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Rank #116 in Business category

Business

Business Daily

Updated about 1 month ago

Rank #116 in Business category

Business
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The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

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The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

iTunes Ratings

379 Ratings
Average Ratings
281
46
17
13
22

Great daily news

By R Liam - Oct 05 2017
Read more
Good insights, top global stories

Great podcast! Love every episode of it.

By Davo91 - Feb 06 2015
Read more
Great podcast! Love every episode of it.

iTunes Ratings

379 Ratings
Average Ratings
281
46
17
13
22

Great daily news

By R Liam - Oct 05 2017
Read more
Good insights, top global stories

Great podcast! Love every episode of it.

By Davo91 - Feb 06 2015
Read more
Great podcast! Love every episode of it.
Cover image of Business Daily

Business Daily

Latest release on Jul 11, 2020

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The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

Rank #1: The growth of fake coronavirus cures

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In today’s programme, we’ll be looking at how fake coronavirus cures are marketed and why people are buying them. We’ll also be asking if social media platforms need to do more to stop the flow of disinformation. Claire Wardle who leads strategy at First Draft News tells us why social media is a fertile ground for spreading rumours and disinformation. Stephen Lea, Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Exeter University tells us why are people paying good money for unproven remedies. Plus, the BBC’s Pumza Fihlani tells us about a supposed herbal remedy being touted by the Madagascan government.

(Picture: A bottle of pills, credit: Getty Images).

May 26 2020

17mins

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Rank #2: The Green New Deal goes global

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Plans for gigantic government investments to decarbonise the world economy are gaining traction, but they may hinge on the US election results in November.

Justin Rowlatt speaks to Spain's deputy prime minister Teresa Ribera about how her government aims to make the country carbon neutral by 2050, as well as a one-trillion-euro EU green recovery plan expected to be unveiled by the European Commission this week.

Meanwhile in the US, the signs are that Democrat Joe Biden will adopt a climate change plan similar in scale to the original 1930s New Deal as the central plank of his election campaign, according to Vox journalist David Roberts.

But what about the world's biggest carbon emitter, China? Justin asks Li Shuo of Greenpeace East Asia whether President Xi will prioritise green investments as part of his country's coronavirus recovery plan, currently being fleshed out at the National People's Congress. And what difference would the US election outcome make to China's willingness to phase out fossil fuels?

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Chinese women hold a hoe and a basket and smile while standing under a solar photovoltaic panel array; Credit: Jenson/Getty Images)

May 25 2020

17mins

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Rank #3: Can 'immunity passports' help us get back to normal?

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Countries around the world are working on ways for people to safely get back to normal, people like Pam in Scotland, who is navigating the world of app dating during coronavirus and wondering when, and if, to meet up. One answer is the idea of an immunity passport or certificate: something that shows you have had coronavirus and are now immune. Franz Walt, chief executive of Swiss firm Quotient, says antibody testing is so accurate it could be the basis for such a system. But Professor Robert West at University College London, says we don’t know enough about the illness to guarantee a passport system would work. And Stanford University historian Kathryn Olivarius explains how a 19th century yellow fever outbreak in New Orleans can help us think about it.

(Picture: a testing vial. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

May 27 2020

17mins

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Rank #4: A meatless future?

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The food we'll be eating in the future may look the same, it may even taste the same, but it may well have been grown in a lab. In today's programme we're talking volcanic fungi, eggless scrambled eggs and meat that doesn't come from an animal. But will it all get past regulators and fussy eaters?
Manuela Saragosa and Regan Morris investigate the California companies involved in the race to replace the meat we eat.
(Photo: Non-meat burgers from Beyond Meat, Credit: Getty Images)

Oct 25 2019

18mins

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Rank #5: The next financial crisis

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It's more than a decade since the global financial crisis. Central banks have pumped trillions of dollars into the financial system to support markets and the broader economy. But there are warning signs that major risks may be re-emerging in the financial markets.

This month, fund manager Neil Woodford suspended trading in his largest fund after rising numbers of investors asked for their money back. Could this highlight a vulnerability in the financial system that runs right through the investment management business?

The BBC's Manuela Saragosa and Laurence Knight speak to two veterans of the investment community: Mohamed El-Erian, chief economic adviser at Allianz and former head of Pimco in California; and Lord Paul Myners, the former head of Gartmore in the UK. Both worry that investors are unaware of the risk they are running that they won't be able to access their money when they most need it, and warn that regulators could be blindsided by the next big crisis.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: A trading screen flashes red; Credit: Getty Images)

Jun 13 2019

18mins

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Rank #6: Going after Google

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The attorneys general of 48 out of the 50 US states have come together to challenge the control of the search giant over what we buy or view online.

