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World Bank Podcasts

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Fighting poverty with passion and professionalism for lasting results. http://www.worldbank.org/The World Bank is one of the world's largest sources of development assistance. Our mission is to fight poverty with passion and professionalism for lasting results.We are not a bank in the common sense; we aim to help people help themselves and their environment by sharing knowledge and providing financial and technical assistance. Conceived in 1944 to reconstruct war-torn Europe, we work in more than 100 developing countries.

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Fighting poverty with passion and professionalism for lasting results. http://www.worldbank.org/The World Bank is one of the world's largest sources of development assistance. Our mission is to fight poverty with passion and professionalism for lasting results.We are not a bank in the common sense; we aim to help people help themselves and their environment by sharing knowledge and providing financial and technical assistance. Conceived in 1944 to reconstruct war-torn Europe, we work in more than 100 developing countries.

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Cover image of World Bank Podcasts

World Bank Podcasts

Updated 4 days ago

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Fighting poverty with passion and professionalism for lasting results. http://www.worldbank.org/The World Bank is one of the world's largest sources of development assistance. Our mission is to fight poverty with passion and professionalism for lasting results.We are not a bank in the common sense; we aim to help people help themselves and their environment by sharing knowledge and providing financial and technical assistance. Conceived in 1944 to reconstruct war-torn Europe, we work in more than 100 developing countries.

Ebola: The Economic Impact of Ebola in Liberia

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Producer Eva Flomo of United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) Radio discusses the economic impact of Ebola on Liberia's economy with Timothy Bulman, World Bank Senior Country Economist in Liberia.

A recent World Bank Group analysis of the Ebola epidemic has found that that if the virus continues to surge in the three worst-affected countries – Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone – its economic impact could grow eight-fold, dealing a potentially catastrophic blow to the already fragile states.

Sep 19 2014

8mins

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Actualités : Le ralentissement de la croissance: une opportunité pour l’Afrique ?

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Selon Makhtar Diop, vice-président de la Banque mondiale pour l’Afrique, le ralentissement de la croissance représente une opportunité pour les pays africains de changer la structure de leurs économies.
Éditions précédentes d'Africa's Pulse
Avril 2015 : http://www.banquemondiale.org/fr/news/press-release/2015/04/13/africa-end-of-the-commodity-super-cycle-weighs-on-growth

Oct 05 2015

5mins

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News Highlights: Turning on the Taps to Help Lebanon’s Poor and Syria’s Refugees

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It seems impossible but true. Lebanon has one of the world’s largest amounts of available fresh water and yet its people have such limited access that the taps for many are turned on for only a few hours a day. Now, the World Bank Group has announced a massive project that will soon get water flowing to over 1.6 million people in and around Beirut, improving the lives of Lebanon’s poorest, including Syrian refugees seeking shelter from conflict back home.

Sep 29 2014

8mins

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AFRONOMICS: Analyzing Inequality in Africa

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Discussions on Sub-Saharan Africa often center on extreme poverty: the subcontinent is home to half of the world’s extreme poor, and the number of people living in extreme poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa keeps going up even though the rates of extreme poverty have declined. At the same time, on a continent as economically diverse as Sub-Saharan Africa, the issue of inequality cannot be ignored. Eight of the ten most unequal countries in the world, when looking at the Gini coefficient, are in Sub-Saharan Africa, and gaps persist when digging deeper into wage inequality, inequality of opportunity, and other areas where the playing field is far from level. There are no easy answers to reducing inequality, but several countries have taken positive steps to make their societies and economies more equitable.

In this episode of Afronomics, Albert welcomes Haroon Bhorat, Professor of Economics and Director of the Development Policy Research Unit at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, and a Non-resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in the Global Economy and Development Program and the Africa Growth Initiative. His research focuses on labor economics, poverty, and income distribution, and this episode of Afronomics takes a closer look at his recent work on wage inequality in South Africa as part of the broader discussion on inequality in Africa.

May 30 2019

27mins

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South Africa: Using Fiscal Policy to Address Economic Inequality

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The end of Apartheid in South Africa has led to many positive changes in the country.
But the division of wealth and income remains inadequate to address Apartheid’s crippling economic legacy.

Like many growing countries, South Africa faces the difficult challenge of redistributing its wealth. However, unlike other countries, South Africa is facing the challenge head on.

