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History

The History Network

Updated 12 days ago

Society & Culture
History
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A fortnightly military history podcast looking at all aspect of war throughout the ages.

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A fortnightly military history podcast looking at all aspect of war throughout the ages.

iTunes Ratings

202 Ratings
Average Ratings
147
27
7
11
10

Fantastic! So well done!

By Robert Henry Holtz - Oct 07 2019
Read more
Fantastic! So well done! History done right! Very nice!

I like this podcast

By Greg n Emily - Oct 23 2018
Read more
Well done and covers a huge amount of ground historically. well done brother. Keep it up

iTunes Ratings

202 Ratings
Average Ratings
147
27
7
11
10

Fantastic! So well done!

By Robert Henry Holtz - Oct 07 2019
Read more
Fantastic! So well done! History done right! Very nice!

I like this podcast

By Greg n Emily - Oct 23 2018
Read more
Well done and covers a huge amount of ground historically. well done brother. Keep it up
Cover image of The History Network

The History Network

Latest release on May 17, 2020

Read more

A fortnightly military history podcast looking at all aspect of war throughout the ages.

Rank #1: 2107 The Hanseatic League

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Around the 12th Century, German regionalism was very strong with the northern lowlands having their own distinct languages of Saxon and Frisian. Efforts by Imperial central government to unify provincial and legal frameworks, while attempting to impose Middle High German as the official language, failed.

 The importance of towns within this regionalism, they were the focus and strength of the local communities with the power to effect terms of trade, rights, position.

It was therefore a fertile period for the emergence of urban leagues, and in 1241 the first formal alliance between Lubeck and Hamburg was strengthened when they agreed to jointly protect trade routes on sea and land. This was the first formation of what would become the Hanseatic League. This league would expand, fight, defend, trade and negotiate across the next 400 years until Europe no longer needed it. But its legacy can still be seen and found today. Dur: 16mins File: .mp3

Oct 02 2016

15mins

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Rank #2: 2104 The Battle of Franklin

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As night fell on July 4, 1863, the fate of the Confederate States of America had been sealed. General Robert E. Lee's second attempt to invade the Union had been turned back at Gettysburg with heavy and irreplaceable losses. In the west the city of Vicksburg surrendered to Ulysses Grant, severing the Eastern and Western portions of the Confederacy and denying the Confederates use of the Mississippi River. The Confederacy would fight the remainder of the war on the defensive, with steadily dwindling resources. Dur: 18mins File: .mp3

Aug 21 2016

17mins

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Rank #3: 2706 Franco-German Rivalry

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In the First World War, one of the main aims of the French was to retake the "lost provinces" of Alsace and Lorraine, which had been occupied by the Germans since the Franco-Prussian war of 1871. But this was only one phase of a long cycle of power imbalances leading to invasions and thirst for revenge between these two countries. Dur: 24mins File: .mp3

Nov 24 2019

23mins

Play

Rank #4: 2109 12th Armoured Division - The 'Hellcats' at Herrlisheim

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The 12th Armoured Division set off from New York for the European theatre of war on September 20th 1944. They would spend November and December surging across northern France encountering the enemy in Alsace and at the Maginot Line, liberating parts of France as they went. They were one of only two US Armoured Divisions to have african american combat companies integrated into the division. They adopted the nickname "Hellcats" symbolising their toughness and readiness for combat. They would meet their toughest opposition against German Forces at Herrlisheim - part of Hitler’s Operation North wind.  Dur: 20mins  File: .mp3

Oct 30 2016

19mins

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Rank #5: 2003 Vlad Dracula, Prince of Wallachia - Part 1

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In December 1476, two monks from the monastery of Snagov, about forty kilometers north of Bucharest, stumbled upon a bloody, mangled, headless corpse. Recognizing the clothing, the monks secretly interred the body in the monastery's crypt. The head, meanwhile, made its way to Constantinople where it was put on display. The body belonged to the newly returned prince, Vlad, who was at the time known as 'the Impaler', but history knows him by a different name - Dracula. Dur: 39mins File: .mp3

Jan 31 2016

38mins

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Rank #6: 2105 Eugene of Savoy

