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Matt's Basement Workshop Video Feed

Updated 2 days ago

Education
Leisure
Hobbies
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This is the video only feed for Matt's Basement Workshop Podcast. If you prefer to watch your woodworking content this is the feed for you!

Read more

This is the video only feed for Matt's Basement Workshop Podcast. If you prefer to watch your woodworking content this is the feed for you!

iTunes Ratings

43 Ratings
Average Ratings
29
7
4
1
2

Common Sense Woodworking

By jointer46 - Feb 23 2013
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Great job showing how to do projects and what to do if you make a mistake. Keep up the great work.

Been watching a while now

By bkbiggs - Nov 04 2012
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Matt's one of us. 'nuff said? Make sure you also check out his spoken wood podcasts.

iTunes Ratings

43 Ratings
Average Ratings
29
7
4
1
2

Common Sense Woodworking

By jointer46 - Feb 23 2013
Read more
Great job showing how to do projects and what to do if you make a mistake. Keep up the great work.

Been watching a while now

By bkbiggs - Nov 04 2012
Read more
Matt's one of us. 'nuff said? Make sure you also check out his spoken wood podcasts.
Cover image of Matt's Basement Workshop Video Feed

Matt's Basement Workshop Video Feed

Latest release on Feb 05, 2017

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This is the video only feed for Matt's Basement Workshop Podcast. If you prefer to watch your woodworking content this is the feed for you!

Rank #1: 550 Simple Cabinet Construction Pt 1

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Don't tell my wife, but after all these years of her asking if I'd ever consider building new cabinets for our kitchen I'm finally getting around to doing it.

Except they're not for the kitchen, and they're not even for our house. Instead, it's a small build for a client.



The good news is Samantha shouldn't be too upset by it for two reasons; 1) I'm getting paid to build them, and 2) Once I've built these, I'll know how to build ours even better if we still want to replace the existing ones!

In today's episode we're getting started on the construction of a pair of overhead cabinets for my client's laundry room. The case construction is pretty straight forward, and made all that much easier because I'm using a blind rabbet joint which makes assembling them so much easier.



As a matter of fact, that's what we'll be discussing and demonstrating in today's episode - milling the blind rabbet joint and then assembling the case from start to finish.

Then in the next episode we'll move on to milling and constructing the face frame and the two sets of overlay doors to wrap up the project.

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Aug 23 2015

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Rank #2: 532 H.O. Studley Tool Chest

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The H.O. Studley Tool Chest is considered by many to be THE "Iconic Tool Chest," the very tool chest that all others are compared to, and the envy of every woodworker who set their eyes upon it.

[caption id="attachment_12920" align="aligncenter" width="400"] Image courtesy Don's Barn blog[/caption]

On the outside it's constructed of a gorgeous Cuban Mahogany, but it’s the meticulousness of the organization on the inside that sets it apart from everything.

When opened, it reveals the breathtaking layout and arrangement of the 240+ tools contained within. All of which add to the beauty and awe-inspiring effect the tool chest has on those who’ve seen it. But who was H.O. Studley?

Truthfully, we know more about the chest than the man who built it. And what about the lesser known Studley workbench? Have you ever seen it up close or even knew it existed ("Chortle"-level Patrons of Matt's Basement Workshop will get a look at it in the bonus footage accompanying this video, join today by clicking here?) Those, and many more questions were what Don Williams set out to answer in his upcoming book about H.O. Studley and his tool chest, due out in early 2015.

Don, along with photographer Narayan Nayar, and Christopher Schwarz of Lost Art Press are painstakingly documenting the man, his tools, and of course his tool chest, so the rest of us can understand who he was and what’s so amazing about this iconic piece of woodworking history.

Along the journey to write the book and document the tool chest, Don made arrangements with the current owner to set up an exhibit for the general public to come in and see it up close.

The H.O. Studley Tool Chest and Workbench Exhibit is happening May 15-17, 2015 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. It’s occurring the same weekend as Handworks in nearby Amana, Iowa and will be offering visitors a full 360º view of the tool chest and workbench.

Tickets are currently on sale, but there is a limited number available. So don’t miss out on the opportunity to see the Studley Tool Chest in person. For more information visit www.studleytoolchest.com.

