Hadfield

The Code Book by Simon Singh

No One Tells You This by Glynnis MacNicol (rec’d by Rebecca)

The Magnificent Spinster by May Sarton

I Await the Devil’s Coming by Mary MacLane

To the Bright Edge of the World by Eowyn Ivey

Sep 05 2019

46mins

Play

195: Hat Pins Are Involved

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Amanda and Jenn discuss divorce reads, Latinx fiction, writing advice, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by Book Riot InsidersLibro.fm, and Crown of Coral and Pearl by Mara Rutherford.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

Bad Neighbor by Molly O’Keefe (rec’d by Diana)

Lilah Pace’s duology Asking for It/Begging for It (rec’d by Diana)

Cath Staincliffe (rec’d by Stephanie)

QUESTIONS

1. Hey guys!

I’ve recently been inspired to write my own novel and have started envisioning my story, characters and setting. However, as I’ve gotten started I’ve realized I have no idea how to write a book at all let alone a book that people might actually want to read. I’m looking for a book on how to write books, specifically how to design compelling characters, write dialogue, design settings, inspire emotion and just the basics of writing that every writer needs to know. I’ve read Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott and loved it. Im looking for other books to help guide my writing process. If it helps at all I’m hoping to write a character-driven coming of age novel. Thanks so much and I look forward to your suggestions!

– E. W.

2. Hello, ladies!

I was wondering if you had any recommendations for a lesbian regency romance?

I have read a few with male romance, and a ton with hetero romance, and I love these but haven’t heard of any featuring a lesbian romance…

I have read Sarah Waters and some other lesbian romance set in Victorian or early 20th century, but really hoping for a regency romp in the vein of Tessa Dare or Sarah MacLean, or Courtney Milan.

Thank you both!

-Sarah

3. Hey there!

I wanted to get into more books about true crime! It creeps me out but I like reading about it, it’s like watching shows about it, I can’t get enough! Could you guys recommend me some true crime books that’ll really be sending chills down my spine?

-Tamika

4. Hey bookish people!

My fiancé and I are taking a little bit of an unconventional honeymoon in October to Vancouver, Canada. I’m looking for recommendations for books that take place in that area. I love pretty much every genre except horror and romance, and I particularly enjoy stories (both fiction and nonfiction) that emphasize culture and food. Bonus points if it’s a cozy read that will go well with the gloomy October weather!

Thanks ladies!

-Morgan

5. Hi Folks,

I am starting the process of divorcing my husband and I am looking for support and an example from books as I’m struggling to find those things in real life. I am not in an abusive situation, but I’ve finally realized that I deserve a partner, not a dependent. This realization doesn’t make the process easier. Especially because I don’t have any personal experience with divorce. No one among my family or close friends has gone through divorce. Not that I’m complaining, but I don’t have a personal pattern or example to see that one can have a fulfilling life afterwards.

I’m looking for examples of women or non-binary folks (just no dudes please) who have made it through divorce and come out the other side happy and successful (with or without a new partner). I’m open to nonfiction or fiction.

-S

6. I’m looking at a job in Richmond, VA, and I’m a little bit apprehensive about leaving the midwest. I would love to read anything set in Virginia (but not DC) that would give me a sense of the place and its history, though I’m not looking for a Civil War history specifically. Readalikes from other parts of the country that I’ve enjoyed/appreciated include Kristin Hannah’s The Great Alone; J.D. Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy; Min Jin Lee’s Pachinko; and Barbara Kingsolver’s Prodigal Summer (in case that might have been a recommendation!). I don’t have a preference for fiction vs nonfiction, and I read most genres, but am particularly loving multigenerational family stories like Pachinko. Bonus points for LGBT characters.

-Stephanie

7. Hi ladies, I adore the podcast!

I’m a first generation Latina American, and in the wake of the El Paso shooting (and all the hatred surrounding Mexicans and Hispanic people as a whole) I’ve found myself at something of a loss. Reading is a place I inevitably turn to, and I was hoping you two ladies could recommend me some fiction about Latinx characters. It’s something I’ve been doing all summer actually, trying to seek out Latinx authors, and I know you two will have great recommendations. I read pretty much any genre, though my favorite is fantasy. Some books I love and have read this summer are Water For Chocolate, The House on Mango Street, Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, and a bunch of Gabriel García Márquez. I also read The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo, which I loved, but even though it was a 5 star rating for me, I do feel you can tell it isn’t an own voices book, and right now I really need that.