CATRIONA PURFIELD, World Bank Senior Economist

We look at the top ten percent. They are earning incomes that are a thousand times bigger than those in the bottom ten percent in South Africa. They are only earning ZAR 200 a year before fiscal policy takes effect. However, once we look at fiscal policy, we say that it takes taxes to the rich, and gives it to the poor in the form of fiscal benefits. And as a result of that, that gap narrows from a thousand times bigger, to sixty six times bigger.

In South Africa, the government provides benefits in the form of cash payments such as child and old age grants to the poorest people.

It also provides free education and free healthcare. As a rule, the poorest people receive more in cash benefits than they are required to pay in taxes.

The most recent South Africa Economic Update finds that this is a level of redistribution unsurpassed by other countries.
GABRIELA INCHAUSTE / World Bank Senior Economist

And what we find is that in terms of fiscal policy’s ability to reduce inequality and to reduce poverty, South Africa stands out. It stands out both in its ability to redistribute, but also in its ability to actually produce impacts on reducing poverty.

South Africa’s cash transfers are cutting the poverty rate for those living on less than $2.50 per day by about 7 percentage points.

The money brings meals to the dinner tables of families who otherwise would have no reliable income.

66 year old Eunice Ngcobo lives in the township of Alexandra in Gauteng Province. She’s Raised her four grandchildren after they were orphaned.

EUNICE NGCOBO/Social Security Grant Recipient

If I wasn’t getting the old age and child support grants, life would be very difficult for me. I am not working, and I have high blood pressure, so I would be in and out asking for food for my kids as well.

Despite the benefit of such a progressive fiscal policy for South Africa’s poor, the country is grappling with slowing growth, high fiscal deficits and a debt burden that has grown to 40 percent of GDP, leaving little room for expanded social spending .

Ending the legacy of inequality in South Africa and ensuring a bright future for all of its citizens will require a greater emphasis on the quality of education and health spending.

It also calls for higher growth that creates jobs, especially for the poor, so that all South Africans can increase their earning potential.

Nov 13 2014

3mins

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AFRONOMICS on Africa’s Pulse: Focus on Closing the Infrastructure Gap to Increase Growth

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World Bank Africa Region Chief Economist, Albert Zeufack and Africa’s Pulse Lead author, Punam Chuhan Pole discuss the most recent Africa’ Pulse report.

In this issue the Pulse tackles Sub-Saharan Africa’s projected moderate growth of 2.6 percent, which should strengthen somewhat in 2018, helped by improvements in commodity prices, a pickup in global growth, and domestic conditions.

However, there is a need to spur investment in infrastructure, energy production and roads, without losing the hard won battle against debt in poor countries. Albert and Punam discuss the ways that countries can increase investment to achieve their goals and reduce poverty.

Apr 19 2017

23mins

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Jim Yong Kim: Mutual Efforts to End Poverty

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October 28, 2013 - Vatican City - Like many people around the world, I've been closely following Pope Francis' comments on the importance of serving the poor. When I had a chance to meet the His Holiness at the Vatican, I had the privilege to talk to about it -- and about helping lead a social movement to end extreme poverty. Listen to President Kim's audio blog to learn more.

Apr 15 2014

1min

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What Makes for a Game-Changing Investment to Secure Ghana’s Energy Future

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In recent years, Ghana has suffered serious energy shortages that have affected the poor the most. The World Bank Group’s one-of-a-kind $700 million in guarantees for the “Sankofa Gas Project” aims to change that. Listen to the World Bank’s Anita Marangoly George and Pankaj Gupta talk about why this project is a “game changer” and how it aims to make reliable, clean and affordable electricity accessible for Ghana’s people.

Learn more: http://www.worldbank.org/en/country/ghana/brief/what-is-the-sankofa-gas-project

Sep 03 2015

4mins

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Bookmark: Adventures in Dystopia - A Novel View of the Modern World?

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Daniel Sellen has worked in almost thirty countries around the globe for the World Bank. He’s now dedicated to ensuring the well-being of the employees as chair of the Staff Association. His experience in DC and far beyond is the basis for his novel spread across differing continents and countries that tells a story of six intertwined individuals. Daniel brings his insights to present the differing perspectives of those from developing countries and those in one way or another who are attempting to help.

