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Rank #128 in Visual Arts category

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Visual Arts

National Gallery of Art | Audio

Updated 7 days ago

Rank #128 in Visual Arts category

Arts
Visual Arts
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This audio series offers entertaining, informative discussions about the arts and events at the National Gallery of Art. These podcasts give access to special Gallery talks by well-known artists, authors, curators, and historians. Included in this podcast listing are established series: The Diamonstein-Spielvogel Lecture Series, The Sydney J. Freedberg Lecture in Italian Art, Elson Lecture Series, A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, Conversationricans with Artists Series, Conversations with Collectors Series, and Wyeth Lectures in Ame Art Series. Download the programs, then visit us on the National Mall or at www.nga.gov, where you can explore many of the works of art mentioned. New podcasts are released every Tuesday.

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This audio series offers entertaining, informative discussions about the arts and events at the National Gallery of Art. These podcasts give access to special Gallery talks by well-known artists, authors, curators, and historians. Included in this podcast listing are established series: The Diamonstein-Spielvogel Lecture Series, The Sydney J. Freedberg Lecture in Italian Art, Elson Lecture Series, A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, Conversationricans with Artists Series, Conversations with Collectors Series, and Wyeth Lectures in Ame Art Series. Download the programs, then visit us on the National Mall or at www.nga.gov, where you can explore many of the works of art mentioned. New podcasts are released every Tuesday.

iTunes Ratings

64 Ratings
Average Ratings
40
13
7
2
2

Fantastic show

By HagenThomann - Jun 27 2019
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I just recently stumbled into this podcast but I couldn’t be happier I did! Fantastic episodes and lots of interesting content. Can’t wait to go back to DC and see ‘The Life of Animals in Japanese Art’! Thank you and keep up the great work!

Love the lectures but

By 铿兑有 - Aug 24 2018
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Would be wonderful if the audience could see the pictures.

iTunes Ratings

64 Ratings
Average Ratings
40
13
7
2
2

Fantastic show

By HagenThomann - Jun 27 2019
Read more
I just recently stumbled into this podcast but I couldn’t be happier I did! Fantastic episodes and lots of interesting content. Can’t wait to go back to DC and see ‘The Life of Animals in Japanese Art’! Thank you and keep up the great work!

Love the lectures but

By 铿兑有 - Aug 24 2018
Read more
Would be wonderful if the audience could see the pictures.
Cover image of National Gallery of Art | Audio

National Gallery of Art | Audio

Latest release on Apr 07, 2020

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This audio series offers entertaining, informative discussions about the arts and events at the National Gallery of Art. These podcasts give access to special Gallery talks by well-known artists, authors, curators, and historians. Included in this podcast listing are established series: The Diamonstein-Spielvogel Lecture Series, The Sydney J. Freedberg Lecture in Italian Art, Elson Lecture Series, A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, Conversationricans with Artists Series, Conversations with Collectors Series, and Wyeth Lectures in Ame Art Series. Download the programs, then visit us on the National Mall or at www.nga.gov, where you can explore many of the works of art mentioned. New podcasts are released every Tuesday.

Rank #1: The East Building at Forty: Reflections from Curators Past and Present

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Panelists include E. A. Carmean Jr., a canon in the Episcopal Church and former curator and head of 20th-century art, National Gallery of Art (1974–1984); Jack Cowart, founding executive director, Roy Lichtenstein Foundation, and former curator and head of 20th-century art, National Gallery of Art (1984–1993); Mark Rosenthal, independent curator, former head of modern and contemporary art, Philadelphia Museum of Art, and former curator and head of 20th-century art, National Gallery of Art (1993–1997); Marla Prather, former curator of modern and contemporary art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, and former curator and head of 20th-century art, National Gallery of Art (1996–1999); and Jeffrey Weiss, former senior curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and former curator and head of modern and contemporary art, National Gallery of Art (1999–2007). The National Gallery of Art was conceived and given to the people of the United States by Andrew W. Mellon (1855–1937). In 1936 Mellon wrote to President Franklin D. Roosevelt offering to donate his art collection for a new museum and his own funds to construct a building for its use. With the president’s support, Congress accepted Mellon’s gift and established the Gallery in March 1937. Andrew Mellon had anticipated that the collections would grow beyond the capacity of the original building, and at his request, Congress had set aside an adjacent plot of land for future use. In 1967 Andrew Mellon’s children, Paul Mellon and Ailsa Mellon Bruce, offered funds for a second building, and architect I. M. Pei (b. 1917) was selected to design it. Construction of the East Building began in 1971, and artists such as Henry Moore and Alexander Calder were commissioned to create works for the space. On June 1, 1978, Paul Mellon and President Jimmy Carter dedicated the new museum to the people of the United States. To celebrate the East Building’s 40th anniversary on June 1, 2018, the Gallery’s current and former head curators of 20th-century art gathered to reflect upon their experiences acquiring art and planning special exhibitions.

