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Rank #172 in Visual Arts category

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National Gallery of Art | Audio

Updated 5 days ago

Rank #172 in Visual Arts category

Arts
Visual Arts
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This audio series offers entertaining, informative discussions about the arts and events at the National Gallery of Art. These podcasts give access to special Gallery talks by well-known artists, authors, curators, and historians. Included in this podcast listing are established series: The Diamonstein-Spielvogel Lecture Series, The Sydney J. Freedberg Lecture in Italian Art, Elson Lecture Series, A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, Conversationricans with Artists Series, Conversations with Collectors Series, and Wyeth Lectures in Ame Art Series. Download the programs, then visit us on the National Mall or at www.nga.gov, where you can explore many of the works of art mentioned. New podcasts are released every Tuesday.

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This audio series offers entertaining, informative discussions about the arts and events at the National Gallery of Art. These podcasts give access to special Gallery talks by well-known artists, authors, curators, and historians. Included in this podcast listing are established series: The Diamonstein-Spielvogel Lecture Series, The Sydney J. Freedberg Lecture in Italian Art, Elson Lecture Series, A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, Conversationricans with Artists Series, Conversations with Collectors Series, and Wyeth Lectures in Ame Art Series. Download the programs, then visit us on the National Mall or at www.nga.gov, where you can explore many of the works of art mentioned. New podcasts are released every Tuesday.

iTunes Ratings

54 Ratings
Average Ratings
34
13
4
1
2

Fantastic show

By HagenThomann - Jun 27 2019
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I just recently stumbled into this podcast but I couldn’t be happier I did! Fantastic episodes and lots of interesting content. Can’t wait to go back to DC and see ‘The Life of Animals in Japanese Art’! Thank you and keep up the great work!

Love the lectures but

By 铿兑有 - Aug 24 2018
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Would be wonderful if the audience could see the pictures.

iTunes Ratings

54 Ratings
Average Ratings
34
13
4
1
2

Fantastic show

By HagenThomann - Jun 27 2019
Read more
I just recently stumbled into this podcast but I couldn’t be happier I did! Fantastic episodes and lots of interesting content. Can’t wait to go back to DC and see ‘The Life of Animals in Japanese Art’! Thank you and keep up the great work!

Love the lectures but

By 铿兑有 - Aug 24 2018
Read more
Would be wonderful if the audience could see the pictures.
Cover image of National Gallery of Art | Audio

National Gallery of Art | Audio

Latest release on Jan 21, 2020

Read more

This audio series offers entertaining, informative discussions about the arts and events at the National Gallery of Art. These podcasts give access to special Gallery talks by well-known artists, authors, curators, and historians. Included in this podcast listing are established series: The Diamonstein-Spielvogel Lecture Series, The Sydney J. Freedberg Lecture in Italian Art, Elson Lecture Series, A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, Conversationricans with Artists Series, Conversations with Collectors Series, and Wyeth Lectures in Ame Art Series. Download the programs, then visit us on the National Mall or at www.nga.gov, where you can explore many of the works of art mentioned. New podcasts are released every Tuesday.

Rank #1: The East Building at Forty: Reflections from Curators Past and Present

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Panelists include E. A. Carmean Jr., a canon in the Episcopal Church and former curator and head of 20th-century art, National Gallery of Art (1974–1984); Jack Cowart, founding executive director, Roy Lichtenstein Foundation, and former curator and head of 20th-century art, National Gallery of Art (1984–1993); Mark Rosenthal, independent curator, former head of modern and contemporary art, Philadelphia Museum of Art, and former curator and head of 20th-century art, National Gallery of Art (1993–1997); Marla Prather, former curator of modern and contemporary art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, and former curator and head of 20th-century art, National Gallery of Art (1996–1999); and Jeffrey Weiss, former senior curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and former curator and head of modern and contemporary art, National Gallery of Art (1999–2007). The National Gallery of Art was conceived and given to the people of the United States by Andrew W. Mellon (1855–1937). In 1936 Mellon wrote to President Franklin D. Roosevelt offering to donate his art collection for a new museum and his own funds to construct a building for its use. With the president’s support, Congress accepted Mellon’s gift and established the Gallery in March 1937. Andrew Mellon had anticipated that the collections would grow beyond the capacity of the original building, and at his request, Congress had set aside an adjacent plot of land for future use. In 1967 Andrew Mellon’s children, Paul Mellon and Ailsa Mellon Bruce, offered funds for a second building, and architect I. M. Pei (b. 1917) was selected to design it. Construction of the East Building began in 1971, and artists such as Henry Moore and Alexander Calder were commissioned to create works for the space. On June 1, 1978, Paul Mellon and President Jimmy Carter dedicated the new museum to the people of the United States. To celebrate the East Building’s 40th anniversary on June 1, 2018, the Gallery’s current and former head curators of 20th-century art gathered to reflect upon their experiences acquiring art and planning special exhibitions.