Manuela Saragosa speaks to the BBC's technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones about why the US anti-trust authorities have decided to join their EU counterparts in taking on Google.

Jonathan Tepper, author of the new book The Myth of Capitalism: Monopolies and the Death of Competition, takes us through the history and significance of anti-trust legislation. But are anti-monopoly laws equipped to deal with the tech giants of today? And can these companies even be called monopolies? We'll also hear from Sally Hubbard of the Open Markets Institute, and Alex Moazed, co-author of the 2016 book Modern Monopolies.

(Picture: The Google logo displayed through a magnifying glass; Credit: Chesnot/Getty Images)

Sep 11 2019

18mins

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Rank #7: WeWork and the cult of the CEO

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How WeWork's Adam Neumann lost his job after a disastrous attempt to list the company on the stock market. Manuela Saragosa speaks to the Wall Street Journal's Eliot Brown about the charisma of Adam Neumann and how it helped raise billions from investors, and to Andre Spicer from the Cass Business School about the cult of the founder-CEO. Scott Galloway, professor of marketing at the New York University Stern School of Business, explains why WeWork's IPO failure should be a lesson to the markets.

(Photo: Adam Neumann, Credit: Getty Images)

Sep 27 2019

17mins

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Rank #8: The US consumer debt pile

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Payday loans, auto loans and student loans are overwhelming a sector of American society - what can be done to help them dig their way out of their debts?

Ed Butler speaks to Dean, a military veteran who says his debts wrecked his health and forced him into personal bankruptcy. Plus student Melissa says her inability to keep up with the interest on her student loans, despite working a well remunerated middle class job, is typical of her Millennial generation.

Such stories are becoming commonplace among the young and the poor in the US. In search of solutions to their plights, Ed speaks to Mary Jackson of the Online Lenders' Alliance, Harvard economist Ken Rogoff, and Martha Wunderli of the AAA Fair Credit Foundation in Utah.

(Picture: Senior man receiving bank debt documents; Credit: THEPALMER/Getty Images)

Jul 11 2019

18mins

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Rank #9: Should workers be offered unlimited paid leave?

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A new idea has emerged in the business world over the last few years: maybe employees should take time off whenever they feel like it, and get paid while they do it. Lila MacLellan from online business site Quartz explains why, with people ever more expected to be available around the clock on email, phone or in the office, it might be better to leave it to the worker to decide when they do and don’t need time off without having to justify it. Some companies have embraced this idea. Dr Amantha Imber at Inventium and Felicity Tregonning of Spacelab explain why their companies have decided to let employees take as much time off as they want. But not everybody is convinced. Ben Gateley explains why his company scrapped just such a scheme after seven years.

(Picture: A white sand beach on the island of Koh Phangan off the coast of Koh Samui. Picture credit: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)

Aug 14 2019

17mins

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Rank #10: How to be ambitious

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We hear about the negative effects ambition can have, and the tools you need to relieve them, with Neel Burton of Oxford University. Author Rachel Bridge defends the thesis of her book 'Ambition: Why it's good to want more and how to get it'. And what happens when you decide to re-direct your ambition? Joe Udo tells his story of becoming a stay at home dad.

Also in the programme, writers Elizabeth Schenk and Hana Wallace discuss the results of a project they launched looking at the careers of their old university sorority members. Plus, top tips on achieving your goals from Peter Gollwitzer, experimental psychologist at New York University.

This programme was first broadcast on 1 Aug 2017

PHOTO: Little boy in a superhero costume. Credit: Getty Images

Aug 08 2019

17mins

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Rank #11: Are stock buybacks a corporate scam?

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Share buybacks are when a publicly-listed company uses some of its spare cash to buy up shares in itself, in order to drive the share price up and benefit shareholders. The practice has become so common that the amount of buyback money extracted from corporations exceeds their profits. Rita McGrath, a professor at Columbia Business School, explains how stock buybacks emerged. But are stock buybacks a good idea? Is it perhaps better to use that money to grow the business in other ways? And crucially, with so many executives paid in shares, is this just a way for them to maximise their own take? Nell Minnow of Value Edge explains why she thinks buybacks are ripe for abuse. But Ken Bertsch, Executive Director of the Council of Institutional Investors says buybacks don’t need to be totally reined in, but can be used for good.