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Eugene - Who's full french title was Francois-Eugene, prince de Savoie-Carignan was born in Paris in 1663. His Italian mother, Olympia Mancini, was niece to Cardinal Mazarin the Chief Minister of the French King (or in his case Kings as he served both Bourbon monarchs Louis XIII and Louis XIV). His father was the Italian-French nobleman Eugene Maurice, Count of Soissons. Dur: 21mins  File: .mp3�

Sep 04 2016

20mins

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Rank #7: 2110 The Battle of Hattin

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In 1187 Saladin at the head of a huge army crossed the river Jordan. Laying siege to the fortress at Tiberias, inside was the wife of Raymond of Tripoli. Until recently Raymond had been at odds with the new Crusader King Guy of Lusignan. The Crusader army numbered an impressive 20,000, though this was not as large as Saladin's. What it lacked in quantity it made up for however, in quality with heavily armoured knights, horsemen, foot soldiers and crossbow men. When word reached Guy that the siege was underway he decided to relieve the fortress with all haste, taking the shortest route possible straight across the hot arid plains with minimal baggage... The Crusaders had taken Saladin's bate. Dur: 23mins File: .mp3

Nov 13 2016

22mins

Play

Rank #8: 2704 - The British campaign in Egypt, 1801. part 1

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If one was to ask about the contribution of the British army during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, some of the immediate responses would concern the Duke of Wellington, the Peninsular War and the Battle of Waterloo. These subjects have acquired great fame over the past two decades, thanks in part to Bernard Cornwall’s popular Sharpe novels, and to the bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo in 2015. However, the battles fought at Waterloo and in the Spanish Peninsula were only a fraction of those fought by the British army during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. One British campaign that has largely been forgotten was fought in Egypt in 1801. Although the numbers of men who fought in Egypt were far smaller than in later campaigns in Spain, Portugal and Belgium, Egypt nevertheless proved a turning point in the fortunes of the British army. The significance of the Egyptian campaign can still be felt to this day. 

This episode was written by Simon Quinn

Simon is a postdoctoral research fellow in history at the University of York. He has recently completed a PhD studying the lives of British soldiers on campaign in Egypt in 1801.

Nov 01 2019

27mins

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Rank #9: 2102 The Cushing Brothers - Part 2

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Three brothers born in the 1830s in the Wisconsin Territory left a remarkable legacy of bravery, loyalty and determination through their service to the Union during the American Civil War. William, Alonzo and Howard Cushing each fought in separate theaters of that war and their combined service represents a remarkable mosaic of the Union soldier's experience. In the words of biographer Jamie Malinowski, "The Cushing brothers had an astonishing ability to show up at the Civil War's most important moments." Dur: 36mins File: .mp3

Jul 24 2016

35mins

Play

Rank #10: 2101 The Cushing Brothers - Part 1

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Three brothers born in the 1830s in the Wisconsin Territory left a remarkable legacy of bravery, loyalty and determination through their service to the Union during the American Civil War. William, Alonzo and Howard Cushing each fought in separate theaters of that war and their combined service represents a remarkable mosaic of the Union soldier's experience. In the words of biographer Jamie Malinowski, "The Cushing brothers had an astonishing ability to show up at the Civil War's most important moments." Due: 27mins  File: .mp3

Jul 10 2016

26mins

Play

Rank #11: 2010 The Torpedo

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To many of us the the idea of a torpedo is that of a sweaty submarine, the commander peering through his periscope and announcing "fire", and the torpedo whizzes through the water leaving a discernible foamy trail. The single hit is devastating. Whilst this has many elements of truth the Torpedo has a much longer history than the World War Two films we grew up with... Dur: 21mins File: .mp3

May 08 2016

19mins

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Rank #12: 2009 The Aleutian Islands Campaign

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The Aleutian Islands Campaign is often referred to as the Forgotten Battle due to history concentrating more on battles like that of Midway and Guadalcanal, yet this important campaign to take back U.S. soil, witnessed the first American amphibious assault in the North Pacific as well as one of the first Japanese banzai attacks of the war, and was fiercely fought by both sides. After the Japanese first took their Aleutian Island targets it would take over a year and a force some 20 times as strong before the US retook the land back from the Japanese. Dur: 20 mins File: .mp3