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Oct 19 2014

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Rank #3: 551 Simple Cabinet Construction Pt 2 - "Face Frames, Doors & More"

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In the previous episode of this two part series "550 Simple Cabinet Construction Pt 1" we started the construction on a pair of overhead cabinets for a laundry room.



The cabinets are about as simple in design and construction as possible. A box with a face frame and a pair of full-overlay doors to enclose them.

The only detail that could be remotely described as "ornate" is the ogee profile routed on the rail and stiles of the door frames. As far as I'm concerned the simpler the better when it comes to cabinet design.

Why? For two reasons; 1) it makes construction a whole lot easier and more predictable, and 2) an entire wall filled with highly ornate cabinets would actually be it's own kind of special craziness.

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Sep 10 2015

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Rank #4: 529 Scrap wood magnet clips

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If you haven't noticed yet there's a bit of a theme to my videos this summer. Have you figured it out? It's "Scrap wood projects!"
Continuing along with the last couple of episodes this one is no different. For today's project all you need are some Metal Hinge Clips, Magnet discs, and scrap wood.

What I find great about this project is that it's an opportunity to use some of your smallest scraps and you're truly only limited by your imagination when it comes to shape and size. Okay, maybe you're a little limited also by the strength of the magnet, but that's easy to fix too with the purchase of a rare earth magnet or two.

And just like all the other scrap wood projects we've seen over the years, this is a great opportunity to not only use material that might ordinarily get tossed or burned, but it's an inexpensive way to familiarize yourself with a new species or two.

If after watching the video you decide to make some yourself, please feel free to share pictures. I'd love to see what you create!

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Aug 14 2014

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Rank #5: 422 Veritas Surface Vise

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There are a lot of workbench accessories on the market, but typically they're either something that needs to be built as part of the workbench top and are nearly permanent components or they're small useful items, but don't have much versatility to them.

A newer accessory that hit the market in the past year is the Veritas Surface Vise. It's a great tool that adds a ton of versatility and options to my less than adequate bench. The basic tool right out of the box worked amazing, and because it's removable head is designed to have shop made accessories attached...if necessary...the options for it's use increases dramatically.

Aug 23 2015

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Rank #6: 518 Platform Bed Build No. 7 “Headboard Schmeadboard”

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I’m getting oh so close to the end of the platform bed build, but we still have a couple more episodes to go before we finally wrap it up for good.

On today’s episode we start working on the headboard. More specifically we start working on the supports that will hold the headboard itself in place.

The supports were originally designed as single pieces 6 inches wide, but after yet another re-design, the new version of the support will work much better.

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Feb 27 2014

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Rank #7: 513 Platform Bed Build No. 2 "A Box"

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The next component of the platform bed build to tackle is the box encasing the undercarriage assembly. It has three purposes:

First, it's a means to support the undercarriage assembly for when it's attached to the platform proper.

Second, it'll act as part of the support and reinforcement system for when we attach the legs in an upcoming episode.

Third, it just looks cool and is an opportunity to cut some beautiful thru-dovetails and show off my mad joinery skills (of which you'll learn more about the truth behind this last point).

The main focus of this episode is on the cutting of the dovetails themselves. I chose to do it completely by hand for one simple reason, I don't own a dovetail jig. There's an entire list of reasons why I prefer to hand cut my dovetails and I'll share them at a point further down the road, but suffice to say, they may take me a little longer to do it but I enjoy the process.

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May 31 2014

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Rank #8: Become a Patron of Matt’s Basement Workshop

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For a long time now I've been trying to find a way to take Matt's Basement Workshop Podcast to the next level. So what exactly is the "next level?"

Well I have an idea, but it's never been worth talking about because I never had the time to create a plan to get there. That was until recently!

I'm so excited about this, I want to get started on it right away. So here it is:


Why should I become a Patron of Matt's Basement Workshop?

Maybe the better question to start with is "what is a Patron?"

According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary a Patron is "a person who gives money and support to an artist, organization, etc. : a person who buys the goods or uses the services of a business, library, etc."

Without Patrons there's a good chance some of the world's greatest artists, musicians, playwrights, and even furniture makers would never have created the pieces that inspire and enlighten us today.

Just ask modern tool-makers like Scott Meek of Scott Meek Planes, or Mark Harrell of Bad Axe Tool Works what their beloved patrons did for them and the many other tool makers who needed a helping hand to get started.