Jun 05 2018

51mins

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Rank #2: Tintoretto Lecture Series, Part 1—Tintoretto in Context: Framing Tintoretto: Sixteenth-Century Venetian Painting

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Eric Denker, senior lecturer and manager of gallery talks and lectures for adults, National Gallery of Art On the occasion of the exhibition of Tintoretto: Artist of Renaissance Venice, Eric Denker, senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art, presents a four-part lecture series examining Jacopo Tintoretto’s work in the context of 16th-century Venetian art, history, and culture. In the first lecture, “Tintoretto in Context: Framing Tintoretto: Sixteenth-Century Venetian Painting,” held on April 16, 2019, Denker discusses Venetian Renaissance painting beginning with Giovanni Bellini, his workshop, and his followers, in the second half of the 15th century. Giorgione and Titian were among his most prominent pupils, developing out of Bellini’s linear style the more atmospheric color, light, and shadow characteristic of Venetian High Renaissance oil painting. Though Titian would dominate the painting of large-scale altarpieces and decorations in Venice during the first half of the 16th century, rivals influenced by contemporary central Italian art appeared in Venice by the 1520s and ’30s. Artists including Pordenone and Andrea Schiavone provided alternative sources of style and imagery for both painters and patrons.

Jul 02 2019

51mins

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Rank #3: Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: New Insights and Discoveries

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Arthur K. Wheelock Jr., curator of northern baroque paintings, National Gallery of Art. Exhibitions always provide opportunities for seeing works of art with fresh eyes. Rarely, however, have the comparisons of much-beloved paintings, such as those brought together in Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: Inspiration and Rivalry, yielded so many insights about artistic achievement and the creative process. The landmark exhibition examines the artistic exchanges among Johannes Vermeer and his contemporaries from the mid-1650s to around 1680, when they reached the height of their technical ability and mastery of genre painting, or depictions of daily life. In this lecture held on January 7, 2018, Arthur K. Wheelock Jr. discusses some of these revelations and how they help explain the enduring impact of Vermeer's paintings. Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting is on view at the National Gallery of Art through January 21, 2018.

Jan 23 2018

51mins

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Rank #4: Abstraction and Its Capacities

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David Getsy, Goldabelle McComb Finn Distinguished Professor of Art History and chair, department of art history, theory, and criticism, School of the Art Institute of Chicago. To celebrate the publication of Abstract Bodies: Sixties Sculpture in the Expanded Field of Gender, David Getsy presented a lecture at the National Gallery of Art on October 25, 2015. The book examines abstract sculpture in the 1960s that came to propose unconventional and open accounts of bodies, persons, and genders. Drawing on transgender and queer theory, Getsy offers innovative and archivally rich new interpretations of artworks by, and critical writing about, four major artists—Dan Flavin (1933–1996), Nancy Grossman (b. 1940), John Chamberlain (1927–2011), and David Smith (1906–1965). Abstract Bodies makes a case for abstraction as a resource in reconsidering gender’s multiple capacities and offers an ambitious contribution to this burgeoning interdisciplinary field.

Oct 27 2015

51mins

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Rank #5: The Artist's Sketchbook: A Personal View

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Charles Ritchie, artist, and former associate curator, department of modern prints and drawings, National Gallery of Art In this lecture held on October 27, 2019, in conjunction with the month-long Sketching is Seeing program at the National Gallery of Art, Charles Ritchie presents varied approaches to collecting ideas. For example, do artists fill a sketchbook from front to back or do they open it to an empty space and begin working? Does writing accompany the drawings and how might it relate to the images? Are the drawings and/or writings employed for developing skill, or are they compost for the creation of other works, or does the book document completed works? Using his experience as a keeper of a sketchbook/journal, Ritchie explores the creative practices of some of his favorite artists including Isabel Bishop, Paul Cézanne, Eugène Delacroix, Alberto Giacometti, and Edward Hopper, among others, and he touches on formative manuscripts by Emily Dickinson, Jack Kerouac, and Wallace Stevens. The presentation concludes with a meditation on some of the forces at the core of drawing and writing: the desire to remember, the spirit of play and improvisation, and the essential ingredient―curiosity.

Jan 21 2020

51mins

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Rank #6: Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art: Dutch Art of the Golden Age

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Eric Denker, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art The 2019 Summer Sunday Lecture Series, Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art, takes a closer look at the many treasures housed in the Gallery’s permanent collection. Works by Italian, French, Dutch, and American artists are featured in this visual tour. New insights and surprising discoveries await, featuring Gallery favorites and recently acquired works. In this first lecture in the series, presented on July 14, 2019 senior lecturer Eric Denker discusses the Gallery’s collection of 17th-century Dutch paintings, one of the most important outside of the Netherlands. The holdings include a distinguished selection of well-known masters, including Frans Hals, Rembrandt, and Vermeer, as well as many superlative works by lesser-known painters of the Golden Age of Dutch painting. Intense competition during this era propelled artists to specialize in specific genres of painting including portraiture, landscape, still life, and scenes of daily life.

Nov 19 2019

51mins

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Rank #7: The Moon in the Age of Photography

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Mia Fineman, curator, department of photographs, Metropolitan Museum of Art 2019 marks 50 years since Apollo 11 landed on the moon on July 20, 1969, capturing the attention of viewers worldwide who eagerly awaited the first photographs taken onsite. Photography played a key role in the space race of the 1960s, both as a tool of scientific documentation and as a medium of public relations. In this lecture held on October 20, 2019, in celebration of the exhibitions By the Light of the Silvery Moon: A Century of Lunar Photographs at the National Gallery of Art and Apollo’s Muse: The Moon in the Age of Photography at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, curator Mia Fineman explores the connections as well as the tensions between these two functions, delving into the fascinating history of lunar imaging.