Bookmark explores the creative literary works of World Bank Group staff members. To listen to others episodes of the series, visit: soundcloud.com/worldbank/sets/bookmark

Aug 29 2016

7mins

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Haïti - sur la voie difficile de la reconstruction

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Van Anh Vu Hong est arrivée en Haïti en 2010 peu après le tremblement de terre pour travailler sur des projets de secours d'urgence, y compris un projet de nettoyage des canaux d'eaux usées qui risquaient de propager des maladies. Cinq ans plus tard, dit-elle, de nombreux défis demeurent. L’un d’eux est la decentralisation de l'économie de la capitale Port-au-Prince vers les aux autres régions, afin de créer plus d'opportunités d'emploi pour la population croissante de Haïti.

Mar 10 2015

7mins

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Between 2 Geeks: Episode 4: What Can You Measure with Cell Phone Metadata?

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What do our cell phones reveal about society’s poverty or prosperity? This week’s edition of 'Between 2 Geeks’ looks at the way that metadata from our phones paints a picture of our collective behavior. Presenters Tariq Khokhar and Andrew Whitby talk to Professor Joshua Blumenstock, from the University of California, on this innovation in data analysis and what it means for development.

Apr 25 2017

14mins

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News Highlights: Ebola Cases Drop, but Disease Continues to Cripple Economies

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The number of Ebola cases are dropping, but the epidemic will continue to cripple the economies of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. That’s the conclusions of a new World Bank Group report released on the eve of the World Economic Forum in Davos.

Listen to World Bank Senior Economist David Evans, co-author of the report, as he explains why the cost of Ebola is so high and why impoverished people who never got the disease are suffering.

Jan 20 2015

6mins

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Between 2 Geeks: Episode 7 - The Future of Data? (Cape Town Edition)

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Earlier this year, hundreds of geeks gathered in South Africa for the first ever World Data Forum. Among them, was Tariq Khokhar. In a special edition marking the end of the first series of “Between 2 Geeks”, he reports on innovations in how data are being produced, with discussions featuring Amazon, Facebook and The World Pop Project. He also speaks with Anna Rosling Rönnlund of Gapminder, and explores new ideas for how data can be used to promote a “fact based view of the world”

May 17 2017

14mins

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The Role of Development in Preventing Extremism

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Achim Steiner, Administrator of the UN Development Program (UNDP), talks about how preventing violent extremism can help us reach the goal to end poverty.

Apr 06 2018

32mins

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From SDGs to Business: Partnership for Global Development

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Why are partnerships crucial to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)? Jeremy Oppenheim, Program Director, Business and Sustainable Development Commission, and Steve Waygood, Chief Responsible Investment Officer of Aviva Investors, discuss in this interview during the 2017 World Bank Annual Meetings.

Feb 22 2018

20mins

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Spotlight: Win-Win Solutions for Food Staple Trade in West Africa

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Food insecurity caused by fragility, lack of agricultural progress and trade barriers in West Africa is a well-documented concern. A 2012 World Bank report, Africa Can Help Feed Africa showed that increasing the supply of food staples could be improved by better connecting African markets to each other. That report called for a stronger focus on removing trade barriers and building on the forces of regional integration.

Now, World Bank Analysts have taken those concepts further.
A new report, Connecting Food Staples and Input Markets in West Africa: A Regional Trade Agenda for ECOWAS Countries explores how West African governments can build an integrated, regional trade market for food staples.

World Bank Senior economist, and author of the Report, Jean Christophe Maur: “There is actually very active trade in most products, whereas people often tend to focus only on a subset of products. Trade along borders is particularly important for instance.

West Africa’s 2011 population of 342 million is expected to increase to 516 million by 2030 and to 815 million by 2050.
The region is already home to a third of the African continents population and to some of its most vulnerable countries.
World Bank Senior Economist and co-author, John Keyser: “Crop yields in West Africa are some of the lowest in the world. West Africa has a very quick – rapidly growing population, particularly in the urban areas, and it is not able to feed itself. It is heavily dependent on food imports. With greater productivity of the farmland, West Africa could certainly do a better job of feeding itself and through regional trade and trade with neighbours.”
Michigan State University Professor Emeritus, John Staatz, an Agricultural Economist and African Studies expert, says it’s important for West African governments to think about how to make the whole region competitive to take advantage of the growth potential.