I’m also Cuban, so if you know any good books about Cubans that would be a major bonus, but not necessary.

-Anon

BOOKS

On Writing by Stephen King

Steering the Craft by Ursula K. Le Guin

A Little Light Mischief by Cat Sebastian

Mrs. Martin’s Incomparable Adventure by Courtney Milan

The Fact of a Body by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich (TW: violence against children)

American Predator by Maureen Callahan (tw: home invasion)

The Jade Peony by Wayson Choy

Better Living Through Plastic Explosives by Zsuzsi Gartner

Wild by Cheryl Strayed

Tiny Beautiful Things

Blue Plate Special by Kate Christensen (tw: domestic violence & child abuse, pet death, disordered eating & drinking)

Shine Shine Shine by Lydia Netzer

Animal Vegetable Miracle

The Wettest County in the World by Matt Bondurant

Chilling Effect by Valerie Valdes (out 9/17)

We Set The Dark On Fire by Tehlor Kay Mejia

Aug 29 2019

46mins

Play

194: How Many Rocks Did They Lick?

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Amanda and Jenn discuss dark fiction, humorous SF/F, women breaking down barriers, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by Book Riot InsidersThirteen by Steve Cavanagh, and Blinkist.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

QUESTIONS

1. I’m getting married in the fall and am looking for books that portray marriage in a positive light. So many books use marriage as the plot twist, ie, murder, infidelity, etc. I want to read about good marriages and what will bring positive feelings in my marriage, not the negative portrayal usually used. I like historical fiction, magical realism, Mary Roach type of non-fiction, fantasy, romance.

-Angela

2. I have been reading Things You Save in a Fire by Katherine Center, and realized that I need more stories in my life about women working in high testosterone settings. I work in a job that involves carpentry, electrical work, and a lot of physical labor. In some ways I was originally drawn to the job because of the boys’ club atmosphere. I love confounding expectations; I love the challenge of proving myself, but some days that challenge is more daunting than others. Could you point me in the direction of some other books that capture this?

-Sasha

3. I have a bit of an itch I need scratched, and I’m having a hard time finding books with this specific description in mind. Earlier this year, I was very depressed and, although I love really dark fiction, I couldn’t bring myself to read it. I’m doing better now, and I want to plunge back in. I’m specifically wanting to read a fantasy/horror/thriller that’s really strange and doesn’t make a whole lot of sense but you’re just going with it? Something unsettling and stress-inducing possibly with a magical or supernatural element to it. I want to be so scared and confused and horrified that I feel like I’m going to throw up. The only examples I can think of that kind of have given me similar feelings (but maybe not quite as high of a distress level as I want or as strange as I want) have been Sawkill Girls, Baby Teeth, We Have Always Lived in the Castle, I’m Thinking of Ending Things, The Call, and, notably for it’s weirdness, Mouthful of Birds. Please no short story collections or anything too experimental (nothing has frustrated me more than trying to piece my way through House of Leaves). Please also no pregnancy horror, miscarriage, or child death. Thanks!!

-Anon

4. Hello Amanda & Jenn!

I am looking for a two-part recommendation.

One of my favorite parts of being a parent is having a built-in “book buddy”! She is a voracious little book worm despite being only two and a half, and I’ve loved using books as tools to talk about new topics. My husband and I haven’t yet traveled as much as we’d like to with our daughter. In order to bring a bit of the world to us, I’ve started choosing both my books and her children’s books by authors from a specific country or that take place in that country. For example: We’re focusing on Nigeria right now and I’m reading Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor and Looking for Transwonderland: Travels in Nigeria by Noo Saro-Wiwa, while my daughter and I have read Chicken in the Kitchen by Nnedi Okorafor and Why The Sky Is Far Away by Mary-Joan Gerson. Could you recommend a book for me (any genre) to couple with a children’s book for her to help us learn about a new country? The World is Your Oyster!

-Amber

5. Hi there!

I’m looking for some recommendations for my sister, who enjoys SF/Fantasy and a dash of humor. She’s also an interior/graphic designer so she tried Horrostor by Grady Hendrix at my recommendation – she said that she really enjoyed the unique format and worldbuilding but that it also totally freaked her out. (She read it alone while home with a fever. Oops.) I’m thinking of trying Night Film by Marisha Peesl next – too much you think?

