Cover image of The Rideshare Guy Podcast : A Community for Rideshare Drivers | Uber | Lyft | Postmates | DoorDash
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The Rideshare Guy Podcast : A Community for Rideshare Drivers | Uber | Lyft | Postmates | DoorDash

Updated 2 days ago

Business
Technology
Careers
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A Blog and Podcast For Rideshare Drivers

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A Blog and Podcast For Rideshare Drivers

iTunes Ratings

220 Ratings
Average Ratings
196
12
2
5
5

Amazing!!!!

By Erikabiancospino - Nov 07 2019
Read more
Love the podcast, right on! Everything you need to know and the best way to stay updated.

A must listen for all Rideshare drivers.

By darthblaq - Apr 11 2019
Read more
A brilliant resource for any rideshare driver. Should be required listening

iTunes Ratings

220 Ratings
Average Ratings
196
12
2
5
5

Amazing!!!!

By Erikabiancospino - Nov 07 2019
Read more
Love the podcast, right on! Everything you need to know and the best way to stay updated.

A must listen for all Rideshare drivers.

By darthblaq - Apr 11 2019
Read more
A brilliant resource for any rideshare driver. Should be required listening
Cover image of The Rideshare Guy Podcast : A Community for Rideshare Drivers | Uber | Lyft | Postmates | DoorDash

The Rideshare Guy Podcast : A Community for Rideshare Drivers | Uber | Lyft | Postmates | DoorDash

Latest release on Jan 21, 2020

Read more

A Blog and Podcast For Rideshare Drivers

Rank #1: RSG046: Why Mindset Matters Most For New Uber Drivers

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A lot of new drivers are surprised at the level of negativity when it comes to rideshare Facebook groups and forums.  But I’ve always ignored the haters since just like any other line of work, there are positives and negatives to driving.  And I don’t think it’s my job to tell people what they should or shouldn’t do.

I’d rather focus on sharing my own personal experience and letting people make the decision for themselves.  Today’s guest on the show is similar in that respect and we go in-depth on the mindset that you need in order to be successful as a driver and in life.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Made it to two years of marriage – all right!
  • At FinCon right now, a personal finance conference
  • Interview with Bobby Marchesso, a new Uber Select driver based out of LA
  • Check out driving for DoorDash – we did an article about how you can maximize your DoorDash cash recently, and also consider signing up – 97% of customers tip, and drivers keep 100% of the tips!
  • Missed an episode of one of our podcasts? Click here

Interview with Bobby Marchesso

  • Moved to California to expand acting career and took up Uber driving for the in-between times
  • Heard about Uber late last year, has been driving for 5 months
  • Came across RSG while searching for advice about driving for Uber, found the YouTube videos and podcasts really helpful

Experience as a New Driver

  • Was approved to drive quickly and started researching the practicalities of being a driver
  • Found that the morning and mid-afternoon rush are the most lucrative
  • Didn’t read any of the negative comments during research – wanted to find out on own the pros and cons of driving
  • Found driving came pretty easy as long as it was common sense

Advice for New Drivers

  • Could be considered lucky, but it’s also your perspective on the job
  • Stop hustling around trying to be the fastest at the job
  • Stop trying to compete with all the drivers around you – it’s going to stress you out more
  • You just can’t force it – Uber is going to be there and you’re going to get rides, you have to be patient to get those longer, more profitable rides

Actionable Tips for Uber Drivers

  • Start by relaxing and by knowing your city – what areas draw the most rides? What time of the day is most popular?
  • Don’t stress and try to force rides – it won’t work and passengers know when you’re agitated
  • Get used to driving, get accustomed to the days and get better at driving
  • Focus on the customer service
  • Take a look at your metrics: where did you drive and when was it most lucrative? Go back to basics

Struggles as a New Uber Driver

  • No truly awful or scary rides – it’s about common sense and recognizing when pax want to chat and when they want to be left alone
  • Uber customer could improve

Outro

  • Do some due diligence, put in the time to make yourself successful, and stay positive
  • If being successful is important to you, you’ll make time for it
  • Before I started RSG, I was driving because the money was good and I liked driving – writing about rideshare driving has also allowed me to build up a successful business
  • Feel free to reach out to me at harry[at]therideshareguy.com or follow me on Twitter @TheRideShareGuy
  • Leave comments, questions and feedback below!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

-Harry @ RSG

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The post RSG046: Why Mindset Matters Most For New Uber Drivers appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Sep 23 2016

50mins

Play

Rank #2: RSG064: Two MRP Students Share Their Best Strategies and Tips

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Maximum Ridesharing Profits is a course I created, along with another experienced rideshare driver, a few years ago, and it’s been incredibly helpful for students who’ve taken the course. Today, I wanted to bring on two MRP students to discuss the strategies they learned from MRP and what they’ve implemented. Both Chike and Adan have some really great tips on today’s episode, and there’s a lot of information in this podcast to help you get on the road and work smarter, not harder.

Interested in Maximum Ridesharing Profits? Click here to sign up.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • One thing I really like about rideshare driving is that it enables you to be an entrepreneur
  • You’ll notice one of the taglines for this podcast is “Work Smarter, Not Harder”
  • Today I’ll be talking with two Maximum Ridesharing Profit students who are going to share their best strategies and tips
  • Maximum Ridesharing Profits is a course that we created a couple years ago that’s all about helping drivers make more money from their driving
  • If you’re a driver who wants to confirm some of your own strategies, the course has helped students answer the questions, “What am I doing out there? What can I be doing better?”

Interview with Chike Ujagu

  • Started as a part-time driver initially then moved to full-time
  • Prefers part-time driving to full time because it’s easier physically, but makes double as a full-time driver
  • Drives in San Francisco, primarily with Lyft

Suggested Driving Strategies

  • Really important to learn your city and traffic trends, especially if you’re a FT time
  • If you’re a PT driver, you can do airport runs and big events, but driving FT means you have to be more aware and informed to drive consistently
  • Really important to minimize the time from request to pick up – the more time you waste on getting to the rider, that’s like unpaid time
  • It can actually be more profitable to drive for one company (like Lyft) over driving for both – bonuses, prime time, etc.

Experience with Maximum Ridesharing Profits

  • Signed up for the course to confirm driving strategies
  • Learned new things as well, including information on taxes and what you can write off, insurance, etc.

Interview with Adan Castillo

  • Adan is a former engineer and is now full-time entrepreneur
  • He started driving for Uber and Lyft in 2015 because he needed a flexible schedule
  • In 2017, he started WindyCityDrivers.com, a resource for Chicago drivers
  • Driving for rideshare was flexible and could pay the bills, leaving Adan with more time for his family

Suggested Driving Strategies

  • In salary positions, the more you work, the less you make because you’re paid a set amount. Not the same with rideshare driving
  • Now drives full time vs. part-time
  • Chicago is a popular destination for business travelers, and the airports are very busy, so airports are an important part of rideshare driving strategies – but you don’t want to spend a lot of time there
  • Important to talk to people in your city – particularly bartenders!
  • Really important to know your city – know about the big events, but also the smaller events

Experience with Maximum Ridesharing Profits

  • Really helpful that the course helps you think of driving as a business – you’re a business owner
  • Tax advice and strategies was helpful too
  • The advanced strategies were also really helpful, strategies for diversifying your income

Outro

  • Big thank you to Chike and Adan for coming on the podcast and chatting with me!
  • Maximum Ridesharing Profits takes the videos, podcasts, and articles you read on RSG to another level – MRP is like a personal trainer for rideshare drivers
  • This course is for people who are looking to take their driving to the next level
  • Looking to do more of these chats with drivers – would you be interested in sharing your thoughts with me? Let me know!
  • Follow me on FacebookTwitter and YouTube and you can always contact me if you have questions – I like to hear from you all!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

-Harry @ RSG

Read next: How rideshare drivers are making hundreds of extra dollars per month

The post RSG064: Two MRP Students Share Their Best Strategies and Tips appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Nov 07 2017

52mins

Play

Rank #3: RSG038: Steven Hill On What’s Wrong With Uber

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Today’s guest on the podcast is one of the most well-spoken critics of Uber and the on demand economy.  There are obviously a lot of people in this category but not many of them have researched and studied the industry like Steven Hill.  I first read about Steven’s work a year ago and knew it was only a matter of time before he came on the podcast as a guest.  You may also be familiar with his book, Raw Deal: How the “Uber Economy” and Runaway Capitalism Are Screwing American Workers.

On the podcast, we talk about all that Uber has done to revolutionize the taxi industry, the problems that’s created for workers and we also attempt to come up with a few solutions.  Hope you enjoy it!

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

Interview with Steven Hill

The Rideshare Gig Economy

  • In general, Uber and Lyft good inventions – taxi cabs needed a challenge
  • Not a perfect system
  • Problems arise with labor issues, lack of job protections, and wages
  • Sounds great to be your own boss, but there’s a huge risk to that
  • Uber doesn’t really have to care about its drivers – keeping costs low is priority

Uber and Profitability

  • At some point, Uber can’t keep burning through drivers without realizing some consequence
  • However, the economy isn’t great, which is why people keep driving for Uber
  • Companies waiting longer to go public for several reasons
  • UberPool a classic Silicon Valley pivot

Is Uber Turning Into a Minimum Wage Job?

  • Depends on the state of the economy and how badly people need jobs
  • People are not making $100,000 a year
  • Media embraced that story – not at all correct
  • Now Uber is a “part time job” – another pivot
  • There are worse ways to make money
  • Not just the drivers affected: riders and everyone sharing the streets

The Best Path for Workers, Cities

  • NGOs or nonprofits could step in and create an app where people share rides with others going to the same place
  • Basically, an easier version of the carpool
  • Cities could create “congestion zones”
  • For workers, security accounts could be created – safety nets for drivers
  • Right now, companies have an incentive NOT to hire employees
  • Better regulations for drivers
  • Raw Deal book goes into greater detail and how other countries handle ridesharing

Outro

  • Really easy to criticize the on-demand economy, but much harder to solve these problems
  • A lot of pros to driving for Uber and Lyft, as well as other delivery companies
  • However, how can we make things better for people out there driving right now?
  • Hope I gave you something to think about in today’s podcast

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Drivers, what do you think about Steven’s take on Uber and the on demand economy in general?

-Harry @ RSG

The post RSG038: Steven Hill On What’s Wrong With Uber appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Apr 18 2016

50mins

Play

Rank #4: RSG087: Jay Cradeur Answers YOUR Top 10 Rideshare Questions!

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Over the last five years, we here at RSG have received a ton of questions about rideshare driving! We’ve rounded up the top 10 most frequently asked rideshare questions and had our very own Jay Cradeur tackle those questions and share his thoughts in this podcast episode below. You can read the full FAQ here: The Most Popular Rideshare Questions – Answered.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • It’s safe to say RSG receives thousands of questions every year about rideshare driving, delivery and more
  • But what we’ve found is that the same 5-10 questions bubble up and are asked over and over
  • We wrote a blog post on these top questions, but today we’re going to get a more in-depth response to these questions
  • Jay Cradeur, RSG writer and a full time driver in San Francisco, tackles these top 10 questions and adds his own personal recommendations
  • Let me know what you think of this podcast format!

[3:16] How can I earn more in [my city]?  

  • The biggest determining factor? What the demand is like for Uber/Lyft in your city
  • Low demand (maybe a small population or rideshare is new), little demand. Bigger city, more demand
  • Surge, prime time will also help your bottom line
  • Your schedule – part time drivers may struggle more with earning bonuses, as may drivers that don’t work on busy days/nights

[6:46] How can I consistently earn money?

  • Put in your hours
  • Always stay busy while you’re on the road – DoorDash, Postmates, Caviar, etc.

[7:32]  Any other tips for driving?

  • Take care of your physical self
  • Avoid excessive caffeine
  • Try the cold brew coffee. 

[9:00]  Where can I find rideshare insurance?

  • We have an insurance page you can check out!
  • Biggest thing to pay attention to: period 1, when your app is on but no passenger in the car
  • This is really when you will want coverage!
  • But having full coverage from an insurance provider we recommend (we check and make sure the companies listed offer coverage to rideshare drivers, or at least won’t drop them for rideshare driving!) is the best way to protect yourself

[11:15] Which rideshare insurance policy is best?

  • Depends on a variety of factors, especially where you live!
  • Check out the insurance page and always ask multiple companies for quotes – don’t just go for the first offer

[11:31] Where can I get a vehicle to drive for Uber and/or Lyft?

[13:18] What do rideshare drivers really need carry in their car?

  1. Phone Mount
  2. Car Charger Hub and Charging Cables
  3. Dash Cam
  4. All Weather Floor Mats
  5. Towels (for cleaning and for service dogs)
  6. Seat Covers
  7. Illuminated Uber/Lyft Window Sign
  8. Car Cleaning Supplies (interior and exterior)
  9. Tip Jar (with a funny picture/message)
  10. Emesis Bags (for throw up/vomit/barf)

[16:27] How can I stay safe while driving?

  • In most states, you can’t bring a gun into your car with Uber/Lyft, so make sure you check all your local laws to see what you can and can’t bring with you
  • Overall, avoid fighting your passengers, even if they are trying to fight you. Get away from the situation (preferably drive away if they are outside of your car)
  • Your safety is the most important thing!
  • If you’ve recently gotten into an accident while driving for Uber/Lyft, we recommend speaking with Bryant Greening, an attorney at LegalRideshare – (312) 767-2222.  Head to the Uber Accident Lawyer page to learn more.

[19:26] How do I contact Uber & Lyft?

  • Best way: through the app
  • In many cities, there is phone support through the app
  • Check out the show notes for more information on phone numbers, critical safety response, and more
  • Another way? Go into an Uber or Lyft Hub! Speaking to someone in person can really help you out and get you clarification

[20:21] Bird Questions

  • The number one question we get now about Bird is when are they coming to my market!
  • Be patient, Bird is expanding and growing their Charger team
  • If you apply to be a Charger and don’t hear back, it’s probably because you either didn’t finish the onboarding process or Bird is not currently adding new Chargers to your market
  • It pays to sign up with Bird right away once they get to your market, just so you can be one of the first people they accept.

Outro

  • This is definitely one of our most comprehensive podcasts we’ve done on ridesharing (and Charging!) in a while, and I hope you got some good information and perspective from Jay and his stories
  • RSG gets 50-100 questions a day from readers, everything from simple questions like the ones above to a lot more complex questions
  • We also get a ton of Facebook messages too!
  • If it takes a little while to get back to you, don’t worry – just working through the pile of emails!
  • But one of the best parts of this job is getting to talk to and interact with you, so please – keep sending me those questions!
  • Let me know what you think of this podcast set up
  • Send me feedback via Twitter – let me know your thoughts on this podcast and the first three people to tweet me will win a copy of my new book!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG087: Jay Cradeur Answers YOUR Top 10 Rideshare Questions! appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Feb 07 2019

25mins

Play

Rank #5: RSG096: Surge Only Rideshare Driving in Los Angeles

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In this episode, we’re going to take a deep dive into the world of rideshare driving with a driver in Los Angeles. If you’ve ever wanted to learn what a day in the life looks like for a high-earning ($30-35/hr) driver (and get his tips!), this is the episode for you.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Today I’m chatting with Sergio, a rideshare driver with 5 years experience in LA and frequent commenter here
  • You may notice in the comments that Sergio never fails to ask the tough questions, and I appreciate that
  • For a long time, Sergio was hesitant to share his strategies for driving, but I was finally able to get him on the show!
  • Sergio is also a driver coach, so if you have questions or want tips on being a better driver, check out our Rideshare Coaching page
  • Our newest sponsor is Zum! Zum is a rideshare service for kids – drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here!