“You’re not just dealing with a small local market. West Africa now part of a global economy, it has to deal with global competition. For example, there are imports of chicken coming in from Brazil, the other big global players. And to be globally competitive, you need to get these kinds of efficiencies that allow that huge market in West Africa to be accessed by all the farmers and actors in West Africa. There are great growth potentials for agriculture in West Africa, but achieving them is going to require greater regional integration.”

Staple foods are the main source of calories in Sub-Saharan Africa, and in West Africa.

In West Africa, staple foods like rice maize and cassava, provide the main source of calories in coastal countries, with millet and sorghum being an important source of food in Sahelian countries. However, trade in these foods is informal and therefore more fragile.

Ben Shepard, co-author of the report:
“A lot of the distribution happens very locally, so it’s not just people going into grocery stores as people going to local markets and things like that. And definitely, they would expect to see a difference if the sorts of policies that we look at in the book are implemented. We see a lot of scope in the book for win-win solutions, so what we call a win-win is where both producers and consumers win from a particular reform. So just to think of one example, improving post-harvest treatment, is a way in which to reduce losses. So that’s good for producers, in that they are getting more of their products to market and obviously getting better income. It is also good for consumers, because it reduces the gap between the farm gate price and the price that they pay in their market. So it means that you can have these kinds of scenarios where both sets of people stand to gain from a particular policy reform. Same thing with access to finance that can help improve efficiency in the value chain and that can be beneficial for producers and consumers.”

Jul 28 2015

4mins

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My Favorite Number: 2 Is a Small Number with Big Problems

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http://www.worldbank.org - For World Bank Vice President and Special Envoy for Climate Change, Rachel Kyte, 2 is a number worth fixating on. My Favorite Number shows how a smart economist can bring passion and prose into complex issues, such as Climate Change and global emissions.

Mar 24 2014

3mins

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The Golden Aging of Europe and Central Asia

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A new report shows that populations across Europe and Central Asia are aging, but people are not living longer. What does that mean for health, education, and pension systems? And what are the opportunities of aging societies? Pabsy Pabalan finds some answers in an interview with Hans Timmer, World Bank Chief Economist for Europe and Central Asia. #PabsyLive

Jul 07 2015

2mins

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AFRONOMICS: ITechpreneurship in Africa

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Chief Economist of the World Bank's Africa Region, Albert Zeufack, chats with Silicon Valley’s Kamran Elahian about the power of disruptive technologies when it comes to development in Africa. For Elahian, disruptive technologies coupled with ramped up broadband and electricity access opens up the democratizing force of the internet to men and women equally, empowering them to come up with the solutions of the future.

Jun 29 2017

23mins

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News Highlights: Chad Reaches HIPC Initiative Completion

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Chad, Africa’s fifth largest country, has reached the completion point of the Highly Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) initiative, an international debt relief mechanism that provides special assistance to the world's poorest countries. As a result, the IMF and the World Bank have decided to support $1.1 billion in debt relief for Chad.

First launched in 1996 by the World Bank and the IMF, the HIPC initiative’s aim is to ensure that no poor country faces a debt burden it cannot manage.

Chad is the 36th country to reach the completion point under the HIPC Initiative

Kordjé Bedoumra, Chad’s Minister of Finance and Budget, explains why reaching the HIPC completion point is such an important milestone for his country.

World Bank, Africa, Chad, Highly indebted, HIPC, poverty, growth, debt reflief, devleopment

May 13 2015

2mins

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Machine Learning Joins the Housing Revolution

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This podcast explores the concepts and realities surrounding resilient housing. Through interviews, sound bites, and trips to countries where resilient housing is underway, we will share with you the World Bank’s new effort to support building homes better before a disaster strikes. From structural engineers to government officials, you will hear from a wide variety of professionals working to strengthen the homes we live in.

Leveraging technologies, such as drones, street cameras, and machine learning, and pairing them with low cost, life-saving construction methods, the Global Program for Resilient Housing aims to strengthen retrofitting measures. Understanding which homes put families at risk and where they are located are vital components to successfully prioritize investments.

From complex algorithms to simple construction design, you will learn what it takes to make homes safer and more resilient to natural disasters and climate change.

Dec 02 2019

22mins

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AFRONOMICS: What will it take to accelerate poverty reduction in Africa?