Jun 05 2018

51mins

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Rank #2: Abstract Expressionism

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David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art, August 14, 2018. From the mid-1940s through the 1950s painters in New York imbued their work with a heady new confidence, scale, and energy. Before and during World War II European émigrés poured into New York, including artists Max Ernst, Fernand Léger, Piet Mondrian, and the writer and surrealist leader André Breton. Their influence led to the exploration of biomorphic forms, archaic themes, and accidental processes designed to unleash the unconscious, like dripping and scraping. It is in the large canvases of the 1950s, by Jackson Pollock and others, that what one critic called “the triumph of American painting” can really be felt. These paintings increased ambition and introduced new techniques: Pollock’s rhythmic pours and drips, Clyfford Still’s dry palette-knifing, Newman’s masking-taped “zips,” Franz Kline’s chiseled gestures, and Joan Mitchell’s flurries of strokes. This generation of artists revealed new horizons in the practice of painting and the experience of viewing. As part of the series Celebrating the East Building: 20th-Century Art, senior lecturer David Gariff explores the triumph of American painting in postwar America. This lecture was presented on August 14, 2018, at the National Gallery of Art.

Sep 11 2018

51mins

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Rank #3: Carrie Mae Weems: Kitchen Table Series

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Carrie Mae Weems, artist. Made only a few years after Carrie Mae Weems received her MFA in 1984 from the University of California, San Diego, Kitchen Table Series consists of 20 staged photographs depicting Weems and others seated at a table. Endowed with a keen sense of how to transform her body into an expressive tool, Weems used the photographs to tell the story of a woman’s life as seen through the intimate space of the kitchen—the traditional sphere of women and a site of sanctuary, creation, shared experiences, and emotional honesty. In this performance held on February 6, 2018, in conjunction with the installation of Kitchen Table Series in the East Building of the National Gallery of Art, Weems presents this seminal body of work in the context of her career, including images from Grace Notes: Reflections for Now performed recently at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. This program is made possible by the James D. and Kathryn K. Steele Fund for Photography.

Mar 27 2018

51mins

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Rank #4: Abstraction and Its Capacities

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David Getsy, Goldabelle McComb Finn Distinguished Professor of Art History and chair, department of art history, theory, and criticism, School of the Art Institute of Chicago. To celebrate the publication of Abstract Bodies: Sixties Sculpture in the Expanded Field of Gender, David Getsy presented a lecture at the National Gallery of Art on October 25, 2015. The book examines abstract sculpture in the 1960s that came to propose unconventional and open accounts of bodies, persons, and genders. Drawing on transgender and queer theory, Getsy offers innovative and archivally rich new interpretations of artworks by, and critical writing about, four major artists—Dan Flavin (1933–1996), Nancy Grossman (b. 1940), John Chamberlain (1927–2011), and David Smith (1906–1965). Abstract Bodies makes a case for abstraction as a resource in reconsidering gender’s multiple capacities and offers an ambitious contribution to this burgeoning interdisciplinary field.

Oct 27 2015

51mins

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Rank #5: Pop without Pretense: Mass Media and the Art of James Castle

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Diana Greenwald, Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow, departments of American and British paintings and American and modern prints and drawings, National Gallery of Art. Self-taught artist James Castle (1899–1977) lived in remote rural Idaho until moving to the outskirts of Boise in his thirties. Not only was he isolated geographically, he was also born deaf. For Castle—like many “outsider” artists—past scholarship used biography and his marginalized social status to interpret his work. On December 3, 2018, as part of the Works in Progress series at the National Gallery of Art, Diana Greenwald argues that the progressive integration of visual culture—nationally and globally—is key to understanding this artist’s work. Greenwald considers Castle through the same art historical lens applied to mainstream artists of the period who were similarly engaged with mass-circulated visual culture. Classifying Castle as a pop artist, although one without the pretense to distinguish “high” from “low” visual sources, moves away from the myth-making rhetoric that pervades discussion about outsider artists and makes an important contribution to the literature.

Mar 26 2019

51mins

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Rank #6: Bunny Mellon: The Pursuit of Perfection

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Meryl Gordon, director of magazine writing, Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, New York University, and author of The Phantom of Fifth Avenue: The Mysterious Life and Scandalous Death of Heiress Huguette Clark (2014) and Mrs. Astor Regrets: The Hidden Betrayals of a Family Beyond Reproach (2008). Rachel Lowe Lambert Lloyd Mellon (1910–2014), also known as Bunny Mellon, was an American gardener, horticulturalist, philanthropist, and art collector. She represented the epitome of American aristocratic self-taught taste. With an unerring eye and an unlimited budget, she brought a modern sensibility to the extraordinary art collection that she and her husband Paul Mellon amassed, which included many works now in the collection of the National Gallery of Art. Acclaimed for designing the White House Rose Garden for her friend John F. Kennedy and famed as a garden designer and fashion trendsetter, Mellon was press shy during her lifetime. To write Bunny Mellon: The Life of an American Style Legend, the first biography of this influential woman, author Meryl Gordon drew on Mellon’s journals and letters and interviewed more than 175 people. In this lecture held on October 15, 2017, Gordon discusses the interplay between the public and the private Bunny Mellon, as well as her close friendship with Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

Nov 28 2017

51mins

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Rank #7: Saul Steinberg: Outsider Extraordinaire

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Judith Brodie, curator and head, department of modern prints and drawings, National Gallery of Art. In this lecture held on January 14, 2018, Judith Brodie presents the special installation of 18 drawings, two photographs, and an assortment of small sculptures by Saul Steinberg (1914-1999). This installation is part of an initiative-dating from the reopening of the East Building galleries in 2016-to include selected modern drawings, prints, and photographs as part of the permanent collection display. Revered by millions for his outstanding covers for the New Yorker magazine, Steinberg was an extraordinary draftsman whose line, according to the art critic Harold Rosenberg, was "delectable in itself." Whether making independent works or ones for publication, Steinberg brought a mordant wit and a sharp eye to all his art, creating works that disarm, enchant, and electrify. On view from September 12, 2017, through May 18, 2018, Saul Steinberg spans the years 1945 to 1984 and includes a wide range of subjects and types: from World War II air raids to New York hipsters, from collages incorporating real stationery to bogus documents enhanced with fake signatures and seals.