Mar 10 2020

51mins

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Rank #8: Bunny Mellon: The Pursuit of Perfection

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Meryl Gordon, director of magazine writing, Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, New York University, and author of The Phantom of Fifth Avenue: The Mysterious Life and Scandalous Death of Heiress Huguette Clark (2014) and Mrs. Astor Regrets: The Hidden Betrayals of a Family Beyond Reproach (2008). Rachel Lowe Lambert Lloyd Mellon (1910–2014), also known as Bunny Mellon, was an American gardener, horticulturalist, philanthropist, and art collector. She represented the epitome of American aristocratic self-taught taste. With an unerring eye and an unlimited budget, she brought a modern sensibility to the extraordinary art collection that she and her husband Paul Mellon amassed, which included many works now in the collection of the National Gallery of Art. Acclaimed for designing the White House Rose Garden for her friend John F. Kennedy and famed as a garden designer and fashion trendsetter, Mellon was press shy during her lifetime. To write Bunny Mellon: The Life of an American Style Legend, the first biography of this influential woman, author Meryl Gordon drew on Mellon’s journals and letters and interviewed more than 175 people. In this lecture held on October 15, 2017, Gordon discusses the interplay between the public and the private Bunny Mellon, as well as her close friendship with Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

Nov 28 2017

51mins

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Rank #9: Elson Lecture 2016: Cecily Brown

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Cecily Brown, artist, in conversation with Harry Cooper, curator and head, department of modern art, National Gallery of Art. Born in London in 1969, Cecily Brown attended the Slade School of Fine Art in the early 1990s, just when such "Young British Artists" as Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin were dominating the scene with provocative work. While Brown shared interests with some of them in feminism, sexuality, and mass media, her commitment to the history and practice of painting was distinctive. She moved to New York City in 1994 and has lived and worked there ever since. Brown paints with a fine balance of control and abandon, mining art history and the suggestions of the paint itself. For her inspiration, Brown relies on a variety of two-dimensional sources—from magazines and record album covers to children's books, movies, and a library of exhibition catalogs and monographs including studies of El Greco, Velázquez, Goya, Picasso, Delacroix, Manet, and, present in her most recent work, Degas. Brown's ability to create dense, intricate spaces in which figures emerge from abstraction has earned her recognition as one of the most important contemporary painters. Her work is represented in the National Gallery of Art collection by Girl on a Swing (2004). Brown participated in the 23rd annual Elson Lecture with Harry Cooper on March 10, 2016.

Mar 22 2016

57mins

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Rank #10: Thomas Hart Benton: Painting the Song

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Leo G. Mazow, associate professor of art history, University of Arkansas, and guitarist, The Coverlets; Brittany Stephenson, singer, The Coverlets. American artist Thomas Hart Benton (1889–1975) used folk and popular song as source material for several of his best-known murals, easel paintings, and prints. Borrowing from such classic tunes as “Jesse James,” “John Henry,” “Wreck of the Old ’97,” and “Frankie and Johnnie,” Benton found in music and lyrics artistic material that could help preserve a quickly vanishing past. In this lecture and music performance presented on November 22, 2015, at the National Gallery of Art, Leo G. Mazow and Brittany Stephenson offer a survey of Benton’s sonic subjects—including train whistles, gunshots, and musical instruments—that figure prominently in his work.

Dec 01 2015

51mins

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Rank #11: Introduction to the Exhibition: Frédéric Bazille and the Birth of Impressionism

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Kimberly A. Jones, curator of 19th-century French paintings, National Gallery of Art. Frédéric Bazille (1841–1870) was a central figure in the history of early impressionism who worked closely with the renowned artists Claude Monet (1840–1926) and Auguste Renoir (1840-1917). Killed in the Franco-Prussian War just prior to his 29th birthday, Bazille all but vanished from history before his talent could be fully recognized. To celebrate the opening of Frédéric Bazille and the Birth of Impressionism on April 9, 2017, at the National Gallery of Art, Kimberly A. Jones provides an overview of the exhibition, the first devoted to the artist in the United States in a quarter century. On view through July 9, 2017, the exhibition examines Bazille’s place within the vibrant avant-garde art scene of Paris in the 1860s and the role he played in the birth of the impressionist movement.

Apr 18 2017

51mins

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Rank #12: Pop Art

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David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art. In all of art history, only one movement dared to predict public and commercial success in its very name. The distinction is appropriate, because pop art was all about commerce and consumption from the beginning. Emerging in mid-1950s Great Britain and soon spreading to the United States, pop was a creature of the postwar boom, when television, advertising, fast food, birth rates, home appliances, and suburban sprawl were quickly changing daily life in the developed world. Works by Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, and Claes Oldenburg reflect a new syntax of imagery drawn from popular culture and mass media, devoid of exalted art historical themes and the personal expression that were hallmarks of abstract expressionist painting. As part of the series Celebrating the East Building: 20th-Century Art, senior lecturer David Gariff considers the wide variety of objects, themes, and working methods that characterized pop art and the way it blurred distinctions between high art and popular culture. This lecture was presented on August 23, 2018, at the National Gallery of Art.