Interview with Sergio Avedian

  • Has been driving for 3 years with Uber and Lyft, around 5,000 trips
  • Drives in Los Angeles – with price cuts, drives less now
  • Finance degree and worked for a Wall Street firm for 18 years
  • Teaches golf

Sergio’s Driving Philosophy

  • Not a 9-to-5 job – understand that
  • Drive when there is demand – set your own parameters
  • If you drive full-time, try to split your shifts and take advantage of surge

Airport Driving Strategy


  • Try to avoid the queue!
  • Keep an eye on scheduled rides to the airport – check your app and pick up scheduled rides
  • Tries to keep himself in the core of the city after rides to the airport
  • Get to know business travelers

A Day in the Life of an LA Driver

  • Lives outside of the city, uses the destination filter to get into the city
  • Makes sure to treat driving as a small business
  • Doesn’t chase any bonuses – tries to work only during surge
  • Would rather take one passenger for a higher rate than taking many pax in 1 hour

Additional Driving Strategies

  • Uses two phones to see where it’s surging
  • Waits for surge to build – takes a break, gets a coffee
  • Uses destination filters to get downtown, even when working night shifts (burn all of your destination filters)

Thoughts on Uber and Lyft

  • Push to become profitable
  • The only way they can be profitable? At the drivers’ expense
  • Cut rates for drivers – writing is on the wall
  • Recommends drivers not accept everything Uber/Lyft throws at them – be thoughtful about how you drive and maximize your earnings

Outro

  • Big thanks to Sergio for coming on the podcast, I definitely learned a lot about his strategies – remember: patience is key!
  • Even with the rate cuts, Sergio is still earning $30-35/hr – goes to show you if you employ the right strategies, you can keep your earnings up
  • Don’t forget to check out our page on Rideshare Coaching if you’re interested in being coached by Sergio or Jay
  • Also, check out Zum – Zum is a rideshare service for kids – drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG096: Surge Only Rideshare Driving in Los Angeles appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

May 21 2019

50mins

Play

Rank #6: RSG086: Andy Slye – What It’s Like to Drive for Uber in a Tesla

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As rideshare drivers, we always want to give the best possible experience to our passengers, getting high ratings and possibly a higher tip. With that in mind, could you imagine if you pulled up to your passenger in a Tesla? It might sound a little crazy, but in this podcast episode, I interview rideshare driver Andy Slye, who recently filmed his passengers’ reactions to being picked up in his Tesla. 

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Today, we’re talking about a pretty cool topic: Tesla!
  • I found YouTuber Andy Slye while doing research on a Tesla Model 3, and I wanted to bring him on today because his YouTube channel is really informative (both about tech and Tesla)
  • Today’s guest, Andy Slye, also picked up rideshare passengers in his Tesla and filmed their reactions (with permission, of course!) to being picked up in a Tesla
  • I’ll be doing a lot more with Tesla in upcoming YouTube videos, so make sure you head over to our YouTube channel and subscribe to get the latest!

Interview with Andy Slye

  • Andy is a tech YouTuber and videographer based in Louisville, KY
  • He’s been driving for Uber with his Tesla Model 3 since 2018 and is currently the world’s top Tesla referrer with over 280 referrals
  • Drives for Lyft Premier rides
  • Has to give a certain number of rides before he can drive for Uber Select

Making the YouTube Tesla Reactions Video

  • Andy Slye “Picking Up Uber Riders in a Tesla Model 3! (REACTIONS)
  • Decided to record on a football game day, didn’t think it would work but thought he would give it a try
  • All of the reactions in the video were from the same two hour window – every single person agreed to be on camera
  • Most people didn’t really know what the Model 3 was before getting into Andy’s car – only one person knew about it
  • The only thing people struggled with were how to open the door handles and how to get out of the car (one electronic button)

World’s Top Tesla Referrer

  • While driving passengers in the Tesla, many mentioned wanting to buy one for themselves
  • Andy is the world’s top Tesla referrer – no discount on the Tesla, but if someone signs up with your code, they get 6 months of free supercharging
  • Tesla’s strategy is word of mouth, letting fellow drivers educate people on Tesla

Getting Started with YouTube

  • Started 10 years ago – right out of high school
  • Started with sketch comedy
  • Screencast tutorial – Tech Channels
  • Still has full-time 9-5 job.  Planning to go full-time YouTube this year

Strategies for YouTube Success

  • Three keys to Andy’s YouTube Success
  • #1 – Already on YouTube Stuff (didn’t start from zero – established audience)
  • #2 –  Finding something you’re super excited about
  • #3 – Perfect timing  – One of the first folks to begin YouTubing about the Model 3
  • Over 280 referrals to Tesla based on his videos

Outro

  • Big thanks to Andy for coming on the podcast, I recommend you check out his channel on YouTube (links below) not only for Tesla but also for tech
  • Appreciate seeing someone with such passion for what he does, even though he’s not even doing this full time yet
  • Stay tuned for more content on Tesla, driving a Model 3, driving Tesla for Uber/Lyft, etc.

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here

The post RSG086: Andy Slye – What It’s Like to Drive for Uber in a Tesla appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jan 22 2019

34mins

Play

Rank #7: RSG110: The Black Car Babe on Driving Rideshare in New York City

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Recently, we launched a new podcast called The Rideshare Dojo with Jay Cradeur. In this episode, I’ll be highlighting a new episode he just released with The Black Car Babe. This is a really unique episode not simply because the guest is a female driver, but also because we get to hear the perspective of a driver driving in New York City. NYC is a pretty unique market compared to every other city, so I hope you find this episode interesting and let us know in the comments below.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro


  • Today I’ll be chatting with Minna Palaquibay, also known as the Black Car Babe in NYC
  • We’ll be talking about driving in NYC, the best and worst parts of driving in NYC, and how to maintain your energy as a driver
  • This episode is sponsored by Fair – if you’re looking for a car rental program that includes everything, including insurance and miles, you’ll want to check out Fair. Use code ‘RSG’ to get $100 off.

Intro to The Black Car Babe

  • Minna Palaquibay, aka The Black Car Babe, drives in NYC
  • Drove for Via and Uber, now drives for a luxury company
  • Drove for Via first, enjoyed it, drove for about 10-12 hours a day
  • Currently drives a Chevy Suburban LTZ (2016)

Driving in Manhattan

  • Started driving in Manhattan because she wanted to control her time and be her own boss
  • Opportunity came along to drive the suburban, decided to go for it
  • Best part has been the conversations, talking to people
  • Long hours are the worst part – have to meet a quota to cover bills, can be tiring

Rideshare Driving as a Woman

  • Anyone should set aside some money for emergencies – at least $1000
  • Don’t take things personally as a driver – there is more positive than negative out there
  • Other drivers (male) aren’t rude to her – clashes have been few and far between
  • Minna doesn’t drive that late at night, so she hasn’t been hit on (less chance because most people are not drunk during the day)

How to Keep Up Your Energy as a Driver

  • Has changed up her diet, taking supplements
  • Tries to eat healthier (instead of a burger, get a salad or at least balance burger with a salad)
  • Typical day starts at 4 am, ends around midnight – breaks in between

Goals for the Future

  • Pay off debt!
  • Would love to do a TED Talk
  • Create an online course to help inspire people
  • Would like to write a book

Outro

  • Thanks to Minna for coming on the podcast! My main takeaway is being generous with your time and learning from other people
  • Minna shared what she’s gone through and still has a positive attitude – make sure to follow her YouTube channel!

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG110: The Black Car Babe on Driving Rideshare in New York City appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Oct 15 2019

40mins

Play

Rank #8: RSG041: The Husband And Wife Team That Did Over 600 Uber Rides Together

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It’s not every day that you hear about a husband and wife team that has done over 600 Uber rides together.  But today’s guest has done just that!  And although she was eventually deactivated by Uber (since driving with someone else is against Uber’s policies), on the podcast Karen shares the reasons that led her to do this in the first place and details her experience riding with her husband.

As a newlywed myself (2 years this summer), it was inspiring to hear how Karen and her husband worked together to solve problems on the road, keep each other company and provide an awesome Uber experience for their passengers.  Oh and they’ve also been married for 25 years!

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Interview with Karen Levien, one of the people in a husband and wife rideshare driving team
  • Completed 600 rides, had a high rating and positive passenger reviews
  • Interview will cover what made her drive as a team and the pros and cons of team driving
  • Xero smartphone app that helps you track your business expenses right from your phone
  • Xero Tax Touch – will help you figure out taxes and save a bunch of money on your taxes too
  • Missed an episode of one of our podcasts? Click here

Interview with Karen Levine

  • Drives in Southern California
  • Began driving to supplement income
  • Had problems with the voice navigation app and began bringing along her husband to help with navigation
  • Ended up being a really successful team, as her husband brought strengths to driving she didn’t have and vice versa

Difficulties for New Drivers

  • Uber provides little to no assistance for struggling new drivers
  • LA location for help is difficult to get to, no ability to make appointments
  • Lyft is not much better
  • Depends on the type of Lyft mentor you get and the information provided
  • Lots of improvement needed to help new drivers, because learning on the job can be dangerous

Driving as a Team

  • Began driving together initially as support when voice navigation didn’t work
  • Continued to drive together because of positive reviews & late night driving concerns
  • Deactivated from Uber after 600 rides, yet high rating and positive feedback from passengers
  • Interesting especially because driving as a new driver is difficult, made extra difficult due to attacks on drivers recently
  • Many women afraid to drive (feedback from passengers) because they’re afraid of being attacked. Bringing along your husband or partner as a new woman driver should be seen as a positive way to get more women drivers
  • Driving is inherently lonely, driving with someone else makes it more enjoyable, both for driver and for passengers

Advice for Uber

  • Karen and her husband have an easy icebreaker to introduce him to passengers
  • Uber could easily approve husband as driver and let them drive as a team (husband and wife photo on app)
  • Lyft may be the better platform to introduce team driving to
  • Many passengers have felt more comfortable with the team driving aspect, and others have expressed interest in team driving with their spouse or partner

Outro

  • Basically, you can’t bring anyone (spouses, friends, pets) in the car with you while driving
  • However, it’s interesting to see how team driving could work if Uber allowed it
  • Karen’s experience probably would work for a lot of new drivers, especially women drivers
  • Being a new driver can be difficult – would be great if Uber or Lyft offered something to help new drivers
  • Feel free to reach out to me at harry[at]therideshareguy.com
  • Leave comments, questions and feedback below!

Show Notes

What do you think of team driving, and do you think it’s a good idea for new drivers? How do you think passengers would feel about this?

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

-Harry @ RSG

The post RSG041: The Husband And Wife Team That Did Over 600 Uber Rides Together appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jun 06 2016

37mins

Play

Rank #9: Bonus Episode of The Rideshare Guide Chapter 1: What It’s Really Like to be a Rideshare Driver

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The Rideshare Guide is officially live today! You can buy it online at the booksellers below, or you can buy it from your local bookstore using this link. In this bonus episode of The Rideshare Guy podcast, I give you a preview audiobook version of Chapter One of The Rideshare Guide. Feel free to play this in your car while you’re driving to give your passengers some perspective on what it’s like to be a driver!

BUY NOW: AMAZON | BARNES & NOBLE | YOUR LOCAL BOOKSTOREIBOOKS |

Also, want a walk through and behind the scenes look at The Rideshare Guide? Take a look at my behind the scenes video walkthrough below!

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • In this bonus episode, I’m going to be giving you the first chapter of my book, The Rideshare Guide, for free!
  • You can also read the first chapter by signing up to get the PDF download below
  • Think of this as a preview audiobook 🙂 This is the perfect episode to play in your car while you’re driving, too, to introduce your passengers to ridesharing and to show them a little bit about what it’s like to be a rideshare driver
  • Today my new book is officially live!: The Rideshare Guide. It’s a book for really anyone from new drivers to people who’ve been driving for a while, and it’s meant to be a book you can skip around and find what you’re looking for. You can find out more about it here!

You Get an Exclusive First Look

Interested in getting a sneak peek at The Rideshare Guide? Sign up below to get the first chapter sent to you – for free! Just enter your email below and we’ll send you the first chapter!

Chapter One of The Rideshare Guide: Getting Started

  • I took my first ride as an Uber passenger in 2013 – I still remember talking to the driver, who really enjoyed driving for Uber and had nothing but good things to say about the company
  • This was really appealing to me because, at the time, I was working in a cubicle. Driving people around and chatting sounded much more fun than what I was doing!
  • While it doesn’t seem difficult to drive for Uber, it is harder than it looks
  • Uber has over two million drivers on their platform, but half will end up quitting after one year
  • However, if you can figure it out, being a rideshare driver could be one of the most unique work experiences in your lifetime

Chapter One: How Much Can You Make?

  • Driving for Uber and/or Lyft has its perks, but at the end of the day it’s not something I would do for free
  • The average driver reports earning around $16-18 per hour before expenses
  • Driving in busy cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Chicago will be more lucrative than driving in smaller or mid-size cities
  • There are still strategies you can use to maximize your time on the road though
  • See Chapter 5 for more information on maximizing your profits

Chapter One: Expenses

  • As a rideshare driver, you are a 1099 independent contractor, which means you’re responsible for all your expenses and filing taxes (don’t worry, I cover what you need to know in chapter eight!)
  • Rideshare drivers do put a lot of miles on their cars – a full-time driver easily will put 1,000 miles a week or more on their vehicle
  • If your car gets 25 miles per gallon and gas costs $3 per gallon, you’ll have to subtract the cost of gas from your earnings

Chapter One: Flexibility

  • Uber and Lyft are some of the most flexible jobs in the world – where else can you go out, drive for a while, and make $50 in one day? There aren’t many jobs with this kind of scheduling flexibility
  • Even though Uber and Lyft provide flexibility, most drivers work in blocks of 3-4 hours or more
  • Uber and Lyft don’t set maximum hours that you can work, but it’s important to stay safe on the road, which is why I try to take a break every couple of hours
  • I’ll cover how drivers can take care of themselves in chapter eight

Chapter One: Sign Up Bonuses

  • Uber and Lyft have raised billions of dollars from investors over the years, and a lot of that money goes into subsidies for drivers and passengers
  • I’ll cover more about weekly bonuses and incentive programs in chapter 5, but one of the first things you’ll want to take advantage of is a potential sign up bonus for new drivers
  • You can sign up directly on the Uber or Lyft website, but I don’t recommend it since you won’t be eligible for a sign up bonus unless you use a referral code
  • To maximize your earnings on the guaranteed earnings system, you’ll want to complete as many short trips as possible

Chapter One: The Reality of Being a Rideshare Driver

  • This job is not for everyone – I drive for Uber and Lyft part-time since I feel that’s the best way to maximize the experience
  • Rideshare driving offers the ultimate flexibility, but if you have to drive 40-50 hours a week, you might not be able to take advantage of the flexibility as much
  • That said, for people who want/need flexible work arrangements or are out of work, doing Uber and Lyft full time can be a lifesaver
  • There are only a certain number of highly profitable hours you can target each week, and I cover weekly bonus offers in chapter five
  • Since this industry is so new, the most important piece of advice I can give you is: in order to be a successful driver, you’re going to need to think like a business owner

Outro

Show Notes

You can buy this book at:

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here

-Harry @ RSG

The post Bonus Episode of The Rideshare Guide Chapter 1: What It’s Really Like to be a Rideshare Driver appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Apr 24 2018

23mins

Play

Rank #10: RSG060: What Questions are Uber and Lyft Drivers Asking?

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When I tell people I run a rideshare blog, some people are surprised. “It’s just driving!” they say. Sure, while rideshare driving isn’t rocket science, there is a lot more than “just driving” that goes into being a good rideshare driver. In this podcast, I’m going to be answering a lot of questions that new and veteran rideshare drivers have, including how to make more money, which map apps are the best, and how drivers can improve their ratings. 

Did I miss a question? Leave me a note in the comments or send me an email here!