Some of her favorites include: Mogworld by Yahtzee Croshaw, The Martian by Andy Weir, American Gods by Neil Gaiman, Seconds by Brian Lee O’Malley, and the Finder Series by Carla Speed McNeil.

Thank you!!

-Melanie

6. I’m looking for some recommendations for my husband. He wants to get back into reading, but he doesn’t really know where to begin. He only reads nonfiction titles. He’s an attorney and former history teacher, so he enjoys both political and historical biographies. Some of his other interests include sports and standup comedy. He’s also expressed interest in reading stories about Mexico or Mexican immigrants. I realize these subjects are kind of all over the board, but I’m hoping you guys can pull something amazing out of your brains. Thanks so much, I appreciate your help!

-Sarah

7. Hello,

I’ve been listening to your podcast for a while, and I’m always looking forward to new episodes! For a while now I’ve been trying to find a good book to give to my mother in law. I’m a woman of colour, and my partner’s family is white. my mother in law is very open and willing to listen to my experiences as a woman of colour but I find that most – if not all – of the stories she finds most powerful are told from white men and women. While I’m sure the stories she loves are powerful and well-told, I wanted to find a book that offers the perspective of a person of colour and their experiences. Some of her favourite books are Still Alice, My Secret Sister, and A Dog’s Purpose. I hope you are able to help me out either on the podcast or by email.

Happy reading!

– Sandi

BOOKS DISCUSSED

An Affair Before Christmas by Eloisa James

The Deepest Blue by Sarah Beth Durst

Cork Dork by Bianca Bosker

Documentary: SOMM

Shoot Like a Girl by Mary Jennings Hegar (tw: sexual assault, family abuse, misogyny)

Hegar’s viral ad

Hex by Thomas Olde Heuvelt, transl by Nancy Forest-Flier (TW: child abuse, violence)

White Is For Witching by Helen Oyeyemi (tw: disordered eating, self-harm)

Frida Kahlo and her Animalitos by Monica Brown

Signs Preceding the End of the World by Yuri Herrera, transl. by Lisa Dillman

Under My Hijab by Hena Khan, illustrated by Aaliya Jaleel

The Faithful Scribe by Shahan Mufti

The Parasol Protectorate series (Soulless #1) by Gail Carriger

Unraveling by Karen Lord

Pit Bull by Bronwen Dickey (tw: animal abuse)

The River of Doubt by Candice Millard

The Woman Next Door by Yewande Omotoso

Men We Reaped by Jesmyn Ward

Aug 22 2019

51mins

Play

193: Suck My Galoshes

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Amanda and Vanessa discuss Italian comics, paranormal smut, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by Book Riot InsidersLibro.fm and TBR.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSS, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher.


Feedback

None this week!


Questions

1. I was just offered a position as a 4th grade reading/writing teacher starting in the fall. I've been teaching abroad for a while and need good kid-lit recs for my classroom as I'm out of the loop. Picture books, chapter books, and graphic novels are all welcome. I've already got some good ones like Lumberjanes, the Anne of Green Gables graphic novel, and of course Harry Potter. For context, the school is very diverse and has a very high ESL population with students from South Asia, the Middle East/ North Africa, and Central America. Books where kids can see themselves represented and that can cater to different English fluency levels would be amazing. 

Thanks!

-Teaching in America

2. I love historical fiction, it is one of my favorite genres. However, I am running out of books in my tbr that are historical fiction. My favorite eras are Tudor England and the American Civil War. (please no more WW2!) I tend to prefer stories surrounding larger-than-life figures or momentous events in history. But really I am up for anything, so long as I get attached to the characters. Some of my favorites include Wolf Hall, The Killer Angels, and The Help. (I also like historical fantasy and other genre-benders, but I don't need any help finding more of THAT.)

-Katie

3. I hope you two can help! My boyfriend doesn’t read books at all, but that’s my main pastime and he has expressed an interest in trying to read more so we can hang out together and read. The main reason he doesn’t currently read books is because they need to grab him right away or he quickly loses interest, puts the book down, and never picks it back up again. A little about him: he’s an electrical engineer, is super smart, likes to tinker with cars and gadgets, is pretty curious about world events and all sorts of things – he will hear about something and go on an internet deep dive to learn all about it, and he has a great memory. 