Sep 25 2018

51mins

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Rank #13: linn meyers: work

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linn meyers, artist and co-founder, STABLE, in conversation with Jonathan Frederick Walz, director of curatorial affairs and curator of American art, The Columbus Museum. Artist linn meyers creates works that reveal the expansive potential of drawing. In monumental installations drawn straight onto the wall and smaller works of ink on panel or mylar, meyers uses simple designs and delicate handling of materials to make rhythm visible in drawings of astonishing detail. That meyers works alone—even on the 400-foot long our view from here, made in 2017 at the Hirshhorn Museum—means these drawings also materialize her extensive labor, recording not only meyers’s skill but also her capability for extreme endurance. With fellow Washington, DC-based artists Tim Doud and Caitlin Teal Price, meyers is a cofounder of STABLE, a local studio complex that provides visual artists with an active, affordable workspace to pursue their profession. In this conversation recorded at the National Gallery of Art on December 9, 2018, meyers and Jonathan Frederick Walz discuss the artist’s practice and institutional collaborations to celebrate the publication of her monograph, linn meyers: Works 2004–2018.

Feb 26 2019

51mins

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Rank #14: Cézanne's Portraits: Doubt, Certainty, and Painting in Series

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John Elderfield, chief curator emeritus of painting and sculpture, Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Allen R. Adler, Class of 1967, Distinguished Curator and Lecturer, Princeton University Art Museum. Bringing together some 60 paintings drawn from collections around the world, Cézanne Portraits is the first exhibition devoted exclusively to this often-neglected area of Paul Cézanne’s work. His portraits were widely thought to be shockingly inept when they were first exhibited, but were understood by a small circle of artists and critics to be extremely radical works. In this lecture held on June 3, 2018, at the National Gallery of Art, John Elderfield discusses how Cézanne’s extended, methodical style of painting—“one stroke after the other” is how the artist described it—readily led to the creation of one painting after the other of the same subject. Elderfield also explains how indifferent Cézanne was to the “personality” or “character” of his sitters—long thought to have been necessary aims of portraiture—wanting simply to paint the objective, permanent presence of someone seen. Cézanne Portraits, in its sole American venue at the National Gallery, is on view through July 8, 2018.

Jun 19 2018

51mins

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Rank #15: Minimalism

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David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art. Referred to variously as “ABC art” or “primary structures,” minimalism displays the reductive aspects of earlier modernist trends that embraced geometric abstraction in painting and pure geometric forms in sculpture. In direct opposition to their abstract expressionist predecessors, minimalist artists sought to eliminate concepts of self-expression and subjective emotion. Painters and sculptors associated with minimalist practices include Donald Judd, Tony Smith, Dan Flavin, Frank Stella, Ellsworth Kelly, and Robert Mangold. As part of the series Celebrating the East Building: 20th-Century Art, senior lecturer David Gariff surveys the art and theory of minimalism. This lecture was presented on August 28, 2018, at the National Gallery of Art.

Oct 02 2018

51mins

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Rank #16: Abstract Expressionism

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David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art, August 14, 2018. From the mid-1940s through the 1950s painters in New York imbued their work with a heady new confidence, scale, and energy. Before and during World War II European émigrés poured into New York, including artists Max Ernst, Fernand Léger, Piet Mondrian, and the writer and surrealist leader André Breton. Their influence led to the exploration of biomorphic forms, archaic themes, and accidental processes designed to unleash the unconscious, like dripping and scraping. It is in the large canvases of the 1950s, by Jackson Pollock and others, that what one critic called “the triumph of American painting” can really be felt. These paintings increased ambition and introduced new techniques: Pollock’s rhythmic pours and drips, Clyfford Still’s dry palette-knifing, Newman’s masking-taped “zips,” Franz Kline’s chiseled gestures, and Joan Mitchell’s flurries of strokes. This generation of artists revealed new horizons in the practice of painting and the experience of viewing. As part of the series Celebrating the East Building: 20th-Century Art, senior lecturer David Gariff explores the triumph of American painting in postwar America. This lecture was presented on August 14, 2018, at the National Gallery of Art.

Sep 11 2018

51mins

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Rank #17: Michelangelo Pistoletto

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Michelangelo Pistoletto, artist, in conversation with James Meyer, curator of art, 1945–1974, National Gallery of Art. Commonly referred to as the Mirror Paintings and composed of photo-based images on steel, Michelangelo Pistoletto’s most celebrated works were developed in 1962 and represent his dual interest in conceptualism and figuration. The Mirror Paintings directly include the viewer and real time in the work, and open up perspective, reversing the trend of twentieth-century avant-garde movements that had closed the linear perspective of the Renaissance. In 1965–1966 Pistoletto created the Oggetti en meno (Minus Objects), a set of nonrepresentational sculptures constructed of commonplace, “poor” materials. These works are considered fundamental to the birth of the Arte Povera movement in Italy, of which Pistoletto was a leading figure. In the context of the disillusionment of postwar Europe, they sought to reconfigure the relationship between art and life. Comprised of 28 disparate objects—an oversize cardboard rose; an industrial lamp casting green light; a minimalist iron sculpture—the Minus Objects break with the notion of a signature style and are symbolic of infinite creative possibilities. As an ensemble, it minimizes the role of authorship, permitting each enigmatic object to speak for itself as autonomous and self-sufficient. In this conversation with James Meyer, held on November 6, 2017, the artist discusses his newly published monograph, Michelangelo Pistoletto: The Minus Objects 1965-1966, which explores the origins and impact of this seminal body of work as a radical turning point in postwar sculpture and conceptual art. His work is represented in the National Gallery of Art collection by Donna che indica (Woman who points) (conceived 1962, fabricated 1982).