If you choose to become a Patron of Matt's Basement Workshop I have three reward levels as my way of saying "thank you!"

  • $2/month - "Spoiler" - Your name on the Patreon supporter web page on the website, and access to new content at least one day before everyone else!

  • $5/month - "Chortle" - Same as the "Spoiler" level but with an option for a clickable link to your website on my Patreon supporter web page.

    Plus access to bonus content from each new episode; easily an extra 5-10 minutes of footage exclusive to this level of patronage and above.

  • $15/month - "Woobie" - All of the benefits listed above plus a guaranteed minimum of one exclusive bonus video each month (videos answering listeners’ questions, expanding on content from previous video(s), and possibly even an exclusive build just for "Woobie" patrons.)

    Also, Patrons at this level will also have their choice of a MBW "Classic Logo" or a "Your Brain on Matt's Basement Workshop" t-shirt to be delivered during the first month of their patronage.
And regardless of which level of Patronage you choose, every Patron of Matt's Basement Workshop will be entered into a monthly giveaway of woodworking/show related schwag.*

*due to international shipping costs, alternate schwag items may be provided for Patrons outside of the USA

As the support from Patrons of Matt's Basement Workshop continues to grow I have milestones to gauge the success of the partnership between the show and the audience that benefit not only the Patrons but EVERYONE. Milestones I know you'll love!

Rather than explaining everything here and writing a lengthy blog post, visit the Patreon information page I setup on the website. All your questions should be answered there, along with links and detailed information about the reward levels and milestones.

Together we can create the next level of Matt's Basement Workshop Podcast that I know you'll love watching & participating with, and I'll love producing, because I'm freed from chasing down advertisers and supporters when I could be creating content.


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Oct 04 2014

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Rank #9: 535 Wood body coffee scoop

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Mornings can be rough for me, but a good cup of coffee can make all the difference. Over the years we’ve tried several different coffee makers, including the K-cups, but in the end we always come back to our good old Mr. Coffee coffee maker. As a result it's important to make sure I get the right amount of coffee grounds in the filter every time for the perfect cup. This doesn’t sound like it should be a big deal, but when I’m doing it with one eye open (and that one eye is unfocused and sleepy) it can be a challenge.

For years we've used an old measuring scoop that I've never been convinced was giving us the right measurements (or at least for me it hasn’t,) so I decided to do something about it. And that something is to make my own coffee scoop from scrap maple I have laying around. Okay, that’s not completely true, part of the reason I want to make the new coffee scoop is that I want an excuse to keep honing my woodturning skills and this seemed like the perfect project.

So on today’s episode, we’re turning a maple bodied coffee scoop on the lathe. It’s surprisingly simple, and can be knocked out in less than an hour (if you’re not filming it to share with friends.) Perhaps the hardest part about the project is deciding how big of a scoop you'll need, or even what species of wood to use. This one ended up being just deep enough to equal one cup of coffee per scoop, which is perfect for me, because the only math I have to do when I’m waking up is adding up the number of cups I think I’ll need to figure out which pair of pants to wear.

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Dec 11 2014

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Rank #10: 536 "I love lamp" the veneer lampshade

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During the long, cold winter nights I like to cozy up with a hot cup of cider and sit down to watch a movie or read a good book, and to help set the mood (because who DOESN'T take the time to set a mood?) I'll turn on a nice accent light and let it bath me in its warm glow.

On today's episode we're making a wood veneer lampshade for just the kind of accent lighting that I like to use. The project is super simple, and you can batch a whole bunch of them out to be placed wherever you think a little light needs to be cast.

The veneer I’m using for this particular project came from the folks at Oakwood Veneer at www.oakwoodveneer.com. It’s a paperback cherry veneer that’s easily bendable and cuts clean with very little splintering. It comes in a variety of species, and we already have some amazing Douglas Fir veneer waiting for another project or set of lights.

It’s not only the species of veneer you can experiment with, but also the design of the seam where the two ends meet. In this video I’ll demonstrate how to create a zigzag pattern that looks pretty sharp when the light is turned on, but there are so many options to play with, the choice is completely yours.