Apr 25 2016

19mins

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Rank #13: 2308 Samurai - Part 1

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The term samurai is a word that is almost universally recognized around the world. This is somewhat unusual for a historically based word, particularly for one that traces its origins back to a culture as unique as 10th century Japan. The image conjured by the term samurai for most people is that of a fierce, sword wielding warrior, and while somewhat cliché, is not entirely incorrect. And yet for a historical word and group that is so widely known, very few people really know anything else about these famed warrior figures of Japan's feudal past. Dur: 30mins File: .mp3

Nov 12 2017

29mins

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Rank #14: 2004 Vlad Dracula, Prince of Wallachia: part 2

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In the last episode we heard of Dracula's rise to power in Wallachia and how in 1459 he refused to pay tribute to the Ottoman's. His failure to do so forced Sultan Mehmed II to raise a huge army to march on Wallachia. Dracula had prepared Wallachia for such a fight. Not only did he order the construction or repair of border castles, and hire mercenaries for the army, but he also prepared his people for war. He moved his official residence south to the strong citadel of Bucharest to be closer to the border. Dur: 28mins File: .mp3

Feb 14 2016

28mins

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Rank #15: 2006 The Schlieffen Plan – A Pistol Cocked at England's Heart

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By the first decade of the last century, the two great opposing alliance systems in Europe had formed, or been starched into the fine conformity of Milton, "a staunch and solid piece of framework, as any January could freeze together" (if we overlook the pliable Italians). All had their war plans, but none as famous as Schlieffen's. And by 1914, all plans were for the offensive – any previous defensive ones were discarded in favour of the much more manly and becoming offensive action, or so the thinking went. Dur: 46mins File: .mp3

Mar 13 2016

45mins

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Rank #16: 2201 The Battles of Imphal and Kohima

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The Second World War came to Burma in December, 1941. In quick succession, the American Pacific fleet was devastated at Pearl Harbor, the American Far Eastern air forces destroyed in the Philippines. Hong Kong was threatened and Siam (Thailand) concluded a peace treaty with Tokyo. Burma was exposed. By May, 1942, it would be occupied from China in the north to Rangoon in the south. With amazing speed and minimal forces, Tokyo had cut the Burma Road supplying the Nationalist Chinese, set forces on the threshold of a restive India and added the Burmese oil fields to Japan's Greater East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere. Dur: 23mins File: .mp3

Jan 29 2017

22mins

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Rank #17: 2206 Bloody Antietam

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The Battle of Antietam Creek as it was known to the Union, or the Battle of Sharpsburg as it was known to the Confederate States, was fought on the 17th of September 1862 and became the most costly one-day battle of the American Civil War. The battle claimed nearly 23,000 casualties including 6 generals, and in a protracted 4 year civil war would go on to cost over 600,000 lives. While the official death toll for the battle stands at nearly 4,000, in actual fact, the true death toll is closer to 9,000 as many men who were marked down as wounded on the field of battle would later die in hospitals, some even months after the battle. Dur: 25mins File: .mp3

Apr 09 2017

24mins

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Rank #18: 2403 Caesar

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Julius Caesar waged campaigns of strategic boldness and tactical prudence. He fused himself into both head of state and military commander and in the chaos of the late republic, where it became nearly impossible to distinguish war as politics by other means, Caesar waged both war and politics. In his success was sown the seeds of his demise and that of the republic he served. Dur: 22mins File: .mp3

Feb 11 2018

21mins

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Rank #19: 2203 The Battle of Borodino

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The fighting on the 7th of September 1812 would be the bloodiest day of the Napoleonic war. The French victory would open the road to Moscow, but the failure to finally smash the Russian's in the field would ultimately prove fatal for Napoleon's Grand Armee. Dur: 20mins  File: .mp3

Feb 26 2017

19mins

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Rank #20: 2404 The Battle of Bunker Hill - Part 1

