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The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

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The Logistics of Logistics podcast is dedicated to exploring how things get places. Join our host, Joe Lynch, for conversations with the people who get them there. Joe talks with logistics and transportation industry leaders about innovation, technology, trends, and the future of freight.

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The Logistics of Logistics podcast is dedicated to exploring how things get places. Join our host, Joe Lynch, for conversations with the people who get them there. Joe talks with logistics and transportation industry leaders about innovation, technology, trends, and the future of freight.

iTunes Ratings

16 Ratings
Average Ratings
15
1
0
0
0

Informative & Fun

By Jamin Alvidrez - Apr 16 2020
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Recommend this podcast for anyone in logistics. I have learned a ton from each episode and appreciate getting to “meet” great guests in each episode.

Go Joe!

By MattAJ93 - Mar 15 2019
Read more
This is a great podcast with really quality content and insightful guests. If you’re in the logistics industry you should get familiar with Joe’s work and his podcast.

iTunes Ratings

16 Ratings
Average Ratings
15
1
0
0
0

Informative & Fun

By Jamin Alvidrez - Apr 16 2020
Read more
Recommend this podcast for anyone in logistics. I have learned a ton from each episode and appreciate getting to “meet” great guests in each episode.

Go Joe!

By MattAJ93 - Mar 15 2019
Read more
This is a great podcast with really quality content and insightful guests. If you’re in the logistics industry you should get familiar with Joe’s work and his podcast.
Cover image of The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Latest release on May 22, 2020

All 55 episodes from oldest to newest

The 5 Billion Dollar Overcharge with Steve Ferreira

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The 5 Billion Dollar Overcharge with Steve Ferreira

Steve Ferreira and Joe Lynch discuss the 5 billion dollar overcharge which refers to the amount that ocean shippers are overcharged every year. Steve is well recognized expert in ocean freight auditing and in the interview, he describes the problem of ocean freight overcharges and ways to recapture the difference.

About Steve Ferreira

Steve Ferreira is the founder and CEO of Ocean Audit. Steve has spent his entire career in global container shipping. He established Ocean Audit in 1994 when he realized general freight audit practices reverse no more than 50% of overcharges occurring in ocean transportation. Today, Steve’s process is leading edge and utilizes machine learning to identify and validate ocean freight invoice errors. Initial recovery validation can be accomplished with only a very basic requested client-side report. Steve Ferreira is often featured in leading business publications like USA Today, Journal of Commerce, and as a guest commentator on CNBC.

About Ocean Audit

Ocean Audit is the leader in ocean freight invoice auditing. Ocean freight billing is very complex, and few shippers fully understand all the charges. As a result of this complexity, ocean freight shippers are commonly overcharged. Ocean Audit and Steve Ferreira specialize in ocean freight auditing. Ocean Audit uses machine learning and artificial intelligence to identify invoice inaccuracies and overcharges. Ocean Audit utilizes its expertise on a contingency only basis, which means Steve only gets paid if he discovers a saving.

Key Takeaways - 5 Billion Dollar Overcharge The Problem with Ocean Freight Invoices
  • In Steve’s experience, ocean freight invoices are usually inaccurate. The average high-volume ocean freight shipper is overcharged by 1-2% with some shippers getting overcharged by much more.
  • Ocean freight invoices are very complex and there are few supply chain people who have the time and or expertise required to audit the invoices. Auditing of the ocean freight invoices frequently falls in a gap somewhere between accounting and the supply chain group.
  • Ocean freight invoicing is often very antiquated and technology improvements implemented are far behind the truckload and LTL modes.
  • The top five reasons ocean freight invoices are inaccurate:
    • Double billing (the ocean freight provider may double bill when they discover a surcharge not added to the freight bill).
    • Date cusp issues
    • Fuel surcharges
    • Not checking container numbers
    • Contract complexity
Ocean Freight Auditing – Recapturing the 5 Billion Dollar Overcharge
  • Shippers can conduct their own ocean freight auditing; however, they would need to hire an internal resource that would have a deep understanding of ocean freight auditing. This specialized knowledge is not easily found.
  • Shippers can also hire a pre-auditing firm, which is a 3rd party company that audits the freight bills prior to the shipper paying the invoice. Since most pre-auditing firms specialize in over the road trucking freight audit, they may lack the knowledge required to conduct an effective ocean freight audit.
  • For many ocean freight shippers, the right audit solution is a company that specializes in ocean freight auditing. Ocean freight auditing is too complex to hire a firm that just dabbles in the space – hire a specialist.
  • Ocean freight shippers hire Steve Ferreira because he has over 40,000 hours of expertise in all areas of ocean freight invoicing and dispute management. Steve is the world’s leading expert in recovery auditing for the container shipping industry.
  • Ocean Audit is the only international company specializing in all aspects of ocean freight recovery.
Learn More:

Steve Ferreira

Ocean Audit

Business Insider

FreightWaves

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

May 22 2020

32mins

Play

The Niches Have Riches with Kevin Hill

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The Niches Have Riches with Kevin Hill

Kevin Hill and Joe Lynch discuss why the niches have riches, which refers to the advantage of specializing and owning a niche. In the logistics and transportation business, competition is intense and increasingly the best 3PLs are developing market segments, so they can customize their services to a specific niche (market segment).

