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Education
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The Teach Better Podcast

Updated 7 days ago

Education
Courses
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The Teach Better Podcast is a series of conversations with teachers about teaching. We talk mostly with faculty in higher education, but will occasionally talk with other teachers too. Your hosts are Doug McKee and Edward O’Neill.

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The Teach Better Podcast is a series of conversations with teachers about teaching. We talk mostly with faculty in higher education, but will occasionally talk with other teachers too. Your hosts are Doug McKee and Edward O’Neill.

iTunes Ratings

18 Ratings
Average Ratings
13
3
1
1
0

Are they all this good?

By librariandee - Oct 18 2017
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This was my first episode and it was great! I love Cult of Pedagogy and I was hoping to find another podcast that was just as good. This is it. I'm looking forward to listening to more episodes to get more ideas.

Pretty Good

By K3ll33n - Jul 12 2016
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It's an interesting take on education from non-education professors. I really appreciate hearing the biggest failure at the end of each podcast. Each professor interviewed gives a different take on how to move past and build off their past mistakes. My favorite episodes are 10, 11, 13, 14, and 18.

iTunes Ratings

18 Ratings
Average Ratings
13
3
1
1
0

Are they all this good?

By librariandee - Oct 18 2017
Read more
This was my first episode and it was great! I love Cult of Pedagogy and I was hoping to find another podcast that was just as good. This is it. I'm looking forward to listening to more episodes to get more ideas.

Pretty Good

By K3ll33n - Jul 12 2016
Read more
It's an interesting take on education from non-education professors. I really appreciate hearing the biggest failure at the end of each podcast. Each professor interviewed gives a different take on how to move past and build off their past mistakes. My favorite episodes are 10, 11, 13, 14, and 18.

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Cover image of The Teach Better Podcast

The Teach Better Podcast

Updated 7 days ago

Read more

The Teach Better Podcast is a series of conversations with teachers about teaching. We talk mostly with faculty in higher education, but will occasionally talk with other teachers too. Your hosts are Doug McKee and Edward O’Neill.

Rank #1: Podcast #69: Extreme Teaching

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In this episode we take a walk through our archive and share some amazing examples of extreme teaching. These include college classes in prisons and chapels, incorporating balloons and cotton candy machines into a student project fair, and holding office hours on the radio. If you're new to the podcast or just want to be inspired by feats of pedagogical daring, you're going to love this one.

Jan 23 2018

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Rank #2: Podcast #10: Eight Habits of Highly Effective Teachers

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Edward and Doug reflect back to identify eight habits which almost all of our guests have used to teach effectively. If you're new to the podcast, this is a great place to start since it's filled with our favorite quotes from earlier episodes.

Jun 15 2015

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Rank #3: Podcast #63: A Better Way to Integrate Student Presentations into the Classroom with Ileen Devault

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Ileen Devault is a historian in Cornell’s Industrial and Labor Relations school. In this episode she talks with us how about how she shares teaching responsibility with her students by having them lead discussion of topics using primary sources. In the process, they learn about archival research, they bring fresh energy into the classroom, and perhaps most important, they learn to think like historians.

Sep 27 2017

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Rank #4: Podcast #52: Teams and Game Design with Walker White

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Walker White has one of the coolest jobs in higher ed. He directs Cornell’s Game Design Initiative, and teaches beginning and advanced game design classes in the computer science department. In this episode we go deep inside Walker's introductory games course for programmers, writers, and artists. He tells us how he organizes his students in heterogeneous teams, gives them copious feedback, and helps each team build a brand new playable game by the end of the semester.

Apr 17 2017

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Rank #5: Podcast #67: Beyond Multiple Choice with Mark Urban-Lurain

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Mark Urban-Lurain is the Associate Director for Engineering Education Research at Michigan State University. He's also the Principle Investigator on an NSF-sponsored project developing methods and software for Automated Analysis of Constructed Responses. Open-ended questions force students to think differently than multiple choice questions, but are much harder to grade. In this episode we talk to Mark about how the project uses machine learning to evaluate and analyze free text answers in order to shed new light on student understanding and misconceptions.