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On June 17, 1775, over one thousand New England militia stood on a hill overlooking Charlestown, Massachusetts and Boston Harbor. Arrayed in front of them in their scarlet and white uniforms, brushed clean for the occasion, were regiments of the British Army. Their goal was to take this hill from the erstwhile colonists-turned-rebels and fortify it, which would prevent the rebels from controlling the harbor. Honor would not allow General Thomas Gage, commander of British Forces in North America and governor of the Colony of Massachusetts, to stand by while farmers and merchants made pitiful displays of defiance. Gage expected these amateur soldiers to flee at the sight of his professional army. Instead, to the shock of British command, the American colonists stood and fought. Dur: 15mins  File: .mp3

Feb 25 2018

14mins

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2806 Sir Jeffrey Amherst and the Conquest of New France

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The Seven Years War, fought from 1756 to 1763, pitted the alliance of France, Austria, Sweden, Saxony, Russia and Spain; against Great Britain, Prussia and Hanover. The first truly world war, campaigns in the war were fought in Europe, India, North America, and on the oceans throughout the world. Dur: 27mins File: .mp3

May 17 2020

26mins

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2805 The ubiquity of the Cretan Archer in Ancient Warfare - Part 2

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One thing to note in regard to Cretans is that when they are mentioned in our sources they are always referred to as Cretan archers or just ‘Cretans’ or, occasionally just archers and we must work out from the context that they were Cretan. Dur: 25mins. File. mp3

May 03 2020

24mins

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2804 The ubiquity of the Cretan Archer in Ancient Warfare - Part 1

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When a contingent of archers is mentioned in the context of Greek and Roman armies, more often than not the culture associated with them is that of Crete. Indeed, when we just have archers mentioned in an army without a specified origin, Cretan archers are commonly assumed to be meant, so ubiquitous with archery and groups of mercenary archers were the Cretans. The Cretans are the most famous, but certainly not the only ‘nation’ associated with a particular fighting style (Rhodian slingers and Thracian peltasts leap to mind but there are others too). The long history of Cretan archers can be seen in the sources – according to some stretching from the First Messenian War right down to the fall of Constantinople in 1453. Even in the reliable historical record we find Cretan archer units from the Peloponnesian War well into the Roman period. Dur: 14mins File: .mp3

Apr 19 2020

13mins

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2803 - Bougainville: Civil War leads to new nation

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Bougainville is a 9000 sq. km pacific island and was first subject to European contact in 1768 when Louis Antoine De Bougainville landed there and, in an act of typical vainglory, named it for himself. People had been on Bougainville for 28,000 years but it was the Austronesian people who 4,000 years ago established pigs, chickens, dogs and cultivation with obsidian tools.  The Comte De Bougainville was every bit the equal of James Cook and it was he who established the Falkland Islands, circumnavigated the globe and fought as a captain of dragoons in the what was effectively the first world war, the 7 years’ war between England and France. As an Admiral he sailed south from Tahiti and nearly discovered the Great Barrier Reef then in 1768 encountered Bougainville, east of Papua New Guinea. The wonderful variegated coloured flower, Bougainvillea, is named for him. The island is a natural wonder and historical treasure.

This episode was written by Lt Col Chris Alroe.

Chris was an Australian Army Officer and specialist medical practitioner who spent twenty-one years full and part time in the Australian Defence Forces. He was at one time SMO 11 BDE and later appointed SMO 3 BDE, retiring from the army before taking up the appointment. During Operation Bel Isi commenced 1999, the UN Peace Keeping Mission to the Island of Bougainville after the civil war there, he was appointed Officer Commanding the Combined Health Element for the mission. He was commended by the Brigadier of the Mission for his survey of New Guinea Health services which he conducted as part of the plan to complete the Mission.