Photo: Getty Images

Aug 16 2019

17mins

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Rank #12: The right to repair

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Why is it so hard to fix your own things? Ed Butler speaks to those campaigning for manufacturers to make it easier for us to fix our electronics goods - everything from tractors to smartphones. Clare Seek runs a Repair Café in Portsmouth, England, a specially designated venue for anyone who wants to get their stuff to last longer. And Ed travels to Agbogbloshie in Accra in Ghana, one of the places where our mountains of e-waste end up being pulled apart and melted down for scrap. The programme also features interviews with Gay Gordon-Byrne, executive director of The Repair Association; Kyle Wiens, founder of iFixit; intellectual property lawyer Jani Ihalainen; and Susanne Baker, head of environment and compliance at techUK.

(Photo: Broken iPhones, Credit: Getty Images)

Oct 03 2019

18mins

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Rank #13: The next agricultural revolution

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We need to transform the way we grow food if we are to head off disaster - so say leading agronomists. But can it be done?

The modern agricultural industry, borne out of the Green Revolution that has multiplied crop yields since the 1960s, has contributed to multiple new crises - obesity, soil degradation, collapsing biodiversity and climate change. To address this "paradox of productivity" a whole new revolution is needed, according to Professor Tim Benton of the University of Leeds and think tank Chatham House.

The BBC's Justin Rowlatt travels to the world's longest running scientific experiment, a collection of wheat fields dating back to the 1840s at the Rothamsted agricultural research centre just outside London, to ask resident scientist John Crawford whether our past success in staving off global hunger can be sustained in the coming decades.

Plus what role should the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organisation play, especially as that body prepares to appoint new leadership? Justin speaks to the former UN Rapporteur for the Right to Food, Olivier de Schutter.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: The Broadbalk research wheat fields at Rothamsted; Credit: BBC)

Jun 19 2019

18mins

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Rank #14: Climbing the student debt mountain

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Could a new scheme alleviate the crippling cost of university fees for young Americans, who have already accumulated a trillion and a half dollars in student debts?

Dr Courtney McBeth tells Ed Butler how under the "income sharing agreement" scheme that she is piloting at the University of Utah, the amount that students repay depends on how much money they manage to earn in their future careers. This new approach frees graduates up to start a family or risk starting their own company, according to Charles Trafton, who runs a student loan marketplace called Edly.

But the financing is provided by investors looking to make a profit, in contrast to similar government-run schemes in the UK and Australia. And according to David Robinson of British think tank the Education Policy Institute, this means that the US scheme may not do much to improve social mobility or meet the needs of the jobs market.

(Picture: Coins stacks stepping up towards a money jar topped by a university mortar board; Credit: marchmeena29/Getty Images)

May 15 2019

19mins

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Business Weekly

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On Business Weekly, we look at what's been the biggest corporate scandal of 2020 so far. Wirecard was one of the German stock exchange's largest companies, but it now finds itself embroiled in fraud and corruption claims. How did the technology star fall so quickly from grace? Fergus Nicoll investigates. The coronavirus pandemic has taken its toll on the education sector and in the United States new rules say foreign students might face deportation if their courses have gone online, throwing their lives into disarray, Rob Young hears their stories. And what’s the formula behind a winning brand? We join Elizabeth Hotson on a quest to bring out a winning range of mushy peas. Presented by Vishala Sri-Pathma and produced by Matthew Davies.

Jul 11 2020

49mins

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Trump's tax returns

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The US Supreme Court has ruled that the US President's taxes cannot be withheld from a grand jury investigation - but what does it mean for his bid to keep his finances private and to get himself re-elected in November?

Ed Butler asks John Coffee, professor of law at New York's Columbia Law school, which legal team and which political party should be celebrating more over this complicated ruling.

Plus, New York Times investigative journalist Susanne Craig tells us what is already known about Mr Trump's tax affairs and the source of his wealth. And tax journalist David Cay Johnston explains why Mr Trump's finances were so little investigated before he became president.

(Picture: US President Donald Trump in the cabinet room of the White House; Credit: EPA/Samuel Corum)

Jul 10 2020

18mins

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Voting amidst a pandemic

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Could electronic voting help the US hold an election?