About Kevin Hill

Kevin Hill is the Director of Editorial and Research at FreightWaves, which publishes proprietary research on all things transport and logistics. Kevin is also the co-host of the popular freight sales podcast, Put That Coffee Down. Additionally, Kevin is the founder of CarrierLists, which is the only carrier database that provides a comprehensive profile of carriers that go beyond what is available in public records.. Earlier in his career, Kevin held leadership positions in both the financial and logistics industries. Kevin earned an MBA from the University of Oklahoma.

About FreightWaves

FreightWaves is the leading freight intelligence provider, offering current digital intelligence and context to the freight community on a central platform. FreightWaves'​ SaaS product, SONAR, is the leading freight market analytics tool and dashboard, aggregating billions of data points from hundreds of sources to provide the fastest data in the transportation and logistics sector.  FreightWaves.com, the company's news site, is the leading provider of news and commentary for the transportation and logistics space. FreightWaves also hosts conferences under Transparency and MarketWaves branding and is a co-developer of the first futures contracts dedicated to trucking spot rates.

Key Takeaways – The Niches Have Riches The Problem with One Size Fits All
  • The competition is fierce in the transportation and logistics business and without a niche, you and your company will struggle to stand out from the crowd. The “we are everything to everyone” messaging is a sure loser
  • Shippers look to 3PLs for answers to their transportation and logistics problems. Shippers are increasingly looking for industry-specific expertise and if you do not have it, they will work with your competition.
  • Content marketing begins with market segmentation (niches). If you want to gain favorable attention with a food shipper, you better be able to create content that appeals to them. Food shippers are obviously different than hazmat shippers, and vice versa.
  • With a one size fits all strategy, your marketing and messaging is going to be a “mile wide and an inch deep” which won’t for shippers who want to work with experts in their business.
The Niches Have Riches Approach
  • When logistics providers develop their own niche, they have a better chance of winning business with shippers in that niche.
  • To develop the selected niche, learn about the biggest problems facing the niche industry - that your company can solve. Once understood, incorporate the problems along with your solutions into your marketing and sales messaging. With industry knowledge, your chances for a sale increase. Since your company is focused on a niche, the confidence of the sales team will be much higher.
  • Logistics market segments include:
    • Automotive
    • Chemical and Plastics
    • Industrial and Manufacturing
    • Gov & Defense
    • Energy and Petrochemicals
    • Consumer Packaged Goods (CPG)
    • Furniture
    • Food and Beverage
    • Appliances
    • Electronics
    • Health, Pharma, Life Sciences
  • Industry leaders like CH Robinson are using market segmentation and thought leadership to grow their business: https://www.chrobinson.com/en-us/industries/
Learn More:

Kevin Hill

FreightWaves

Put That Coffee Down

CarrierLists

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

May 22 2020

34mins

Play

Securing the First, Middle and Last Mile with Andrew Kelley

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Securing the First, Middle and Last Mile with Andrew Kelley

Andrew Kelley and Joe Lynch discuss securing the first, middle and last mile. As supply chains evolve, the need for secure asset transfer increases for both consumers and business to business applications.

About Andrew Kelley

Andrew Kelley is the Chief Commercial Officer at BoxLock. Andrew is an experienced technology executive and entrepreneur with over 20 years of experience in supply chain, logistics, SaaS, software, and technology-enabled services businesses. Prior to joining BoxLock, Andrew held leadership positions at Bell Creek Partners, Haulme, Omnitracs, and Dell. Andrew has an MBA from Harvard Business School, a Masters in Science in Mechanical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Bachelor of Science from North Carolina State University.

About BoxLock

BoxLock is the industry leader in secure, unattended delivery technology. The company’s inventory, access, and security solutions integrate into existing systems to help businesses make their supply chain more efficient, accountable, and reliable in the first and final mile. BoxLock’s unique combination of barcode scanner and connectivity allows an unprecedented level of secure integrations without the need for complicated and unreliable mobile software or key fobs.