Apr 05 2020

17mins

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2802 The Battle For New York - Part 2

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The year 1776 began joyously for the American rebels. After the Battle of Bunker Hill and the subsequent siege of Boston, the rebel army, now formally organized into the Continental Army commanded by George Washington, successfully forced the British army under William Howe to withdraw from Boston and sail for Halifax, Nova Scotia. There Howe licked his wounds and awaited reinforcements. Dur: 28mins File: .mp3

Mar 22 2020

27mins

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2801 The Battle For New York - Part 1

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The year 1776 began joyously for the American rebels. After the Battle of Bunker Hill and the subsequent siege of Boston, the rebel army, now formally organized into the Continental Army commanded by George Washington, successfully forced the British army under William Howe to withdraw from Boston and sail for Halifax, Nova Scotia. There Howe licked his wounds and awaited reinforcements. Dur: 33mins File: .mp3

Mar 08 2020

32mins

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2710 The Battle of The Standard - Part 2

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At the moment when the Galwegians were at their most hard pressed, it seems as if Prince Henry led his Battle in a charge (the detail is not in Richard of Hexham). Henry 'hurled himself, fierce as a lion, upon the opposing wing.' He put the English to flight on that wing (the English left) and continued on against the men stationed with the horses (some distance away from the English line if we use the detail from Richard of Hexham). The English there fled two furlongs and the poorly armed peasants ran with them. Several reconstructions of the battle have Henry's charge a mounted one although this is far from clear and there are reasons to believe his charge was on foot (he could not mingle with the English pursuing the retreating Scots as he did if he was mounted and therefore obviously stood out from the English troops). Dur: 19 mins File: .mp3

Jan 19 2020

18mins

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2709 The Battle of The Standard - Part 1

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King David I of Scotland invaded England in the summer of 1138 in support of his niece, the Empress Matilda, who was embroiled in a fight against her cousin, King Stephen (of Blois) for control of the English throne. This period of civil war, known as the Anarchy, raged in England from 1135 until 1153. It was caused by the succession crisis following the drowning death of William Adelin in the White Ship disaster in 1120. William was Henry I’s only legitimate son and, even though Henry nominated his daughter Matilda as his heir, when the king died in 1135, his nephew Stephen of Blois seized the throne. Dur: 21mins File: .mp3

Jan 05 2020

20mins

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2708 The Macedonian Phalangite vs Persian Warrior

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In August 334 BC, Alexander the Great invaded the Persian Empire and systematically set about its conquest. At the core of Alexander's army were 10,000 members of the phalanx, the phalangites. Armed with a long pike and fighting in formations up to 16 ranks deep, these grizzled veterans were the mainstay of the Macedonian army.

Facing them were the myriad armies of the peoples that made up the Persian Empire. At the centre of these forces was the formation known as the Immortals: 10,000 elite infantry, armed with spears and bows.

In this episode we're going to be discussing the "Macedonian Phalangite vs Persian Warrior" with Ancient Warfare Podcast regular Murray Dahm, who has literally written the book on the topic.

Dec 22 2019

25mins

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2707 Surviving a Siege

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The treatise How to Survive Under Siege by Aineias Tacticus, is among the earliest treatises to survive from the genre of didactic military literature. Its author was regarded as the pre-eminent authority on military science in subsequent centuries because he wrote many other works. None of these survive. This single surviving treatise (although incomplete) covers nearly everything that a city need do in order to survive a siege by an enemy. Dur: 24mins File: .mp3

Dec 08 2019

23mins

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2706 Franco-German Rivalry

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In the First World War, one of the main aims of the French was to retake the "lost provinces" of Alsace and Lorraine, which had been occupied by the Germans since the Franco-Prussian war of 1871. But this was only one phase of a long cycle of power imbalances leading to invasions and thirst for revenge between these two countries. Dur: 24mins File: .mp3

Nov 24 2019

23mins

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2705 The British Campaign in Egypt, 1801 - Part 2

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The British now occupied the tip of the Aboukir peninsula directly opposite the French forces. The flanks of both armies were secured by the Mediterranean Sea on the one side, and the marshy ground of the dried up Lake Mareotis on the other. Following the landing on the 8 March, the British built defences, heaved supplies ashore and buried the dead. A short action took place on 13 March, during which the British repulsed an attack by French cavalry and horse-artillery. After this, the British paused to consider their next move. Dur: 28mins File: .mp3

Nov 03 2019

27mins

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2704 - The British campaign in Egypt, 1801. part 1

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If one was to ask about the contribution of the British army during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, some of the immediate responses would concern the Duke of Wellington, the Peninsular War and the Battle of Waterloo. These subjects have acquired great fame over the past two decades, thanks in part to Bernard Cornwall’s popular Sharpe novels, and to the bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo in 2015. However, the battles fought at Waterloo and in the Spanish Peninsula were only a fraction of those fought by the British army during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. One British campaign that has largely been forgotten was fought in Egypt in 1801. Although the numbers of men who fought in Egypt were far smaller than in later campaigns in Spain, Portugal and Belgium, Egypt nevertheless proved a turning point in the fortunes of the British army. The significance of the Egyptian campaign can still be felt to this day. 