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Despite the incredible progress that so many African countries have made, poverty remains a defining part of the narrative around Africa. While the share of people living in extreme poverty has come down in the last decades, the number of people has gone up, due to rapid population growth during the same period, to reach nearly 416 million people. If left unchecked, extreme poverty in the world will become almost exclusively an African issue by 2030, in just ten years. In this episode of Afronomics, Albert Zeufack welcomes Kathleen Beegle and Luc Christiaensen, the main authors of a new World Bank study on Accelerating Poverty Reduction in Africa, to discuss what needs to be done differently to fight poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa.
For more information, access the full study here: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/32354

Nov 14 2019

25mins

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AFRONOMICS: The Future of Work in Africa, Part 2: The Role of Social Protection

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The 2019 World Development Report focused on the Future of Work on a global scale, highlighting the real tension between job losses in “old” manufacturing sectors that are susceptible to automation, and potential job gains driven by innovation in “new” sectors. Our Africa-focused companion report, released in July 2019, finds that Africa has a chance to take a different path – if governments and businesses can take advantage of digital technologies, and if the right policies and investments are in place.
 
Part two of this two-part podcast examines the role of social protection in helping workers, especially the most vulnerable, transition into the jobs and technologies of the future. Host Albert Zeufack welcomes Zainab Usman, Social Scientist in the Office of the Chief Economist for Africa at the World Bank, and co-author of the World Bank’s recent Future of Work in Africa report.

Oct 03 2019

15mins

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AFRONOMICS: The Future of Work in Africa, Part 1: Can digital technologies really work for all?

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The 2019 World Development Report focused on the Future of Work on a global scale, highlighting the real tension between job losses in “old” manufacturing sectors that are susceptible to automation, and potential job gains driven by innovation in “new” sectors. Our Africa-focused companion report, released in July 2019, finds that Africa has a chance to take a different path – if governments and businesses can take advantage of digital technologies, and if the right policies and investments are in place.
 
Part one of this two-part podcast looks at what’s different about the future of work in Africa compared to the rest of the world, and digs in to the potential of digital technologies to improve livelihoods and create jobs for all kinds of workers. Host Albert Zeufack welcomes Mark Dutz, Lead Economist in the Office of the Chief Economist for Africa at the World Bank, and co-author of the World Bank’s recent Future of Work in Africa report.

Oct 03 2019

17mins

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Smarter Subsidies

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Doing More With Less – Smarter Subsidies for Water Supply and Sanitation shows that most existing water supply and sanitation subsidies are pervasive, expensive, poorly-targeted, non-transparent and distortionary. Yet if designed in smart and targeted ways and implemented effectively, subsidies can be powerful and progressive tools that help ensure all people benefit from water supply and sanitation services.

Aug 28 2019

5mins

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From Unknown To Urgency

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Quality: Unknown — The Invisible Water Crisis presents new evidence and data that call urgent attention to the hidden dangers lying beneath the water’s surface. This podcast explains how poor water quality stalls economic progress, stymies human potential, and reduces food production.

Aug 20 2019

5mins

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AFRONOMICS: Analyzing Inequality in Africa

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Discussions on Sub-Saharan Africa often center on extreme poverty: the subcontinent is home to half of the world’s extreme poor, and the number of people living in extreme poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa keeps going up even though the rates of extreme poverty have declined. At the same time, on a continent as economically diverse as Sub-Saharan Africa, the issue of inequality cannot be ignored. Eight of the ten most unequal countries in the world, when looking at the Gini coefficient, are in Sub-Saharan Africa, and gaps persist when digging deeper into wage inequality, inequality of opportunity, and other areas where the playing field is far from level. There are no easy answers to reducing inequality, but several countries have taken positive steps to make their societies and economies more equitable.

In this episode of Afronomics, Albert welcomes Haroon Bhorat, Professor of Economics and Director of the Development Policy Research Unit at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, and a Non-resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in the Global Economy and Development Program and the Africa Growth Initiative. His research focuses on labor economics, poverty, and income distribution, and this episode of Afronomics takes a closer look at his recent work on wage inequality in South Africa as part of the broader discussion on inequality in Africa.