Jan 30 2018

51mins

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Rank #8: Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: New Insights and Discoveries

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Arthur K. Wheelock Jr., curator of northern baroque paintings, National Gallery of Art. Exhibitions always provide opportunities for seeing works of art with fresh eyes. Rarely, however, have the comparisons of much-beloved paintings, such as those brought together in Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: Inspiration and Rivalry, yielded so many insights about artistic achievement and the creative process. The landmark exhibition examines the artistic exchanges among Johannes Vermeer and his contemporaries from the mid-1650s to around 1680, when they reached the height of their technical ability and mastery of genre painting, or depictions of daily life. In this lecture held on January 7, 2018, Arthur K. Wheelock Jr. discusses some of these revelations and how they help explain the enduring impact of Vermeer's paintings. Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting is on view at the National Gallery of Art through January 21, 2018.

Jan 23 2018

51mins

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Rank #9: Tintoretto Lecture Series, Part 1—Tintoretto in Context: Framing Tintoretto: Sixteenth-Century Venetian Painting

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Eric Denker, senior lecturer and manager of gallery talks and lectures for adults, National Gallery of Art On the occasion of the exhibition of Tintoretto: Artist of Renaissance Venice, Eric Denker, senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art, presents a four-part lecture series examining Jacopo Tintoretto’s work in the context of 16th-century Venetian art, history, and culture. In the first lecture, “Tintoretto in Context: Framing Tintoretto: Sixteenth-Century Venetian Painting,” held on April 16, 2019, Denker discusses Venetian Renaissance painting beginning with Giovanni Bellini, his workshop, and his followers, in the second half of the 15th century. Giorgione and Titian were among his most prominent pupils, developing out of Bellini’s linear style the more atmospheric color, light, and shadow characteristic of Venetian High Renaissance oil painting. Though Titian would dominate the painting of large-scale altarpieces and decorations in Venice during the first half of the 16th century, rivals influenced by contemporary central Italian art appeared in Venice by the 1520s and ’30s. Artists including Pordenone and Andrea Schiavone provided alternative sources of style and imagery for both painters and patrons.

Jul 02 2019

51mins

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Rank #10: Watching Thinking: Self-Reflection and the Study of Process in Drawing

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Charles Ritchie, artist and associate curator, department of modern prints and drawings, National Gallery of Art As an artist who has worked behind the scenes with the prints and drawings collections of the National Gallery of Art for 35 years, associate curator Charles Ritchie relishes his unique vantage point for watching artists think. He has an intimate view of everything from the sketching, erasing, and refining at the core of drawing, to studying the sequences of proof impressions that record the development of a print. On March 25, 2019, as part of the Works in Progress series at the National Gallery of Art, Ritchie shares how his own drawing, journal keeping, and printmaking have been influenced by what he’s learned. The presentation offers a collection of his observations.

Apr 16 2019

51mins

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Rank #11: Minimalism

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David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art. Referred to variously as “ABC art” or “primary structures,” minimalism displays the reductive aspects of earlier modernist trends that embraced geometric abstraction in painting and pure geometric forms in sculpture. In direct opposition to their abstract expressionist predecessors, minimalist artists sought to eliminate concepts of self-expression and subjective emotion. Painters and sculptors associated with minimalist practices include Donald Judd, Tony Smith, Dan Flavin, Frank Stella, Ellsworth Kelly, and Robert Mangold. As part of the series Celebrating the East Building: 20th-Century Art, senior lecturer David Gariff surveys the art and theory of minimalism. This lecture was presented on August 28, 2018, at the National Gallery of Art.

Oct 02 2018

51mins

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Rank #12: Elson Lecture 2016: Cecily Brown

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Cecily Brown, artist, in conversation with Harry Cooper, curator and head, department of modern art, National Gallery of Art. Born in London in 1969, Cecily Brown attended the Slade School of Fine Art in the early 1990s, just when such "Young British Artists" as Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin were dominating the scene with provocative work. While Brown shared interests with some of them in feminism, sexuality, and mass media, her commitment to the history and practice of painting was distinctive. She moved to New York City in 1994 and has lived and worked there ever since. Brown paints with a fine balance of control and abandon, mining art history and the suggestions of the paint itself. For her inspiration, Brown relies on a variety of two-dimensional sources—from magazines and record album covers to children's books, movies, and a library of exhibition catalogs and monographs including studies of El Greco, Velázquez, Goya, Picasso, Delacroix, Manet, and, present in her most recent work, Degas. Brown's ability to create dense, intricate spaces in which figures emerge from abstraction has earned her recognition as one of the most important contemporary painters. Her work is represented in the National Gallery of Art collection by Girl on a Swing (2004). Brown participated in the 23rd annual Elson Lecture with Harry Cooper on March 10, 2016.

