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Climate One

We’re living through a climate emergency; addressing this crisis begins by talking about it. Host Greg Dalton brings you empowering conversations that connect all aspects of the challenge — the scary and the exciting, the individual and the systemic. Join us.

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Yvon Chouinard: Founding Patagonia and Living Simply

The explorer, climber, surfer and founder of sporting goods company Patagonia, Inc., has spent a lifetime welcoming adventure – and risk - of all kinds. Yvon Chouinard, Founder and Owner, PatagoniaThis program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on October 27, 2016 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr

25 Nov 2016

Rank #1

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C1 Revue: Future Food

Unpredictable weather has always been the farmer’s Achilles heel. And the weather is getting wilder, stressing water supplies and changing where crops can grow. How do we address food security for a growing global population? One approach is getting back to basics. Protecting the soil, growing food for people – not for cows – and cutting down food waste. Simple solutions can create a big pay-back. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

53mins

30 Mar 2015

Rank #2

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Coal Wars

Coal provides cheap energy and economic prosperity – along with greenhouse gases and lung disease. Can we wean ourselves, and our planet, off coal for good? Richard Martin, Author, Coal Wars: The Future of Energy and the Fate of the Planet (Palgrave Macmillan Trade, 2015) Bruce Nilles, Senior Director, Beyond Coal Campaign, Sierra Club Frank Wolak, Director, Program on Energy and Sustainable Development, Stanford University Brian Yu, Senior Analyst, Citi Research This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 22, 2015. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr

15 May 2015

Rank #3

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Aquatech (03/11/14) (Rebroadcast)

From Egyptian irrigation systems to Roman aqueducts to the dikes and canals of The Netherlands, the world’s civilizations have long found innovative ways to harness and conserve their water supply. But with California entering the third year of an historic drought, what 21st century technologies are on the horizon to help us deal with an ever-shrinking pool of water? Peter Yolles is the CEO of Watersmart Software, which takes a grass-roots approach to the issue by educating residential and commercial customers on how to save water. For most residential customers, says Yolles, saving water is part of the social compact. “Research tells us that only 1 out of 10 people will change their behavior to save money.” Yolles says. “Only 1 out of 10 people will change their behavior to save the environment. But 8 out of 10 will do so because of what’s happening around them.” Comparing water usage within a community, he says, is the first step. “That really motivates people to say, “Gosh, I’m using a lot more than my neighbors. What can I do to save water?” Tamin Pechet is the Chairman of Imagine H20, which seeks out and funds start-ups in the water industry. He says the need for new ideas is greater than ever. “Over the past couple of decades, the pressures on our water system have increased,” says Pechet. “When we face an acute event, like a drought or…a heavy series of rains that causes more water to enter into our storm and sewer systems, we don’t have the same level of excess capacity to deal with that as we used to. We essentially need a new wave of innovation to address those problems.” And a new wave of entrepreneurs and innovators are out there, exploring solutions from desalination to wastewater treatment to mining satellite data. Despite dire predictions for California’s reservoirs and rivers, Pechet says the future of water technology is promising. “There’s a lot of really cool stuff out there,” he told the Commonwealth Club audience. “The history of water in civilization is one of innovation. And so just about anything that you dream up…is something that someone could innovate and come up with. If you look hard enough, you can find a company doing it.” Steven Hartmeier, CEO, mOasis Tamin Pechet, CEO, Banyan Water, Chairman, Imagine H2O Peter Yolles, CEO, WaterSmart Software This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on March 11, 2014 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr

25 Jul 2014

Rank #4

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Yvon Chouinard

The explorer, climber, surfer and founder of sporting goods company Patagonia, Inc., has spent a lifetime welcoming adventure – and risk - of all kinds.Yvon Chouinard, Founder and Owner, PatagoniaThis program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on October 27, 2016 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

52mins

8 Sep 2017

Rank #5

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Powering Innovation (09/28/14) (Rebroadcast)

Companies big and small are conjuring up new technologies, production methods and delivery systems to capitalize on the trend towards a green economy. Greg Dalton, Founder and Host, Climate One David Crane, CEO, NRG Energy, Inc. Katie Fehrenbacher, Reporter, GigaOm.com Adam Lowry, Co-Founder and Chief Greenskeeper, Method Products PBC Arun Majumdar, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University; former Vice President for Energy, Google This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on September 15, 2014. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr

19 Dec 2014

Rank #6

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Keystone and Beyond (10/30/14)