So far I have given him Shadow Divers by Robert Kurson and he really likes that one and I have Dark Matter by Blake Crouch and All Our Wrong Todays by Elan Mastai teed up for him because I think he will like the science-y, brain twistiness of both. Any ideas for what else I can give him? And for the record, I am totally fine with him not reading, but he has asked and so, of course, I am glad to oblige him and provide him with reading material! :)

Thanks so much!

-Elizabeth

4. A friend recently invited me travel to Italy this Fall, but I'm not sure if it's in my budget -- Can you help me find a graphic novel set in Italy so I can travel there in my imagination? Some comics/graphic novels/graphic memoirs I've enjoyed recently: Relish by Lucy Knisely, Moonstruck by Grace Ellis et. al., Sweater Weather by Sara Varon, and Lumberjanes 

Thank you!!

-Jess

5. I've been in a serious reading slump and I just need something super fast paced to get me out of it. I really like YA fantasy and romances. Anything with a map is great. I just bought Courting Darkness but haven't started it yet... I love Marissa Meyer and Richelle Mead. Stalking Jack the Ripper... The Dresden files... I read all over the place so basically anything is fine from kid lit to Adult. Love Captain Underpants. 

-Rye

6. Please help with audiobooks for a concussed reader! Hi! I am a voracious reader, and after concussing myself on a freezer 10 days ago, I haven't been allowed to read text. I'm going into withdrawal! 

I am a very eclectic reader, but generally I am more drawn to plot than characters. Humor, particularly snark, is always a plus, as well as just beautiful writing. Authors I love that I am in the mood for are Lois McMaster Bujold (particularly her Vorkosigan series, Cordelia is my favorite character), John Scalzi (particularly the Old Man's War series) and also Laurie R King (particularly her Mary Russell series). For beautiful writing, see China Mieville, though his books are way too complex for my poor brain to follow right now. Speaking of which, easy to follow is important right now! I'm having trouble with that.

-Becca

7. hello ladies, firstly, I love listening to you guys- even when I'm not interested in the books suggested.

I am on break in August for midwinter chill (hehah) and am on the lookout for some fun reads. I have just finished the psy-changeling series (got to support my fellow kiwis!) and Polaris Rising. They are both smutty and fun while still having a good plot. Can you give me any new SSF/smutty suggestions, I feel like I have read all the good ones and they are all the same. Thanks in advance! 

-Shontelle


Books Discussed

Everlasting Nora by Marie Miranda Cruz

Juana and Lucas by Juana Medina

Leading Men by Christopher Castellani

Queen of the Night by Alexander Chee

Lexicon by Max Barry

Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann

Recursion by Blake Crouch

Catwoman: When in Rome by Jeph Loeb

Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life by Ulli Lust, translated from Austrian by Kim Thompson TW: sexual assault

A Winter’s Promise by Christelle Dabos, transl by Hildegarde Serle

The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi

Finder by Suzanne Palmer

The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley

Immortals After Dark  by Kresley Cole, shout out to Sarah MacLean’s Fated Mates podcast with Jen Prokop

The Magicians by Lev Grossman

Aug 15 2019

54mins

Play

192: Complicated Feeling About Bees

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Amanda and Jenn discuss political nonfiction, twin stories, nonbinary reads, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by Book Riot InsidersLibro.fm and The Right Swipe by Alisha Rai.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

Chloe Poems’s Li’l Book O’ Manchester (rec’d by Arlene)

The Night Brother by Rosie Garland (rec’d by Arlene)

Pies and Prejudice: In Search of the North by Stuart Maconie (rec’d by Arlene)

QUESTIONS

1. I love books that take a look inside a certain industry. I’ve read Deep Sea and Foreign going about commercial shipping and Flower Confidential about the cut flower industry recently. I’ve previously read books about the funeral trade and restaurant/food industry. So I’m looking for more! Preferably ones that are about things that don’t immediately spring to mind. Thanks in advance.