Mar 22 2016

57mins

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Rank #13: Thomas Hart Benton: Painting the Song

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Leo G. Mazow, associate professor of art history, University of Arkansas, and guitarist, The Coverlets; Brittany Stephenson, singer, The Coverlets. American artist Thomas Hart Benton (1889–1975) used folk and popular song as source material for several of his best-known murals, easel paintings, and prints. Borrowing from such classic tunes as “Jesse James,” “John Henry,” “Wreck of the Old ’97,” and “Frankie and Johnnie,” Benton found in music and lyrics artistic material that could help preserve a quickly vanishing past. In this lecture and music performance presented on November 22, 2015, at the National Gallery of Art, Leo G. Mazow and Brittany Stephenson offer a survey of Benton’s sonic subjects—including train whistles, gunshots, and musical instruments—that figure prominently in his work.

Dec 01 2015

51mins

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Rank #14: Edvard Munch: Spiritualism, Science, and Color

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Valerie Hellstein, independent scholar, and Elizabeth Prelinger, Keyser Family Professor of Art History and Modern Art, Georgetown University, in conversation with Mollie Berger, curatorial assistant, department of prints and drawings, National Gallery of Art. This conversation, held on September 10, 2017, in conjunction with the exhibition Edvard Munch: Color in Context, aims to connect the highly charged and personal art of Edvard Munch (1863–1944) with contemporary notions of spirituality. Mollie Berger, Valerie Hellstein, and Elizabeth Prelinger explore how theosophy influenced Munch’s art, specifically his use of color. In addition, the discussion examines the ways in which advances in various scientific fields impacted the spread of spiritualism and how artists responded to these cultural shifts. Edvard Munch: Color in Context is on view at the National Gallery of Art from September 3, 2017, through January 28, 2018.

Sep 12 2017

51mins

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Rank #15: The Sixty-Sixth A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts: The Forest: America in the 1830s, Part 1: Herodotus among the Trees

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Alexander Nemerov, department chair and Carl and Marilynn Thoma Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities, Stanford University. In the six-part lecture series The Forest: America in the 1830s, Nemerov explores the Hudson River School painters and their contemporaries, focusing on what their art did and did not show of the teeming world around them. The forest serves as a metaphor for the unruly and wooded realms of lived experience to which art can only gesture. The lectures present a fundamentally new account of Thomas Cole (1801–1848), John Quidor (1801–1881), James Fenimore Cooper (1789–1851), and other artists and writers of that time. The first lecture, held on March 26, 2017, “Herodotus among the Trees,” considers the questions: How does life get into art? What were the definitions of life and of art in the United States in the 1830s? How might life and art have met and diverged there and then—for example, in two landscape paintings by Thomas Cole?

May 23 2017

51mins

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Rank #16: German Expressionism and Degenerate Art

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David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art. Germany around 1900 was a volatile contradiction—modernizing rapidly, yet deeply conservative in values. This was fertile ground for the birth of German expressionism represented by the paintings and sculptures of Ernst Barlach, Max Beckmann, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Franz Marc, Otto Müller, Emil Nolde, and others. With the rise of national socialism in the 1930s in Germany, many of these avant-garde artists and the movements of which they were a part came to be labeled “degenerate.” The recent gift of the Arnold and Joan Saltzman collection of German expressionist art has transformed the Gallery’s holdings of modern art in this area. In this lecture presented on May 4, 2018, at the National Gallery of Art, senior lecturer David Gariff explores the nature of German expressionist art against the backdrop of two important exhibitions mounted by the Nazis in 1937: The Great German Art Exhibition, on July 18, and the Entartete Kunst (Degenerate Art) exhibition, on July 19. Through these two exhibitions and their related documents and propaganda, the Nazis sought to establish and support the reputation of the approved art of the Third Reich, while at the same time to unleash a destructive “tornado” (as Hitler referred to it) against modern art.

Aug 07 2018

51mins

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Rank #17: The Sixty-Seventh A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts: Positive Barbarism: Brutal Aesthetics in the Postwar Period, Part 4: Asger Jorn and His Creatures

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Hal Foster, Townsend Martin, Class of 1917, Professor of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University. In the six-part lecture series Positive Barbarism: Brutal Aesthetics in the Postwar Period, Hal Foster explores the pervasive turn, from the mid-1940s to the early 1960s, to the brut and the brutalist, the animal and the creaturely, as these are manifest in the early work of five artists. In the fourth lecture, “Asger Jorn and His Creatures,” held on April 29, 2018, Foster considers how Jorn saw the beastly figures of his CoBrA paintings as expressions of political crisis.