May 30 2019

27mins

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There's No Place Like Home! Resilient Housing

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This podcast explores the concepts and realities surrounding resilient housing. Through interviews, sound bites, and trips to countries where resilient housing is underway, our host, David Cavell, will teach you about the World Bank’s new effort to support building homes better before a disaster strikes. From structural engineers to government officials, you will hear from a wide variety of professionals working to strengthen the homes we live in.

Leveraging technologies, such as drones, street cameras, and machine learning, and pairing them with low cost, life-saving construction methods, the Global Program for Resilient Housing aims to strengthen retrofitting measures. Understanding which homes are at high risk and where they are located are vital components to successfully prioritize investments and distribute subsidies.

From complex algorithms to simple construction design, you will learn what it takes to make homes safer and more resilient to natural disasters and climate change.

Apr 16 2019

18mins

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AFRONOMICS: M-Pesa and the rise of digital financial services in Africa

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Sub-Saharan Africa is the only region where the share of adults with a mobile money account now exceeds 10 percent. That mobile revolution began in Kenya. In this episode of Afronomics, World Bank Chief Economist for Africa, Albert Zeufack, speaks with Professor Njuguna Ndung’u who is currently the Executive Director of the African Economic Research Consortium and was the Governor of the Central Bank of Kenya from 2007 to 2015.
During Prof. Ndung’u’s tenure as Central Bank governor, Kenya stepped up as a global leader in financial inclusion. This was driven by the path-breaking M-Pesa program, which made mobile payments and mobile banking the norm for Kenyans everywhere.

Mar 27 2019

34mins

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Putting Nature to Work

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This podcast explains how a new generation of infrastructure projects that harness the power of nature can help achieve development goals, including water security and climate resilience. In a new report from the World Bank and World Resources Institute, both organizations are calling for green infrastructure, such as mangroves and wetlands, to play a bigger role in traditional infrastructure planning.

Mar 21 2019

4mins

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Rising To The Challenge Of A Changing World

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In 2017, the World Bank with its partners launched a new initiative for a water-secure world, the Global Water Security & Sanitation Partnership (GWSP), housed within the World Bank’s Water Global Practice. This podcast provides a snapshot of its first year of delivery. It shows how by bringing innovation, new knowledge and evidence, and flexibility to World Bank lending operations, the GWSP helps clients achieve even more significant and more sustainable results.

Nov 26 2018

4mins

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AFRONOMICS : le Rwanda, en tête du classement CPIA

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En 2017, près du tiers des 38 pays africains bénéficiant du guichet concessionnel IDA ont renforcé la qualité de leur politiques et institutions publiques par rapport à 2016.
C’est l’une des conclusions de la dernière évaluation des politiques et des institutions en Afrique (CPIA) publiée chaque année par le bureau de l’économiste en chef de la Banque mondiale pour l’Afrique. Elle mesure les progrès réalisés par les pays d’Afrique subsaharienne pour améliorer la qualité de leurs politiques et institutions publiques, leur capacité à soutenir une croissance durable et à réduire la pauvreté. Il s’agit d’un outil essentiel pour les pays puisque la Banque mondiale utilise les notes obtenues pour déterminer le volume des prêts concessionnels et des dons que la Banque mondiale accorde aux pays à faible revenu.
Dans ce nouvel épisode du podcast Afronomics, Albert Zeufack, économiste en chef pour l’Afrique à la Banque mondiale, s'entretient avec Gérard Kambou qui a contribué à la rédaction du dernier CPIA.

Oct 04 2018

19mins

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AFRONOMICS: Rwanda tops Africa in CPIA ratings

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In 2017, nearly third of the 38 African countries that receive the IDA concessional window, strengthened their policy and institutional quality compared to 2016.
This is one of the findings of the World Bank’s Country Policy and Institutional Assessment. The CPIA, as it is called, is an annual assessment by the World Bank of the quality and institutional framework of African countries and their ability to support sustainable growth and poverty reduction. CPIA scores are composed of development indicators in four areas: economic management; structural policies; social inclusion and equity and public-sector management and institutions.
Scores are used to determine the allocation of zero finance grants from IDA, so a better score indicator has an implication for more funding under better terms the countries can use for development.
In this Afronomics, Chief Economist of the World Bank’s Africa Region, Albert Zeufack, speaks with report author, Punam Chuhan-Pole about policy improvements; policy declines and the African countries that are global examples of effective policy reform that enables positive growth and development.