Nov 28 2017

51mins

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Rank #18: Diamonstein-Spielvogel Lecture Series: Alex Katz

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Alex Katz, artist, in conversation with Harry Cooper, senior curator and head of modern art, National Gallery of Art. Alex Katz was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1927 and educated at Cooper Union. Although he fraternized in the 1950s with the abstract expressionists, Katz never embraced the gestural style popular in New York, clinging instead to some degree of observation. Yet if Katz's work has always celebrated the realism of quotidian life and landscape, it also incorporates the scale and structure of the ambitious abstract painting of his time. In 1968, Katz moved to an artists’ cooperative building in SoHo, where he has lived and worked ever since. Although he is best known for his figure paintings, often set in and around Manhattan, Katz is equally a painter of Maine, where he has summered for decades. Represented by 89 works in the Gallery’s collection, Katz’s career can be traced through generous gifts like Folding Chair (1959) and Isaac and Oliver (2013), and important acquisitions such as Swamp Maple (4:30) (1968). Most recently, he was commissioned to enhance Manhattan’s 57th Street/6th Avenue subway station interior with Metropolitan Faces, a series of his iconic, brightly colored portraits and flower paintings. Katz was also approved to place a series of cutout sculptures of his wife, Ada, on the median of New York’s Park Avenue. In this conversation held on March 9, 2019, as part of the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Lecture Series, Katz and National Gallery of Art senior curator Harry Cooper discuss the genesis and evolution of Katz’s practice over 50 years.

Apr 16 2019

51mins

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Rank #19: Painting and Representation

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Tim Doud, artist; professor, department of art, American University; cofounder, ‘sindikit; and cofounder, STABLE; in conversation with artists Jonathan Lyndon Chase and Louis Fratino. Jonathan Lyndon Chase, Tim Doud, and Louis Fratino all engage with themes of race, gender, and sexuality while working in the genre of figurative painting. Yet the artists’ idiosyncratic styles also take their paintings beyond categories of identity, challenging normative strategies of representation. In this discussion recorded October 21, 2018, in conjunction with the special installation Bodies of Work at the National Gallery of Art, Doud moderates a conversation with Chase and Fratino about painting techniques and the tropes surrounding figurative work, looking particularly into how their methods explore and expand the practice of modern portraiture.

Mar 05 2019

51mins

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Rank #20: Modern Sculpture in the National Gallery

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David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art. The East Building of the National Gallery of Art houses an impressive collection of modern sculptures displayed throughout its many levels. Henry Moore’s Knife Edge Mirror Two Piece, Anthony Caro’s National Gallery Ledge Piece, and the enormous mobile, Untitled, by Alexander Calder were commissioned for the opening of the building in 1978 and are prominently displayed at the entrance and in the atrium. Other large-scale works by Max Ernst, Andy Goldsworthy, Isamu Noguchi, Richard Serra, and David Smith are also found in the atrium. Throughout the upstairs galleries one can trace the history of 20th-century sculpture in parallel with the history of 20th-century painting. As part of the series Celebrating the East Building: 20th-Century Art, senior lecturer David Gariff leads a tour of the Gallery’s modern sculptures in this lecture presented on August 30, 2018, at the National Gallery of Art.

Oct 09 2018

51mins

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The Problem with Renoir: A Hard Look at the Artist on the Centennial of His Death April 2, 2020, 11:18 AM

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Mary Morton, curator and head of French paintings, National Gallery of Art Auguste Renoir rebelled against the standards of the official art world, like other impressionists, pushing the limits of painting and creating his distinct style. But Renoir, in particular, has become an all-too-easy target for museumgoers who find his late female figures contrived and his palette cloying. Marking the centennial of the artist’s death in 1919, Mary Morton counters the anti-Renoir movement by reaffirming the artist’s achievement and lasting significance within the history of Western art in her lecture on December 3, 2019.

Apr 07 2020

51mins

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Wyeth Lecture in American Art: Art Is an Excuse: Conceptual Strategies, 1968–1983

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Kellie Jones, Columbia University. In this lecture, presented on November 6, 2019, Kellie Jones, of Columbia University, looks at international conceptual art networks and the making of global community in the late twentieth century. The lecture considers moments in the global reach of performance art in the 1970s in locales from Mexico City to London to Los Angeles, considering projects by artists including Felipe Ehrenberg, Lourdes Grobet, Adrian Piper, Senga Nengudi, and David Lamelas.

Apr 07 2020

51mins

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Degas at the Opéra: Introductory Slide Overview

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Edgar Degas was fascinated by music, opera, and ballet throughout his long career. He was a regular attendee at the old Paris Opéra house on the Rue Le Peletier through his early career, and then at the Garnier Opéra after its opening in 1875. Degas explored every aspect of the world of the opera—from rehearsals to performances, from the practice rooms to the stage. Yet his many paintings of the rehearsal rooms and the operas were never done on the spot; they were the product of his careful study of the ballerinas, singers, and musicians posed in his studio. The leader of the avant-garde group known as the impressionists, Degas always asserted that nothing was less spontaneous than his art. He kept volumes of drawings of figures, from every conceivable angle, that he would return to time and again for compositions throughout his career. He was interested in the body in motion and at rest, often in characteristic (if awkward) positions. Toward the end of his life, when his sight began to fail, Degas substituted brilliant color for the precise draftsmanship of his earlier work. To celebrate the exhibition, on March 13, 2020, Eric Denker, Senior Lecturer, National Gallery of Art, provides an overview of the exhibition.