Key Takeaways - Securing the First, Middle and Last Mile The Problem with Unsecured Shipments
  • With the rise of e-commerce, supply chain logistics has evolved into more small package deliveries to both consumers and businesses. Many of the deliveries are to locations where there is nobody available to receive the package. This is true for both home and business deliveries.
  • One option is to deliver the package to the porch or dock and hope that it does not get stolen or discovered by insects or rodents in the case of food deliveries. When a driver leaves a package unattended on a porch or dock, the proof of delivery can potentially be disputed.
  • A second option is for the delivery company to keep the package and attempt to deliver when the receiver is available. Re-delivery results in inconvenience, delayed deliveries, and added costs.
  • Clearly, after-hour and unattended location deliveries are the weakest links in the supply chain. There is a high risk of theft, loss, time delays, privacy concerns, and additional costs associated with these types of deliveries.
Securing the First, Middle and Last Mile
  • Both businesspeople and consumers want the convenience of a shipment direct to their home or business whether they are there or not– and those shipments must be safe and secure.
  • Shippers and the logistics companies they work with also want the option of delivering to a location even when there is no one available to receive the shipment. Of course, shippers and 3PLs, do not like the lack of security of leaving a package unattended on a porch or dock – it puts them at risk.
  • BoxLock has developed a unique padlock with a scanner that enables supply chain visibility and security at the point of asset transfer. BoxLock is easy for delivery drivers to recognize and use.
  • Once the package barcode is scanned by the padlock scanner, the container opens, and the package can be put in the secure container and locked. The scan feature enables real-time visibility and proof of delivery notification.
  • The smart padlock works with a broad range of hasped storage containers, sheds, gates, and doors, for maximum compatibility and security. Note: a hasp is the metal hinge mechanism that enables a container or door to be locked.
Learn More:

Andrew Kelley

BoxLock

BoxLock Video

Year 2025 – The Future of the 3PL Industry with Andrew Kelley

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

May 21 2020

22mins

Play

Upgrading to One Integrated Suite for all Logistics Operations with Naval Sabharwal

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Upgrading to One Integrated Suite for all Logistics Operations with Naval Sabharwal

Naval Sabharwal and Joe Lynch discuss why using one integrated suite for all logistics operations is the best approach for driving logistics and supply chain efficiency and effectiveness. Utilizing fragmented systems limits logistics companies from fully leveraging the data in their systems. Data equals dollars and the 3PLs that best harvest the data (dollars) in their systems will be the most profitable.

About Naval Sabharwal

Naval is Global Head of Supply Chain and Logistics at Ramco Systems, where he leads a team that is building a logistics software platform that meets the end to end needs of transportation and logistics providers. Prior to joining Ramco, Naval held leadership positions at a variety of companies including Safexpress, Reliance Logistics, Reliance Retail, Unipart Logistics and Hexaware Technologies. Naval has a Postgraduate in Material Management from the National Defense Academy. He served the Logistics stream of the Indian Air Force for 20 years before taking pre-mature retirement in September 2004 as a Wing Commander.

About Ramco

Ramco’s Logistics Software is a unified cloud-based software covering the end to end needs of third-party logistics, freight forwarders, and parcel/courier service providers who are seeking a high-performance logistics software. Ramco Logistics Software will not only help you manage your business with ease but also swiftly respond to evolving imperatives of business, regulatory changes, market conditions, etc. without having to go through the pains of integration again and again.

Noteworthy Questions
  • [7:45] Logistics companies don’t necessarily have the talent in-house to manage information systems.
  • [20:10] Trying to integrate systems from different suppliers is where the problems begin.
  • [28:30] Why do we need an integrated solution for all of our logistics operations?
Key Takeaways - Integrated Suite for all Logistics Operations The Problem with the Fragmented Approach to Software
  • Most transportation and logistics companies have purchased stand-alone, single-function software like TMS, WMS, CRM, HR, tracking, and fleet management to better manage their business.
  • The problem with this hodge-podge approach to software is that each system is disconnected, and the data created is not easy to share between software systems. Some companies integrate their disparate software, which is time-consuming and costly – and with uncertain results.
  • Fragmentation of software systems and data causes a lack of visibility and data that is too old to act on. Real-time data enables real-time decision making.
  • As logistics companies push for additional efficiencies, business intelligence, and real-time insights, the fragmented systems can not deliver.
The Advantages of One Integrated Suite for All Logistics Operations
  • Customer (shippers) expectations are rising, they need a fully integrated suite for all logistics operations. The platform seamlessly connects every function from the CRM through freight claims.
  • The integrated suite eliminates silos, enables continuous innovation, and provides real-time data and insights that can help improve service and lower costs.
  • An integrated suite for all logistics operations (like Ramco’s solution) is a platform that is completely configurable by operations people – no IT people required.
  • By utilizing a completely integrated platform, logistics companies can take advantage of artificial intelligence/machine learning, which will take their business to the next level
Pick a Strategic Partner for Your Logistics Company Software Needs
  • Most 3PLs do not have the internal expertise required to compete with the best 3PL software development teams.
  • To stay competitive, 3PL should consider partnering with a 3PL software company that can build and support a comprehensive, end-to-end software suite that includes CRM, freight rating, billing, operations, WMS, cross-docking, profitability, claims, finance, and HR.
  • When selecting a 3PL software partner, logistics companies should look for three things: 1. Design capabilities, 2. Flexibility and 3. Investment capabilities.
  • Technology is advancing quickly and companies need to invest to stay ahead of the curve. 3PLs must look to the future and make lasting technological and digital partnerships that will ensure their competitive advantage.
Learn More:

Naval Sabharwal on LinkedIn

Ramco

Ramco Webinars

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

May 17 2020

32mins

Play

A Better Way to Reach Your Target Market with Tom Augenthaler

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A Better Way to Reach Your Target Market with Tom Augenthaler

Joe Lynch and Tom Augenthaler discuss what it takes to reach your target market more effectively and more efficiently. Tom is an influencer marketing expert and he shares how influencer marketing can be used to boost your company’s growth and form better relationships with your customers.

About Tom Augenthaler

Tom grew up in Long Island and studied finance at Gettysburg College. Finding himself unfulfilled by the world of finance, Tom went on to study American English Language at Harvard before entering the PR industry. Tom worked with HP for years which is where he discovered how to utilize influencer marketing during the economic crash of 2008.

About 551 Media and The Influence Marketer

The Influence Marketer is the place to go for any company looking to start or improve their use of influencer marketing. Tom offers full team training on the many different aspects of the process, one on one mentoring, or strategy calls. He consults digitally and in-person to help B2B businesses build a marketing strategy that is right for them.

Reach Your Target Market Using Influencer Marketing 
  • Individuals are more likely to be trusted over brands. Think of when your friend recommends a movie or T.V show to you; you are much more likely to watch than if it were recommended by an anonymous entity.
  • Finding bloggers who already have an audience in the same demographic you are looking to target makes it easy to effectively convey your message and increases its relevancy.
  • Utilizing influencer marketing effectively will enable your business and brand to grow, resulting in your own brand becoming an influencer in the B2B industry.
Why Use Influencer Marketing in the B2B industry?
  • The landscape of traditional marketing has evolved to trend more towards digital.
  • While businesses do still have to run advertising campaigns to maintain a presence, influencer collaborations are often a cost-effective way to increase your audience, especially in the B2B industry.
  • B2B is a harder market to corner in some respects because you often can’t give bloggers a physical product to review.
  • Often, influencers in the B2B industry will be a more inexpensive choice to collaborate with as their audiences are smaller and more focused. Tom has also found it will usually be a quid pro quo situation.
Digital Vs. Influencer Marketing
  • Digital marketing includes things like articles, SEO optimization, and social media. This can be costly and hard to see an ROI on.
  • There is no right or wrong answer. Track what works for you and see which offers the best return.
  • The consumer and market changes quickly. In terms of B2B the sales process is a longer one than other industries. Influencer marketing is a way of keeping up with your target audience in a more immediate fashion than using a digital strategy to launch over a longer period of time.
Noteworthy Questions
  • [3:29] What are some of the problems people are experiencing in trying to reach their target market?
  • [18:22] How does content creation and SEO compare to influencer marketing?
  • [22:15] How can companies get started using influencer marketing?
Key Takeaways - A Better Way to Reach Your Target Market
  • Know your objectives - are you looking for more brand awareness and consideration or are you looking for more sales leads?
  • Don’t work with too many influencers at once - be selective about who you work with and develop a relationship with them for a lasting partnership. Choose a strategic over transactional relationship; it will offer more benefits in the long run.
  • Leverage your relationship with current collaborators to find new people to work with.
Learn More

Tom Augenthaler Linkedin

The Influence Marketer

Why Marketing is Your Best Sales Person with Jim Bierfeldt

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

May 02 2020

29mins

Play

Understanding Your Sales Personality with Ryan Schreiber and Ann Holm

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Understanding Your Sales Personality with Ryan Schreiber and Ann Holm

Joe Lynch is joined by Ann Holm and Ryan Schreiber to discuss sales personality type. When you understand your sales personality type it enables you to play to your strengths and account for your blind spots. Knowing your individual sales personality type leads to greater self-awareness, a starting point for self-improvement activities, and better sales results.

About Ryan Schreiber

Ryan is the Director of Engagement at CarrierDirect in Chicago. Ryan was born and raised in Tampa Florida. Ryan earned a degree in History from the University of South Florida and then a Law degree from Michigan State University.  Prior to joining CarrierDirect, Ryan worked at a variety of logistics companies and even started and exited a few tech-enabled freight brokerage start-ups. Ryan is a skilled technologist and strategist who has helped transform many leading transportation and logistics companies. In Ryan’s experience great technology is important but finding and keeping the right people is the key to success in the 3PL business.

About Carrier Direct

Since 2011 carriers, 3PLs, shippers, and logistics technology vendors have looked to CarrierDirect to deliver the efficiency, strategy, go-to-market plans, and technology that will elevate their business above their competition. CarrierDirect builds organizations and relationships, providing strategy and technology designed to maximize efficiency, reduce cost, and make your business stand out. CarrierDirect advises clients on the elements of their business most vital to success: strategy, organizational structure, compensation, technology, training, recruiting, workflows, processes, and more. CarrierDirect clients include Werner, J.B. Hunt, Covenant, CRST, and FedEx.