May 01 2018

51mins

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Rank #18: Edgar Degas (1834–1917): A Centenary Tribute, Part 8—Degas’s Sculpture: An Inside Look

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Shelley Sturman, senior conservator and head of object conservation, National Gallery of Art, and Daphne Barbour, senior conservator of objects, National Gallery of Art. Dedicated to Edgar Degas (1834–1917) in the centennial year of his death, Volume 3 of the conservation division's biennial journal Facture: Conservation, Science, Art History focuses on the tremendous wealth of works by Degas in the National Gallery of Art collection. The first to feature the work of a single artist, this issue includes essays by conservators, scientists, and curators. It presents insights into Degas's working methods in painting, sculpture in wax and bronze, and works on paper, as well as a sonnet he wrote to his "little dancer." The Gallery has the third largest collection in the world of work by Degas, comprising 21 paintings, 65 sculptures, 34 drawings, 40 prints, 2 copper plates, and 1 volume of soft-ground etchings. Its extensive Degas holdings and conservation resources have inspired not only groundbreaking Gallery exhibitions—such as Degas, the Dancers (1984), Degas at the Races (1998), Degas's Little Dancer (2014), and Degas/Cassatt (2014)—but also exhibitions around the world. For the public symposium held as a centenary tribute on September 22, 2017, Daphne Barbour and Shelley Sturman presented on the complex topic of the posthumously cast bronzes and summarized their discoveries in historical and technical contexts.

Dec 26 2017

51mins

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Rank #19: Cézanne's Portraits: Doubt, Certainty, and Painting in Series

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John Elderfield, chief curator emeritus of painting and sculpture, Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Allen R. Adler, Class of 1967, Distinguished Curator and Lecturer, Princeton University Art Museum. Bringing together some 60 paintings drawn from collections around the world, Cézanne Portraits is the first exhibition devoted exclusively to this often-neglected area of Paul Cézanne’s work. His portraits were widely thought to be shockingly inept when they were first exhibited, but were understood by a small circle of artists and critics to be extremely radical works. In this lecture held on June 3, 2018, at the National Gallery of Art, John Elderfield discusses how Cézanne’s extended, methodical style of painting—“one stroke after the other” is how the artist described it—readily led to the creation of one painting after the other of the same subject. Elderfield also explains how indifferent Cézanne was to the “personality” or “character” of his sitters—long thought to have been necessary aims of portraiture—wanting simply to paint the objective, permanent presence of someone seen. Cézanne Portraits, in its sole American venue at the National Gallery, is on view through July 8, 2018.

Jun 19 2018

51mins

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Rank #20: The Role of Libraries in our Cultural Landscape

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Daniel Boomhower, director of the research library, Dumbarton Oaks; Sir Peter Crane, president, Oak Spring Garden Foundation; Nancy E. Gwinn, director, Smithsonian Libraries; Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress; Roger Lawson, executive librarian, National Gallery of Art; David Leonard, president, Boston Public Library; E. C. Schroeder, director, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library; Michael Witmore, director, Folger Shakespeare Library; moderated by Kaywin Feldman, director, National Gallery of Art On September 25, 2019, the National Gallery of Art hosted eight library leaders from major cultural heritage institutions to discuss how libraries have incorporated innovative thinking to meet traditional challenges and seize new opportunities for audience engagement. This special program was held in conjunction with the fall 2019 meeting of the National Gallery of Art Trustees’ Council and in honor of outgoing Gallery president, Frederick W. Beinecke.

Nov 19 2019

51mins

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Art and Photography in the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration, Part II

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David Gariff, Senior Lecturer, National Gallery of Art In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, this two-part lecture examines art and photography created during the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration (from the end of the 19th century to 1922). The Antarctic expeditions of Robert Falcon Scott, Roald Amundsen, Ernest Shackleton, and Douglas Mawson were the equivalent of NASA’s Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs. Antarctica was the last place on earth to be discovered and explored. It was, to many, like going to the moon—and, indeed, photographs of the polar landscape resemble images of the lunar surface. Today, locations on the moon attest to the continuing link between the heroic accomplishments of Antarctic explorers and lunar astronauts. “Shackleton,” named after the Antarctic explorer, is an impact crater at the south pole of the moon. And NASA is now working to send American astronauts to the lunar south pole, a place no human has ever gone before. Artists and photographers, most notably Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley, accompanied the various Antarctic expeditions. These artist-explorers made photographs, films, paintings, and drawings that reveal the triumphs and tragedies of first attempts to reach the South Pole. In Part II of this lecture, presented on November 21, 2019, senior lecturer David Gariff explores the artists and photographers who visually documented the Antarctic continent during this heroic age of 20th-century exploration.

Jan 21 2020

51mins

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Art and Photography in the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration, Part I

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David Gariff, Senior Lecturer, National Gallery of Art In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, this two-part lecture examines art and photography created during the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration (from the end of the 19th century to 1922). The Antarctic expeditions of Robert Falcon Scott, Roald Amundsen, Ernest Shackleton, and Douglas Mawson were the equivalent of NASA’s Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs. Antarctica was the last place on earth to be discovered and explored. It was, to many, like going to the moon—and, indeed, photographs of the polar landscape resemble images of the lunar surface. Today, locations on the moon attest to the continuing link between the heroic accomplishments of Antarctic explorers and lunar astronauts. “Shackleton,” named after the Antarctic explorer, is an impact crater at the south pole of the moon. And NASA is now working to send American astronauts to the lunar south pole, a place no human has ever gone before. Artists and photographers, most notably Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley, accompanied the various Antarctic expeditions. These artist-explorers made photographs, films, paintings, and drawings that reveal the triumphs and tragedies of first attempts to reach the South Pole. In Part I of this lecture, presented on November 19, 2019, senior lecturer David Gariff explores the artists and photographers who visually documented the Antarctic continent during this heroic age of 20th-century exploration.