Nov 28 2017

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Rank #6: Podcast #50: Active Learning with Peter LePage

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Peter LePage from the Cornell Physics Department joins us on our extra special 50th episode to talk about active learning pedagogy. He shares his first teaching experiences, his introduction to physics education research, and why he believes students benefit from problem solving and discussion in class. We also talk about the Active Learning Inititive, a program Peter started at Cornell that was inspired by Carl Wieman's Science Education Initiave. Both programs aim to change the culture of teaching in higher ed by giving departments large grants to radically overhaul how they teach their undergraduate courses.

Mar 22 2017

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Rank #7: Podcast #37: Using POGIL to Get out of the Lecture Game with Andri Smith

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In this episode we talk to Associate Professor Andri Smith about how she brings organic chemistry to life at Quinnipiac University by using POGIL:  Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning. Students work in small groups, and discover scientific principles for themselves through guided exercises.

Aug 01 2016

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Rank #8: Podcast #59: Games and Simulations in the Classroom

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Economists study systems where individuals make decisions about buying, selling, and investment, and interesting patterns emerge. As in many disciplines, they teach by developing theory and pointing to examples in the real world, but it’s not always very convincing. Doing simulations and playing games in class lets students participate and see for themselves where the theory does and does not apply. Our guests Bob Gazzale (Toronto) and Matt Olczak (Aston) do this in their classes using three different web platforms: Moblab, economics-games.com, and Veconlab. In this episode they share their experiences with each.

Jul 24 2017

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Rank #9: Podcast #68: Teaching Online with Doug, Edward, and Laura Gibbs

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Laura Gibbs has been teaching mythology and folklore online since 2002 for the University of Oklahoma. For the past five summers, Doug has taught small private online courses (SPOC's) for the Yale Summer Session, and Edward has taught several courses in a variety of online formats. In this episode all three share the lessons they've learned along the way.

Dec 15 2017

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Rank #10: Podcast #60: Low-Tech Alternatives

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Edward and Doug discuss several low-tech alternatives to technology products they've discussed in earlier episodes of #edtechsummer. Laminated color-coded cards and Plickers let you poll your class without any student-held electronics. Atiyeh Showrai joins us from the USC French department to talk about their experience creating an e-workbook using just Microsoft Word and Adobe Acrobat. Then Quirine Ketterings (Cornell) shares the role-play game she plays at the end of term in her Whole Farm Nutrient Management class.

Aug 07 2017

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Rank #11: Podcast #42: Evidence-based Teaching with Bill Goffe

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Bill Goffe teaches economics at Penn State where he is both a consumer and a producer of evidence-based teaching. He is also an Associate Editor at the Journal of Economic Education. In this episode we talk about how to get the most out of the research-based teaching literature, how to use evidence to persuade your colleagues to change how they teach, and how to get started doing your own teaching-related research.

Nov 07 2016

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Rank #12: Podcast #39: Communicating Effectively with Jeff Niederdeppe

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In this episode we are joined by Associate Professor Jeff Niederdeppe from the Cornell Department of Communication. His research focuses on public communication about health and health care, and he teaches classes on planning and implementing communication campaigns as well as undergraduate research methods. Jeff shares with us how he brings his disciplinary skills into the classroom, as well as how and why he makes group projects a big part of his courses.

Sep 19 2016

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Rank #13: Podcast #41: Confronting Teaching Challenges with Edward and Doug

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Edward and Doug discuss several challenges they've faced in teaching new classes this semester. Edward needs help motivating online students from 3,000 miles away, while Doug tries to energize students in an early morning econometrics class. Edward's screenwriting class has a lot of moving parts to track, and Doug's juggling in-class activities and short bursts of lecturing. Both of them wrestle with new Learning Management Systems and other technology. There's something for everyone in this episode.