Finding Your Sales Personality
  • The process to discover your personality type is a simple one. Ann provides a link to an online assessment. The assessment is easy and fun and takes about 20 minutes to complete.
  • After you receive your customized report, you schedule time with your coach (Ann). In your coaching session, you review and discuss your sales personality type report with Ann. Ann explains the nuances of the report. Utilizing this approach helps salespeople identify strengths and blind spots, which leads to greater self-awareness, improved capability and ultimately more sales. points.
  • Finding your personality type can help you to apply what you learn to your role at work and what aspects you can leverage for the best results.
Ryan’s Impression of the Process
  • It has a two-fold value: 1) Taking the assessment allowed him to highlight aspects of his personality he was not aware of previously and 2) Having a professional come in and add depth to the things that originally didn’t mesh with him.
  • Initially, Ryan found the assessment to be about 80% true and about 20% not quite accurate. During his consultation with Ann, Ryan was able to help clarify these traits and allowed Ryan to crystallize the interpretation in his own mind.
Ryan's Sales Personality
  • Ryan was assessed as an ENFP. The results are evaluated by which way you learn more, rather than a binary result. No one is purely one thing; we are all comprised of different personality traits and combinations. The definition is split into 4 different groups: Extroversion vs. Introversion, Sensing vs. Intuition, Values vs, Logic, and Routine vs. Spontaneity.
  • Ryan tells us how this fits with him in various different ways, such as how he remembers things related to concepts rather than details. He also has always seen himself as more of an introvert but after consulting with Ann realized that he does form relationships easily and has a natural ability to connect with people.
Contextualizing Personality with Sales
  • Ryan and Ann discuss how he is an ‘ideas generator’, a typical aspect of ENFP personalities and how the assessment revealed his problems with handing off ideas.
  • This identifies areas of strength and areas to be improved for Ryan in regard to teamwork. He is able to generate excitement within his team very easily but has issues finding that balance of sharing with his team.
  • It is typically a trait of Ryan’s to have unrealistic expectations about what is possible. He has found he struggles with realistic timelines and needs to open up to others definition of realistic.
  • The benefits of finding out your personality type is the ability to work on becoming a more well-rounded individual.
  • Organization is a typical stumbling block for ENFP's like Ryan. Ryan feels like he is organized, but his approach is different than most people.
  • When it comes to opening and closing sales, ENFPs are natural openers and Ryan agrees. He has much more trouble in closing sales as he gets bogged down in details. Ann recommended that Ryan partner with someone who is very good with details to enable Ryan to close more deals. Becoming aware of his blind spots will also enable Ryan to be more aware when he is dealing with a difficult area.
Noteworthy Questions
  • [3:56] Ryan, what are some of your impressions on going through the process of finding your sales personality?
  • [17:12] What does the collaborative environment look like in your work?
  • [23:44] Let’s talk about opening versus closing in the sales process.
Key Takeaways
  • Knowing your personality type allows you to set goals within a situational framework to improve your performance at work.
  • It allows for the ability to open up with your team regarding strengths and weaknesses allowing for better cooperation.
  • It provides the ability to see things from different perspectives, and why other people think differently will allow for more cohesive teams.
Learn More

Ryan Schreiber LinkedIn profile

CarrierDirect

Ann Holm LinkedIn profile

Ann Holm Coaching

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

May 01 2020

33mins

Play

Building a High Growth, Customer-Focused 3PL with Betsy Westhafer

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Building a High Growth, Customer-Focused 3PL with Betsy Westhafer

Joe Lynch and Betsy Westhafer discuss building a high growth, customer-focused 3PL. In Betsy's experience, the difference between a high growth company and a low growth company is customer focus. The companies that build their entire business around the customer and customer engagement become market leaders. Betsy is the CEO of The Congruity Group and has years of experience in helping other companies improve their customer focus. Today, she’ll outline the strategies your company needs to adopt for success today.

About Betsy Westhafer

Betsy is the founder and CEO of The Congruity Group. The Congruity Group works with CEOs and private equity firms to increase the value of their companies by accelerating recurring revenue, customer retention, and account expansion. Betsy is passionate about helping companies establish strategies to facilitate deeper connections with customers. Betsy attended Western Kentucky University where she studied Journalism, Public Relations, and Business Administration.

About The Congruity Group

Congruity means alignment, and The Congruity Group was formed to help organizations reach this alignment. They use strategic conversations that will give a greater insight into customer needs and facilitate a deeper relationship with client bases. The Congruity Group offers in-person and digital customer advisory boards tailored to your company to help you achieve your goals.