Jan 21 2020

51mins

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Reflections on the Collection: Marc Fumaroli on Jean Honoré Fragonard’s Landscape Paintings

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Marc Fumaroli (professor emeritus at the Collège de France and former Edmond J. Safra Visiting Professor at the National Gallery of Art) examines four landscape paintings by Jean Honoré Fragonard from the period 1775/1780: A Game of Hot Cockles, Blindman’s Buff, The Swing, and A Game of Horse and Rider. In contrast to the pleasure-seeking pursuits usually identified in these garden scenes, Fumaroli sees fearful apprehension in Fragonard’s ambiguous depiction of natural settings and human expressions.

Jan 21 2020

51mins

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Verrocchio and the Interplay between the Arts

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Sir Nicholas Penny, currently visiting professor, National Academy of Art, Hangzhou; previously director, National Gallery, London (2008–2015); former senior curator of sculpture, National Gallery of Art (2002–2008) Verrocchio: Sculptor and Painter of Renaissance Florence is the first-ever monographic exhibition in the United States on Andrea del Verrocchio (c. 1435–1488). The National Gallery of Art is the sole American venue of the exhibition that runs from September 15, 2019 through January 12, 2020. Verrocchio was both a draftsman and modeler whose designs were carried out in painting and sculpture by his own hand, but also by pupils and assistants, including Leonardo da Vinci, Pietro Perugino, and likely Sandro Botticelli. In this lecture held on December 15, 2019, Sir Nicholas Penny argues that Verrocchio was one of the most influential of all European artists because he developed practices that came to be of fundamental importance in subsequent centuries, notably the separate study of drapery, the nude, and expressive heads and hands.

Jan 21 2020

51mins

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The Sydney J. Freedberg Lecture on Italian Art: Andrea Mantegna’s Stones, Caves, and Clouds

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Gabriele Finaldi, director, National Gallery, London In his lecture, presented on December 8, 2019, Gabriele Finaldi of the National Gallery, London, discusses Mantegna's particular universe as constructed in stone: carved, cut, polished, and sometimes invented. In his compelling imaginarium, the ancient world is a severe construct of marble, alabaster, and porphyry. He juxtaposes sculpted stone with flesh, creating potent dualities of ancient and modern, eternal and transient, dead and alive. In the skies of his paintings, clouds take on mysterious forms, sometimes rocklike, that want to insinuate themselves into his narratives. This lecture explores how the realms of nature, art, and antiquity are fused into the unique vision of Mantegna's Renaissance world.

Jan 14 2020

51mins

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Verrocchio’s Medici Tombs: New Observations and Technical Analysis

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Dylan T. Smith, Robert H. Smith Research Conservator, department of object conservation, National Gallery of Art Between 1464 and 1473, Andrea del Verrocchio created two funerary monuments for the Medici in the Church of San Lorenzo in Florence: the tomb of Cosimo the Elder and the tomb of his sons, Piero and Giovanni. These monuments integrate marble, porphyry, and bronze into magnificent designs that were both highly original and technically innovative. In this lecture given on December 10, 2019, conservator Dylan T. Smith presents the results of new technical investigations that offer greater insight into the materials and techniques of the tombs—pivotal works in the career of this Renaissance master. This program is held in conjunction with the exhibition Verrocchio: Sculptor and Painter of Renaissance Florence, on view through January 12, 2020.

Jan 14 2020

51mins

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Cima da Conegliano and Venetian Landscape Painting

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Sarah Hyde, development officer for planned giving, National Gallery of Art Cima da Conegliano was a prolific painter in the Venetian Renaissance known for his bright colors and spatial harmony in his landscapes. While Cima is often compared to his contemporaries, such as Giovanni Bellini, his landscape paintings are particularly poetic, as he anchors his religious subjects in real places. In this lecture held on October 21, 2019, as part of the Works in Progress series, Sarah Hyde investigates Cima’s landscapes within the context of recent scholarship on Venetian landscape painting. Hyde specifically addresses the artist’s depiction of trees to explain his vision of nature.

Dec 10 2019

51mins

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Executed En Masse: Early Modern Portrait Prints at the National Gallery of Art

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Lara Langer, 2019 Mellon/ACLS Public Fellow In 1943 Lessing J. Rosenwald gifted roughly 6,000 works on paper to the nascent National Gallery of Art. By the time of his death in 1979, his collection had grown to over 28,000, including nearly 2,400 early modern portrait prints representing Europe’s major leaders, artists, and thinkers. On November 25, 2019, as part of the Works in Progress series at the National Gallery of Art, Lara Langer looks at several examples from the Rosenwald collection while discussing the history of collecting portrait prints and their importance in the development of portraiture.

Dec 10 2019

51mins

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Instructional Videos: Didactic Documentary for the Postmodern Era

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Zach Feldman, contractor, department of film programs, National Gallery of Art The notion of didactic art has been both lauded by the ancient Greeks as a powerful educational technique and dismissed by 19th-century Romantics as overburdened with facticity and morality. In recent decades, however, didactic films and videos have been utilized, in both satire and earnest, within art spaces as a subversive tool to acutely observe and diagnose the conditions of contemporary life. In this lecture, as part of the Works in Progress series, on September 9, 2019, Zach Feldman considers this tool in select nonfiction instructional videos by filmmakers and artists Harun Farocki and Hito Steyerl.