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Dec 21 2014

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Rank #11: 539 Madison’s Dresser Pt 3 “Sides, sides, everywhere are sides”

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It’s time to get started with the actual building of Madison’s tall dresser, and the first steps in the process is making the sides for the body.
These consist of two wide, solid-wood panels just over 49 inches in length and 19 inches in width.

In order for us to attach the drawer frames (which not only support the drawers but are an important part of the overall structural framework of the dresser,) we need to plow out a few dados across the width of the sides and cut rabbets at the top/bottom and also on the back edge to eventually receive the back panel.

For the side panels I got really lucky and chose two extra-wide boards (approximately 12+ inches in width each) to make up the majority of the width, and then eventually glued them together with some not so extra-wide 8 inch boards to give me a rough dimension I could start working with.

To mill the extra-wide boards I decided against ripping them to widths that would fit on my 8 inch jointer, and instead built a very simple thickness planer sled that would allow me to flatten one face as if I had ran it over the cutter head of a monster-sized jointer.

Then after the glue-up was completed it was over to the table saw to crosscut and rip the panels to size, followed by installing my dado blade and getting to work on those dados and rabbets.

I’d love to tell you there weren’t any complications along the way…but that would be a lie! So we’ll discuss what happened and how I fixed those mistakes in today’s episode.

A full set of detailed plans are available for sale on my website, thanks to Brian Benham of Benham Design Concepts.

You can find them by visiting our new "Digital Downloads Store" by clicking here.

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Feb 19 2015

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Rank #12: 526 A bottle opener's wooden makeover

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For sure the warm days of summer are upon us in the Northern hemisphere, and as I mentioned in a recent post, that means it's time for me to start spending more time out of the shop.

I'd love to say all that time outdoors is devoted to hanging with the family; swimming in the big lake, riding bikes and just all around having fun. But typically the summer is usually filled with plenty of yard work and home repairs too.

While shop time can get limited in the summer, I still manage to head into the basement during the hottest parts of the day to escape the heat and enjoy this shared passion of ours for woodworking by tackling smaller projects I can knock out in an hour or two or over a few evenings during the week.

Last year, around the 4th of July, I built the six-pack made of scrap wood that was lying around the shop. This year I'm taking some of my smaller cutoffs and scraps that I bought from the folks at Bell Forest Products and decided to spruce up a rather ordinary rubber gripped bottle opener I picked up at my local big box grocery store.

[caption id="attachment_12198" align="aligncenter" width="600"] So many wood scraps to choose from...I guess I need to make more of them![/caption]

This is one of the projects that reminds me how much fun it can be to be a woodworker. Being able to take something that looks rather plain and ordinary and making it my own.

I was looking around at the store where I originally bought it and I can't find any more. I also looked online and at the manufacturer's website, but apparently this must be a discontinued item?

However, I did see this model is available from the same manufacturer, and it looks like it could work just as easily. Perhaps another video in the making?




In the meantime, I hope you enjoy this little project and it inspires you to do something similar with items laying around your house.

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Jun 29 2014

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Rank #13: 523 Bathroom cabinet part 2

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In today’s episode we’re moving along on the bathroom cabinet by constructing all three doors. The two on top and the flip down version below.

All three are a form of frame and panel construction, but the biggest difference is in how I chose to assemble them. For the two larger doors up top, the panel is actually 3/4” plywood glued to the stiles creating one large piece.

Then for the flip-down door I used a more “traditional” construction technique and turned to a rail and stile router bit set to create the joinery.

Once all the doors were constructed, we also need to drill the holes that will make up the adjustable shelving system behind the two doors on top.

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Apr 21 2014

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Rank #14: 520 Veneered smart phone case

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Looking for a fun project in the shop that doesn't take long and you can carry it around in your pocket where ever you go? Here's one for you, a custom veneered smart phone case.

One of the benefits of being a woodworker is that we can frequently customize everyday items. Whether it's building them from raw materials or adding a little flair to an existing item, it's relatively easy to find a way to spruce them up a bit.

In today's episode I'll show you a little fun I've been having lately when I combine some inexpensive pre-manufactured plastic smart phone cases I picked up at Amazon.com with some veneers I bought at Woodcraft.com.

The process is simple, it can be relatively quick and more importantly it's a great way to have fun in the shop and maybe even impress your friends and family (unless they're like mine who just roll their eyes and walk away...with the item in hand.)