Ed Butler speaks to Nimit Sawhney founder and CEO of Voatz - a US startup that provides voting through a smartphone app, and to Priit Vinkel, the former head of the state electoral office of Estonia where 50% of citizens now cast their votes online.

J. Alex Halderman, professor of computer science at the University of Michigan explains why e-voting systems are so risky when it comes to election security. Lori Steele Contorer, former founder and CEO of e-voting company Everyone Counts, argues the case for electronic voting amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Producer: Edwin Lane

(Photo: Voters line up at polling stations in the US state of Wisconsin earlier this year; Credit: Getty Images)

Jul 09 2020

18mins

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Rising tensions with China

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Why does China seem to be upsetting countries around the world?
Beijing's recent clampdown on Hong Kong with a new security law has led many countries to condemn the Chinese leadership. It's also put more pressure on the trade war with the US. So what's in it for Beijing to apparently spur international hostility over Hong Kong and a number of other regional border conflicts? George Magnus, an economist and an associate at the China Centre at Oxford University, believes the domestic unemployment issue is a big determining factor in Beijing's thinking. Yuen Yuen Ang, a political scientist and an expert on China and emerging economies at the University of Michigan, says it's all a symptom of President Xi's and Donald Trump's insecurities at home. And Ian Bremmer the President of the risk consultancy the Eurasia Group, says despite the Chinese always having been thought of long term, strategic thinkers they are now not even thinking six months ahead.

(Picture: Cargo containers with US and China flags hoisted by crane hooks clash with each other; Credit: cybrain/Getty Images)

Jul 08 2020

18mins

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How brands are born

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What's the secret to coming up with a brand name?

Elizabeth Hotson goes on a mission to create a new line of mushy peas - also known as Yorkshire caviar. With their low fat, high fibre, vegan credentials, mushy peas should be a winner with health conscious millennials, but a great name is still essential to success.

We negotiate legal minefields with Kate Swaine, head of the UK trademarks, brands and designs team at law firm Gowling WLG, and get some valuable branding insights from Simon Manchipp and Laura Hussey at design agency SomeOne.

Eric Yorkston, associate professor of marketing at the Neeley School of Business at Texas Christian University, tells us why analysing the sounds of words can make or break a brand.

Producer: Sarah Treanor

(Picture: Queen Pea branding by Simon Manchipp of SomeOne)

Jul 07 2020

17mins

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Africa's tech entrepreneurs

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Coronavirus has brought new opportunities to Africa's tech sector, despite the devastating blow it has delivered to economies around the world.

Tamasin Ford speaks to one of Forbes Africa’s 50 most powerful women, Rebecca Enonchong, the founder and CEO of AppsTech, a global provider of digital solutions. Claud Hutchful, chief executive of Dream Oval, a technology firm in Accra, Ghana, tells us about payments app Slydepay.

Plus we hear from Moses Acquah, chief technology officer of GreenTec Capital Partners, an investment firm that supports African entrepreneurs. He’s also the founder of the networking organisation, Afrolynk.

(Picture: Woman using a tablet; Credit: Getty Images)

Jul 06 2020

17mins

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Business Weekly

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Big brands are turning away from Facebook over its so-called toxic content - so how will the social network cope? That’s the big question we’ll be asking on Business Weekly. We’ll also be investigating the changing face of make-up as Kim Kardashian West sells a stake in her cosmetics business to the beauty giant Coty. We’ll hear why traditional make-up brands are struggling to keep up with companies born in the age of social media and influencers. Our correspondent in France heads to the sparkling shores of Brittany to see whether businesses there are ready for summer tourists - and we have an interview with the film director, Gurinder Chadha. Presented by Lucy Burton.

Jul 04 2020

49mins

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Nollywood under lockdown

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Coronavirus has brought one of the most prolific film industries to a virtual standstill. Nollywood, Nigeria’s film industry, is the third largest in the world after Hollywood and India’s Bollywood. Chijioke Uwaegbute from the entertainment desk at Price Waterhouse Coopers Nigeria explains the financial impact of the virus on Nollywood. Moses Babatope, co-founder of Filmhouse, the biggest cinema chain in West Africa, says that with all his cinemas closed, he’s having to pay furlough money out of his own pocket. Plus actress and screenwriter Alexendra Amon tells us that she has had projects cancelled. And we’ll also hear from Obi Emelonye on using smartphones to overcome restriction during the pandemic.