Oct 04 2018

31mins

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AFRONOMICS: protéger les économies côtières d’Afrique de l’Ouest

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Aujourd'hui, environ 120 millions de personnes vivent le long des côtes ouest-africaines et sont menacées quotidiennement par l'érosion côtière et les inondations. De grandes portions de littoral ont disparu, emportant avec elles des maisons, des usines et des routes. Les pertes économiques sont colossales pour ce territoire qui génère 42 % du PIB de l'Afrique de l'Ouest. Préserver et protéger ces habitats fragiles apparaît donc comme un investissement rentable et rationnel.
Pour en savoir plus, consultez :
www.worldbank.org/waca www.worldbank.org/afrce

Aug 21 2018

16mins

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AFRONOMICS: Protecting West Africa’s Coastal Economies

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Today, there are about 120 million people living along the coast of West Africa who are threatened by coastal erosion and flooding on a daily basis. Large areas of coast line have disappeared, and with them houses, factories and roads. The economic losses are staggering. About 42% of West Africa’s GDP is generated along these same coastal areas. Preserving and protecting these fragile habitats makes dollars… and sense.
To learn more, please visit:
www.worldbank.org/waca www.worldbank.org/afrce

Aug 21 2018

21mins

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From Water Scarce Cities to Water Secure Cities

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Population growth, economic expansion and climate change are increasing the pressures on limited water supplies in cities around the world. A holistic approach is needed to help water scarce cities develop resilient strategies for long-term water security. That’s why the World Bank’s Water Scarce Cities initiative is collaborating with urban water practitioners, global thought leaders, and institutions in over 20 water scarce cities to document and share innovative strategies.

Jun 13 2018

7mins

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Let Everyone Reap the Benefits of Water

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Water belongs to everyone and yet many are excluded from its benefits and often from ownership and control of this critical resource. Inclusion – ensuring everyone reaps the benefits of water – is central to achieving universal access to water and sanitation and the way the World Bank thinks about policy and programs, because prosperity is best when shared.
Water World is a new podcast series brought to you by the World Bank’s Water Global Practice and the Global Water Security & Sanitation Partnership (GWSP). It explores the issues that are crucial to delivering a water-secure and healthy world for all. Join us every two weeks to learn more!

May 10 2018

7mins

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AFRONOMICS: Africa’s Pulse Spring Edition Part 2: Access to Energy in Africa

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Part Two of our discussion on Africa’s Pulse focusses on how African countries can improve access to electricity to accelerate progress in development outcomes, jobs and prosperity. We’re speaking with special topic author, Mike Toman, and member of the core team of economists who crafted the report, Moussa Blimpo.

Technical innovations, especially in solar power, provide the possibility for faster progress in electricity provision by complementing grid expansion with mini-grids and home-scale systems. However, in sorting through various possibilities for accelerated electrification, it is important to keep in mind that national electrification strategies generally seek to address several development objectives.
These include facilitating accelerated income growth and job creation, and improving lives and livelihoods in more remote areas, as well as limiting environmental and health damages from providing
electricity.

On the one hand, to accomplish this range of objectives, given the changes in generation technology and the expectation of rapid future growth in electricity demand, the evolution of electricity
systems in Sub-Saharan Africa will need to involve more than one national grid. The path to universal electrification also will incorporate interconnected or stand-alone “mini-grids” and “micro-grids” serving
small concentrations of electricity users, and off-grid home-scale systems. On the other hand, as rural populations continue to migrate to rapidly growing urban areas in Sub-Saharan Africa, economies of
scale and density will lower the costs of grid-supplied power in urban and peri-urban areas.

Apr 26 2018

20mins

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Resilience To Survive and Thrive

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What does resilience mean when it comes to water? Is it really that important? Experts explain in this podcast.

Water World is a new podcast series brought to you by the World Bank’s Water Global Practice and the Global Water Security & Sanitation Partnership (GWSP). It explores the issues that are crucial to delivering a water-secure and healthy world for all. Join us every two weeks to learn more!

Apr 24 2018

4mins

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AFRONOMICS: Africas Pulse Spring Edition Part 1

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AFRONOMICS: Africas Pulse Spring Edition Part 1 by Listen to the latest news, insights, and development highlights from the World Bank.

Apr 18 2018

13mins

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