-Anna

2. Fun, Light, Realistic YA – Not too fantastical or sci-fi. I’m looking for recommendations for my teenage daughters, ages 15 and 16 and I’m stumped. It seems we keep finding books with material that is too young for them too dark and serious. They have liked “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before”, “When Dimple Met Rishi” and the “Selection” series. They would love realistic fiction that isn’t teen romance but we are having a hard time finding anything fun that isn’t childish.

-Cami

3. I recently came out as nonbinary after several years of being out as queer/bi. I am looking for a book with queer or nonbinary characters, though that certainly doesn’t need to be the focus of the book. I would just like to see more of myself represented in the things I read, and I knew you two would do a fantastic job! I like a little bit of everything, and I don’t shy away from YA or children’s books (Jessica Love’s Julian is a Mermaid is what inspired me to come out as nonbinary!). I would just say no religious books, please, and bonus points if the book is written by a queer or nonbinary author. Side note – thank you for this beautiful podcast! I have found so many books because of it, and I just adore you two.

-Cheyenne

4. Hello Readerlicious Rock Stars!

First off, you folks are super awesome and I adore listening to your show. My identical twin sister and I love reading about twins and I’d love some twin-ish recommendations from you all for us to read together.

Some things to consider:

1) We’re open to any genre (other than horror) or reading level (middle grade and beyond).

2) Plots surrounding twins tend to be dark for some reason. Or, at least that seems to be the case with most twin books I’ve come across. A focus on fun/upbeat/kickass/bright/optimistic would be great. Please, no tragic death of one of the twins. That would be way too much of a bummer.

3) We’d love it if you could recommend some reads that don’t involve the typical good twin/bad twin trope. As twins who are constantly facing the ridiculous tendency for folks to categorize us/twins in that kind of binary way, it’d be great to read something that doesn’t do the same. How about BOTH twins being bright lights in the world?

4) Along the same lines as no twin death, I’m not a fan of any book that delves into serious abuse or tragic death of kids. As a mom of two cuties, it’s way too hard for me to read about kids and dark, tragic circumstances; i.e. abduction, murder, rape, etc.

5) We’re huge fans of strong, fabulous, outrageous, potentially super power grrls who kick ass. Characters who overcome hardship and beat a crappy system are definitely ones we’d love to root for.

Thank you!

-Nicole

5. Hello! I love your podcast! I am looking for a personal recommendation. Every so often I come upon a book or movie that broadens my mind and my heart. These books and movies usually have unconventional characters who become unlikely heroes. Strong character development, authenticity, and complexity are all fabulous, and magical realism is a bonus. Some of my favorites have in this genre have been The Seventh Gate by Richard Zimler, Peace Like a River by Leif Enger, Mink River by Brian Doyle, Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson, Sing Unburied Sing by Jesmyn Ward, and Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz. I would love another one to devour and fall in love with. Thank you for your help 🙂

-Melissa

6. Hi Ladies, Thanks for always putting up a great show! I often pretend y’all are my girlfriends who are talking to me about books. 😉 This is my first time putting in a request, but it’s one that I’ve been wanting to submit for quite some time now. As an avid reader, I want nothing more than to read a book with my non-reader husband. My dream may soon be realized because he just asked me for some recommendations on books about politics. He reads a bunch of articles every day about politics (and sports) online, but is now ready to graduate to books! Do you have any book recommendations about U.S. politics that reads like fiction and are interesting enough to capture the attention of a non-reader? It can be about the current political climate or anything in the past as well. I can’t provide any books he’s liked since he’s a non-reader, but he does read a ton of articles and forums on reddit. I’m hoping this is enough info for you guys to go on, because I’m definitely lost on this one. THANK YOU!!

-Helen

7. Hi,

Recently both me and my sister have got into the slightly niche genre of eastern Asian authors writing about/from the point of view of animals. The includes books like The Guest Cat by Takashi Hiraide, anything by Seonmi Hwang, The memoirs of a polar bear by Yoko Tawada and the travelling cat chronicles by Hiro Arikawa. I would like to get my sister another book of this kind but I’m running out of ideas and was wondering if you would be able to help? It doesn’t really matter where the authors are from its just the style that we enjoy although extra brownie points if they aren’t British/American as we read so many of these anyway!

Thanks love the show!