(Image: Nollywood films at a market in Lagos. Picture credit: CRISTINA ALDEHUELA/AFP via Getty Images)

Jul 03 2020

17mins

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US states resist second lockdown

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Coronavirus cases have been rising in two dozen states over the last 14 days. Of these, Texas, Florida, Arizona and California have emerged as the country's latest virus epicentres. And yet governors in many of these states are resisting efforts to close down economic and social activity, or a “second lockdown".

Republican strategist Chris Ingram in Tampa, Florida, explains to Business Daily's Ed Butler the thinking behind allowing most Americans, apart from the most vulnerable, to get back to normal life. But some Floridians are not waiting for directions from the government. Ed Boas, owner of Lanes clothing store, describes the precautions he’s taking on his own initiative.

Meanwhile Dr Cheryl Holder, at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, says that while the state is better-equipped to deal with a second wave, she’s concerned many young people think themselves invulnerable. And Wendell Potter, former health insurance broker turned whistle-blower, explains how the US healthcare system is leaving tens of millions of people untreated, potentially worsening the public health crisis.

(Picture: A pamphlet on how to stay safe from COVID-19 being distributed in Miami, Florida; Credit: Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images)

Jul 02 2020

18mins

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Brands boycott Facebook

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Will the Stop Hate for Profit campaign change the social network's handling of "toxic" content? Big names like Ford, Starbucks and Unilever are pulling ads from Facebook starting this month.

Ed Butler speaks to some of the companies involved: Damien Huang, president of outdoor clothing company Eddie Bauer, Mary Ellen Muckerman from tech firm Mozilla, and Ryan Gellert from Patagonia.

As the campaign appears to gather momentum, how much will it hurt Facebook's business? Jordan Bucknell, founder and CEO of Upbeat Agency, a facebook and Instagram advertising agency, describes the draw of the platform for many small businesses. And Steven Levy, author of the book Facebook: The Inside Story, explains why the real pressure for change could come from Facebook's own workforce.

Producer: Edwin Lane

(Photo: Stop Hate for Profit campaign displayed on a smartphone, Credit: EPA)

Jul 01 2020

18mins

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Rethinking the future

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The 2020s will be transformational for humanity, according to the tech prophet founders of RethinkX,

Tony Seba and James Arbib talk to Justin Rowlatt about their prediction that a confluence of new technologies - in energy, transportation, and food and materials production - could wipe out poverty and solve climate change in the next 10-15 years, and usher in a new "Age of Freedom" for our species.

But while it sounds utopian, they also warn in their new book Rethinking Humanity that it could pose huge civilizational challenges for a planet that still clings to outdated concepts such as democracy, capitalism and the nation state.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Global communications Planet Earth graphic; Credit: metmorworks/Getty Images)

Jun 30 2020

18mins

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The billionaire and the pandemic

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Mohamed Mansour is a household name in Egypt. The billionaire head of the multinational conglomerate Mansour Group has been involved in business and politics in Egypt and abroad for decades, as the BBC’s Mohamed El Aassar explains. Mansour himself sat down to speak with Manuela Saragosa about globalisation, the long-term impact of coronavirus and donating to the UK conservative party.

(Picture: Mohamed Mansour. Picture credit: Mansour Group.)

Jun 29 2020

17mins

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Business Weekly

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On Business Weekly we’ll be asking why the boss is often the least skilled person in the room? Are incompetent people put into middle management to get them out of the way - or are they just more confident than their more proficient peers? We’ll also be looking at the future of meat and asking whether china will turns its back on pork and embrace plant-based alternatives. And we’ll hear from the pilots who have swapped aviation for empathy.

Presented by Lucy Burton, produced by Benjie Guy .

Jun 26 2020

49mins

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Does the WTO have a future?

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With current World Trade Organization Director-General Roberto Azevêdo due to leave his post later in the year, the race is on for a new DG. Abdel Hamid Mamdouh, a former diplomat and candidate for the top job, tells Manuela Saragosa how he imagines the WTO of the future, while the BBC’s Andrew Walker explains how US opposition under President Trump to a global multilateral trading system is putting the organisation’s future in doubt.