The Have-Nots (Not Experiencing High Growth)
  • The have-nots are not seeing growth, because they lack customer focus and alignment despite their belief that they know what their client base wants and needs. They only know their customers on a superficial level.
  • The market changes and evolves quickly. What worked a few years ago may not be working for them now, but they have yet to see the need to update their strategies. This leads to unimaginative marketing strategies.
  • Lack of communication with the day-to-day staff causes a disconnect between them and the senior management. This leads to ineffective sales teams because they are trying to sell something that customers don’t necessarily want or needs.
The Haves (Experiencing High Growth)
  • The haves (customer-focused 3PLs) understand their customers on a deeper level, so they can build breakthrough value propositions and superior products.
  • They understand the need for deeper relationships with their customer base and use them to create new insights and innovations that fulfill their needs.
  • The haves show alignment with their customers by demonstrating marketing, values, onboarding, and sales in sync with the customer.
Noteworthy Questions - Building a High Growth, Customer-Focused 3PL
  • [5:14] In your experience, what’s the difference between the companies that are winning and the companies that are not winning?
  • [16:15] The haves understand their customers and align with them so talk about that.
  • [19:37] Talk to us about a process that helps us get these deeper insights.
Key Takeaways - Building a High Growth, Customer-Focused 3PL
  • Senior management should commit to a process for understanding the customer. Recognize that it takes time and effort to develop a strategy for better understanding the customer.
  • Consider a neutral third party to offer advice. It is often hard to see what needs to change when you have been making decisions in a bubble for so long.
  • Ask questions of the customer and accept feedback. Take their feedback and use it to implement change.
  • Maintain strong lines of communication with the customer. Keeping them updated builds trust and deepens the relationship.
  • Leverage your relationships with existing customers to create a base that will advocate for you when trying to expand.
Learn More About Building a High Growth, Customer-Focused 3PL

Betsy Westhafer LinkedIn

The Congruity Group

ProphetAbility: The revealing Story of Why Companies Succeed, Fail or Bounce Back

Transportation Marketing & Sales Association

The New Reality of Logistics Sales and Marketing with Brian Everett

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

May 01 2020

29mins

Play

The Right Talent - Recruiting Training and Retaining with Ryan Schreiber

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The Right Talent – Recruiting, Training, and Retaining with Ryan Schreiber

Ryan Schreiber and Joe Lynch discuss what it takes to recruit the right talent in the transportation and logistics industry. While Ryan is very much a techie, he believes that people are the ultimate competitive advantage. In the interview, Ryan shares his perspective on recruiting, training and retaining the right talent.

About Ryan Schreiber

Ryan is the Director of Engagement at CarrierDirect in Chicago. Ryan was born and raised in Tampa Florida. Ryan earned a degree in History from the University of South Florida and then a Law degree from Michigan State University.  Prior to joining CarrierDirect, Ryan worked at a variety of logistics companies and even started and exited a few tech-enabled freight brokerage start-ups. Ryan is a skilled technologist and strategist who has helped transform many leading transportation and logistics companies. In Ryan’s experience great technology is important but finding and keeping the right people is the key to success in the 3PL business.

About CarrierDirect

Since 2011 carriers, 3PLs, shippers, and logistics technology vendors have looked to CarrierDirect to deliver the efficiency, strategy, go-to-market plans, and technology that will elevate their business above their competition. CarrierDirect builds organizations and relationships, providing strategy and technology designed to maximize efficiency, reduce cost and make your business stand out. CarrierDirect advises clients on the elements of their business most vital to success: strategy, organizational structure, compensation, technology, training, recruiting, workflows, processes, and more. CarrierDirect clients include Werner, J.B. Hunt, Covenant, CRST, and FedEx.