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Today’s podcast is just you and me – no guests!
  • People always ask me how hard could it be to be a rideshare driver
  • There are a lot of questions new and even veteran drivers have
  • Going to answer the top reader questions I get from you – whether it’s via email, social media, or YouTube!
  • If you haven’t signed up with Uber or Lyft yet, you can sign up with Uber here using my code 3E3DG or with Lyft here using the code Harry757

How Can I Contact Uber or Lyft?

  • Our most popular article had over 1 million page views – but the easiest answer? Through your Uber app!
  • Can’t access the app? I have another way to contact Uber through their website here and don’t forget their phone support
  • Want to contact Lyft? Going through the app is a good first start, but you might want to check out Lyft on Twitter too

How Much Do Rideshare Drivers Make?

  • This is an easy and not-so-easy question to answer: according to our 2017 survey, drivers can make $15-20 an hour, higher with Lyft
  • It all depends on when you drive, surges, tips, and more
  • Where you drive matters to – San Francisco drivers make more on average, but that doesn’t mean you can’t maximize your earnings with smart driving strategies
  • Take into account the cost of maintenance for your car – a Prius should be cheaper for gas than a big SUV, for example

How Can I Make More?

  • Another popular question – how can drivers make more and compete with driver saturation?
  • Need to consider when other drivers won’t be out – this means that supply will be low, which could trigger surge
  • You should know by now not to chase the surge, but predict the surge
  • I also recommend drivers sign up for delivery companies – staying busy is key to maximizing your earnings. If you’re not driving but you’re “on”, you’re losing money

Why Do I Need Rideshare Insurance?

  • Just to give you a quick primer:
    • Period One is when you’re online and waiting for requests
    • Period Two is once you’ve accepted a request and you’re en route to pick up the passenger
    • Period Three is when you’ve acquired that passenger, and you’re now driving to their destination
  • Uber provides $1 million of liability coverage, and they also provide collision coverage but with a $1,000 deductible
  • If you get into a collision and it’s your fault, you’ll have to pay the $1,000 deductible
  • During period 1, you won’t receive any collision coverage and liability limits are lower than normal
  • Uber and Lyft are pretty much identical, except Lyft’s collision deductible is $2,500
  • It’s really not that expensive to get rideshare coverage: lots of drivers report increases of $5, $10 a month
  • It’s a hassle to find a new insurance company that covers rideshare, but we’ve done the hard work for you! Check out the Insurance Marketplace here

What’s the Best Vehicle for Rideshare Drivers?

  • There’s no one right answer for this question 🙂
  • Need to think of gas, mileage and maintenance, but also comfort and style
  • The Toyota Prius is one of the most popular rideshare driver vehicles, but it’s not your only option
  • Think about your personal situation: is this going to be a car you drive full time, drive with your kids and family? Might want a bigger car that can do double duty as a rideshare and family vehicle
  • You need to always be tracking your rideshare miles. I recommend Stride Drive or QBSE, and there’s no reason you shouldn’t be tracking your miles

What’s the Best Phone for Rideshare Drivers?

  • The best phone really comes down to personal preference – do you like Android of iPhone more? Style is up to you
  • Your phone is almost as important as your car – try to get the latest model you can afford
  • One app I highly recommend is Mystro – if you drive for Uber and Lyft, Mystro takes away the hassle of logging into both apps, accepting rides, and logging back in once you’re done with the ride
  • For now, Mystro is only available for Android phones – something to keep in mind!

Will Ignoring UberPOOL or Lyft Lines Get Me Deactivated?

  • For now, a lot of drivers don’t like UberPOOL or Lyft Line
  • You can ignore POOL or Line requests without getting deactivated
  • Might want to be careful because you could be put in a “time out” if you decline too many in a row, or if you have to maintain a certain acceptance rate
  • This is why I like Mystro – you can filter out POOL and Line requests

What Happens if I Can’t Find My Passenger?

  • It happens – it’s busy, dark, an event is getting out, etc.
  • Don’t keep driving around! Pull over somewhere safe and see if you can find your passenger. Good time to call them.
  • It pays to be proactive – if you know a certain area is busy, call your rider and explain the situation, then tell them to meet you at “the intersection of X St. and Y St.”

Can I Advertise for Local Companies/My Business While Driving?

  • More companies are getting involved with this – we reviewed Cargo, which helps drivers make money and keeps passengers happy
  • Had a driver on our podcast who talked to his passengers about the family bakery – easy way to slip your business into the conversation and hand the passenger a business card
  • For the most part, it’s probably a lot of work to establish connections with and get paid by local businesses, but it could be a good way to increase your side income

What Do I Do If a Passenger Asks Me to Do Something I Don’t Want to?

  • For some legal things, like taking a service animal, you have to do it. It’s against the law (and Terms of Service) to refuse a ride to a passenger with a service animal
  • For other things, like going through a drive through or helping with luggage, put yourself in their shoes and try to diffuse the situation
  • Be smart about it: maybe make a joke, or explain the situation (“have to pick up the kids, can’t stop at a drive through – day care charges by the minute after hours!”)

Do I Have to Provide a Ride to a Minor or Infant?

  • Taking an infant without a car seat is a huge liability issue, and for that reason, I wouldn’t take them
  • UberTEEN has rolled out in some states, but in many states you aren’t allowed to give rides to minors (under 18)
  • Now obviously, sometimes it happens. This is why I always recommend having a dash cam in your car
  • It’s “just in case” and commonsense to have a dash cam

Which Map App is the Best for Drivers?

  • I hope you’re not using Uber Navigation!
  • Google Maps or Waze is your best bet – here’s a showdown we did between the two
  • Personally, I prefer Google Maps

How Can I Improve My Driver Ratings?

  • 4.6 is the cut off – you don’t want to be near a 4.6 because that means you can be deactivated from Uber or Lyft
  • Navigation is one of the most important things for passengers – this means you really need to know your city
  • Use Google Maps or Waze but don’t rely on it – get to know where the big events are, the popular bars and restaurants
  • Not all passengers are chatty – if they don’t immediately say anything, I check in and say “how’s your day going” or ask if the air conditioning is okay with them. If they’re not in a talking mood, that’s fine!

Outro

  • Little bit different for this podcast today, but I wanted to get the most common questions out there for you to hear them
  • Did I miss something? Reach out to me and let me know if there’s a question you want me to answer!
  • Driver referrals help me keep the lights on and great content coming, so if you haven’t signed up to drive yet,  you can sign up with Uber here using my code 3E3DG or with Lyft here using the code Harry757
  • Follow me on FacebookTwitter and YouTube and you can always contact me if you have questions – I like to hear from you all!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG060: What Questions are Uber and Lyft Drivers Asking? appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Aug 23 2017

28mins

Play

Rank #11: RSG079: An Interview With a Rideshare Unicorn (4.99 Star Rating After 5,000+ Trips)

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Have you wondered how some drivers can maintain a 4.9 or even 5-star rating after thousands of trips? How do they make it look so easy? In this episode, we’re talking with one of those unicorn drivers, a driver with a 4.99 star rating, who’s given over 5,000 rides. We’ll discuss how he maintained such a high rating, and his secrets for getting five-stars every time.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Many passengers don’t know that rideshare drivers are required to maintain a 4.6 rating in order to stay active on the platform
  • Unfortunately, almost every driver has gotten a poor rating and wondered, what did I do? What can I do to control this better in the future?
  • In this episode, I’m chatting with a pro driver who’s given 5,000 trips and maintained a 4.99 rating. We’ll learn what his tips are for other drivers, how he does it all, and how you can get to know your city better and improve your driving habits
  • This podcast episode is sponsored by Take 5, and their goal is to get your oil change done in just a few minutes. In fact, Take 5 will actually allow you to stay in your car while they change your oil! Also, they really only focus on basic services like oil changes, transmission fluid, air filters, etc. so you won’t be upsold anything like “blinker fluid” (which doesn’t exist in real life).
  • Take 5 is not yet in California but they are available in the Southeast, and right now Take 5 is offering 25% off oil changes. Find more about it here!

Interview with Leon, a 4.99 Rated Driver

  • Leon started driving for Uber and only Uber in 2016 and primarily drives in the Louisville, KY market
  • He first heard about Uber from a friend, and since customer service has always been a priority of his, he thought he would try it
  • Louisville is a big market, famous for the Kentucky Derby, plus it’s the bourbon capital of the world. Louisville is becoming a big tourist city
  • Has been driving full-time from the beginning

Driving UberX vs. SELECT

  • Providing excellent service from the beginning is Leon’s mission
  • He started out on X, then traded that car for a SELECT vehicle (Cadillac SRX – used, and pre-leased). Did a lot of research on it before choosing it, and he bought it for passenger comfort
  • He actually made more on UberX, but driving for SELECT has taught him to be more selective about what times and where he drives in the city
  • He gives fewer SELECT rides, but that also means less wear-and-tear on his vehicle. He still does UberX rides (surge pricing – but he doesn’t chase surge!)

How to Become a Pro Driver

  • Get to know your city! Not only the streets, but also the landmarks and history
  • In your downtime, learn about events going on, construction taking place, etc.
  • Treats picking up pax like going on an important interview – car looks and smells good, Leon treats the passenger respectfully
  • Leon uses text-to-speech to contact his pax before he arrives – this sets an expectation for the passenger that they’re getting a thoughtful and thorough driver
  • Opens the door for pax if possible and always greets them with a smile
  • Want to be a better driver? Follow the ‘Golden Rule’ for your passengers and treat them the way you’d want to be treated

Chatting with Passengers

  • One thing that can be difficult, especially for new drivers, is understanding when to talk/not talk with passengers
  • Leon lets passengers control the flow of conversation – some want quiet whereas others want to chat, and he lets them lead
  • Body language is very important – it tells you a lot about what the pax want and don’t want
  • That’s not to say every ride is perfect! Leon has had incidents, and for the most part Uber has handled those incidents very well

The Missing Connection Between Drivers & Uber

  • Leon is obviously going above and beyond to make a connection with his passengers, but Uber doesn’t seem to do the same
  • Leon has shared his success (and his unique license plate!) with Uber, to no response
  • How can drivers feel like Uber respects and appreciates them?
  • For Leon, it’s overall about the passengers and the connection he makes with them – that’s what he likes the most about driving

Outro

  • Big thanks to Leon for coming on and sharing his story about being a rideshare unicorn
  • I really enjoy interviewing drivers, especially drivers like Leon who have a lot to share and teach us about being better drivers, getting better ratings and more
  • Also, this podcast episode is sponsored by Take 5, and their goal is to get your oil change done in just a few minutes. In fact, Take 5 will actually allow you to stay in your car while they change your oil! Also, they really only focus on basic services like oil changes, transmission fluid, air filters, etc. so you won’t be upsold anything like “blinker fluid” (which doesn’t exist in real life).
  • Take 5 is not yet in California but they are available in the Southeast, and right now Take 5 is offering 25% off oil changes. Find more about it here!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG079: An Interview With a Rideshare Unicorn (4.99 Star Rating After 5,000+ Trips) appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Sep 04 2018

39mins

Play

Rank #12: RSG107: What AB5 Means for the Rideshare Industry with Alex Rosenblat

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In California, Assembly Bill 5 recently passed and could uproot the entire economy. We’ve covered AB5 extensively, but today I wanted to talk to someone who knows the industry (and regulations surrounding the gig economy) well, someone who could give us a bigger bigger about what AB5 means for gig workers and rideshare drivers. In this episode, I’m chatting with Alex Rosenblat about how AB5 could affect anyone in the gig economy, what Uber and Lyft are doing to fight AB5, and more.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro


  • Today I’m talking with Alex Rosenblat, a researcher, author, and someone who really has a pulse on driver issues
  • Alex has been on the podcast before, and we also reviewed her book, Uberland
  • She has done a tremendous amount of research not only on drivers, but on the gig economy overall
  • This will be a quick episode, but you won’t want to miss it!

Intro to Alex Rosenblat

  • Alex Rosenblat is a technology ethnographer, author of Uberland: How Algorithms are Rewriting the Rules of Work
  • Alex’s 3rd time on the show!
  • Several things to cover today: AB5, and Uber/Lyft’s fight against AB5 in California

Discussion on AB5

  • AB5 is a catalyst for the conversations we’ve been having for years about Uber/Lyft and the gig economy overall
  • Is Uber a tech company or a transportation company? Want to have it both ways and finally they’re being forced to choose
  • Uber and Lyft fighting against the classification of workers as employees – will go to great lengths to avoid that

Fight Against AB5

  • Uber and Lyft must have a number of backup plans, had time to prepare for this challenge
  • However, right now there is this backlash against tech companies and Uber is a low hanging fruit
  • Chances are AB5 in its current version right now will change
  • Hard for the discussion between ‘Uber is bad’ and ‘Uber is wonderful’ to come together

Is AB5 the Solution to Driver Woes?

  • Overall, driving is better suited for part-time drivers – doing it full time is really tough
  • Lack of benefits, stressful, etc.
  • AB5 conversation seems to leave out part time drivers
  • Question is: should the standard be set for the recreational worker or the breadwinner worker?

Future of AB5

  • Uber and Lyft will drag their feet – basically, will cities or government agencies sue them?
  • It won’t take affect day 1 – there are clearly challenges to AB5
  • Political will has shifted more toward regulation, however
  • Willingness to take this challenge on is more apparent than before
  • Opportunity for compromise is there

Drivers Opinions on Uber/Lyft

  • Even the drivers that don’t support AB5 seem loathe to side with Uber
  • They’ve been lied to in the past or don’t have a lot of expectation that U/L will do the right thing – lack of trust
  • In the end, not everyone is going to get what they want – it’s a difficult situation all around

Outro

  • Big thanks to Alex for coming on the podcast and chatting all about AB5
  • Big thing we covered was a shift in political will – in 2015, this kind of law would have been shot down easily. Not the case anymore.
  • There is a potential for compromise, but it looks like this will be a drawn out legal battle
  • Curious to see the outcome!

Related article: Ab5 Uber – Everything You Need To Know

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG107: What AB5 Means for the Rideshare Industry with Alex Rosenblat appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Sep 24 2019

51mins

Play

Rank #13: RSG067: Jay Cradeur Shares What it Takes to Hit 15,000 Rides

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Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be a full-time driver and entrepreneur? In this podcast episode, I interview RSG contributor Jay Cradeur about what it’s like full-time driving, the strategies he uses to not burn out (he’s given over 15,000 rides!), and how he’s transitioning from rideshare driving into his own business. It’s a really cool episode, and if you have any questions for Jay, please leave them below in the comments!

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Roughly half of all new Uber/Lyft drivers end up quitting after one year, so what makes some drivers stick it out and go for the long haul?
  • In this episode, I’ll be talking to one of our RSG contributors, Jay Cradeur, about how he’s given over 15,000 rides – his tips, strategies, and how he’s able to take amazing vacations all because of his rideshare work
  • At the same time, Jay knows rideshare driving isn’t forever and he’s come up with a strict schedule that gets him into a whole other path of entrepreneurship, so stick around for how Jay plans to accomplish his goals while rideshare driving – it’s inspiration for those of you who want to transition from rideshare driving to full-time entrepreneurship or another hustle
  • Have you heard of Mystro? It’s an app that allows Uber/Lyft drivers to simultaneously log on to both Uber/Lyft, accept and decline rides and more. It allows you to drive, accept trips and more all hands-free, which makes driving safer for everyone. You can find out more about Mystro here.