Oct 24 2016

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Rank #14: Podcast #57: Classroom Response Systems

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In our first Summer 2017 edtech episode, we talk about classroom response systems, aka clickers. We're joined by three guests who have each used a different product extensively in their classes. First, Jenny Wissink (Cornell) shares how she uses iClicker to assess students' understanding of pre-class video. Next, Bonni Stachowiak (Vanguard and the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast) explains why and how PollEverywhere gets students engaged. Finally, Susan Reilly (Florida State, Jacksonville) talks about how much fun her students have with Kahoot! Along the way we tell you what tools might be the best fit in different situations and how to get started with each tool.

Jun 27 2017

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Rank #15: Podcast #23: The Students' Perspective with Maia Eliscovich-Sigal and Miguel Goncalves

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This episode is extra-special as we're joined not by any faculty, but instead by Maia Eliscovich-Sigal and Miguel Goncalves. Maia is a senior economics major here at Yale and Miguel is a senior global affairs major. They give us the students' perspective on their classes and tell us what they find works and doesn't work when professors lecture, organize discussions, and use technology.

Dec 14 2015

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Rank #16: Podcast #72: Course Evaluations with Betsy Barre

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Everyone has an opinion about course evaluations, but most of these opinions are based on personal anecdotes and armchair speculation. Our guest in this episode is Betsy Barre, author of several articles reviewing the literature on what's right and what's wrong with course evaluations. Betsy is currently an Associate Director at Rice University's Center for Teaching Excellence, and in May 2018 she will move on to become the Executive Director of the Teaching and Learning Collaborative at Wake Forest University. We cover a lot of ground during our conversation about this important and complex topic.

Mar 22 2018

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Rank #17: Podcast #25: Changing the Culture of Teaching with Noah Finkelstein

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Noah Finkelstein has a BS in Math from Yale and a Phd in Applied Physics from Princeton. He started teaching physics and studying how to teach physics during post-docs at UC San Diego and UC Berkeley. Now, he teaches physics and is a director at University of Colorado's Center for STEM Learning, and he thinks hard about how to induce and sustain improvements in teaching across the university. In our wide ranging conversation, Noah shares his deep insights into what happens and what should happen in the classroom and at the institutional level. This is a good one.

Feb 01 2016

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Rank #18: Podcast #53: What's a Course? with Edward and Doug

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In this episode we go conceptual and talk about a new way Edward has devised to categorize courses into three distinct types. The first, Interpret-and-Explain is common in the humanities, business schools, and some advanced courses in the social sciences. The second, Explain-and-Predict is the predominant type in the sciences where theories, models, and methods are central. The third type, Plan-and-Create is the primary mode of many arts and engineering courses. We look back at our past episodes for good examples of each, and discuss when and why you might want to teach using a method that's atypical for your discipline. At the end we go meta and try to fit our podcast into this ontology and ruminate on our goals for the podcast.

May 01 2017

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Rank #19: Podcast #13: Active Learning with Lynne Regan

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Professor Lynne Regan from Yale's Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry believes in the power of active learning. In this episode she shares what she's learned incorporating active learning exercises into her classes.

Jul 27 2015

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Rank #20: Podcast #43: Co-Teaching across Disciplines with David Easley

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Our guest in this episode is Professor David Easley from the Cornell Economics and Information Science Departments. David is a world-renowned researcher and he’s long been a champion of interdisciplinary work. Several years ago he created a brand new cross-field class with computer scientist Jon Kleinberg called Networks, Crowds and Markets. It’s been a huge success and more than 600 Cornell students are currently enrolled. It’s been taught by multiple instructors (currently David is teaching with computer scientist Eva Tardos), it’s been picked up by other schools, and David and Jon even turned it into a book. During our conversation David tells us how the course came about, how it was built, how it’s changed over the years.

Nov 21 2016

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