Dec 10 2019

51mins

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Collaborations and Investigations in Sound: Alex Braden and Emily Francisco in Conversation

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Alex Braden, artist, and Emily Francisco, artist, and gallery support specialist, department of media production, National Gallery of Art In this conversation held on November 4, 2019, as part of the Works in Progress series, artists Alex Braden and Emily Francisco discuss how they develop collaborative projects in relation to their independent artistic and curatorial practices. Last year Braden and Francisco created Bipedal Soundscapes, the inaugural Arlington Art Truck activation that involved participants pedaling a stationary bike to power a five-tiered turntable housing vinyl records. Each visitor created their own unique audio experience by controlling the speed of the turntable through their pedaling.

Dec 10 2019

51mins

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Photography and Nation Building in the Nineteenth Century

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Makeda Best, Richard L. Menschel Curator of Photography, Harvard Art Museums On the 180th anniversary of photography’s introduction to the world in 1839, The Eye of the Sun: Nineteenth-Century Photographs from the National Gallery of Art offers an in-depth look at the development of the medium throughout its first 50 years. In this lecture held in conjunction with the exhibition on October 6, 2019, Makeda Best explores the function of slavery and enslaved people in visual narratives about the Civil War. Working through the photography by and associated with the Scottish-born photographer Alexander Gardner and his Washington, DC–based photographic corps, Best compares and contrasts portrayals of slavery and enslaved people and demonstrates how Gardner contextualized chattel slavery within a broader and decades-long discussion about the meaning of American democracy. This program was made possible by the James D. and Kathryn K. Steele Fund for Photography. The Eye of the Sun is on view from September 8 through December 1, 2019.

Dec 03 2019

51mins

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Introduction to the Exhibition—The Touch of Color: Pastels at the National Gallery of Art

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Kimberly Schenck, head of paper conservation, National Gallery of Art, and Stacey Sell, associate curator of old master drawings, National Gallery of Art Through the centuries, artists have adopted a variety of approaches to pastel, experimenting with it to achieve exciting and unexpected effects. Featuring approximately 70 exquisite examples drawn entirely from the permanent collection, The Touch of Color: Pastels at the National Gallery of Art traces the history of pastel from the Renaissance to the 21st century and examines the many techniques that artists have developed to work with this colorful and versatile medium. To celebrate the opening on September 29, 2019, Kimberly Schenck and Stacey Sell provide an overview of the works, many of which have never been exhibited before. The exhibition is on view at the National Gallery of Art through January 26, 2020.

Dec 03 2019

51mins

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The Living Legacy National Speaking Tour: David C. Driskell and Curlee R. Holton in Conversation

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David C. Driskell, artist, curator, and Distinguished University Professor of Art, Emeritus, University of Maryland, College Park; and Curlee R. Holton, artist and director, David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora at the University of Maryland, College Park The David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora organized the Living Legacy National Speaking Tour to present, celebrate, and document the achievements and legacy of its founder, David C. Driskell (b. 1931). This tour, a series of conversations between Driskell and Curlee R. Holton, highlights his contributions as an artist, scholar, and cultural historian and the contributions of African American artists to the country’s artistic heritage. Driskell has lived through and witnessed firsthand the dynamic historic changes that define America’s contemporary cultural landscape. In addition to Driskell’s singular accomplishments, he is a gifted and inspiring speaker whose personal narrative brings with it an intimate and powerful voice. The National Gallery of Art provided a Washington, DC, venue for the national tour on September 22, 2019.

Dec 03 2019

51mins

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Reflections on the Collection: The Edmond J. Safra Visiting Professors at the National Gallery of Art: Antoinette Le Normand-Romain on Auguste Rodin, The Walking Man (L’Homme qui marche) (model 1878–1900, cast probably 1903)

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Antoinette Le Normand-Romain (former director of the Institut national d’histoire de l’art and former Edmond J. Safra Visiting Professor at the National Gallery of Art) discusses Auguste Rodin’s sculpture The Walking Man (1903). Le Normand-Romain describes a history of The Walking Man that reveals much about Rodin’s methods, his deep appreciation of antiquity, and the significance of his art in the evolution of modern sculpture.

Dec 03 2019

51mins

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Fifteenth-Century Florentine and Tuscan Sculpture in the National Gallery of Art

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David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art Italian sculpture of the 15th century in Florence and Tuscany, departed from the elegant, decorative style of the earlier Gothic period to reflect a greater admiration for, and understanding of, the strength and structure of the human body. In this respect, Renaissance sculptors emulated the ideals of the ancient Greeks and Romans when depicting contemporary or Christian subjects. Sculptors like Donatello, Desiderio da Settignano, Mino da Fiesole, Bernardo and Antonio Rossellino, Luca and Andrea della Robbia, Jacopo della Quercia, and Verrocchio, revived a classical interest in the human body depicted in full-length figures demonstrating naturalism and ease of movement. Relief sculptures explored new effects of light and atmosphere. Displaying a variety of materials including marble, bronze, wood, terracotta, and ceramic; and a range of processes from carving to modeling to casting, 15th-century Florentine sculpture served a variety of secular and religious purposes. It also became a model for the many talented Italian sculptors to follow, most notably the young Michelangelo. In this lecture presented on October 22, 2019, at the National Gallery of Art, senior lecturer David Gariff explores the rich holdings of 15th-century Florentine and Tuscan sculpture in the Gallery’s permanent collection.