Interview with Jay Cradeur

  • Jay Cradeur is a full-time driver in SF and RSG contrubutor
  • Jay’s worked as a coach in internet marketing, is a world traveler, and author of the book “Radical Freedom”. Prior to becoming a rideshare driver, he lived in Chiang Mai, Thailand, for a year
  • Returned to the US, signed up to start driving and found it pretty fun

Becoming a Full-Time Driver

  • Initially started driving in Sacramento but found San Francisco would be more lucrative, decided to move up to SF and drive full-time
  • Wanted to travel and earn money and found ridesharing to be a good opportunity to earn money while driving around in a new part of the state
  • Typical day: Monday through Fridays starts early, around 5-6 a.m. and drives for 4 hours to catch morning surge. Takes a break for lunch around 10 a.m. then continues until 7 or 8 p.m. to capture the evening surge
  • Does get ruthless about choosing which rides to take: with Lyft, you can see the passenger destination before the passenger gets in the car, and Jay won’t take anyone who will take him outside of the city during surge times
  • At first, Jay took everyone, but that wasn’t profitable given the surges happening in the city – made the business decision to only accept rides that would be quick, put him on track to earning a bonus, made business-sense

Earning More as a Driver

  • Enjoys weekend driving because that’s an opportunity to make more: longer trips, airport rides, etc.
  • Saturdays could drive from 5 a.m. to 8 p.m. and be booked solid – but Jay doesn’t drive that much!
  • Avoids nights and still makes a solid income by ensuring he’s up and ready for early morning rush hour, surge, and airport rides on the weekends
  • Driving is all about freedom and flexibility, but it also takes a certain amount of discipline to get up, shower, put gas in your car and go. Just doing it everyday is the first step and from there you can profit

What’s Next for Jay?

  • Traveling is a passion: Jay has taken 10 vacations since starting rideshare driving
  • Rideshare driving can take its toll on your body, so Jay doesn’t plan on this being his full-time job forever – plans on coaching full-time in June and continue with traveling
  • Driving is a great opportunity to meet interesting people and just learn about them – be inquisitive
  • You can learn more about Jay and his travels at NomadJay.com

Outro

  • One of the reasons I wanted to have Jay on is because he is so disciplined at ridesharing. He knows exactly what he wants to get out of it, and he’s been very successful at rideshare plus his other endeavors
  • If you want to rideshare full-time or use rideshare to transition to another job or entrepreneurial pursuit, Jay’s an excellent person to follow
  • Don’t forget to check out Mystro – I highly recommend this app as another tool in your rideshare toolbox, especially since it helps keep you safe and focused on the road!
  • Do you have a story or experience you want to share on this podcast? Reach out to me – always looking for interesting perspectives!
  • Follow me on FacebookTwitter and YouTube and you can always contact me if you have questions – I like to hear from you all!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Readers, do you have plans after rideshare driving? Or are you happy to continue rideshare driving indefinitely?

-Harry @ RSG

The post RSG067: Jay Cradeur Shares What it Takes to Hit 15,000 Rides appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Dec 25 2017

40mins

Play

Rank #14: RSG109: Bruce Schaller on Why Too Much Uber and Lyft is a Bad Thing for Cities

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It seems like whenever Uber and Lyft are in the news nowadays, it’s for all the wrong reasons. What do all of the current and upcoming regulations say about the state of rideshare? In this episode, I’m speaking with an expert transportation consultation about the current state of the rideshare industry about changing trends, regulation and more.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro


  • Today I’m talking with Bruce Schaller of Schaller Consulting, an NY-based consulting firm that specializes in urban transportation policy
  • In addition to focusing on urban transit, he’s also involved with trends among cities and the relationships between rideshare, micromobility and more

Intro to Bruce Schaller

  • Bruce Schaller is a consultant based in NYC
  • Author of recent reports on ride services including traffic and transit
  • Worked on taxi issues in the late 1990s and early 2000s
  • Began looking into Uber and Lyft in 2014

State of Rideshare Industry Today

  • A big question mark!
  • Innovation of Uber and Lyft is having part-time workers available on flexible schedules
  • Needs to be a sweet spot when it comes to flexibility and earnings
  • Overall, NYC doing a good job in trying to regulate, increase driver earnings

Are Uber and Lyft Adding to Traffic Congestion?

  • Personal cars are the bulk of traffic, not Uber/Lyft
  • However, Uber and Lyft do add to traffic congestion
  • Goal is to increase utilization rate, making sure someone is in the car a majority of the time

Political Landscape of Rideshare

  • There will absolutely be more regulation – potentially Washington state, Oregon
  • Cities and states looking to regulate rideshare companies will need to focus on utilization rate

Outro

  • Thanks to Bruce for coming on and sharing what he knows about the public side of the transportation business
  • If you’re interested in learning more, highly recommend you check out his reports on his consulting site – they’re free!
  • For me, it’s all about finding a balance – what are the benefits of taxis? Of rideshare? How can we combine the best of both?

Ad: If you want to save money on your everyday purchases, check out these best cash back apps that you can use to earn money on everything you buy from gas, to groceries, to beauty products.

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG109: Bruce Schaller on Why Too Much Uber and Lyft is a Bad Thing for Cities appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Oct 08 2019

31mins

Play

Rank #15: RSG108: Victor Pontis is Helping You Start a Scooter Company with Spring!

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One of the things I love the most about the rideshare industry is all of the cottage services that have popped up due to Uber and Lyft’s immense growth. Everything from apps, products and services, and even blogs and podcasts (like this one!) have popped up and many are designed to help drivers succeed and make more money. To no one’s surprise, we’re seeing the same thing happen in the scooter industry. On this episode, I’m talking with someone in the micromobility space, scooters in particular, on how his business helps scooter companies get off the ground. 

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro


  • Today I’m talking with Victor Pontis, who started the company Scooter Map that helps riders and chargers find scooters
  • Runs the new company, Spring, which makes it easy for new scooter or bike rental companies to get started
  • Excited to chat with him about what it’s like working with new scooter companies
  • If you’re interested in starting your own scooter company, stay tuned

Intro to Victor Pontis

  • Victor is one of the leading entrepreneurs in the scooter space
  • First took a Bird scooter in San Francisco, realized this was an amazing opportunity to get people around
  • Started Scooter Map to make it easier for chargers and riders to find e-scooters

Scooter Map

  • Saw a problem (riders and chargers not easily finding scooters) and decided to create Scooter Map
  • Took off quickly, there was a demand for this
  • Next opportunity – scooter companies

Spring

  • Decided to start the company Spring, to help make starting a scooter/bike business easier
  • Aggregates the software, tech, manufacturing, etc. to help scooter companies be more successful
  • One stop shop for a lot of these companies
  • Shopify for micromobility

Why Scooter Companies?

  • There’s a lot that goes into starting a scooter company
  • Beyond the costs of the scooters themselves (thousands to get a fleet), additional challenges
  • Regulatory, working with cities, etc.
  • Operations challenges are some of the biggest headaches right now

Outro

  • Big thanks to Victor for coming on and sharing how he got involved with scooters
  • His company, Spring, is offering a lot of options to companies that want to get started in micromobility but can’t yet compete with the big names
  • Really interesting blend of micromobility, entrepreneurship, etc.

Ad: Rideshare drivers love using the GetUpside app to save money on gas.

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG108: Victor Pontis is Helping You Start a Scooter Company with Spring! appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Oct 01 2019

34mins

Play

Rank #16: RSG093: Why Lyft COO Jon McNeill is All About The Drivers!

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Lyft has always had the reputation for being a more driver-friendly service, but what have they done lately to keep that goodwill from drivers? In this episode, I speak with Lyft’s Chief Operating Officer (COO) Jon McNeill about investments the company is making to improve things for drivers and distinguish themselves from the competition. 

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Today I’m chatting with Lyft COO Jon McNeill, who as COO focuses on all things related to the driver and passenger experience
  • Lyft drivers really are the main customers for Lyft, so we spend a lot of time talking about what he’s working on for drivers – including driver pay
  • I also took reader questions before this episode, and two main topics rose to the top: driver safety and the future for drivers + autonomous vehicles
  • Don’t forget to leave a review for the RSG podcast on iTunes – you can leave a review here

Interview with Jon McNeill

  • Jon McNeill is a world class leader who brings experience to Lyft (he previously worked for Tesla) as a game changing transportation executive. Jon leads all business operations at Lyft and focuses on the driver and passenger experience
  • First met with Lyft founders while working at Tesla, found a way to combine Lyft + Tesla
  • Gave up car for a month to take Uber and Lyft’s everywhere – talked to drivers and learned there are a lot of improvements that can be made to change the business for drivers
  • Role at Lyft is to help take the founders’ vision and make it reality on the ground by working with drivers and riders

Express Drive Program

  • As an example of one way to improve the driver experience, the Lyft Express Drive program looks at all the ways to improve the driver & passenger experience
  • Charging cords – can lead to more tipping for drivers
  • Vehicle safety (accident avoidance)
  • Newer cars, so less maintenance and downtime for drivers

How Does Lyft Calculate Driver Pay?

  • The price is the price the customer is willing to pay
  • Need to look at more ways to put money in drivers’ pockets: lower costs to drive so that drivers can take home more (electric vehicle (EV) cars for example)
  • Lyft calculates real time estimates of what customers (passengers) are willing to pay – massive amounts of data go into determining these rates, down to the penny
  • Affected by weather, events, etc. and Lyft watches customer response in real time to determine if their pricing forecast was right – usually pretty accurate
  • NY rate card introduced – example of prices going up (pay going up to drivers) but rides dropped by 20% and now drivers aren’t driving as much
  • Passengers determined they were willing to do other things (walk, ride a bike) vs. pay the increased rates

Communicating with Drivers

  • Lawsuit in NY more about regulations vs. driver pay – Lyft is looking to get fairness for passengers and drivers without market distortions like regulation
  • Could do better messaging Lyft’s position to drivers
  • Driver Advisory Councils help

New Lyft Services for Drivers

  • Wanted to address the 3 big categories of spend for drivers: car, fuel, service
  • On the service side, Lyft looking at reducing the cost of service for drivers up to 50% – so drivers would get their cars back in half the time plus at half the cost
  • Cost of fuel – providing a bank account and cash back card on gas (4%) & food, will add more features over time but really wanted to attack fuel costs
  • Express Drive program – expanding the program and adding to the number of hybrid and electric vehicles in the fleet

How Lyft is Distinguishing Itself from Uber

  • Going all in on Driver Advisory Councils, keeping drivers in the feedback loop and making sure Lyft lowers costs for drivers
  • Hubs/driver support centers for drivers to get frontline support
  • Many team leads have given rides for Lyft and many people at the hubs are also drivers, so the people drivers are talking to are familiar with what they’re talking about

Questions from Readers for Jon McNeill

  • Driver safety – in 2018, Lyft brought on Lisa Monaco, the Homeland Security advisor in the Obama administration, to advise on safety
  • Working on screening and tracking on the backend to help keep drivers safe
  • Future for drivers in light of AV development? AV technology is not going to be overnight – have already been working on it for more than a decade and there are still aspects people can’t solve
  • Massive costs associated with AV too – Lyft will be in the (human) driver business for a long time

Outro

  • Big thanks to Jon for coming on the podcast and talking about Lyft, driver pay, Lyft programs to help drivers and more
  • Spent a lot of time prepping for this interview and making sure I covered topics drivers are interested in – thanks for your questions as well!
  • Lyft cash back card on gas looks very promising – probably will be signing up for that one myself
  • Let me know what you thought of this interview in the comments below, on Twitter, via email

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

-Harry @ RSG

The post RSG093: Why Lyft COO Jon McNeill is All About The Drivers! appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Apr 16 2019

42mins

Play

Rank #17: RSG102: Fair CEO Scott Painter on Rideshare, Cars and Uber

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One of the best parts about rideshare driving is the low barrier to entry, meaning people of any age, gender, race can sign up and drive for companies like Uber and Lyft. However, one pretty expensive barrier to entry can be the vehicle you drive for rideshare. Today, I’m talking to the CEO of Fair, Uber’s official vehicle partner to talk about what it’s like to supply cars to thousands of drivers.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro


  • Today I’m chatting with Scott Painter, CEO of Fair, about the automotive side of the rideshare business
  • Scott’s the perfect person to talk about this with, since he’s at the intersection of rideshare and the automotive industry
  • Scott has founded three different automotive tech companies and will talk about where he sees the rideshare side of the business going in the future
  • This episode is sponsored by Zum, a rideshare service for kids. Work on your own schedule and make up to $32/hr. Learn more about Zum and sign up here.

Interview with Scott Painter

  • Founder and CEO of Fair
  • Serial entrepreneur
  • Seeks to solve problems, like car ownership, with technology
  • When working on Fair, engineers and other employees were constantly trying to make the process ‘fair’, name stuck and became Fair
  • Naming the company Fair set the tone for everything they did and continue to do

Fair

  • Big idea is that people don’t have to borrow money to get access to mobility
  • People are going into debt to buy cars, not great for depreciating assets
  • People with low credit, no credit, etc. were getting penalized for it – with Fair, we’re letting you borrow a car (with stipulations) – anyone can get access to mobility

What About Autonomous Cars?

  • Preposterous to say autonomy is going to change anything in the near term for Uber/Lyft
  • Autonomy will come in waves – cars will get safer
  • It’s great from a safety point of view, but Uber and Lyft will need human drivers for a very long time
  • At the same time, people’s lives are changing – Fair doesn’t lock them into years-long terms, like car ownership once did

What Makes Fair Different

  • Key is to not buy brand new cars and offer them to drivers – cars depreciate immediately when you drive them off the lot
  • Get the right drivers behind the wheels of the right cars
  • Manufacturers are taking in more lease returns than ever before – creates an oversupply situation and used car prices drop
  • Drivers don’t have to worry about maintenance, but Fair does – Fair makes sure to get reliable cars with low mileage because they don’t want additional expenses either

Working with Rideshare Drivers & Uber

  • Right now, more rideshare than the consumer side
  • Trying to eliminate friction for drivers with the first week free program
  • Rideshare drivers are committed to providing great service and solving problems
  • It can be difficult making sure enough cars are available – demand from Uber drivers is huge

Outro

  • Big thanks to Scott for coming on the podcast and sharing his knowledge on the automotive tech sector
  • Big fan of Fair, and I hope you are after listening to this podcast – offers flexible rentals and leases
  • Wanted to show you what it’s like for a company like Fair – drivers can have one perspective of it, but they don’t see everything that goes on behind the scenes, particularly the supply and demand of cars
  • This episode is sponsored by Zum, a rideshare service for kids. Work on your own schedule and make up to $32/hr. Learn more about Zum and sign up here.

Show Notes

If you’d like to sign up with Fair, please use our affiliate links below

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG102: Fair CEO Scott Painter on Rideshare, Cars and Uber appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jul 25 2019

50mins

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Rank #18: RSG059: Sam Choi on Outworking and Outearning Other Rideshare Drivers

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Today we have a terrific interview with driver Sam Choi of Minneapolis. Sam reached out to me for some advice on driving during major events (Super Bowl, major concerts, etc.) and mentioned he makes $30 an hour as a part-time driver. I had to know more about his strategies so I could share them with you, so I asked him to be a guest on today’s podcast and share his advice. Read on for Sam’s advice on making money in a saturated market!

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

⚠️ ATTN Rideshare Drivers. Here’s how Uber & Lyft drivers are earning hundreds of extra dollars per month. Click to learn more.