Mar 31 2020

51mins

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Introduction to the Exhibition-Raphael and His Circle

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Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art In celebration of the 500th anniversary of Raphael’s death, the Gallery presents 25 prints and drawings in an intimate installation. The works illustrate how Raphael’s art shaped the standard of aesthetic excellence for later artists, connoisseurs, and scholars. The exhibition features four drawings by Raphael: the sheet from which the design of his painting Saint George and the Dragon was transferred; the cartoon for the so-called Belle Jardinière; a detailed representation of the prophets Hosea and Jonah; and a well-known study for part of the frescoes in the church of Santa Maria della Pace in Rome. Nine drawings by his closest collaborators and followers—Giulio Romano, Polidoro da Caravaggio, and Perino del Vaga—are also on view. The exhibition includes 10 engravings, as well as a chiaroscuro woodcut, by the earliest interpreters of Raphael’s designs: Marcantonio Raimondi and his followers Agostino dei Musi and Marco Dente as well as Ugo da Carpi. To celebrate the exhibition opening, on February 21, 2020, Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art, provided an overview of the exhibition.

Mar 31 2020

1hr 1min

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Coding Our Collection: The National Gallery of Art Datathon

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The National Gallery of Art will be the first American art museum to invite teams of data scientists and art historians to analyze, contextualize, and visualize its permanent collection data. The Gallery’s full permanent collection data has been released to six teams of researchers from institutions including Bennington College, Carnegie Mellon University, Duke University, George Mason University, Macalester College, New College of Florida, University of California, Los Angeles, and Williams College. Questions from curators, conservators, and researchers will help guide this analysis, and teams are encouraged to pursue whichever avenues of inquiry they find most compelling. The study will culminate in a two-day Datathon during which the teams will finalize their visualizations and present their findings at a public livestreamed event on Friday, October 25, 2019, at 3:30 p.m. The project is led by Diana Greenwald, Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow, National Gallery of Art.

Mar 31 2020

1hr 1min

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Raphael and his Circle: Introductory Slide Overview

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Eric Denker, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art Raphael is recognized by many as the foremost figure of the classical tradition in Western painting. Unparalleled in the complexity of his style and the near reverence his art has inspired over the five centuries since his death, few artists are so deserving of commemoration. In the early twentieth century, the mark of a great Italian collection in the United States was to have work by Raphael. No Michelangelo paintings or sculpture were in America’s collections, nor any work by Leonardo da Vinci. However collectors in the United States astutely acquired 14 paintings by Raphael, five of which would become part of the National Gallery of Art’s collection. To celebrate the exhibition marking the 500th anniversary of Raphael’s death, Eric Denker, senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art, gave this talk on March 13, 2020. He provides an overview of the exhibition and examines the Gallery’s extraordinary collection of paintings, drawings, and prints by Raphael and his workshop.

Mar 31 2020

1hr 1min

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Introduction to the Exhibition—Degas at the Opéra

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Kimberly A. Jones, curator of 19th-century French paintings, National Gallery of Art Edgar Degas (1834–1917) is celebrated as the painter of dancers, a subject that dominated his art for nearly four decades. An exuberant display of rich imagination and keen observation, his renowned images of the Paris Opéra are among the most sophisticated and visually compelling works he created. Celebrating the 350th anniversary of the Opéra’s founding, Degas at the Opéra presents approximately 100 of the artist’s best-known and beloved works in a range of media, including paintings, pastels, drawings, prints, and sculpture. Organized with the Musées d'Orsay et de l'Orangerie, Paris, the exhibition is on view at the National Gallery of Art from March 1 through July 5, 2020. On opening day, curator Kimberly Jones shares insights on the exhibition, the first to explore Degas’s enduring fascination with the Opéra.

Mar 24 2020

51mins

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Painting in the Open Air: A Conversation with Ann Lofquist

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Mary Morton, curator and head of French paintings, National Gallery of Art, and Ann Lofquist, artist At the National Gallery of Art on February 23, 2020, Mary Morton is joined in conversation with artist Ann Lofquist to discuss the exhibition True to Nature: Open-Air Painting in Europe, 1780–1870. Singling out particular paintings from the exhibition, Lofquist describes the influence of 19th-century artists, such as Camille Corot, on her own practice of sketching in oil paint outdoors. Like these European painters who were aesthetically energized by the light of Italy, Lofquist spent several years in California after a lifetime of painting in the northeast. The conversation highlights a tradition begun in the late 18th century that extends to contemporary painting.

Mar 24 2020

51mins

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The Moon in the Age of Photography

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Mia Fineman, curator, department of photographs, Metropolitan Museum of Art 2019 marks 50 years since Apollo 11 landed on the moon on July 20, 1969, capturing the attention of viewers worldwide who eagerly awaited the first photographs taken onsite. Photography played a key role in the space race of the 1960s, both as a tool of scientific documentation and as a medium of public relations. In this lecture held on October 20, 2019, in celebration of the exhibitions By the Light of the Silvery Moon: A Century of Lunar Photographs at the National Gallery of Art and Apollo’s Muse: The Moon in the Age of Photography at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, curator Mia Fineman explores the connections as well as the tensions between these two functions, delving into the fascinating history of lunar imaging.