Links to items mentioned or used in the episode:
Smart phone cases at Amazon.com
Veneer Variety Pack 20 Sq. Ft.
Crown Veneer Saw
Nexabond 2500 Instant Wood Glue (regular formula)


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Mar 01 2014

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Rank #15: 418 The Bora Wide Track Clamp Edge

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The guys over at Bora Clamps recently introduced their latest clamping system, the Bora Wide Track Clamp Edge. A straight edge clamp that works very much like a traditional clamp with the added benefit of having a straight edge body attached to it.

The beauty of a straight edge clamp is you can attach it to a surface, such as a workpiece or a tabletop/workbench and run your circular saw, router, jigsaw or most portable tools along the edge. It's a great system for those with limited space or jobsites where you don't have the luxury of large tools with fences and the like.

Add to all of this the fact the Bora Wide Track Clamp has an extra wide body that will not flex while using, extra thick soft pads that can easily handle stock up to 1-1/2" thick, have the ability to angle the clamp body 22-1/2 degrees left or right while clamping or the fact that the body has a T-track system built in.

Aug 23 2015

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Rank #16: 517 Platform Bed Build No. 6 “A place to lay down”

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We’re FINALLY moving forward with the platform bed. After this round of construction it actually resembles a place you could lay down and take a snooze.

In today’s episode we construct the platform itself. A simple mitered frame that gets attached to the “undercarriage” and a series of slats to keep the mattress from falling through the larger openings.

Perhaps the hardest part of the build today was dragging my son’s mattress into the basement for the test fit. Even gluing the miters together was made easier thanks to a sample of Nexabond’s 2500L C.A. glue.

It’s much longer open time than traditional C.A. glues made it easier to use without worrying about parts sticking to me or the floor.

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Feb 27 2014

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Rank #17: 541 Madison's Dresser Pt 5 "More drawer frame stuffs”

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Just when you thought you were finished, they pull you right back in again!

Actually I was never really finished, once I had the drawer frames glued up I still had a little more work to do on them before we're ready to assemble the entire body of the dresser.

So in today's episode we're going to finish the construction of the drawer frames.



This involves cleaning up the dried glue and tweaking the joinery to insure the drawers will slide in and out smoothly every time. And it also involves cutting a dado down the center rails to accept a drawer guide we'll install later to help keep the drawers perfectly centered.

Unlike the dados we cut for the sides of the dresser body, these dados are a stopped version. So this requires a little more planning to make sure they don't show on the front face and a little chopping with chisels, followed by some tweaking with a router plane.

All of it can sound a little complicated, but it's not as bad as you think it will be.

A full set of detailed plans are available for sale on my website, thanks to Brian Benham of Benham Design Concepts.

You can find them by visiting our new "Digital Downloads Store" by clicking here.

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Mar 06 2015

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Rank #18: 489 Hello Router Table

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At the heart of my workshop's redo is the massive Bench Dog Router Table system I reviewed with ToolSelect.com - see the review HERE. Compared to previous router tables in my shop, this version is a beast! Of course it's not really a fair comparison, given its predecessors were all bench top models, but that's beside the point.

The Bench Dog ProMax RT router table system provides woodworkers with a number of great options for customizing their own version. The system in my shop is a cast-iron top on an enclosed cabinet, but it could easily be a phenolic top instead. Or I could choose to have either one of those tops on an open stand.

For me, what really makes this new router table system so invaluable in my shop IS the cabinet. The enclosed cabinet has enough storage space built into it that it's become my all-in-one router center.

All my router bits, router accessories and even my routers can be stored in it and there's still room for more. What it takes up in floor space, it makes up for with overall storage space…I actually have some empty shelves…I wonder what I can put on those?

The beauty of the system is the fact it has options! And speaking of options, one that will be making a dramatic change in my operations at the router table is the addition of a router lift. In the realm of router table upgrades this one is like going from a bicycle to a jet plane! See my review of it on ToolSelect.com HERE.

Everyone who's used a router table knows the frustration there can be when dialing in just the right height between cuts. Having a router lift allows you to raise or lower your router from the top of the table where you can easily see what's happening versus the old method of reaching underneath and often blindly making the adjustments. How many times have you done this only to realize the bit is much higher or lower than you wanted?