By land, by sea or via the Keystone Pipeline, Canadian oil is coming to satisfy our energy thirst. But is our need for fossil fuel a foregone conclusion? David Baker, Energy Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle John Cushman, Author, Keystone and Beyond: Tar Sands and the National Interest in the Era of Climate Change (Inside Climate News, 2014); former New York Times reporter Dan Matross, Trade Commissioner on Science and Sustainable Technologies at the Consulate General of Canada This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on October 30, 2014. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr

21 Nov 2014

Rank #7

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New Food Revolution (11/24/14)

The amount of food needed to feed the earth’s growing population is expected to double by mid-century. How will we manage the world’s food supply? Karen Ross, California Secretary of Food and Agriculture; former Deputy US Secretary of Agriculture Jonathan Foley, Executive Director, California Academy of Sciences Helene York, Director, Google Global Accounts at Bon Appétit Management Company This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on November 28, 2014. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr

28 Nov 2014

Rank #8

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Stormy Science, Rocky Investments (06/03/14)

Climate change is risky business – but how risky is it for business? With temperatures predicted to rise anywhere from one to four degrees this century, droughts, floods and extreme weather present risks that will impact American families, businesses and habitats. Rebecca Shaw of the Environmental Defense Fund sees a global attitude shift towards adaptation. One example is the wine industry. “As climate shifts, there will be some places where wine grapes are grown today that won’t be suitable in the future,” she says. A move north may be imminent, and some growers are already doing that. But as competition for resources heats up between agribusiness, communities and wildlife, sacrifices may be in order. “We’re really going to have to think about what we’re going to grow here,” cautions Shaw. “Some crops are going to be less viable because water will be more scarce in the future.” Later in the program, financial industry experts discuss shifts on Wall Street wrought by climate change. As Lisa Goldberg of Aperio notes, climate change awareness is nothing new. “But in terms of its impact on economic markets, I think that it’s just really now coming to the consciousness of mainstream investors.” Recent high-profile divestments have put large-cap fossil fuel companies under Wall Street’s microscope. But is shareholder pressure an effective tool for change? “Just having that conversation publicly is a huge step,” says shareholder advocate Andrew Behar. “I think it’s a real milestone.” This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on June 3, 2014. Guests - Part I: Stephen Bennett, Senior Vice President, Verisk Climate Noah Diffenbaugh, Associate Professor, School of Earth Sciences, Stanford University Rebecca Shaw, Associate Vice President and Lead Scientist, Environmental Defense Fund Guests - Part II: Andrew Behar, CEO, As You Sow Lisa Goldberg, Director of Research, Aperio Group; former Director of Research, MSCI Josh Schein, Senior Portfolio Manager, Morgan Stanley Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr

20 Jun 2014

Rank #9

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Oil on Rails (10/03/14)

Crude oil is riding the rails to East Bay refineries at an increasing rate. How can local communities safeguard themselves against potential disaster? Speakers John Avalos, Member, Bay Area Air Quality Management District and San Francisco Board of Supervisors Jess Dervin-Ackerman, Conservation Program Coordinator, Sierra Club San Francisco Bay Chapter Molly Samuel, Reporter, KQED Science Tupper Hull, Vice President, Strategic Communications Western States Petroleum Association Greg Dalton, Host and Founder, Climate One – Moderator This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on October 3, 2014. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr

24 Oct 2014

Rank #10

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The Hidden Health Hazards of Climate Change

Climate change isn’t just an environmental problem – it’s also a health hazard. Air pollution and changing weather patterns give rise to heat-related illnesses, asthma and allergic disorders. Disasters like Superstorm Sandy and Hurricane Irma leave hospitals scrambling to save patients without power and resources. According to the Centers for Disease Control, insect-borne diseases have tripled in the United States in recent years – and warmer weather is largely to blame.Guests:Jonathan Patz, Director, Global Health InstituteSu Rynard, Filmmaker, MosquitoChuck Yarling, Engineer, TriathleteJessica Wolff, U.S. Director of Climate and Health, Health Care Without HarmThis program was recorded at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

53mins

11 May 2018

Rank #11

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C1 Revue: Power Plays

Despite soggy prices the outlook for American oil and gas is still promising. Cycles of boom and bust have always been part of the energy industry, which delivers big profits. At the same time, clean energy is creating jobs and clean communities. Rooftop solar for home owners is increasing rapidly and electric cars are gaining cache. In this episode of Climate One’s National Magazine we are looking at the power brokers who are moving the ball forward on renewable energy and those still making a bundle on fossil fuels. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