Mar 10 2020

51mins

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Weather in Art: From Symbol to Science

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David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art Offered in conjunction with the exhibition True to Nature: Open-Air Painting in Europe, 1780–1870 on view at the National Gallery of Art February 2 – May 3, 2020, senior lecturer David Gariff discusses shifting definitions and visual explorations of weather in European painting. In this lecture, presented on February 26, 2020, at the National Gallery of Art, Gariff investigates how approaches to painting the effects of weather — storms, rain, snow, wind, floods, and cloud formations — slowly transform from symbolic portrayals in religious, mythological, and history paintings to more scientific and empirical depictions of weather, reflecting the influence of the new science of meteorology emerging in the nineteenth century.

Mar 10 2020

51mins

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COMPACT ASSEMBLY

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Jess Cherry, artist, and education assistant with Art Around the Corner, department of gallery and studio learning, National Gallery of Art; Bryan Funk, artist, and adjunct professor, UDC; Maren Henson, artist, and adjunct professor, George Washington University and Anne Arundel Community College; Giulia Piera Livi, artist, and adjunct professor, Maryland Institute of Contemporary Art, and manager, C. Grimaldis Gallery; and Edward Victor Sanchez, artist, and adjunct professor, University of Cincinnati COMPACT ASSEMBLY is an ongoing project showcasing a range of artistic practices from a completely multidisciplinary perspective. This international collective was formed in the city of Baltimore in 2017 and, through time, has evolved to better support and celebrate the work of such a diverse crowd. As part of the Works in Progress series held on November 18, 2019, artists representing the collective reunite to discuss their project goals and the ways in which COMPACT ASSEMBLY breaks away from individual tendencies and seeks to maintain an environment of integration and community engagement.

Mar 10 2020

51mins

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Something, Anything, Everything, Nothing: Ambiguity, Meaning, and Experience

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William Whitaker, senior art services specialist, office of the registrar, National Gallery of Art, in conversation with Molly Donovan, curator of contemporary art, department of modern art, National Gallery of Art Absent context, marks are stubbornly ambiguous things. How, then, do they acquire meaning? Perhaps their meaning lies not in what they signify or represent, but in how the viewer experiences them. On November 18, 2019, as part of the Works in Progress lecture series, William Whitaker and Molly Donovan grappled with this question—and the proposed answer—by examining paintings by Whitaker. Discussing Whitaker’s artistic practice and his goals in mark-making, they challenged the audience to think critically about how meaning is attributed.

Mar 10 2020

51mins

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Collecting European Landscape Sketches: An Introduction to Open-Air Painting in Europe, 1780–1870

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Mary Morton, curator and head of French paintings, National Gallery of Art, in conversation with Jane Munro, keeper of paintings, drawings and prints, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, and director of studies in history of art, Christ’s College, Cambridge; and Alice Goldet, private collector
An integral part of art education in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, painting en plein air was a core practice for avant-garde artists in Europe. Intrepid artists such as Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, John Constable, Simon Denis, Jules Coignet, and André Giroux—highly skilled at quickly capturing effects of light and atmosphere—made sometimes arduous journeys to paint their landscapes in person at breathtaking sites ranging from the Baltic coast and Swiss Alps to the streets of Paris and the ruins of Rome. The exhibition True to Nature: Open-Air Painting in Europe, 1780-1870 consists of some 100 oil sketches, including several recently discovered works. Drawing on new scholarship, it explores issues such as attribution, chronology, and technique. To celebrate its opening at the National Gallery of Art on February 2, 2020, Mary Morton led a conversation with Jane Munro and Alice Goldet. True to Nature is on view through May 3, 2020.

Mar 03 2020

51mins

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A Conversation with Richard Mosse

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Richard Mosse, artist, with Sarah Greenough, senior curator and head of the department of photographs, National Gallery of Art, and Andrea Nelson, associate curator of photographs, National Gallery of Art Irish photographer Richard Mosse (b. 1980) attempts to capture the complex realities of loss and destruction. Having gained initial recognition and acclaim for his work on the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mosse became increasingly frustrated with the constraints of conventional documentary photography. In an attempt to refresh the medium and reengage viewers, Mosse began using a military-grade surveillance camera, focusing on migrants and refugee camps. Locating his subjects and creating images through thermal radiation, Mosse subverts the aggression of the military technology to reveal the hardships of those displaced by war. This work culminated in the 52-minute video Incoming, filmed by Trevor Tweeten with a score by Ben Frost, that vacillates between scenes of the profoundly beautiful and the meditative, the terrifying and the horrific. In conjunction with the installation opening at the National Gallery of Art on November 17, 2019, Mosse discusses this narrative of displacement and migration in a conversation with curators Sarah Greenough and Andrea Nelson. Incoming is on view through March 22, 2020.

Mar 03 2020

51mins

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Introduction to the Exhibition—Verrocchio: Sculptor and Painter of Renaissance Florence

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Andrew Butterfield, exhibition curator, and president of Andrew Butterfield Fine Arts Verrocchio: Sculptor and Painter of Renaissance Florence is the first-ever monographic exhibition in the United States on Andrea del Verrocchio (c. 1435–1488), the innovative artist, painter, sculptor, and teacher whose pupils included Leonardo da Vinci, Pietro Perugino, and likely Sandro Botticelli as well. The exhibition examines the wealth and breadth of Verrocchio's extraordinary artistry by bringing together some 50 of his masterpieces in painting, sculpture, and drawing that allow viewers to appreciate how his work in each art form stimulated creativity in the others. Groundbreaking technical research explores Verrocchio's materials and techniques, offering revelations about his artistic choices. Several carefully argued new attributions in different media are proposed in the exhibition. The National Gallery of Art is the sole American venue for the exhibition, and in this lecture, delivered on November 3, 2019, curator Andrew Butterfield provides an overview of Verrocchio’s work.