The Right Talent
  • The right talent is the talent that will succeed in your organization, not just look good on a resume. To recruit the right talent, recruiters must understand the organization, industry, job responsibilities, and company culture.
  • Turnover is very high in the transportation and logistics industry, which indicates that the people that get recruited to the company are not the people who ultimately succeed at the company. High turnover is demoralizing, upsetting to customers, costly, and negatively impacts company culture.
Recruiting the Right Talent
  • Many companies in the logistics and transportation business are “winging it” when it comes to recruiting and it shows. This is particularly true with start-ups where the founders and early hires do most of the work. The informal recruiting process works well when the company is new, and the founders hire their contacts and friends, but the informal process breaks down as the company grows. Just as the company is scaling, they realize that their recruiting process isn’t working anymore.
  • Ryan compares the recruiting process to the sales process and believes the right candidate can be hired by following a sales process:
    • Lean generation: Target and attract the right talent. Make sure your recruiters really have their finger on the pulse of the organization and the industry. They should also do their homework so they know exactly the type of person they would like to interview and eventually hire.
    • Qualifying: Standardize the interviewing process and develop interview guidelines so there is consistency. In order to develop the guidelines, you must understand what type of people succeed in the organization.
    • Closing: Recruitment is the precursor to the experience a candidate will have with your organization. Provide the candidate the best experience possible so that when you find the right talent, you get them.
  • Design a recruiting process much as you would design a customer’s experience. Consider each step in the process to ensure the candidate is treated properly. Communication throughout the process is crucial. Don’t oversell, keep your commitments and treat the candidate like you would treat your best customer.
Training the Right Talent
  • Ryan believes that many logistics companies do a poor job of training and development. The nature of the industry makes it difficult to pull employees away from day-to-day operations. While this may be true, the lack of training becomes evident in the business. Untrained and under-trained employees are not performing at their highest levels and they may never completely understand the job they were hired to do.
  • Training is not just for new hires, everyone in the organization should be trained, coached and developed to ensure that everyone is getting better at their job. The right training will have a good return on investment, improve customer satisfaction, and deepen the ties to the employees who get trained.
  • Companies should have the following training: 1. New hire training and development. 2. Ongoing training to reinforce learning while incorporating new software features, new processes, and lessons learned. 3. Developmental training for employees who are promoted into leadership positions and or lateral moves to expand their knowledge.
  • People in leadership positions should be coaching their people on a regular basis. To ensure that the coaching is constructive and positive, leaders should be training in effective coaching techniques.
  • Training should include supply chain topics, so employees learn about the whole supply chain, from end to end and not just their small piece of the process.
Key Takeaways
  • Even in the technology-obsessed logistics industry, people matter. The talent war is real. To succeed companies, need to: recruit, train, and retain the right talent.
  • Invest in the right talent and build a culture that attracts the right people to your company.
Learn More

Ryan Schreiber LinkedIn

CarrierDirect

CarrierDirect Office Hours (please subscribe on Youtube)

Understanding Your Sales Personality with Ryan Schreiber and Ann Holm (podcast interview coming soon)

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Apr 12 2020

39mins

Play

The New Reality of Logistics Sales and Marketing with Brian Everett

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The New Reality of Logistics Sales and Marketing with Brian Everett

Brian Everett and Joe Lynch discuss the new reality of logistics sales and marketing. Since Brian is the CEO of TMSA he has a great perspective on what’s working in transportation and logistics sales. Brian shares his thoughtful insights, which are based on TMSA research and his direct involvement with TMSA members.

About Brian Everett

Brian is on a mission to help sales, marketing, and communications professionals in transportation and logistics to be more successful in their careers. Brian uses his 25 plus years of experience in marketing, sales, association management in transportation, logistics and supply chain to do accomplish his mission. He is committed to bringing together a community of successful marketing and sales professionals in freight transportation and logistics as the CEO of the Transportation Marketing & Sales Association (TMSA).

About the Transportation Marketing and Sales Association (TMSA)

TMSA is the one and only association serving marketing, sales, and communications professionals in transportation and logistics. TMSA’s mission is to enable sales and marketing professionals to learn and give back to the transportation and logistics industry through education, connections, and resources, ultimately strengthening their individual development, their businesses, and the industry-at-large. Part of TMSA's mission is to help marketing and sales professionals be armed with knowledge on such issues as sales and marketing integration, blockchain technologies, lead generation, CRM and marketing automation platforms, and content marketing.

Noteworthy Questions

[10:23]  Please tell us the first new reality of marketing and selling logistics services?

[19:53]  What’s the second new reality of logistics marketing and sales?

[23:31]  What’s the third new reality of marketing and selling logistics services?

Key Takeaways
  • Logistics sales is becoming increasingly sophisticated. In the podcast, Brian shared the three (3) new realities of logistics sales and marketing.
  • New Reality One: Leveraging technology is one of the keys to success in sales and marketing. The logistics industry leaders are making big investments in technologies like websites, digital marketing, SEO, social media, email marketing, marketing automation, RFP, collaboration, and CRM software.
  • New Reality Two: Customer experience (CX) can be described as the cumulative impact of multiple touchpoints over the course of a customer's interaction with an organization. CX has been used extensively and successfully in the B2C market but is only now being used by B2B marketers. Top logistics companies, especially the tech-centric players are using CX to increase customer satisfaction, loyalty, and win more business. To improve the customer experience, map the process noting every interaction with the customer, from the first marketing impression through the sales process, onboarding, training, and day-to-day servicing of the account. Capture and fix any gaps or issues in the process.
  • New Reality Three: Sales and marketing integration is a new reality that grows in importance daily. Traditionally, sales and marketing departments had quite different cultures, personalities, and objectives. As the buying and selling process moves online, more and more companies are integrating the two functions. Ideally, the integration will remove silos, communication barriers, and gaps between marketing and sales. Marketing and sales integration ideally will lead to greater customer satisfaction and a more efficient and effective sales process.
Learn More

Brian Everett LinkedIn

Transportation Marketing and Sales Association (TMSA)

TMSA Conference Event Calendar

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Apr 12 2020

35mins

Play

Building Strategic Partnerships with 3PLs and Carriers with Don Dovgin

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Building Strategic Partnerships with 3PLs and Carriers with Don Dovgin

Don Dovgin and Joe Lynch discuss the advantages of building strategic partnerships with 3PLs and carriers. Shippers who develop strategic partnerships with 3PLs and carriers get better service and lower costs than shippers that switch from one carrier to another based on the lowest cost.