54mins

27 May 2015

Rank #12

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Remaking the Planet

Geoengineering may sound like science fiction, but there are many who believe we can -- and should -- be taking drastic measures to cool our planet down. Oliver Morton, Briefings Editor, The Economist; Author, The Planet Remade: How Geoengineering Could Change the World (Princeton University Press, 2015) Kim Stanley Robinson, Author, 2312 (Orbit, 2012) Ken Caldeira, Climate Scientist, Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Global Ecology at Stanford University This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on January 28, 2016. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr

10 Mar 2017

Rank #13

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Mountain Meltdown (10/22/13)

“We want skiers to literally help save the world,” said Porter Fox, editor at Powder Magazine. Climate change has already impacted the length and intensity of winters and reduced snowfall means many of the nation’s ski centers will eventually be forced to close, especially those at lower temperatures. Jeremy Jones, professional snowboarder and founder of Protect Our Winters, reminisced about a spot he revisited in Chamonix: “I used to be able to snowboard here.” This two-panel conversation first explores the science and personal experiences behind shorter winters, then looks at how ski resort CEOs are dealing with the problem. “If you’re going to allow carbon emissions to be free, in the end nobody’s really going to do anything,” said Mike Kaplan, president and CEO of Aspen/Snowmass. With the popularity of winter sports, the ski industry may be able to help communicate the impacts of climate change. “This industry gets it,” Kaplan said. Porter Fox, Editor, Powder Magazine; Author, The Deep: The Story of skiing and the Future of Snow (November 2013) Anne Nolin, Professor, Geosciences and Hydroclimatology, Oregon State University Jeremy Jones, Founder and CEO, Protect our Winters; Professional Snowboarder Dave Brownlie, President and CEO, Whistler Blackcomb Mike Kaplan, President and CEO, Aspen/Snowmass Jerry Blann, President, Jackson Hole Mountain Resort This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on October 22, 2013 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr 12mins

29 Oct 2013

Rank #14

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Meatonomics (02/24/14) (Rebroadcast)

Tim Koopman is a fourth-generation rancher; his family has been raising cattle on their ranch in Alameda County since 1918 and he now heads the California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA). David Robinson Simon is the author of a book that lambasts industrialized meat production. What did these two advocates from “opposite sides of the steer” have to say to each other when they sat down to debate the ethical, nutritional and environmental costs of animal agriculture? Host Greg Dalton started things off on the hot-button topic of animal cruelty. According to Simon, large factory farms have lobbied heavily to eliminate anti-cruelty protections for their industry. “So what we’ve seen the last several decades is that literally, anti-cruelty protections that once protected farm animals from abusive behavior have simply been eliminated in virtually every state in this country.” Koopman said that the demonization of his industry is based on inaccuracies; ranchers, he says, care about their animals. “It’s disturbing for us as livestock producers to have this perception that production basically lives on the backs of animals that are abused from the time they’re born until the time they’re slaughtered.” He was quick to point out that his 200-some head of cattle are treated with respect, nurtured and allowed to roam freely. And he adds that the 3,000 members of the CCA are equally vigilant. “Our membership is very cognizant of and very aware of… animal treatment, all the good things that go along with the nurturing of these animals. We will fight against the mistreatment of animals just as much as David or anybody else would.” Dalton next brought up the connection between livestock, methane emissions and climate change. According to the UN publication Livestock’s Long Shadow, nearly twenty percent of all greenhouse gases can be attributed to the livestock industry. Koopman challenged that figure, saying it was closer to three percent; Simon, not surprisingly, contends that the UN figures are conservative. Both men agree, however, that methane emission is a problem that needs to be addressed. Ironically, grass-fed cattle may be making things worse, not better, says Simon: “The unfortunate result is that they produce four times as much methane as grain-fed animals and so we get this very bizarre result that organically-fed cattle are not necessarily more eco-friendly than inorganically raised animals.” One solution, says Koopman, is genetic improvement, which has led to an overall reduction in the number of cows nationwide. Fewer cows, he points out, means less gas. But there are other reasons to believe ranching is straining our resources. “It takes on average, five times as much land to produce animal protein as it does plant protein,” says Simon. “It takes 11 times the fossil fuels and it takes 40 times or more water to produce animal protein than plant protein… that’s a major sustainability problem.” Koopman disagrees. With two-thirds of the land in the U.S. not farmable, he sees cattle ranching as a necessary part of global food sourcing. “We’ve got an increasing world population with huge demand for protein as a part of their diet. And on the absence of grazing livestock and having that land available to produce food, I think we would be in a lot worse shape than we are.” David Robinson Simon, Author, Meatonomics: How the Rigged Economics of Meat and Dairy Make You Consume Too Much – and How to Eat Better, Live Longer, and Spend Smarter Tim Koopman, President, California Cattlemen’s Association This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on February 24, 2014 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr

13 Jun 2014

Rank #15

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Beyond Plastics (1/30/14)

Who should take responsibility for reducing the amount of plastic debris that litters our cities, waterways and oceans? While many consumers have given up their plastic grocery bags, most still rely on the convenience of plastic water bottles, liquid soap and fast food in styrofoam containers. “Many of our companies are looking at bio-based materials and other kinds of plastics,” says Keith Christman of the American Chemistry Council. “High density polyethylene, made from sugarcane, is one of the largest uses today of bioplastics.” But is plant-based plastic the answer? As Molly Morse of Mango Materials points out, without oxygen to break them down, bioplastics can last as long as or longer than conventional plastic. Her company is working to create plastic out of methane gas harvested from wastewater treatment plants. “It can break down in the ocean,” she says. Bridgett Luther, President of Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, helps steer companies toward more responsible solutions for design, manufacturing and packaging their products. She points out that this approach led to market success for one company that eschewed the use of non-recyclable foam in their chairs. “ [Herman Miller] developed one of the fastest selling office chairs ever, the Aeron Chair. The end of use of that Herman Miller chair was a lot of super valuable materials that can be easily recycled.” The household cleaning company Method Products has been harvesting discarded plastic from beaches in Hawaii to produce their Ocean Plastic bottle. “Using the plastic that's already on the planet is a solution that we have today,” says co-founder Adam Lowry. “So I tend to favor solutions that we can employ right now rather than saying, “Yes. The technology is coming.” Despite these promising steps, all agree that it’s going to take a village -- manufacturers, consumers and legislators -- to work together if we’re going to rid our world of plastic waste. Keith Christman, Managing Director for Plastics Markets, American Chemistry Council; Co-chair, Global Action Committee on Marine Litter Adam Lowry, Co-founder and Chief Greenskeeper, Method Products PBC Bridgett Luther, President, Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute Molly Morse, CEO, Mango Materials This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on January 30, 2014 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

59mins

8 Feb 2014

Rank #16

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We're Doomed. Now What?

Can changing our consciousness hold off the climate apocalypse? When we think about the enormity of climate change and what it’s doing to our planet, it’s easy to get overwhelmed, even shut down, by despair. But is despair such a bad place to be? Or could it be the one thing that finally spurs us to action? A conversation about climate change, spirituality and the human condition in unsettling times. Guests: Roy Scranton Author, We're Doomed. Now What? (Soho Press, 2018) Matthew Fox Co-Author, Order of the Sacred Earth (with Skylar Wilson, Monkfish, 2018) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

51mins

27 Jul 2018

Rank #17

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Water Politics (09/12/14)

It’s a big year for water politics in California. Will voters approve a $7.12 billion bond for water projects to help get us through a record drought? John Coleman, president, Association of California Water Agencies; board member, East Bay Municipal Utility District Danny Merkley, director of water resources, California Farm Bureau Federation Anthony Rendon, California Assemblyman (D-63); Chairman, State Water Parks and Wildlife Committee Lauren Sommer, reporter, KQED Science This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California in Lafayette on September 12, 2014. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr

31 Oct 2014

Rank #18

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We’re Doomed – Now What?

Can changing our consciousness hold off the climate apocalypse? When we think about the enormity of climate change and what it’s doing to our planet, it’s easy to get overwhelmed, even shut down, by despair. But is despair such a bad place to be? Or could it be the one thing that finally spurs us to action? A conversation about climate change, spirituality and the human condition in unsettling times.Guests:Roy Scranton, Author, We're Doomed. Now What? (Soho Press, 2018)Matthew Fox, Co-Author, Order of the Sacred Earth (with Skylar Wilson, Monkfish, 2018) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

52mins

20 Jan 2019

Rank #19

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Why Facts Don’t Trump the President

An information war is raging in our country, in mainstream news and on social media. What is factual and what is an “alternative fact?” Do facts even matter?George Lakoff, Professor of Linguistics, UC BerkeleyRobert Rosenthal, Executive Director, The Center for Investigative ReportingThis program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on February 23, 2017. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr

16 Mar 2017

Rank #20