Router lifts are pricey, and to be honest I always had one on my list but I never considered it a necessity as far as I was concerned. But after using this one just for some test cuts and demonstration purposes, I wouldn't hesitate recommending it get bumped up to the top of the list for anyone who uses their router table frequently. The accuracy and ease of adjustability it provides will dramatically help with router operations in my shop.

And then there's the fence system. Regardless of which table top, base or whether you choose to go with a router lift or traditional insert plate, if you don't have a good fence system it won't matter. The Bench Dog Fence system is worth the money!

Links for items mentioned in today's show:
Bench Dog 40-300 ProMax RT
Bench Dog Tools 40-150 ProLift
Bench Dog Featherboards
Kreg PRS3090 3" Dual Locking Caster-Set

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Aug 23 2015

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Rank #19: My thoughts on the K5

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I’ve had an opportunity over the years to tryout a few versions of the Kreg pocket hole jig and I’ve always been impressed with their ease of use, repeatability and accuracy.

It’s not that Kreg radically redesigns the jigs each time, but instead they make small improvements to their look and feel that make them more user friendly while still working exactly the same way.

A little while ago Kreg sent us a new K5 Pocket-Hole Jig to use in the basement workshop. Considering I’ve always been happy with the K4 I was a little skeptical that I would see any significant difference between them.

As I suspected, the results were the same when it came to accuracy and repeatability but the big difference, as far as I’m concerned, is in its easier to use clamping system and its support wings. Both a very nice touch!

Considering purchasing a Kreg pocket hole joinery system? The K5 is a very nice model to add to your shop.

To expand the range of materials you can use it on, you can eventually add both the Micro Drill Guide System and the new HD Jig for 2x lumber.

Purchase yours through Amazon.com:
Kreg K5 Pocket-Hole Jig
Kreg Tool Company KJHD Jig HD
Kreg KJMICRODGB Jig Micro Drill Guide System

Also available at Highland Woodworking

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Mar 29 2014

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Rank #20: 514 Platform Bed Build No. 3 "The legs have it”

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It doesn’t matter how amazing the joinery or how beautiful the stock is that I’m working with, if this bed doesn’t have a decent set of legs upon which to stand, it’s not worth the effort as far as I’m concerned.

At 3-1/2” square the ideal stock for making these legs might be straight-grain 16/4 maple, but for mine they’re being made from laminated pieces of 8/4.

And while these aren’t pretty in their design, their chunky style and solid construction ensure they’ll stand the test of time or Vanderlists…which ever is worse.

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Mar 29 2014

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556 Simple Planer Sled Q&A Follow Up

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You have questions and comments about the simple thickness planer sled? I have answers; although I can’t guarantee they’re the ones you want to hear.



Thanks to everyone who wrote in!

Jun 19 2016

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555 A simple planer sled

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For the past several months while I've been on the road for work my wife Samantha has been tackling a kitchen project. I've been helping out where, and when I could, but for the most part it was all her sweat and effort going into it (and before anyone asks, no, I didn't build any cabinets or new doors for the kitchen.)




In fact, aside from removing a small partition wall, along with tearing out the countertops and backsplash, the project was really more of a "facelift" than remodel. But now that it's completed, the one project Samantha requested all along was a set of live-edge shelves for where a cabinet once sat. I doubt I'll do much to document their installation; it's pretty straight-forward.

Probably the most difficult part of the build will be carefully drilling through ceramic tile to install them. Of course with that said now, finding a way to mill the 12" wide boards I'm planning to use could've been an even bigger struggle if it weren't for my thickness planer sled.



On today's episode, we're breaking out the thickness planer sled first featured in the Tall Dresser build and putting it to use again.

Jun 12 2016

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554 Small bowl for holding stuff

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I can't believe this is happening to me, but I'm getting bit by the turning bug and it's obvious it's contagious!



Now that my time in the shop is currently less than it use to be, I really want to be able to knock out a project or two from start to finish, and the lathe is probably one of the one tools where this is entirely possible.

In today's episode I'm literally turning some scrap maple into a small bowl.

What'll I use it for? Probably to hold keys, or spare change, or more likely M&M's!