Nov 26 2019

51mins

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Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art: Dutch Art of the Golden Age

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Eric Denker, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art The 2019 Summer Sunday Lecture Series, Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art, takes a closer look at the many treasures housed in the Gallery’s permanent collection. Works by Italian, French, Dutch, and American artists are featured in this visual tour. New insights and surprising discoveries await, featuring Gallery favorites and recently acquired works. In this first lecture in the series, presented on July 14, 2019 senior lecturer Eric Denker discusses the Gallery’s collection of 17th-century Dutch paintings, one of the most important outside of the Netherlands. The holdings include a distinguished selection of well-known masters, including Frans Hals, Rembrandt, and Vermeer, as well as many superlative works by lesser-known painters of the Golden Age of Dutch painting. Intense competition during this era propelled artists to specialize in specific genres of painting including portraiture, landscape, still life, and scenes of daily life.

Nov 19 2019

51mins

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The Role of Libraries in our Cultural Landscape

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Daniel Boomhower, director of the research library, Dumbarton Oaks; Sir Peter Crane, president, Oak Spring Garden Foundation; Nancy E. Gwinn, director, Smithsonian Libraries; Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress; Roger Lawson, executive librarian, National Gallery of Art; David Leonard, president, Boston Public Library; E. C. Schroeder, director, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library; Michael Witmore, director, Folger Shakespeare Library; moderated by Kaywin Feldman, director, National Gallery of Art On September 25, 2019, the National Gallery of Art hosted eight library leaders from major cultural heritage institutions to discuss how libraries have incorporated innovative thinking to meet traditional challenges and seize new opportunities for audience engagement. This special program was held in conjunction with the fall 2019 meeting of the National Gallery of Art Trustees’ Council and in honor of outgoing Gallery president, Frederick W. Beinecke.

Nov 19 2019

51mins

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Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the NGA: Masterpieces of American Furniture

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Dianne Stephens, senior educator, National Gallery of Art The 2019 Summer Sunday Lecture Series, Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art, takes a closer look at the many treasures housed in the Gallery’s permanent collection. On August 11, Dianne Stephens, a senior educator at the National Gallery of Art, discusses masterpieces of American furniture from the Kaufman Collection, 1700–1830. These magnificent objects were permanently installed at the National Gallery of Art in October 2012 as a promised gift of the collection formed over five decades by Linda H. Kaufman and the late George M. Kaufman, which includes some of the finest and most elegant examples of American furniture produced in colonial and post-revolutionary America. The Kaufman Collection a significant addition to the decorative arts at the National Gallery of Art and in Washington, and these important pieces of furniture complement and enrich the great American achievements in painting and sculpture in the Gallery’s permanent collection.

Nov 12 2019

51mins

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Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art: Venetian Painting, 1350–1800

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Eric Denker, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art The 2019 Summer Sunday Lecture Series, Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art, takes a closer look at the many treasures housed in the Gallery’s permanent collection. Works by Italian, French, Dutch, and American artists are featured in this visual tour. New insights and surprising discoveries await, featuring Gallery favorites and recently acquired works. In this second lecture in the series, presented on July 21, senior lecturer Eric Denker discusses the Gallery’s collection of Venetian painting. The holdings begin with rare works by Giovanni Bellini, such as his late masterpiece The Feast of the Gods , as well as works by the most important artists to emerge from Bellini’s studio, including Giorgione, Titian, and Carpaccio. Also well represented in the Gallery’s remarkable collection are Venetian paintings from the second half of the 16th century by Tintoretto and Veronese, and the 18th century, by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo and Canaletto.

Nov 12 2019

51mins

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Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art: Central Italian Painting

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David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art The 2019 Summer Sunday Lecture series takes a closer look at the many treasures housed in the Gallery’s permanent collection. Works by Italian, French, Dutch, and American artists are featured in this visual tour. New insights and surprising discoveries await, featuring Gallery favorites and recently acquired works. In this seventh lecture in the series, presented on August 18, David Gariff, senior lecturer, discusses the Gallery’s collection of Italian paintings, considered the most important in America and among the finest and most comprehensive in the world. The collection contains works by some of the greatest Italian painters in art history, including Duccio, Giotto, Fra Angelico, Fra Filippo Lippi, Botticelli, Piero di Cosimo, Raphael, Giovanni Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, Correggio, and Bernardino Luini. All the important regional schools are represented, including Florence, Siena, Venice, and the Lombard tradition in the north. Most important, the National Gallery of Art is home to the only painting by Leonardo da Vinci in the Western Hemisphere—his Portrait of Ginevra de’ Benci. In this lecture, Gariff explores the history of central Italian painting from 1300 to 1520 seen through the masterpieces in the Gallery’s permanent collection.

Nov 12 2019

51mins

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Fantastic show

By HagenThomann - Jun 27 2019
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I just recently stumbled into this podcast but I couldn’t be happier I did! Fantastic episodes and lots of interesting content. Can’t wait to go back to DC and see ‘The Life of Animals in Japanese Art’! Thank you and keep up the great work!

Love the lectures but

By 铿兑有 - Aug 24 2018
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Would be wonderful if the audience could see the pictures.