(Picture: A shipping freighter with cargo containers. Picture credit: Getty Images)

Jun 26 2020

17mins

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Why your boss is incompetent

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Why is it that the boss never seems to know what they’re doing? The famous “Dilbert principle” asserts that companies promote incompetent employees into middle management to get them out of the way. But Professor David Dunning, co-creator of the competing “Dunning–Kruger effect”, says there’s more to it than that, specifically that the more incompetent a person is, the more confident they can be. Meanwhile, Kelly Shue, Professor of Finance at Yale, says an even simpler idea, the “Peter Principle” helps to explain why people get promoted beyond their level of competence. And entrepreneur Heather McGregor explains why the incompetence of a former boss led her to buy her own company

(Picture: Getty Images)

Jun 25 2020

17mins

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Can we guarantee a job for everyone?

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One of the long-run impacts of the coronavirus pandemic is dramatically worsened unemployment around the world, with millions of people suddenly unable to support themselves and their families. Aside from the obvious financial implications, Dr Stephen Blumenthal, a clinical psychologist in the UK tells Ed Butler about the tremendous impact this could have on mental health and human life. Meanwhile, some economists are discussing whether societies could, or indeed should, make sure everyone who wants a job can have one. Economist Pavlina Tcherneva lays out “The Case for a Job Guarantee.”

(Picture credit: An unemployment line in Chile. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

Jun 24 2020

17mins

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Lifting the lockdowns

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Ever since governments first began trying to contain the coronavirus pandemic, economists and pundits around the world have debated the apparent trade-off between protecting public health, and minimising the economic harm that the containment measure would likely cause.

But is the whole idea of health versus wealth wrongheaded? We hear from Jo Michell, associate professor in economics at the Bristol Business School, and from Laurence Boone, chief economist at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.

Meanwhile, businesses and workers around the UK are holding their breath for the end of lockdown, as the BBC’s Joshua Thorpe has been finding out.

(Picture: Woman reopening her small business after Covid-19; Credit: FatCamera/Getty Images)

Jun 23 2020

17mins

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Will China embrace fake meat?

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In today's programme, Elizabeth Hotson asks how supply chain issues in China’s pork industry could help home grown meat alternatives go mainstream. As pork prices rise and China looks to new forms of protein, we hear from David Yeung from Green Monday, the company behind popular mock-pork product, OmniPork. A rival for the synthetic pork crown, Vince Lu from Zhenmeat, tells us why he has high hopes that his meat free tenderloin will corner the hot pot market and Matilda Ho, founder of Bits x Bites, a food tech VC fund, explains why she's investing in the alternative protein market. We also hear from Bruce Friedrich, co-founder of the Good Food Institute which promotes plant-based alternatives to animal protein. And Shaun Rein, Managing Director of the China Market Research Group asks whether the sales match the hype.

Picture: Soup dumplings with OmniPork filling via OmniPork

Jun 22 2020

17mins

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Business Weekly

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On Business Weekly we ask how international businesses based in Hong Kong are reacting to China’s new security laws. It is finally illegal to discriminate against LGBTQ people in the workplace in the United States, so, we hear from the man who took his case all the way to the Supreme Court. As the World Bank predicts that remittances will fall by 20% this year, we look at how that will affect communities in the developing world and speak to expat workers who send their wages home. Two big food companies are re-branding products that adhere to racial stereotypes - we consider the importance of this. Presented by Lucy Burton.

Jun 20 2020

49mins

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#BLM: Are brands cashing in?

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Companies are pledging support and money to the Black Lives Matter movement, and an end to systemic racism. Do they mean it?

Ed Butler asks Pepper Miller, a market researcher who has campaigned for over 20 years for companies to realise the value of African-American consumers.

One business that already has a long history of supporting black equality and other social justice movements is the ice cream brand Ben & Jerry's. But the company is based in Vermont, the second whitest state in America. Ed asks activism manager Chris Miller whether the firm's purported values are also reflected in their own personnel decisions.

It's a pertinent question, according to Scott Galloway, professor of marketing at the NYU Stern School of Business. With the shift in demographics and purchasing power towards young educated liberal urban workers, and the increased scrutiny of company behaviour in the Google era, he says American businesses see commercial opportunity in taking a much more overt position on US politics than we have seen in the past.

(Picture: Ben & Jerry's Justice Remixed ice cream brand ice cream tub; Credit: Ben & Jerry's)

Jun 19 2020

17mins

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iTunes Ratings

379 Ratings
Average Ratings
281
46
17
13
22

Great daily news

By R Liam - Oct 05 2017
Read more
Good insights, top global stories

Great podcast! Love every episode of it.

By Davo91 - Feb 06 2015
Read more
Great podcast! Love every episode of it.