Intro

  • Today we’re talking with Sam Choi about outworking and out-earning other drivers
  • Sam first reached out to me via email and mentioned he makes $30/hr as a driver in Minneapolis – a mid-tier market
  • Sam has a lot of driving strategies, some simple and some complex, that drivers could learn from
  • Also a MaximumRidesharingProfits.com alum
  • Recently updated our Rideshare Insurance Marketplace – more options for drivers in almost all 50 states

An Interview With Sam Choi

  • Currently lives with his wife and 3 children in Minneapolis, graduated with a Master’s of Divinity, teaches and is also in the process of starting his own church – very busy!
  • Started driving with Uber and Lyft for flexibility, the ability to make money on his schedule
  • Sam had worked in the service industry before and knew he could make as much money as veterans as long as he provided the best service

The Minneapolis Market

  • Saturated market – two cities, so many drivers
  • Luckily there are major sports teams and major entertainers coming through that market, which keeps downtown busy
  • Downloaded all of the event apps for his city (like StubHub) to see when entertainers were coming to town, is willing to flip his schedule around to drive during the busiest times (football game + entertainer visiting, etc.)
  • Now mainly only works during events, Friday through Sunday, and only a few times during the weekdays. Tries to only primarily drive during surge

Rideshare Earnings

  • Has a goal of $30/hr and weekly goal of $455
  • Drives as much as needed to hit those goals and then turns off the phone to leave work at work
  • Minneapolis was one of the first cities to get Uber tipping, so that took him from $25/27 an hour to $30/hr
  • Works about 15 hours a week
  • Still can be difficult to get tips even if you do everything right

Advice for New Drivers

  • Some tips: keeping your car clean and smelling nice; taking rides with other drivers to see what they’re doing; keeping things like brand name mints in the car and auxiliary cables for phones; talking to your passengers and humanizing yourself
  • The Golden Rule: treat people how you would want to be treated. Every situation is different so you have to see if they want quiet or if they want to chat, and you have to respect their choice
  • What would you want in a car? If you like phone-charging cords, have one for your passengers. Water? Have some bottles for your riders
  • Really just tries to hack rideshare driving – uses destination filters, tries to be strategic about driving

Challenges and Opportunities for Drivers

  • Not getting tips after having a really great ride can be frustrating
  • Same frustrations as many drivers: lower fares, minimum earnings, etc.
  • Drivers should be willing to go above and beyond but they should also be informed: join Facebook groups and be aware of what’s going on in your city
  • Get the Mystro app, get apps like Prime Time
  • Be honest with yourself and evaluate every ride after it’s complete: were you too talkative? not talkative enough?
  • Always stay busy: get DoorDash and Postmates so you’re not waiting around for rides

Outro

  • Thank you to Sam for coming on today’s show and sharing his driving strategies with us
  • It’s easy to think of rideshare driving as a business all the time, but Sam reminds us to be human and treat people like we would want to be treated
  • Not only is it the right thing to do, it really can be profitable as well, but don’t go into a ride thinking only about money
  • Follow me on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube and you can always contact me if you have questions – like to hear from you all!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG059: Sam Choi on Outworking and Outearning Other Rideshare Drivers appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jul 26 2017

42mins

Play

Rank #19: RSG045: What’s it Like to Give A Lyft Ride in 65 Different Cities?

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Today’s guest is a fellow rideshare driver and blogger and he recently completed a 12,000 mile cross-country journey in which he gave a Lyft ride in 65 cities!  First, if you’re wondering how you can even do that, we’ll talk to Simon all about the logistics of the trip, why he did it and more.

I’ve always been a fan of road trips but never had the pleasure of driving cross country.  So if you’ve ever thought about it, I think you’ll get a lot out of this podcast.  And even if you have no plans to ever drive outside your state, at least you can live vicariously through Simon’s recent experience.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Interview with Simon, fellow rideshare blogger, Uber and Lyft driver, and now drives for Postmates!
  • Back in Long Beach – was in LA for a few weeks
  • Thank you so much for the 5 star review – I always highlight my 5 star reviews, so please leave me feedback! Thanks to: gurl, chicagoridesharedriver, biglpitcher27, ravrmom, johnny sweet ride and jarangel
  • Missed an episode of one of our podcasts? Click here

Interview with Simon

  • Runs website called Rideshare Dashboard
  • Completed a 12,000-mile road trip from Boston to Seattle, completed a Lyft in every city possible in the United States along the way
  • Wanted to give back to local community, Lyfting America inspired as well
  • Harry was the Orange County visit! Facebook Live video captured the event

Driving Across the US

  • Meeting up with friends and family across the US became a challenge
  • Had a very ambitious goal of getting across the country in 2 weeks
  • Cape Cod was a challenge to get rides
  • First ride to wife in Boston

The Driving Route

  • North to south route, down to Miami from Boston, stopped at Mt. Rushmore, through Texas, Arizona, California
  • Last stop in Spokane – Seattle wasn’t an option when he was driving
  • Seattle was officially the last stop – moving from East Coast to Seattle
  • Goal of this trip was trying to raise money to donate to various mental health organizations around the country
  • RSD Mental Health

Experience Driving Cross Country

  • Gravitate to the worst ones! Nebraska was interesting
  • One of the best was in Lake Tahoe
  • Overall the experience was pretty positive – was able to do a lot of outreach for mental health
  • Slept in car because it was the fastest – drove roughly 800 miles per day
  • Drove during the summer, not too much traffic other than in the big cities

How to Drive in Other Cities

  • Can drive anyway around the country with Lyft
  • Turn on your driver app!
  • Some local regulations around the country are tricky, you won’t know they exist unless you use a passenger app
  • Definitely ask other drivers what the regulations are – can search them out on Facebook groups

Outro

  • Thanks to Simon for sharing his story!
  • Great ride for a great cause and something very interesting to do if you like to drive and want to see the country
  • Feel free to reach out to me at harry[at]therideshareguy.com or follow me on Twitter @TheRideShareGuy
  • Leave comments, questions and feedback below!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Drivers, what do you think about Simon’s cross-country trip?  Does it sound like something you’d like to do?

-Harry @ RSG

Save

Save

Save

The post RSG045: What’s it Like to Give A Lyft Ride in 65 Different Cities? appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Sep 02 2016

44mins

Play

Rank #20: RSG076: Sarah Kessler on the Failed Promises of the Gig Economy

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We’re ten years into the “gig economy”, which was initially conceived of as a way to help workers be their own bosses, work on their own schedules, and still bring in a comfortable wage. 10 years in, we can now take a good look about the benefits and downsides of the gig economy. In this episode, I speak with reporter and author Sarah Kessler about the gig economy and her new book, Gigged: The End of the Job and the Future of Work.

Get your first audiobook FREE when you sign up with a 30 day trial of Audible! Sign up with Audible using our link to receive your first audiobook free here.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • When the gig economy was first pitched, there was a lot of talk about “being your own boss”, but now that the industry has matured, we’re seeing the gig economy is not all it’s hyped up to be
  • In this episode, I’m speaking with Sarah Kessler, a report from Quartz, about her new book Gigged: The End of the Job and the Future of Work
  • Have you heard of Bird yet? Bird is a new electric scooter service operating all over the US. You can learn more about it here!
  • Becoming a Charger is easy to do – simply sign up with my link and learn more about being a Charger with my free guide
  • Already a Charger? Then join my free Facebook group for Chargers!

Interview with Sarah Kessler

  • Sarah is an editor with Quartz at Work, where she works with other writers, and she recently wrote a book about the gig economy called Gigged: The End of the Job and the Future of Work
  • Gigged is about this promise that Silicon Valley made when they started pitching these apps they called the gig economy
  • At the time, these apps and jobs were pitched as solving the problems of the economy and unemployment
  • In Gigged, Sarah follows the outcome of that promise and how it worked for 5 people she followed who were in different situations working in the gig economy
  • Get your first audiobook FREE when you sign up with a 30 day trial of Audible! Sign up with Audible using our link to receive your first audiobook free here.

Beginning & Allure of the Gig Economy

  • The gig economy isn’t a new trend, it’s just a new name. Began in the 1970s with companies outsourcing work (temp hires, contractors, etc.)
  • Sarah noticed the gig economy trend while she was a tech reporter
  • Apps were framed as “the future of work” or ways to solve an unemployment crisis
  • The allure was not having to work a 9-to-5, not have a boss, work your own schedule
  • But the reality seems to be none of that: it’s not quite as flexible, it’s more difficult to earn enough money, etc.

Will the Gig Economy Keep Growing?

  • The percentage of people actually working in the gig economy is very small – 1 out of 3 people have tried freelance work, but less than 1% are actually making the gig economy their full time job
  • However, the gig economy keeps growing and companies are beginning to see they can save money by outsourcing, turning to freelancers, etc.
  • Overall, Gigged looks at out technology is facilitating outsourcing and what it means for the workers who take on these outsourced or new gigs

Varying Impacts of the Gig Economy

  • In Gigged, Sarah profiles a variety of people in the gig economy
  • One story she profiled was a non-profit in rural Arkansas that tested the hypothesis of the gig economy providing employment, particularly for people who live in poverty. Could the gig economy bring opportunity to a rural community?
  • Overall, the gig economy doesn’t work that simply. It’s one facet of reducing poverty but it’s not a one-size fits all solution

Improving the Gig Economy

  • One benefit to the gig economy has been a discussion around portable benefits – health insurance and other benefits shouldn’t necessarily be tied to a company you work for
  • At the same time, how can companies make jobs better for their employees? Why do people see the gig economy as a solution or a “side job” – what is it about their jobs that don’t pay enough or offer the right compensation?
  • The gig economy has been a big improvement for some, particularly high skilled workers or workers who would otherwise be homebound, but who now can work from home and earn money

Outro

  • Thank you to Sarah for coming on and talking with us about the gig economy
  • Overall, there are definitely pros and cons to the gig economy, and like Sarah said, it is not going away
  • Companies want both sides: reduced payroll costs by using independent contractors but also “employees” they can control – to a degree. It’s interesting to see how this will continue to develop
  • Have you heard of Bird yet? Bird is a new electric scooter service operating all over the US. You can learn more about it here!
  • Becoming a Charger is easy to do – simply sign up with my link and learn more about being a Charger with my free guide
  • Already a Charger? Then join my free Facebook group for Chargers!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG076: Sarah Kessler on the Failed Promises of the Gig Economy appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jul 03 2018

39mins

Play

RSG117: Rebecca Stack-Martinez from Gig Workers Rising on AB5

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AB5 has been perplexing for many drivers, not just in California. Uber’s made big changes and drivers all around the country are wondering when or if they could see these changes come to them. Today, we interview a driver and organizer for gig workers about AB5, the driver’s perspective and more below.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Today Jay from Rideshare Dojo is chatting with Rebecca Stack-Martinez from Gig Workers Rising about AB5
  • Builds on my previous interview with David Zipper
  • We’ll cover what drivers can expect from this change and more

Intro to Rebecca Stack-Martinez

  • Has been driving for two years, Uber and Lyft, in CA
  • Gig Workers Rising has closely been following AB5 news
  • AB5 passed in California, now it’s time to make sure it’s enforced

What Does AB5 Say?

  • Basically, drivers are employees – not contractors as Uber/Lyft says
  • Litigation could be first – tie this up in courts
  • Could be tied up in court but a judge could make U/L reclassify drivers anyway

How Do Drivers Feel About AB5?

  • Most are opposed, but many don’t really know what the law says
  • One major point is minimum wage: with AB5, all drivers will earn a minimum no matter what per hour
  • Still get to keep your higher earnings if you earn more
  • Protects drivers from harassment, unfair deactivations

AB5 and Society

  • Really this does more than make drivers employees – it establishes a baseline for how drivers are treated
  • If Uber/Lyft can’t figure out how to pay drivers more, maybe they should’t be in business
  • No policy is perfect but this is a step in the right direction

Gig Workers Rising

  • Came about because Uber/Lyft not listening to drivers
  • U/L don’t want to talk to drivers, are fighting AB5
  • Goal is to demystify what’s happening in the industry

Outro

  • Thanks to Rebecca for coming on this episode and sharing her thoughts on AB5 and its effect on drivers
  • We’ll be covering AB5 more in the upcoming weeks, so make sure to email me if you have a question!

Show Notes

The post RSG117: Rebecca Stack-Martinez from Gig Workers Rising on AB5 appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jan 21 2020

46mins

Play

RSG116: Will Uber’s New Driver Features Lead to Rider Discrimination?

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At the end of 2019, Uber rolled out new features for drivers in California in response to AB5. One of those new features allows drivers to see where their passengers are going and was received positively by drivers. However, today we’re talking about the downside of knowing a passenger’s destination and whether or not this could lead to destination discrimination.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Today I’ll be chatting with David Zipper, a writer for CityLab on urban mobility and technology
  • Also a Visiting Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Taubman Center for State and Local Government
  • We’ll be talking about destination discrimination, what it is, the impact of it and more

Intro to David Zipper

  • David Zipper’s perspective on cities and urban mobility is rooted in his experience in city hall, venture capitalism, policy research and more
  • He advises numerous startups, mayors and transit agencies
  • His writing has been published in The Atlantic, Slate, Newsweek and more
  • He focuses on the relationship between transit and ride hail services

Uber’s Changes in California

  • Before Uber’s recent changes to passenger destination information, drivers never knew where their passengers were going until the minute they picked passengers up
  • Pain point for drivers
  • When Uber got started, it was a big deal that there wouldn’t be discrimination based on destination (which can be tied to race, too)
  • This change could potentially be huge

Destination Discrimination

  • What is to say drivers won’t refuse trips based on where the destination is?
  • The potential for this change is that drivers could decline trips that take them to a less desirable location
  • This isn’t a hypothetical – we have seen Uber direct drivers to certain wealthier areas (demand)
  • Impacts the mobility network (from a policy standpoint)

How to Encourage Equity in Rideshare

  • Balance between ‘carrot and stick’ approach
  • Could be an opportunity for state to regulate these approaches
  • Uber is encouraging drivers to be more like independent contractors – does this make this discussion more difficult?

Balancing Regulation with Independent Contractor Status

  • Uber seems to be pursuing an independent contractor status for their drivers
  • Is Uber just a marketplace connecting drivers and riders?
  • Regulators in California are probably looking at these announcements carefully and may need to dig for more information

Outro

  • Thanks to David for coming on this episode and sharing his thoughts with me on destination discrimination.
  • It’s a tricky issue and I’m curious to see how regulators will work with ridesharing companies, particularly in California and other states pursuing legislation similar to AB5, in the future.

Show Notes

-Harry @ RSG

The post RSG116: Will Uber’s New Driver Features Lead to Rider Discrimination? appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jan 11 2020

42mins

Play

RSG115: Meera Joshi on How Cities Can Regulate Uber and Lyft

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Customers love Uber and Lyft, and as a frequent Uber/Lyft passenger myself, I understand why! Increasingly, however, cities are having major issues with Uber and Lyft. A new report aims to highlight how top cities around the world are regulating Uber and Lyft effectively, and we’ll cover this report and more in this week’s podcast episode.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Today I’ll be chatting with Meera Joshi, a visiting scholar at the NYU Rudin Center for Transportation
  • She’s also the co-author of the report E-Hail Regulations in Global Cities
  • She has a background in ride hailing, law, and more
  • Fascinating episode you won’t want to miss!

Intro to Meera Joshi

  • Outgoing Commissioner of the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission (TLC)
  • Under her tenure, NYC became the first city in the nation to mandate granular trip data from large app operators (like Uber and Lyft)
  • Preferred mode of transit: walking!
  • Spent most of her career in criminal justice and investigations

Regulating Uber and Lyft

  • Companies bottom line is to make money
  • Doesn’t always work together with regulation – usually in conflict
  • Report came about to see how other markets are handling Uber and Lyft
  • E-Hail Regulation in Global Cities (see link below in Show Notes)

Using Data to Improve Safety

  • Using data to determine how to improve safety
  • Focus on ‘professional drivers’ on the road
  • Trip records can show who is driving and when – if drivers are running red lights, this is something that could affect their ability to drive for Uber/Lyft

Revenue Collection

  • The only reason these companies exist is because cities provide the roads
  • Municipalities want to recoup the cost somehow
  • The fee is on the company, but the company puts the fee on each trip (which hurts drivers)
  • This increases passenger angst, too

Cities Creating a Safety Net for Drivers

  • Starting to see a trend among cities trying to offer drivers some form of safety net for independent contractors
  • These protections cost money
  • Don’t want to see the fees going to what companies think drivers need but rather what drivers actually need
  • Cities need to prioritize data collection – hard to say right now what the conditions are out there

Outro

  • Thanks to Meera for coming on the podcast! In the coming months, I think we’ll see more cities engage in more regulation
  • I think this will be something we’ll see a lot more of in the next year or two as well
  • Want me to interview someone on this topic? Let me know!