About Don Dovgin

Don is the Director of Engagements at Maine Pointe. Don was born and raised in the Chicago metropolitan area. Don started his career working as a mechanic at American Airlines. Don rapidly moved up the org chart at AA and eventually landed in the freight and cargo division where he learned first-hand about air freight, distribution, trucking, and supply chain management. Don earned both his undergrad in business and his masters degree at night school. Prior to joining Maine Pointe, Don held a series of positions with increasing responsibility at Accenture, Ryder, Transportation Management Group, and Roadnet/Omnitracs.

About Maine Pointe

Maine Pointe is an implementation focused consulting company that specializes in procurement, logistics, and operations. Their goal is to accelerate measurable improvements in EBITDA, cash and growth across the plan-buy-make-move-fulfill supply chain to deliver the greatest value to customers and stakeholders at the lowest cost to business.

The Consequences of Not Building Strategic Partnerships with 3PLs and Carriers
  • Service failures including shipments that are late, lost or damaged.
  • No customization because neither the shipper nor the provider has invested in the relationship.
  • Capacity and availability may become a problem in tight markets. 3PLs and carriers are always looking for business, but when capacity is tight, they will take care of strategic customers before servicing transactional customers.
  • Cannot fully leverage technology and technology integration which leads to problems. If a shipper decides to use multiple 3PLs, rather than develop a strategic relationship with one, they may not be able to gain the full benefit of system integration. Shippers may find themselves using several different systems and processes. They may not be able to view and track all their shipments in one place. Additionally, KPIs and business intelligence must be managed internally because no one carrier or 3PL has all the data.
  • The data harnessed and then harvested from transportation management systems is extremely valuable for insights and future carrier negotiations – trading these insights for a one-time lower price is short-sighted.
  • Lack of account familiarity is a problem when a shipper uses a lot of different 3PLs and carriers. The 3PL/carrier never fully understands the shipper’s business requirements.
The Process for Building Strategic Partnerships with 3PLs and Carriers
  • Select the right partner for your transportation and logistics business. Involve all internal stakeholders in the selection process to ensure the carriers and 3PLs ultimately selected can provide a world-class solution.
  • Establish trust and mutual respect with your 3PL and carriers.
  • Don’t wear out the welcome mat. As a shipper, become a shipper of choice. Expedites and special requests are a necessary part of logistics, however, shippers who plan and communicate better make better partners.
  • Be patient and expect ramp-up issues at launch. The shipper, 3PL, and carriers should develop a launch plan that includes onboarding, training, system integration along with a regularly scheduled launch meeting. Even with careful planning, there will be issues. Encourage the 3PL/carriers to share the problems and solutions. Constructive feedback should be readily given and received.
  • Make sure the partnership is win-win. Spend the time required to build the relationship. For the shipper, learn about the problems that your carriers and 3PLs have. Ask what you can do to improve your interactions and touchpoints. Become a shipper of choice. For 3PLs and carriers, learn about your customer's industry and their biggest problems. Focus on continuous improvement and customer experience.
The Benefits of Building Strategic Partnerships with 3PLs and Carriers
  • Improved service performance and cost reductions as the shipper, 3PL, and carrier network analyze and optimize the logistics and transportation function.
  • Customized solutions that make shipping faster, easier, and less expensive. When a shipper develops a strategic relationship with a provider, it enables the provider to invest in developing a customized solution for a shipper. For shippers who don’t develop strategic relationships with 3PLs and carriers, they will not a customized solution or the results that come with it.
  • Additional capacity and availability even in tight markets. Shippers who have strategic relationships with 3PLs and carriers typically do a better job forecasting demand, which makes it easier for carriers to support your business.
  • Fully leverage technology and technology integration which streamlines the shipping process and provides invaluable insights, KPIs and business intelligence. Those insights will lead to service improvement, reduced costs and enhanced forecasting.
  • Account familiarity which builds relationships, improves communication, speeds problem resolution, and a better understanding of your business requirements.
Key Takeaways
  • For shippers, build strategic relationships with 3PLs and carriers to ensure that your company gets world-class performance from your 3PL and carriers.
  • For carriers and 3PLs, develop your people, service offering and technology so your company can become the type of service provider that top shippers want to partner with.
Learn More

Maine Pointe

Rail Optimization White Paper: The Future of Rail Series

Don Dovgin LinkedIn

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Mar 06 2020

29mins

Play
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