Feb 25 2020

51mins

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Photographing the Moon: An Evening with Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Curators, Part 1—Mapping the Moon with Telescopes

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David DeVorkin, senior curator of astronomy and the space sciences, National Air and Space Museum The year 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969. Photography played a significant role both in preparing for the mission and in shaping the cultural consciousness of the event. By the Light of the Silvery Moon: A Century of Lunar Photographs features works ranging in date from the 19th century to the “space-age” 1960s. The event Photographing the Moon, held on October 3, 2019, at the National Gallery of Art, celebrated this exhibition by inviting three curators from the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum to give talks on the intertwined histories of photography and space exploration. To open the event, David DeVorkin presented an illustrated inquiry into the interplay of the eye and hand with the photographic process, looking at developments over the past 150 years and their impact on the Apollo program.

Feb 18 2020

51mins

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Photographing the Moon: An Evening with Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Curators, Part 3—Geology from Orbit: Robots, Cameras, and Photogeology

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Matthew Shindell, curator of planetary science, National Air and Space Museum The year 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969. Photography played a significant role both in preparing for the mission and in shaping the cultural consciousness of the event. By the Light of the Silvery Moon: A Century of Lunar Photographs features works ranging in date from the 19th century to the “space-age” 1960s. The event Photographing the Moon, held on October 3, 2019, at the National Gallery of Art, celebrated this exhibition by inviting three curators from the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum to give talks on the intertwined histories of photography and space exploration. In the third talk, Matthew Shindell described the development and impact of the field of photogeology, which provided early photography of the earth and moon from airplanes and eventually allowed for mapping and selecting landing sites for human missions to the moon.

Feb 18 2020

51mins

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Space Still the Place―d.c. space Part II and Its Contemporaries: 1974–1991

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Ray Barker, archivist of special collections/Washingtoniana, DC Public Library; Cynthia Connolly, artist, and booking agent, d.c. space; Claudia Joseph, artist, and booking agent, d.c. space; Rogelio Maxwell, artist, and director and curator (1976–1985), Hardart Gallery; Silvana Straw, poet, writer, performer, and DC’s original Poetry Slam Champion; and Richard Squires, artist, and founder, Museum of Temporary Art Often overshadowed by the presence of national museums, Washington, DC’s independent visual and performance art spaces have nonetheless played a critical role in shaping the cultural life of the city. While many of these local venues no longer exist, the DC Public Library is taking strides to preserve this rich history of a thriving arts community; prominent figures from that community share their experiences in this program presented at the National Gallery of Art on October 19, 2019. Artists Cynthia Connolly and Claudia Joseph speak of their work as booking agents at music venue d.c. space. Rogelio Maxwell, founder of Hardart Gallery, and Richard Squires, founder of the Museum of Temporary Art, discuss the histories of their respective spaces, and DC’s original Poetry Slam Champion, Silvana Straw, who had been featured at these art spaces, contributes a short performance. Finally, the artists join Ray Barker, archivist of special collections/Washingtoniana at the DC Public Library, for a conversation. This program, the second of a multipart series, is held in collaboration with the DC Public Library.

Feb 18 2020

51mins

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Photographing the Moon: An Evening with Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Curators, Part 2—Through Astronaut Eyes

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Jennifer Levasseur, curator of space history, National Air and Space Museum The year 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969. Photography played a significant role both in preparing for the mission and in shaping the cultural consciousness of the event. By the Light of the Silvery Moon: A Century of Lunar Photographs features works ranging in date from the 19th century to the “space-age” 1960s. The event Photographing the Moon, held on October 3, 2019, at the National Gallery of Art, celebrated this exhibition by inviting three curators from the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum to give talks on the intertwined histories of photography and space exploration. In the second lecture, Jennifer Levasseur looked at photographs taken in space by people, revealing the ways that images captured by astronauts of the Apollo era have formed the framework for our understanding of human spaceflight today.

Feb 18 2020

51mins

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Introduction to the Exhibition—Alonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain

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C. D. Dickerson III, curator and head of sculpture and decorative arts, National Gallery of Art Alonso Berruguete, active on the Iberian Peninsula during the first half of the 16th century, initially trained as a painter before becoming known for his painted sculptures in wood. Alonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain is the first major exhibition held outside Spain to celebrate Berruguete’s expressive art. The exhibition presents more than 40 works from across the artist’s career, including early paintings and the largest group of his drawings ever to be assembled, along with an unprecedented number of sculptures. These works range from single figures to large sections of multistory altarpieces, or retablos, that combine reliefs, statues, paintings, and architectural details. In this lecture, delivered on October 14, 2019, curator C. D. Dickerson III provides an overview to this exhibition of work by Berruguete, the preeminent sculptor of Renaissance Spain.

Feb 11 2020

51mins

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iTunes Ratings

64 Ratings
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Fantastic show

By HagenThomann - Jun 27 2019
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I just recently stumbled into this podcast but I couldn’t be happier I did! Fantastic episodes and lots of interesting content. Can’t wait to go back to DC and see ‘The Life of Animals in Japanese Art’! Thank you and keep up the great work!

Love the lectures but

By 铿兑有 - Aug 24 2018
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Would be wonderful if the audience could see the pictures.