Show Notes

The post RSG115: Meera Joshi on How Cities Can Regulate Uber and Lyft appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Dec 31 2019

36mins

Play

RSG114: Matt Brezina on Protecting Bike Lanes From Cars

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KMobility options are changing rapidly these days, and while Uber and Lyft have had a big impact on this new mobility era, they’re not the only players. Today, I’ll be chatting with someone who is on the front lines of multi-mobility issues and keeping cities healthier, greener and happier. 

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Today I’ll be chatting with Matt Brezina of People Protected
  • We’ll be talking about the curb issue, find out what protected bike lanes are, and more
  • Shoutout to Micromobility Podcast – great podcast if you’re interested in learning more about scooters, bikes. Covers global issues and more.

Intro to Matt Brezina

  • Matt Brezina has founded, ran, and exited two ventured-backed companies
  • Has invested in 60 companies over the past 12 years
  • Early to the micromobility revolution having backed two of the earliest companies, Jump and Spin
  • Matt spends his time investing in companies at the intersection of the macro trends of urbanization and electric mobility, co-founder of People Protected

People Protected

  • Grassroots movement to get people aware of bike lanes
  • Started People Protected after two women killed in SF while bike riding
  • Politics is local – and visual. Goal is to draw attention and get laws changed
  • “Green lanes”, “protected lanes” – better names for multi-modal lanes

Relationship with Uber and Lyft

  • Started his second company next to Uber/Lyft (they started with around 5 people and so did Matt’s company)
  • Uber and Lyft have done some amazing things – ability to get a car whenever you need with the click of a button
  • But also a lot of risks – drivers who don’t know the roads very well, roads that are congested

CurbFlow

  • We’ve transformed how we use our city streets
  • Governments are slow to adapt
  • CurbFlow – repurposing the streets
  • Redefine curb space in busy areas – drivers can be directed to open areas using CurbFlow

Outro

  • Thanks to Matt for coming on the podcast! Learned a lot about bike lanes and the companies he works with.
  • Make sure to follow Matt on Twitter if you want to learn more about People Protected
  • Check out the Micromobility Podcast – it’s fascinating, great mobility content if you’re looking for more

Show Notes

The post RSG114: Matt Brezina on Protecting Bike Lanes From Cars appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Dec 24 2019

31mins

Play

RSG113: Morgan Herlocker on Mobility Data and Privacy Concerns

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In this episode, I’m covering some interesting topics with an expert on privacy and data issues. Specifically, we’re going to talk about privacy in its relation to transit – scooters, rideshare, etc. We’ll also talk about the potential concerns and uses of data when it comes to transportation.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Today I’ll be chatting with Morgan Herlocker of Shared Streets, a nonprofit that creates open source software that makes it easier to share info with the public
  • Talking about privacy and data issues related to mobility
  • Eye-opening conversation for me – not a lot of people are familiar with data privacy and rideshare – Morgan is a great guest for this topic!
  • Interested in learning more about driver satisfaction with Uber and Lyft? Make sure to check out our annual Uber driver survey results!
  • Main product right now is our survey – learn more about it at our consulting page

Intro to Morgan Herlocker

  • Morgan Herlocker is a software engineer and researcher focused on map data and privacy
  • Shared Streets, a nonprofit that creates open source software that makes it easier to share information on street networks with the public
  • In his spare time, he looks for privacy vulnerabilities and helps cities patch them
  • His preferred mode of transportation: skateboarding!

Open Source + Collaboration

  • Believes that if people have more information, we can all move more efficiently as a society
  • Became interested in maps and worked on software related to mapping
  • Mapping should be open source – no one entity should ‘own’ a map

Shared Streets

  • Builds tools that allow people to share information about their street networks and make it interoperable between base maps
  • For example, if a government has info on parking spaces in their city, this could be shared with base maps
  • Funding is mixed – public and private

Privacy Issues with Open Source Data

  • So much open source data out there – we need to be careful with what we share nowadays
  • Currently interested in information about scooters
  • Data suggests your trip data is very unique to you – only takes 4 GPS locations to uniquely identify riders
  • Some cities and companies can handle managing this data – but not all, which is alarming, since some are not as well-equipped to handle this data
  • Anonymization is critical – making sure data is anonymous and not based on the ‘honor code’

Uber & LA Compliance

  • Uber should comply, but it’s important to get the security right
  • Why does LA need real-time location data that isn’t aggregated in anyway?
  • CA has a law to protect their residents’ electronic privacy
  • Anyone handling this data should have basic training on trip privacy, what types of info should be protected
  • Huge responsibility to collect data – legislative framework needs to catch up to this issue

Outro

  • Thanks to Morgan for coming on the podcast! Fascinating information about data privacy, definitely eye-opening
  • Not something many people think about when they’re agreeing to terms to use scooters, rideshare, etc. but it’s important to pay attention to
  • Don’t forget to check out our annual driver survey!

Show Notes

The post RSG113: Morgan Herlocker on Mobility Data and Privacy Concerns appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Dec 17 2019

39mins

Play

RSG112: CoMotion LA Recap with Tom Mourmouras

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Recently, I attended one of my favorite conferences: CoMotion LA. The conference brings together the top names in the public and private sides of transportation, and it’s a great conference to attend if you have the chance. Today, I’m talking to another conference-goer about our conference takeaways.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Today I’ll be chatting with Tom Mourmouras, a digital ventures consultant and previous RSG guest
  • Tom and I work together in consulting – helping people at all stages of company development, from the idea stage and beyond
  • Main product right now is our survey – learn more about it at our consulting page

Intro to Tom Mourmouras

  • Has been involved in the mobility and ridesharing space for 7 years now
  • Part of the 3 person team at Lyft that introduced ridesharing to LA
  • In 2017, founded his consulting company, Naxos Mobility

What is CoMotion LA?

  • Opportunity for industry people and regular folks to mingle, find out how they can help each other
  • Not an auto show!
  • This conference is a slam dunk for various reasons, including programming, sponsors, attendees – and weather!
  • Roughly 1200 people there at any one time – people arriving via scooters, Lyfts, Ubers, etc.

Best Panels and Presentations at CoMotion LA

  • Seleta Reynolds, the Head of the LADOT – a panel on rideshare compliance
  • LA Mayor Eric Garcetti announced a new initiative, Urban Movement Labs – headliner at CoMotion LA!
  • Some interesting concepts discussed at the conference, too, including aerial mobility, data and privacy, etc.

Predictions for 2020 CoMotion LA?

  • Cities getting smarter about regulation
  • How cities will adopt and regulate this technology
  • Micromobility – at this year’s conference, got to try out new scooters and technology
  • Unagi scooter – it’s like a hopped up Dodge Viper with a lot of power, not a lot of weight

Interesting Companies from CoMotion LA

  • REEF – cloud kitchen company
  • Ultimate vision is to have several different brands operating out of one place – delivery takes place via ebike or scooter
  • Smacircle – foldable scooters
  • Only at the Model T of scooters right now – we can expect to see a lot of changes in form to future scooters

Outro

  • Thanks to Tom for coming on the podcast! Also, thanks to all the listeners of this podcast who approached me at CoMotion LA, I appreciate it!
  • Hope you got a lot out of this podcast – as you can tell, there is a lot going on
  • If you are interested in the mobility field, highly encourage you to check out the CoMotion LA conference

Show Notes

The post RSG112: CoMotion LA Recap with Tom Mourmouras appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Dec 10 2019

41mins

Play

RSG111: Alison Griswold on Why Juno Failed

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I can’t say I was surprised to hear that Juno shut down recently. They offered a lot to drivers and really seemed to do their research, but ultimately it wasn’t meant to be. Today I’ll be talking about Juno as a case study – what happened, what went wrong, and what we can get out of this whole process.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Today I’ll be chatting with Alison Griswold of Quartz on Juno
  • Covering the sharing economy for as long as I’ve been around!
  • Thanks to George Grama – interviewed him before
  • He white-labels rideshare apps – if you’re interested in starting your own rideshare company, reach out to me: harry [at] therideshareguy.com and I can put you in touch with him!

Intro to Alison Griswold

  • Alison Griswold of Quartz, covers the sharing economy
  • Runs a newsletter on the sharing economy called Oversharing
  • Typically used Via in NYC (but usually uses public transit!)

Juno – The Beginning

  • Became aware of them in 2016
  • Started in beta mode – much lower commission than Uber and offered a higher wage
  • Subsidized on rider side
  • Skeptical early on of their chances – how long could this all last?

Were Drivers Happy with Juno?

  • Overall, they were!
  • RSUs, no shared rides, better pay for drivers
  • Drivers felt they were getting a share of the company

Where Did it All Go Wrong?

  • Did it really go wrong? It all went right – for Juno
  • Juno owner had a pattern of identifying market opportunities, creating a competitor in the space, and then turning it over for a profit
  • Juno sold to Gett in 2017 – deal reported around $2M
  • Drivers lost their stock options

Takeaways from Juno’s Exit

  • Initial branding is very important
  • Uber and Lyft copied a lot of the features Juno had
  • Can a driver-friendly company really unseat Uber/Lyft?
  • Yes! Barriers to entry are not high

Outro

  • Appreciate Ali sharing her expertise as a reporter – she’s doing important work!
  • If you have questions about Juno, reach out!
  • And if you want to start a rideshare company, contact me: harry [at] therideshareguy.com

Show Notes

The post RSG111: Alison Griswold on Why Juno Failed appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Nov 26 2019

44mins

Play

RSG110: The Black Car Babe on Driving Rideshare in New York City

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Recently, we launched a new podcast called The Rideshare Dojo with Jay Cradeur. In this episode, I’ll be highlighting a new episode he just released with The Black Car Babe. This is a really unique episode not simply because the guest is a female driver, but also because we get to hear the perspective of a driver driving in New York City. NYC is a pretty unique market compared to every other city, so I hope you find this episode interesting and let us know in the comments below.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro


  • Today I’ll be chatting with Minna Palaquibay, also known as the Black Car Babe in NYC
  • We’ll be talking about driving in NYC, the best and worst parts of driving in NYC, and how to maintain your energy as a driver
  • This episode is sponsored by Fair – if you’re looking for a car rental program that includes everything, including insurance and miles, you’ll want to check out Fair. Use code ‘RSG’ to get $100 off.

Intro to The Black Car Babe

  • Minna Palaquibay, aka The Black Car Babe, drives in NYC
  • Drove for Via and Uber, now drives for a luxury company
  • Drove for Via first, enjoyed it, drove for about 10-12 hours a day
  • Currently drives a Chevy Suburban LTZ (2016)

Driving in Manhattan

  • Started driving in Manhattan because she wanted to control her time and be her own boss
  • Opportunity came along to drive the suburban, decided to go for it
  • Best part has been the conversations, talking to people
  • Long hours are the worst part – have to meet a quota to cover bills, can be tiring

Rideshare Driving as a Woman

  • Anyone should set aside some money for emergencies – at least $1000
  • Don’t take things personally as a driver – there is more positive than negative out there
  • Other drivers (male) aren’t rude to her – clashes have been few and far between
  • Minna doesn’t drive that late at night, so she hasn’t been hit on (less chance because most people are not drunk during the day)

How to Keep Up Your Energy as a Driver

  • Has changed up her diet, taking supplements
  • Tries to eat healthier (instead of a burger, get a salad or at least balance burger with a salad)
  • Typical day starts at 4 am, ends around midnight – breaks in between

Goals for the Future

  • Pay off debt!
  • Would love to do a TED Talk
  • Create an online course to help inspire people
  • Would like to write a book

Outro

  • Thanks to Minna for coming on the podcast! My main takeaway is being generous with your time and learning from other people
  • Minna shared what she’s gone through and still has a positive attitude – make sure to follow her YouTube channel!

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG110: The Black Car Babe on Driving Rideshare in New York City appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Oct 15 2019

40mins

Play

RSG109: Bruce Schaller on Why Too Much Uber and Lyft is a Bad Thing for Cities

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It seems like whenever Uber and Lyft are in the news nowadays, it’s for all the wrong reasons. What do all of the current and upcoming regulations say about the state of rideshare? In this episode, I’m speaking with an expert transportation consultation about the current state of the rideshare industry about changing trends, regulation and more.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro


  • Today I’m talking with Bruce Schaller of Schaller Consulting, an NY-based consulting firm that specializes in urban transportation policy
  • In addition to focusing on urban transit, he’s also involved with trends among cities and the relationships between rideshare, micromobility and more

Intro to Bruce Schaller

  • Bruce Schaller is a consultant based in NYC
  • Author of recent reports on ride services including traffic and transit
  • Worked on taxi issues in the late 1990s and early 2000s
  • Began looking into Uber and Lyft in 2014

State of Rideshare Industry Today

  • A big question mark!
  • Innovation of Uber and Lyft is having part-time workers available on flexible schedules
  • Needs to be a sweet spot when it comes to flexibility and earnings
  • Overall, NYC doing a good job in trying to regulate, increase driver earnings

Are Uber and Lyft Adding to Traffic Congestion?

  • Personal cars are the bulk of traffic, not Uber/Lyft
  • However, Uber and Lyft do add to traffic congestion
  • Goal is to increase utilization rate, making sure someone is in the car a majority of the time

Political Landscape of Rideshare

  • There will absolutely be more regulation – potentially Washington state, Oregon
  • Cities and states looking to regulate rideshare companies will need to focus on utilization rate

Outro

  • Thanks to Bruce for coming on and sharing what he knows about the public side of the transportation business
  • If you’re interested in learning more, highly recommend you check out his reports on his consulting site – they’re free!
  • For me, it’s all about finding a balance – what are the benefits of taxis? Of rideshare? How can we combine the best of both?

Ad: If you want to save money on your everyday purchases, check out these best cash back apps that you can use to earn money on everything you buy from gas, to groceries, to beauty products.

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG109: Bruce Schaller on Why Too Much Uber and Lyft is a Bad Thing for Cities appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Oct 08 2019

31mins

Play

RSG108: Victor Pontis is Helping You Start a Scooter Company with Spring!

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One of the things I love the most about the rideshare industry is all of the cottage services that have popped up due to Uber and Lyft’s immense growth. Everything from apps, products and services, and even blogs and podcasts (like this one!) have popped up and many are designed to help drivers succeed and make more money. To no one’s surprise, we’re seeing the same thing happen in the scooter industry. On this episode, I’m talking with someone in the micromobility space, scooters in particular, on how his business helps scooter companies get off the ground. 

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro


  • Today I’m talking with Victor Pontis, who started the company Scooter Map that helps riders and chargers find scooters
  • Runs the new company, Spring, which makes it easy for new scooter or bike rental companies to get started
  • Excited to chat with him about what it’s like working with new scooter companies
  • If you’re interested in starting your own scooter company, stay tuned

Intro to Victor Pontis

  • Victor is one of the leading entrepreneurs in the scooter space
  • First took a Bird scooter in San Francisco, realized this was an amazing opportunity to get people around
  • Started Scooter Map to make it easier for chargers and riders to find e-scooters

Scooter Map

  • Saw a problem (riders and chargers not easily finding scooters) and decided to create Scooter Map
  • Took off quickly, there was a demand for this
  • Next opportunity – scooter companies

Spring

  • Decided to start the company Spring, to help make starting a scooter/bike business easier
  • Aggregates the software, tech, manufacturing, etc. to help scooter companies be more successful
  • One stop shop for a lot of these companies
  • Shopify for micromobility

Why Scooter Companies?