-Holly

BOOKS DISCUSSED

The Line Becomes a River by Francisco Cantú

Fire Season by Philip Connors

Hearts Unbroken by Cynthia Leitich Smith

Pride by Ibi Zoboi

Freshwater by Akwaeke Emezi (TW: sexual assault)

The Tensorate series by JY Yang (Red Threads of Fortune #2)

Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

Slayer by Kiersten White (some mentions of parental abuse)

America is Not the Heart by Elaine Castillo

Exit West by Mohsin Hamid

On Tyranny by Timothy Snyder

What Truth Sounds Like by Michael Eric Dyson

The Bees by Laline Paull

Fifteen Dogs by André Alexis (tw: harm to animals)

The Bugs of Literature: A Flowchart

Aug 08 2019

50mins

Play

191: Alpha in the Sheets, Beta in the Streets

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Amanda and Jenn discuss chapter books about girls, thrillers, undersea stories, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by Book Riot Insiders, One Good Deed by David Baldacci, and Never Have I Ever by Joshilyn Jackson.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

Serial Killers: Murder Without Mercy by Nigel Blundell (rec’d by Sharon)

Song of a Captive Bird by Jasmin Darznik (rec’d by Sibyl)

The Mermaid and Mrs. Hancock by Imogen Hermes Gowar (rec’d by Sibyl)

Spoonbenders by Darryl Gregory (rec’d by Sibyl)

The History of Love by Nicole Krauss (rec’d by Sibyl)

QUESTIONS

1. Hi Amanda and Jenn, I’m such a big fan of the show and your recs are always must-adds for my TBR! I tend to buy most of my books at library book sales, used bookstores, etc, where there are a lot of random books in a big mish-mash. It makes me sad when I see a favorite but lesser-known book in a pile, being passed over again and again for new hyped up releases. I’d love to know, if you were at a used bookstore, what would be the book that would make you want to pull it out of the pile and hold it up like Simba in The Lion King while announcing to everyone “this is the one! Please take this one home!”

-Nicole

2. I am thinking about moving to Manchester, England to start a graduate program in September, so I am looking for contemporary fiction or nonfiction books set in Manchester that would give me insight into the city and introduce me to writers from the region. Since I cannot visit the city before starting the program I think reading could help calm my nerves a bit (as it tends to do). When I lived in Paris I read 4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster and really enjoyed the Parisian and literary references. I have read novels set in other European cities but would really appreciate recommendations specific to Manchester. It would be a nice addition if one of the recommendations had a non-white, non-male protagonist and author. Thank you! I really enjoy listening to the podcast and expanding my TBR pile.

-Megan

3. Hi Amanda and Jenn. Hoping you can smash another recommendation for me. I recently bought my friend’s daughter the Phoebe the Unicorn books and successfully turned a tentative reader into a certified book worm. She even posted me her own little thank you note, it was the cutest. I’m keen to get her some new books to keep up the streak.

She comes from an extended family where she is surrounded by young mums and examples of motherhood and homemaking, and while this is lovely, I know her mum is keen to make sure she knows that having children is not the only path available to her. Could you recommend some books to keep her inspired, whatever her path may be. I particularly want to combat the kind of troubling comments I know she’s come up against already in her young life, such as ‘little boys become doctors, little girls become nurses’ 🙁

She’s pretty into street dance, maths, baking and her family’s landrover. Nothing too scary please. She’s 8 years old, turning 9 in December. Availability in the UK a must.

-Kim

4. I’m looking for recommendations for my book club. We tend to gravitate towards mysteries and thrillers, the darker the better. Books we’ve read in the past include: The Good Girl by Mary Kubica, The Child Finder by Rene Denfeld, The Dinner by Herman Koch, The Chalk Man by CJ Tudor, Force of Nature by Jane Harper. My group really really enjoyed Confessions by Kanae Minato. We like lots of twists and the switching perspectives. Thank you for your help! Love your show 🙂

-Earline

5. I just tore through City of Brass and Kingdom of Copper by S.A. Chakraborty and am having trouble moving on! Nothing I pick up is holding my interest, and I find myself dreaming of a big book set in a foreign land, with magic and friendship and intrigue. Can you recommend something that will help fill the hole in my reading heart until the third book comes out in 2020? I am game for almost anything except horror (I am a wimp!). Recent book loves in addition to these two include The Night Circus, Once Upon a River by Diane Setterfield, Circe by Madeline Miller and everything by Becky Chambers. You’ll see a lot of familiar titles on my Goodreads – a Fair number of the books on my TBR (and those I’ve read over the last couple of years) are your fault – in a really good way! Thank you!