This episode was written by Simon Quinn

Simon is a postdoctoral research fellow in history at the University of York. He has recently completed a PhD studying the lives of British soldiers on campaign in Egypt in 1801.

Nov 01 2019

27mins

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2703 Pontiac's Wars

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The Treaty of Paris was signed in 1763 ending the Seven Years War. The victorious British moved west into the Ohio Valley of North America and occupied the forts and outposts of the defeated French. New and drastic policies were instituted on the Native tribes inhabiting the area. These tribes rose up and attacked the British and displaced colonists from the territory. This began a summer of conflict between the Native tribes, the American colonists and British military. Dur: 17mins File: .mp3

Oct 06 2019

16mins

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2702 Quintus Sertorius - Reluctant renegade - Part 2

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Sertorius spent the winter training his Iberian troops and accustoming himself to their nature and tactics. He had a core of veteran Roman legionaries who followed him through many battles. A small number of Iberians were heavy infantry armed in the Roman style but the majority were light troops. Dur: 35mins File: .mp3

Sep 22 2019

34mins

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2701 Quintus Sertorius - Reluctant renegade - Part 1

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Quintus Sertorius could lay claim to a position among the greatest generals of ancient times. A loyal Roman, who lost an eye defending the Roman frontier, fortune then pitted him against the Roman military machine and some of its premier commanders, including Pompey the Great. Dur: 22mins File: .mp3

Sep 08 2019

21mins

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WSS30 - GreatWargameSurvey.com

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The boys are back to remind you that the great war-game survey is now 'live', you can find it here, so please go fill it in.

In this episode Guy updates us with what in new in the hobby and we get a chance to listen to the panel discussion he took part in at the Joy of Six.

Aug 02 2019

1hr 3mins

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2610 John Paul Jones: The American War of Independance comes to Britain

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On 27th February 1782 the British parliament voted to immediately cease the war in America; Britain had lost the War of Independence, (or the Revolutionary war as it is known in America). But Great Britain was not fighting America alone; by 1782 they were at war with 3 European countries and had survived the most serious invasion threat since the Spanish armada. The war had escalated far beyond the 13 colonies, to threaten Britain and her European bases. Dur: 23mins File: .mp3

Jul 14 2019

19mins

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2609 The Battle of Glen Shiel

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The government troops approached from the east, their redcoats standing out against the green of the glen and the dark waters of the River Shiel. The skies overhead were clear, it was the height of the summer, unusually hot for the Scottish Highlands and marching up Glen Shiel were 850 infantry, over 100 dragoons on horseback and a similar number of Highland levies. A long trail pack horses followed in their wake. Dur: 19mins File:.mp3

Jun 30 2019

18mins

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2608 Magic Weapons and Armour in the Middle Ages - Part 2, King Arthur and his Knights

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Many 'magical' items belong to the stories of Arthur and his knights although their genesis is more complicated. Sir Percival had the shield of Joseph of Arimathea, Gawain had the shield of Judas Maccabeus, Galahad the Shield of king Evalach (which had a cross drawn on it by Joseph of Arimathea in his own blood). The knights also had named swords and lances. Dur: 17mins  File: .mp3

Jun 16 2019

16mins

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iTunes Ratings

202 Ratings
Average Ratings
147
27
7
11
10

Fantastic! So well done!

By Robert Henry Holtz - Oct 07 2019
Read more
Fantastic! So well done! History done right! Very nice!

I like this podcast

By Greg n Emily - Oct 23 2018
Read more
Well done and covers a huge amount of ground historically. well done brother. Keep it up