  • There’s a lot that goes into starting a scooter company
  • Beyond the costs of the scooters themselves (thousands to get a fleet), additional challenges
  • Regulatory, working with cities, etc.
  • Operations challenges are some of the biggest headaches right now

Outro

  • Big thanks to Victor for coming on and sharing how he got involved with scooters
  • His company, Spring, is offering a lot of options to companies that want to get started in micromobility but can’t yet compete with the big names
  • Really interesting blend of micromobility, entrepreneurship, etc.

Ad: Rideshare drivers love using the GetUpside app to save money on gas.

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG108: Victor Pontis is Helping You Start a Scooter Company with Spring! appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Oct 01 2019

34mins

Play

RSG107: What AB5 Means for the Rideshare Industry with Alex Rosenblat

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In California, Assembly Bill 5 recently passed and could uproot the entire economy. We’ve covered AB5 extensively, but today I wanted to talk to someone who knows the industry (and regulations surrounding the gig economy) well, someone who could give us a bigger bigger about what AB5 means for gig workers and rideshare drivers. In this episode, I’m chatting with Alex Rosenblat about how AB5 could affect anyone in the gig economy, what Uber and Lyft are doing to fight AB5, and more.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro


  • Today I’m talking with Alex Rosenblat, a researcher, author, and someone who really has a pulse on driver issues
  • Alex has been on the podcast before, and we also reviewed her book, Uberland
  • She has done a tremendous amount of research not only on drivers, but on the gig economy overall
  • This will be a quick episode, but you won’t want to miss it!

Intro to Alex Rosenblat

  • Alex Rosenblat is a technology ethnographer, author of Uberland: How Algorithms are Rewriting the Rules of Work
  • Alex’s 3rd time on the show!
  • Several things to cover today: AB5, and Uber/Lyft’s fight against AB5 in California

Discussion on AB5

  • AB5 is a catalyst for the conversations we’ve been having for years about Uber/Lyft and the gig economy overall
  • Is Uber a tech company or a transportation company? Want to have it both ways and finally they’re being forced to choose
  • Uber and Lyft fighting against the classification of workers as employees – will go to great lengths to avoid that

Fight Against AB5

  • Uber and Lyft must have a number of backup plans, had time to prepare for this challenge
  • However, right now there is this backlash against tech companies and Uber is a low hanging fruit
  • Chances are AB5 in its current version right now will change
  • Hard for the discussion between ‘Uber is bad’ and ‘Uber is wonderful’ to come together

Is AB5 the Solution to Driver Woes?

  • Overall, driving is better suited for part-time drivers – doing it full time is really tough
  • Lack of benefits, stressful, etc.
  • AB5 conversation seems to leave out part time drivers
  • Question is: should the standard be set for the recreational worker or the breadwinner worker?

Future of AB5

  • Uber and Lyft will drag their feet – basically, will cities or government agencies sue them?
  • It won’t take affect day 1 – there are clearly challenges to AB5
  • Political will has shifted more toward regulation, however
  • Willingness to take this challenge on is more apparent than before
  • Opportunity for compromise is there

Drivers Opinions on Uber/Lyft

  • Even the drivers that don’t support AB5 seem loathe to side with Uber
  • They’ve been lied to in the past or don’t have a lot of expectation that U/L will do the right thing – lack of trust
  • In the end, not everyone is going to get what they want – it’s a difficult situation all around

Outro

  • Big thanks to Alex for coming on the podcast and chatting all about AB5
  • Big thing we covered was a shift in political will – in 2015, this kind of law would have been shot down easily. Not the case anymore.
  • There is a potential for compromise, but it looks like this will be a drawn out legal battle
  • Curious to see the outcome!

Related article: Ab5 Uber – Everything You Need To Know

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG107: What AB5 Means for the Rideshare Industry with Alex Rosenblat appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Sep 24 2019

51mins

Play

RSG106: Virtual Kitchens With Matt Newberg of HNGRY

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Uber Eats is one of Uber’s fastest growing business segments right now, but they’re not the only ones trying to tackle the future of food and technology. Today’s guest is the perfect person to help us dissect a new concept gaining steam: virtual kitchens. If you’re curious about what’s going on behind the scenes of the food and tech world, stay tuned!

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro


  • Today I’m talking with Matt Newberg of HNGRY.TV
  • New media venture exploring the impact of technology on our relationship with food
  • We’re going to talk about virtual kitchens, macro trends and more

Intro to Matt Newberg

  • Matt Newberg is the host and producer of HNGRY, a content series exploring the impact of technology on our relationship with food
  • Spend the last 8 years working in the tech industry as an entrepreneur
  • Worked at Vimeo
  • Bringing his passion for food to explore emerging field of food tech

What are Virtual Kitchens?

  • Two forms – existing restaurants creating virtual only brands out of existing infrastructure
  • Second type – cloud kitchen, virtual delivery, online delivery
  • Currently more dedicated ‘virtual’ kitchen space right now vs existing brick and mortar
  • Uber has really pushed this for the last few years

Macro Trends in the Food + Tech Space


  • Rise in number of people eating outside the home/having food prepared outside the home
  • Delivery/pickup is eclipsing dining in a restaurant
  • Fast casual brands are doing the best (not McDonalds, not fine dining, middle tier restaurants)
  • Delivery apps

Expose into Virtual Kitchens

  • HNGRY.TV first episode (link in show notes)
  • Expose into the world of virtual kitchens –  two major players
  • Trend around shared kitchens for various purposes (new companies, packaged goods, delivery, etc)
  • Cloud Kitchens funder – Travis Kalanick, founder of Uber
  • Basically, companies are buying up property in urban areas and stocking it with everything from kitchens but also regular, everyday products (toilet paper, tomato sauce, etc.) and turn it into a delivery hub

Why are Virtual Kitchens so Important?

  • One, potential for tech companies to get in the space, see if they can make it profitable for them
  • Two, options for mom and pop companies to try out becoming a restaurant by renting space first
  • Delivery options
  • Restaurant tours

Future Impact of Virtual Kitchens

  • Smaller restaurants/shops that don’t have a brand or serve for convenience will suffer
  • Affect on labor – fewer workers needed. Estimated 85% of service workers will lose their jobs and not be replaced
  • Restaurants are going to need to become more savvy at marketing, maybe even partner with other restaurants (white label delivery service?)

Outro

  • Big thanks to Matt for coming on the podcast – looking forward to his next episode on THC infused beer and the alcohol industry!
  • Really interesting space – you can tell from the interview he’s passionate about the intersection of food and tech – make sure to check out his YouTube video below
  • Big opportunities for rideshare, micromobility, delivery and more with these types of services

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG106: Virtual Kitchens With Matt Newberg of HNGRY appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Sep 17 2019

48mins

Play

RSG105 How Uber Got Into Micromobility with Tortoise Founder Dmitry Shevelenko

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Uber’s come a long way since its humble beginning as a black car service. Now Uber is getting into all kinds of projects, including Uber Eats, Uber Air, Health, Freight and more. However, out of all of these projects, the one I’m most interested in is micro-mobility, like e-scooters, e-bikes and more. Today, I’m talking to someone heavily involved in the micromobility sphere. We’ll cover everything from Uber’s entrance into micromobility, the opportunities in this area, and more.

Intro


  • Today I’m talking with Dmitry Shevelenko, the co-founder and president of Tortoise, a new company helping micro-mobility operators
  • Before founding Tortoise, Dmitry worked for Uber – specifically Uber’s mobility efforts like Jump bikes and more
  • We’ll be talking about Dmitry’s perspective on the industry, investment decisions and more
  • We’ll also be talking about his new company, Tortoise, which combines AI and teleops to help scooter fleets reposition, rebalance and recharge
  • Our podcast sponsor is Zum – Zum is a rideshare service for kids. Drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here!

Intro to Dmitry Shevelenko

  • Dmitry Shevelenko is cofounder and president of Tortoise, a new startup helping micromobility operators automate the repositioning of their vehicles
  • Before founding Tortoise, Dmitry was an advisor to leading mobility and future of work startups, and he also had a 4 year stint at Uber working as the Director of Business Development
  • He initiated many of the company’s new mobility efforts, including the Jump partnership and acquisition and Uber Transit
  • Focused on the whole package of Uber and mobility: rideshare, transit, micromobility and short term car rentals

Decision to Leave Uber

  • Variety of factors, but began to see the trend was in short trips – doesn’t exactly make sense to use a car for all of these short, less profitable trips
  • Perfect fit for micromobility options
  • Opportunity in a burgeoning industry, lots of investment and he had an interest in the topic

Understanding Micromobility


  • Utilization rate of scooters
  • Additional cost of scooters, cost of scooters and Juicers/Chargers, etc
  • Uber and Lyft introduced predictability and reliability not only in the rideshare space, but also in the micromobility space

Startup Company: Tortoise

  • High and low end of building scooters
  • Not a hardware company – provide designs, etc.
  • Operators pay per subscription to have access to software and more
  • Teleops is a game changer

Micromobility in Action

  • First market will be suburbs, college campus
  • Less dense areas actually better – more dense areas like cities typically have enough micromobility options
  • Outreach to communities that don’t have these opportunities

Outro

  • Big thanks to Dmitry for coming on the podcast – excited to talk to him about his experiences at Uber, his perspective on micromobility and his company, Tortoise
  • Excited to have more people on the podcast to talk about micromobility!
  • Our podcast sponsor is Zum – Zum is a rideshare service for kids. Drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG105 How Uber Got Into Micromobility with Tortoise Founder Dmitry Shevelenko appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Sep 10 2019

46mins

Play

RSG104: Enter the Dojo with Jay Cradeur!

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There’s something special about the audio medium that makes it very different from written or visual mediums. It’s more personal – podcasts typically accompany you for 30-40 minutes and over the months, you get to know the podcaster (and their terrible jokes!). As you may know, we recently launched a new podcast called The Rideshare Dojo. To celebrate, I’m taking you behind the scenes today of what it takes to start a podcast.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro


  • Today I’m handing over the mic to Jay Cradeur to talk all about his new podcast, The Rideshare Dojo
  • We’ll go behind the scenes of how to start a podcast, what it takes, and the partnership between the Dojo and RSG
  • The Rideshare Guy podcast has transitioned more into a rideshare and mobility industry podcast
  • The Dojo is a podcast that comes from the driver and worker’s perspective
  • Our podcast sponsor is Zum – Zum is a rideshare service for kids. Drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here!

Intro to The Rideshare Dojo

  • Jay Cradeur is a senior contributor at The Rideshare Guy and recently started The Rideshare Dojo podcast
  • Process of starting a podcast – not as easy as it looks!
  • Break down the moving parts of starting a podcast and launching it

What’s Your Podcast All About?

  • First, you need a name for your podcast!
  • Not as easy as it sounds 🙂 Have to get clear on your topic, write a description
  • For the Dojo, wanted to focus on driving, entrepreneurship, drivers’ Plan Bs
  • Audience that wanted to learn, put their knowledge to use
  • Software is important – easiest to use (and free) podcasting software: Audacity

Creating Artwork and Intro/Outro


  • The artwork for a podcast is that square image you see when your favorite podcast pops up with a new episode
  • You can’t do anything without including that piece of artwork
  • Intro/outro – the beginning and ending of podcasts, like music, you/a narrator introducing what the podcast is about
  • Used Fiverr to hire people for design, intro/outro

Get Ready to Interview!

  • Next biggest step is to interview people!
  • First person I interviewed was Harry Campbell, then daughter Paulina
  • Wasn’t until I started interviewing that I realized this is harder than it seems – takes focus and practice
  • Don’t worry about being amazing on your first episode – no one is going to be great at the first thing they do, just keep practicing

The Tech Side of Podcasting

  • Need to set up your podcast in Simplecast and create a trailer (think movie trailer, but audio: get people excited about your podcast!)
  • Once your podcast is in Simplecast, you can connect it to share it on other platforms, like Apple, Stitcher, Spotify, etc.
  • Overall, getting started with a podcast can be fairly low-tech. It can be more expensive/intensive, but getting started doesn’t take expert know-how or expensive gear

Finding Sponsors for Your Podcast

  • Not all podcasts have sponsors, and not all new podcasts can find sponsors
  • However, it’s worth it to pitch to sponsors (as long as they fit your audience) because companies are always looking to get in front of new audiences
  • This is when the partnership with Harry happened, he helped with the business side
  • Find a sponsor that aligns with your audience and pitch, pitch, pitch – it can’t hurt and can help you fund some of the starting expenses for a podcast

Outro

  • Big thanks to Jay for coming on the podcast and sharing a behind the scenes look at The Rideshare Dojo!
  • You can subscribe to the Dojo using the links below
  • If you have any ideas for Jay or want to be interviewed, reach out to him directly using the Dojo link below!
  • Our podcast sponsor is Zum – Zum is a rideshare service for kids. Drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG104: Enter the Dojo with Jay Cradeur! appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Aug 29 2019

29mins

Play

RSG103: Grayson Brulte on the Public Perception of Autonomous Vehicles

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Even though AVs have been in the news a lot over the past few years, the industry is really still in its infancy. In this episode, I’m chatting with someone who’s on the other side of autonomous vehicles, dealing with things like public perception, helping human drivers and more. We’ll cover the politics of AVs, the social impacts and more – you won’t want to miss this episode!

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro


  • Today I’m chatting with Grayson Brulte, co-founder/President of Brulte & Company, a consulting firm that specializes in design innovation and tech strategies for the global marketplace
  • We’re talking all about AVs and specifically Uber’s AV program, what Lyft is up to and how automation is affecting other industries
  • We’ll also talk about how automation may affect the salaries of workers, everyone from truck drivers to rideshare drivers
  • Our podcast sponsor is Zum – Zum is a rideshare service for kids. Drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here!

Interview with Grayson Brulte

  • Grayson Brulte is an autonomous vehicle consultant – passionate about public acceptance and adoption of autonomous vehicles
  • Believes AVs are the future of transportation
  • Working on public acceptance of AVs – show how AVs benefit and enhance society vs detract from society
  • A bit early to say which companies are leading overall in terms of AVs – some companies are focused on aspects of AVs, like Amazon, Ford, etc.

Working in the AV Sector

  • Brulte & Company focuses across the sector, works with more than one company – every company is working on AVs in some aspect
  • Walmart will become a leader in autonomy for one reason: brand
  • After serving the customer, AVs should be the next thing you consider as an executive
  • Figuring out the logistics

Public Perception of AVs


  • One focus is to highlight the different types of jobs AVs will create
  • Crucial for companies to engage with the public every step of the way – can’t create an amazing car but have the public hate it
  • The biggest challenge with public perception of AVs is misinformation – getting people into AVs to see for themselves is important

Cities, Regulation and AVs

  • Some states are friendlier to developing AV technology – Florida
  • California not as friendly (more regulatory hurdles for businesses)
  • Difficult to pass helpful legislation if you don’t know the technology very well
  • Important to realize there will be challenges along the way, but there were challenges with flight (airplanes) too

Outro

  • Big thanks to  Grayson for coming on the podcast – I appreciate his viewpoint about AVs, particularly what companies are doing
  • It’s interesting to see how many aspects of life/business AVs touch – so many people working behind the scenes on AVs
  • AVs re going to have a big impact on society at large and mobility in general
  • Our podcast sponsor is Zum – Zum is a rideshare service for kids. Drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG103: Grayson Brulte on the Public Perception of Autonomous Vehicles appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Aug 20 2019

41mins

Play

RSG102: Fair CEO Scott Painter on Rideshare, Cars and Uber

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One of the best parts about rideshare driving is the low barrier to entry, meaning people of any age, gender, race can sign up and drive for companies like Uber and Lyft. However, one pretty expensive barrier to entry can be the vehicle you drive for rideshare. Today, I’m talking to the CEO of Fair, Uber’s official vehicle partner to talk about what it’s like to supply cars to thousands of drivers.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro


  • Today I’m chatting with Scott Painter, CEO of Fair, about the automotive side of the rideshare business
  • Scott’s the perfect person to talk about this with, since he’s at the intersection of rideshare and the automotive industry
  • Scott has founded three different automotive tech companies and will talk about where he sees the rideshare side of the business going in the future
  • This episode is sponsored by Zum, a rideshare service for kids. Work on your own schedule and make up to $32/hr. Learn more about Zum and sign up here.