-Kristin

6. Hello! First of all, I would like to say how much I LOVE your podcast. I have been listening since the beginning, and my TBR is forever growing. Who can ever really be “done” with their TBR? So here is my first recommendation request after all this time: Recently I have become fascinated with underwater exploration and all things under the sea. It is a whole different world, and is equal parts exciting and terrifying to me. I have not read many books dealing with underwater adventure, but would love more options to pick up. I read Josh Malerman’s A House At The Bottom of The Lake and loved how uneasy it made me feel as I was reading it. Exploring open water is something I would never do in real life, so I need to read about it! I love all things magical realism and science fiction, but wouldn’t be opposed to an adventure as well! Hoping for more fictional recommendations than non-fiction. Thank you so much in advance!!

All the best,

-Brittany

7. Howdy! I love your podcast! I read a lot of books across a broad range of genres, but I’m looking for recommendations for romances with guys who are bossy/controlling in bed. I’ve really enjoyed Willing Victim, Brutal Game, and After Hours by Cara McKenna. I also enjoyed Lori Foster’s romances with alpha-guy leads. I’m not into the full-on Fifty Shades of Gray-esque BDSM thing–that’s too much, especially when the control bleeds out of the bedroom and into the rest of life. I have a strong preference for heterosexual relationships. Bonus points for recs that include fantasy elements or virgins, but those aren’t required. Thanks ladies!

-Kate

BOOKS DISCUSSED

My Favorite Thing is Monsters by Emil Ferris

Map of Salt and Stars by Zeyn Joukhadar (tw: sexual assault)

Mary Barton by Elizabeth Gaskell

Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? By Jeanette Winterson (tw: child abuse)

Lola Levine is Not Mean by Monica Brown

The Case of the Missing Moonstone (Wollestonecraft Detective Agency #1) by Jordan Stratford, illustrated by Kelly Murphy (rec’d by Karina of Kidlit These Days)

My Sister the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite

Case Histories by Kate Atkinson

Markswoman by Rati Mehrotra

Empire of Sand by Tasha Suri

Low by Rick Remender, Greg Tocchini, Dave McCaig

Into the Drowning Deep by Mira Grant

Her Halloween Treat by Tiffany Reisz

Thirsty by Mia Hopkins

Aug 01 2019

53mins

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190: Love Triangle With Some Communists

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Amanda and Jenn discuss travel reads, super creepy books, mysteries, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by Libro.fmProject Duchess by Sabrina Jeffries, and TBR.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

Starsight by Brandon Sanderson (rec’d by Elizabeth)

QUESTIONS

1. Good Morning!

I recently came across your podcast and I absolutely love it! You’re recommendations in the past couple episodes are amazing and the diversity of hosts with their unique tastes and conversations really makes this one of my favorite podcasts. I am about to start my PhD in August and really would like to make reading a bigger part of my life so I can have an escape from the stress of school over the next 5 years. Up until now I have mainly been reading nonfiction books in areas I am interested in but since I read a lot of scientific papers for class already I would like to break this up by getting more into fiction. My problem however is that I have a hard time getting into fiction works and a lot of times I end up either reading it like it’s homework that I have to read or I just don’t finish it. There are a few fictions books that I do really enjoy however such as, The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, The Count of Monte Cristo, 11/23/63 and Ready Player One. I would really appreciate any recommendations and I look forward to listening to all your future podcasts.

Thank you so much!

-Chase

2. Hello! In late August (time-sensitive!) I am heading away to Europe for a few weeks travelling with my boyfriend between cities he will be working in, and as well as the 40 hour (!!) travel time there and back from where I live in New Zealand, we will be spending a lot of time on trains, and I’ll be exploring on my own while he is working. I’m hoping to fill a lot of this time with reading, and I’m keen to get some suggestions set in the areas we will be in – various cities in Belgium, the Netherlands, and Germany – or stories about trains. I’d love something with good female characters and some focus on the relationships between them, or maybe a little bit of mystery. I also love narrative non-fiction! At the moment I am a little burnt out on historical fiction, thrillers, and books with dark subject matter, so I’d rather steer clear of those, and nothing over 400 pages or so please, for the sake of my baggage allowance. Thanks so much!