Interview with Scott Painter

  • Founder and CEO of Fair
  • Serial entrepreneur
  • Seeks to solve problems, like car ownership, with technology
  • When working on Fair, engineers and other employees were constantly trying to make the process ‘fair’, name stuck and became Fair
  • Naming the company Fair set the tone for everything they did and continue to do

Fair

  • Big idea is that people don’t have to borrow money to get access to mobility
  • People are going into debt to buy cars, not great for depreciating assets
  • People with low credit, no credit, etc. were getting penalized for it – with Fair, we’re letting you borrow a car (with stipulations) – anyone can get access to mobility

What About Autonomous Cars?

  • Preposterous to say autonomy is going to change anything in the near term for Uber/Lyft
  • Autonomy will come in waves – cars will get safer
  • It’s great from a safety point of view, but Uber and Lyft will need human drivers for a very long time
  • At the same time, people’s lives are changing – Fair doesn’t lock them into years-long terms, like car ownership once did

What Makes Fair Different

  • Key is to not buy brand new cars and offer them to drivers – cars depreciate immediately when you drive them off the lot
  • Get the right drivers behind the wheels of the right cars
  • Manufacturers are taking in more lease returns than ever before – creates an oversupply situation and used car prices drop
  • Drivers don’t have to worry about maintenance, but Fair does – Fair makes sure to get reliable cars with low mileage because they don’t want additional expenses either

Working with Rideshare Drivers & Uber

  • Right now, more rideshare than the consumer side
  • Trying to eliminate friction for drivers with the first week free program
  • Rideshare drivers are committed to providing great service and solving problems
  • It can be difficult making sure enough cars are available – demand from Uber drivers is huge

Outro

  • Big thanks to Scott for coming on the podcast and sharing his knowledge on the automotive tech sector
  • Big fan of Fair, and I hope you are after listening to this podcast – offers flexible rentals and leases
  • Wanted to show you what it’s like for a company like Fair – drivers can have one perspective of it, but they don’t see everything that goes on behind the scenes, particularly the supply and demand of cars
  • This episode is sponsored by Zum, a rideshare service for kids. Work on your own schedule and make up to $32/hr. Learn more about Zum and sign up here.

Show Notes

If you’d like to sign up with Fair, please use our affiliate links below

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG102: Fair CEO Scott Painter on Rideshare, Cars and Uber appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jul 25 2019

50mins

Play

Bonus Pod: Introducing the Rideshare Dojo!

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Today’s podcast episode is a special “bonus episode” and I have some exciting news for you: we’re launching a new podcast called the Rideshare Dojo! The podcast tagline is ‘by a driver for drivers’ and is meant to be like a water cooler for drivers. In today’s bonus episode, I’m introducing you to a Rideshare Dojo interview Jay conducted with Nathan Daulton, a driver who has a ‘Plan B’ after rideshare driving.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • If you’re a long time listener, you’ve probably heard me interview Jay Cradeur, but even if you haven’t, he’s a long time senior contributor to RSG
  • He’s written hundreds of articles and done dozens of videos for us, plus he has over 25,000 rides as a driver.
  • Rideshare Dojo launched a couple of months ago and already has over 20 episodes, so head on over (link in Show Notes below) to check out all the latest episodes

What’s Happening to The Rideshare Guy Podcast?

  • Nothing! We’re still around, focusing on everything related to mobility including rideshare, scooters, interviews with industry leaders
  • If you want more driver-focused interviews, Rideshare Dojo is definitely a podcast you want to check out
  • If you want more industry content, stay subscribed to RSG – if anything, we’re ramping up more content!

Preview of The Rideshare Dojo: Interview with Nathan Daulton

  • Nathan is a rideshare driver – also a mobile notary (his Plan B)
  • He’s a year into implementing his Plan B and has plans to make over $100,000 in his second year of work, his goal is $200,000 a year
  • Entrepreneurial spirit alive and well among drivers!

The Idea of a Plan B


  • Was driving in 2018 and met a passenger who worked with an escrow company (signing real estate documentation)
  • Passenger recommended it to Nathan
  • National Notary Association – leading national org that trains and certifies notaries

The Notary Process

  • He learned about being a notary in January 2018, takes about 3-4 months before you can get started making money (need training first – all online)
  • General notaries don’t make as much – around $15 each
  • Loan signing for homes pay around $150 – need additional training for that kind of pay!
  • Has done nearly 500 signings in one year – roughly $60,000 so far
  • In one day, made $965

Implementing Plan B

  • Always interested in entrepreneurship
  • Has reached a point that he could start his own signing service, making passive secondary income
  • Things just started to snowball – met other notaries, made connections in the real estate industry

Logistics of Being a Notary and Driver

  • Being a notary is ridiculously easy once you have the training
  • Coordinating driving + being a notary was difficult at first – had to plan where to be and on time!
  • More than enough work in cities to keep someone busy without rideshare driving!
  • Driving less – as driver pay has gone down and as Nathan works as a notary more, driving wasn’t as lucrative in comparison
  • Most stressful thing of being a notary is making sure everything is signed – if you miss a signature or an initial, you have to go back and fix it and that can mess up sales timelines

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post Bonus Pod: Introducing the Rideshare Dojo! appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jul 16 2019

34mins

Play

RSG101: David Zipper on What Data Can do for Cities and Mobility Companies

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Right now, there’s a battle brewing between cities and mobility companies. The battle is over data, but what does data really mean and why is it important? Today’s podcast guest is the perfect person to talk to about how data affects mobility, both for the tech companies running the services and for the cities who have to deal with these services.

New! The Rideshare Dojo Podcast featuring our very own Jay Cradeur is now live! The Rideshare Dojo is by drivers, for drivers and features interviews about everything from driving strategies and daily inspiration to rants on the latest news.

Subscribe to The Rideshare Dojo on iTunes here or to The Rideshare Dojo on Stitcher here

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro


  • Today I’m chatting with David Zipper all about data and new mobility services
  • David has an interesting background, having spent time working in a city and for the mayor’s office before moving over to the start up side of things
  • In this episode, we’ll be talking about the current state of data, the ‘walled gardens’ Uber and Lyft are building and more

  • Check out our latest sponsor: LISNR! LISNR makes safety for both drivers and passengers “dummy proof”
  • LISNR makes it easier for drivers and passengers to locate and authenticate one another and is providing safety for drivers and TNCs like Uber and Lyft

Interview with David Zipper

  • David’s perspective on cities and urban mobility is rooted in his experience working within City Hall as well as being a venture capitalist policy researcher and startup advocate
  • David advises numerous startups, mayors and transit agencies about the future of urban mobility
  • David is a “cities guy” – first big project was in Philadelphia
  • Worked in the Bloomberg administration in New York and worked on strategy for mayors in DC
  • Moved into startups and became partner at a VC firm

Current State of Data and Mobility Companies

  • People talk about data like it’s the ‘new oil’ – nice catchphrase, but data and mobility are more than that
  • Cities are getting wiser about data, and getting wiser to mobility companies
  • Scooters more likely to be a net positive for cities, unlike rideshare companies
  • Rideshare was a disruptive technology – but it really was just more cars on the streets
  • Scooters/bikes truly disruptive – how do they factor in to sidewalks, special lanes, etc.?

Why is Data So Important to Cities, Companies?


  • Data isn’t the be all, end all, but it can inform better public policy
  • Data can help cities identify drop off zones, bike lanes, traffic patterns
  • MDS – Mobility Data Specification – becoming the standard for data sharing between cities and companies
  • Data collection that helps cities understand all of the shared mobility services that could emerge in the future

Walled Gardens and Data

  • Business technology term – ex. Apple and the App Store – when searching for an app, Apple elevates certain apps and pushes down ones it doesn’t like or think are appropriate for whatever reason
  • Gives Apple a ton of power to elevate or push down certain apps, companies
  • Pull up your Uber app, and Uber is expanding to show you different services beyond just UberX, XL, etc.
  • Each app will have their own ‘walled garden’ and users will have to use several different apps just to figure out which one is the best option for them
  • Uber could decide to elevate what’s most profitable for them – dangerous to give one company control over all options

How Can Cities Leverage Data?

  • Finland could serve as a model – passed a law requiring all providers of transportation to put a realtime availability of vehicles, trip planning information
  • In the US, there needs to be state level legislation if not national involvement
  • Given Uber/Lyft’s success to preempt local laws they don’t like, it’s hard to put faith in most state legislatures to regulate this

Outro

  • Big thanks to David for coming on the podcast and sharing his thoughts on data with us
  • Be sure to take a look at the links below if you want to learn more about data, MDS, or the other topics he mentioned

  • Check out our latest sponsor: LISNR! LISNR makes safety for both drivers and passengers “dummy proof”
  • LISNR makes it easier for drivers and passengers to locate and authenticate one another and is providing safety for drivers and TNCs like Uber and Lyft

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG101: David Zipper on What Data Can do for Cities and Mobility Companies appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jul 09 2019

46mins

Play

RSG100: Nicole Moore on Fighting for Drivers with Rideshare United

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One of the biggest risks to Uber and Lyft’s business right now is drivers. While the companies and investors have gotten rich, drivers seem to have been left behind. Today, I’ll be speaking with a member of an organization (Rideshare Drivers United) that is actually listening to drivers and fighting on their behalf.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro


  • Welcome to episode 100! Goal for this year is to release a new podcast every week – so hopefully you’re enjoying this podcast so far, because there will be at least 100 more!

  • Today I’m chatting with Nicole Moore of the Rideshare Drivers United (RDU) group about what it’s like organizing drivers, the organization’s goals and more

  • We’ll also talk about the LA strike and striking in general, plus what drivers are hoping to get from the strikes

  • Check out our latest sponsor: LISNR! LISNR makes safety for both drivers and passengers “dummy proof”
  • LISNR makes it easier for drivers and passengers to locate and authenticate one another and is providing safety for drivers and TNCs like Uber and Lyft

Interview with Nicole Moore

  • Nicole is a part-time Lyft driver and on the organizing committee of Rideshare Drivers United (RDU), a 5,000 member rideshare driver advocacy organization based in LA
  • In addition to work as a driver/organizer, she’s also a Mom and has a full time job in healthcare
  • Nicole’s favorite moment: the May 8 strike in LA – drivers worked together to make it successful
  • Strike on May 8 was the second strike – lot of work to bring together, especially coordinating with LA airport police

Rideshare Drivers United (RDU)

  • RDU members aren’t just full-time drivers – they’re also part-time drivers who’ve seen their wages decrease over the years and are frustrated by it
  • People ask – why don’t striking drivers just quit? A lot of these drivers actually like driving + talking to people
  • Myth that most drivers are driving for ‘beer money’ – many of them use rideshare to supplement their income or cover more expenses
  • Nicole heard about RDU from a friend on Facebook – sounded like a good opportunity for drivers to organize themselves

Organizing Committee with RDU


  • Nicole is on the organizing committee with RDU
  • Made up entirely of drivers
  • Tries to find members in person and online
  • Drivers need to lead this movement – driver bill of rights, fair pair, transparency

Drivers’ Bill of Rights

  • Fair pay – not being able to change rates overnight
  • Working conditions
  • Transparency – ability to see destination ahead of time

California Assembly Bill 5 (AB5)

  • Basically would make drivers employees
  • What’s happening right now isn’t working – drivers’ pay changes overnight, it’s almost impossible to contact Uber/Lyft, etc.
  • AB5 is one of the best ways to get a lot of the demands on the driver bill of rights met
  • Provides worker protections too, like unemployment

Future of AB5

  • Drivers are worried about loss of flexibility – don’t want to lose that
  • California governor hasn’t really taken a stand on AB5 yet
  • Government’s job is to help, not to shy away from controversy – drivers are asking for a good standard of living
  • Trying to make the economy work for regular people – that’s RDU’s fight

Outro

  • Big thanks to Nicole for coming on the podcast, one of the things I like about RDU is that, you can see, it’s truly driver-led
  • I recommend you go to their website, check out their driver bill of rights and let me know what you think (links below in Show Notes)
  • I haven’t seen many organizations do what RDU is doing
  • Can’t wait to see how this goes in the future

  • Check out our latest sponsor: LISNR! LISNR makes safety for both drivers and passengers “dummy proof”
  • LISNR makes it easier for drivers and passengers to locate and authenticate one another and is providing safety for drivers and TNCs like Uber and Lyft

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG100: Nicole Moore on Fighting for Drivers with Rideshare United appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jul 02 2019

47mins

Play

RSG099 – What Matthew Daus Has Learned From 20 Years in the Transportation Industry

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I’ve only been in the rideshare industry for five years, but in Uber and Lyft terms, that might as well be a lifetime! Over the last few years, the mobility industry has exploded – from cars to bikes to scooters, and even delivery by drone. However, all this innovation has come at a cost, with regulators trying to understand companies like Uber/Lyft. Today’s podcast guest has that regulatory background and has worked for 20+ years in the transportation. Let’s see what he has to say about the intersection of mobility and regulations.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Today I’m chatting with Matthew Daus, the 10th commissioner and Chairman of the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission (TLC)
  • He’s now partner and chair of transportation at Windels Marx Lane & Mittendorf, LLP
  • He does a lot! Looking forward to chatting with him about what he’s seen/experienced over the last 20 years and his thoughts on the rideshare industry
  • Our newest sponsor is Zum! Zum is a rideshare service for kids – drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here!

Interview with Matthew Daus

  • Former chair of the NYC TLC as well as President of the International Association of Transportation Regulators
  • Served as NYC Civil Service Commissioner
  • General counsel to a number of agencies over his 20+ years
  • Transportation technology chair at The City University of New York’s Transit Transportation Research Center

Working in the Transportation Industry

  • Disconnect, especially among passengers, about what transit (of all types) really costs vs. how much riders are really paying
  • Currently, Matthew is working on a variety of projects from representing private mobility companies to working with government agencies
  • Interesting perspective because he sees it from the industry side, drivers’ side and government side
  • Framework at almost every level is broken/disjointed

Being a Regulator in the Transportation Industry


  • Everything has come up a little chaotic – all over the place and there is still a lot of miscommunication
  • Moving toward a direction of seamless integration, but getting access to data still challenging
  • Automation is coming, but there is going to be a lot of unraveling of TNCs, like what we’re seeing in California
  • The way that transit is moving, we are going to need transportation leadership in each state to manage what’s coming

Working with Cities + Governments

  • Smart cities hackathon, working with data and seeing how to improve/effectively use taxis, TNCs, etc.
  • Working with students from different universities to collect and analyze data
  • Helping cities plan for labor disruptions due to technology
  • Working with the Los Angeles Department of Transportation to streamline transit

Future for Transportation Companies

  • Things are certainly changing in the industry – gig economy
  • The answer may not be an employee/employer relationship, but you see changes coming to the industry
  • Drivers need to be respected, that’s clear
  • Everyone needs to work together to see how this can benefit all

Outro

  • Big thanks to Matt for coming on the podcast – as you gathered, he’s working on a lot and I’m excited to see what he does in the future
  • Also, check out Zum – Zum is a rideshare service for kids – drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG099 – What Matthew Daus Has Learned From 20 Years in the Transportation Industry appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jun 18 2019

41mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

220 Ratings
Average Ratings
196
12
2
5
5

Amazing!!!!

By Erikabiancospino - Nov 07 2019
Read more
Love the podcast, right on! Everything you need to know and the best way to stay updated.

A must listen for all Rideshare drivers.

By darthblaq - Apr 11 2019
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A brilliant resource for any rideshare driver. Should be required listening