-Alex

3. I recently had to put down one of my dogs very suddenly. I want to read something, but my usual genre of adventure/ya doesn’t sound appealing. I was currently reading Throne of Glass (and loving it) but it just is too much right now. I want something light that’ll make me laugh but with no death in it. Especially of a pet. I recently read Tiffany hadish’s book, and I loved it, but I don’t typically reread non fiction.

-Taylor

4. Sort of time sensitive. Would need by September.

Hi!

My book club has been going for about 2.5 years now and I have unofficially (but kind of officially) taken over October as my month with the intent of making the group read some super creepy shit. My last 2 picks were White Tears and The Changeling.

Both have really stuck with people–whether they loved them, liked them, or kind of hated them–and we particularly had a lot of great conversation about White Tears. I feel like a bar has now been set (albeit just in my own head) and want to pick something in a similar vein, but am struggling to have that “ah-ha” moment.

Please help me seriously creep out my friends! Preferably something no more than 300/350 pages and by a woman. We do have one rule: no white men!

Some other things that I have recently read and really enjoyed (but would probably be too much, for varied reasons, for the whole group) are: The Beauty (btw, thanks Amanda!) and Fever Dream.

Thank you

-Heidi

5. I am looking for recommendations for my Dad, Myron. He retired a couple of years ago and has rediscovered – aka found more time for – his love of reading! His favourite genres are spy novels, mysteries, and historical fiction. We often chat about the books we are reading, and thanks to discussions we’ve had about MY personal reading habits and goals, he has started looking for more books authored by women and with lady protagonists. I am so excited that he is diversifying his reading list – and so is he! I would love to find him some more books by women (and non-binary) authors in the genres he loves!

-Lisa

6. Hi! I love your podcast and have been listening forever, so I’m sure you’ve answered this at some point and I just don’t know where to look for it.

My husband only does audiobooks, and when he finishes something, he often asks for my opinion on what to read next. He only reads fantasy and sci-fi, for the most part, and has listened to EVERYTHING Brandon Sanderson has ever written.

I’ve recommended (and he’s liked):

The Wheel of Time series

Everything by N.K. Jemisin

Becky Chambers’s Wayfarers

pretty much everything by Marissa Meyer

Bone Street Rumba and Shadowshaper series by Daniel Jose Older

He’s also read a bunch of John Scalzi, Jim Butcher, Neil Gaiman–mostly white dudes, so I try to recommend non-white or lady (or both) authors to him.

Some things he hasn’t cared for: Daughter of Smoke and Bone, Game of Thrones, American Gods, or Shards of Honor (I recommended based on a Star Trek comparison I heard in an earlier episode of either this podcast or SFF Yeah).

Can you recommend a SFF series by a non-white or lady author that I can suggest to him? The longer, the better.

Thank you!!

-Jaimie

7. I’m looking for short, engrossing, quiet novels that I can curl up and read in my armchair in a sitting or two. It’s more about a cozy feeling than about a lot of action. Recent books I have loved that fit this description include: Our Souls at Night by Kent Haruf, Whiskey and Ribbons by Leesa Cross-Smith, and I Married you for Happiness by Lily Tuck.

None of these books sounded terribly exciting in their descriptions, but I couldn’t put them down and they made me feel all of the big feelings without a lot of action. Please help me chase those feelings again.

-KJ

BOOKS DISCUSSED

Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch

The Psychology of Time Travel by Kate Mascarenhas (tw: eating disorders, self-harm, suicidal ideation)

The Madonna of the Sleeping Cars by Maurice Dekobra

Everything Is Going to be Great by Rachel Shukert

Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons

Dealing with Dragons by Patricia Wrede

Sawkill Girls by Claire Legrande

The Merry Spinster by Daniel Mallory Ortberg

Bitter Orange by Claire Fuller

Bluebird, Bluebird by Attica Locke (lots of racism incl. violence and use of slurs)

Queen of the Tearling series by Erika Johansen

The Machineries of Empire by Yoon Ha Lee (Ninefox Gambit #1) (tws: coercion, gore, assault)

The Cook by Maylis de Kerangal, transl Sam Taylor

Dept. of Speculation by Jenny Offill

Jul 25 2019

47mins

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