In this episode I made quite a few references to the Easy Wood Tools' gouges and detailers I was using (pretty much the entire time.) If you're interested in purchasing them or just checking them out or yourself, you can find them at Woodcraft.com

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Jan 02 2016

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553 The Small Pine Cabinet

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Who doesn't need a little more storage space? Whether it's in the woodshop like me, or any where else throughout your living space, small cabinets help to tuck away the clutter and keep things organized.



In this episode we're making a simple, small cabinet from supplies you can easily pick up at just about any home center.

For this one I purchased a few "handi-panels" which are pre-glued and dimensioned boards that eliminate most of the milling we'd have to perform to get them ready for cutting and assembling.

I also purchased some adjustable "euro-style" hinges and a simple wooden knob for the door.

For joinery, it's all about the "blind-rabbet" joint in the corners to assemble the box, but something as simple as pocket-hole joinery or even tongue and groove would work fine too.

Of course you could take a step further and use dovetail joinery or such to spruce it up even more.

The only real "decorative" feature on this simple cabinet is the raised panel on the door.

Originally I planned to leave it a flat panel, but then I wouldn't have had a chance to free-hand the extra wide chamfer all around the edge with my skew rabbet plane.

Regardless of what you do with your small cabinet, this is a quick and easy project perfect for a single-day or leisurely weekend build.

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Nov 29 2015

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552 Chisel Talk "3 chisels to start with"

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Over the years there have been a lot of questions from new woodworkers. One of the most frequent is "should I buy a full set of chisels or just one or two?"

The easy answer is "YES get a full set" but that's not always the correct one.

In fact, if I had to rebuild my entire shop from the ground up and retool it, I'd probably avoid an entire set of chisels and instead concentrate on adding one or two high quality versions as needed.



In today's episode I share with you the advice I like to offer new woodworkers (and some experienced ones) when it comes to purchasing chisels.

With so many different tool manufacturers, sizes and even specialty chisels to choose from, it's hard to decide where to get started when buying your first (or next) chisel(s).

My advice is pretty simple, and it can easily transfer to other tools and accessories in your shop later down the road.

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Oct 18 2015

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551 Simple Cabinet Construction Pt 2 - "Face Frames, Doors & More"

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In the previous episode of this two part series "550 Simple Cabinet Construction Pt 1" we started the construction on a pair of overhead cabinets for a laundry room.



The cabinets are about as simple in design and construction as possible. A box with a face frame and a pair of full-overlay doors to enclose them.

The only detail that could be remotely described as "ornate" is the ogee profile routed on the rail and stiles of the door frames. As far as I'm concerned the simpler the better when it comes to cabinet design.

Why? For two reasons; 1) it makes construction a whole lot easier and more predictable, and 2) an entire wall filled with highly ornate cabinets would actually be it's own kind of special craziness.

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Sep 10 2015

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550 Simple Cabinet Construction Pt 1

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Don't tell my wife, but after all these years of her asking if I'd ever consider building new cabinets for our kitchen I'm finally getting around to doing it.

Except they're not for the kitchen, and they're not even for our house. Instead, it's a small build for a client.



The good news is Samantha shouldn't be too upset by it for two reasons; 1) I'm getting paid to build them, and 2) Once I've built these, I'll know how to build ours even better if we still want to replace the existing ones!

In today's episode we're getting started on the construction of a pair of overhead cabinets for my client's laundry room. The case construction is pretty straight forward, and made all that much easier because I'm using a blind rabbet joint which makes assembling them so much easier.



As a matter of fact, that's what we'll be discussing and demonstrating in today's episode - milling the blind rabbet joint and then assembling the case from start to finish.

Then in the next episode we'll move on to milling and constructing the face frame and the two sets of overlay doors to wrap up the project.

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Aug 23 2015

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416 The Skraper by Benchcrafted

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The folks over at Benchcrafted really know how to make tools. Jameel and everyone stand by the products they make so we don't have to worry about whether or not they're going to hold up in our shops. I think it has a lot to do with the fact that they're woodworkers too. They don't just make tools to sell them, they make tools to use them!

It's very fair to say most of us associate Benchcrafted with their outstanding bench vise equipment and plans, but they also make a cool little tool that I picked up while attending the St. Charles, IL Woodworking In America Conference...The Skraper.

The Skraper is more than a handy little tool for removing hardened glue from tight corners of your projects. I use mine for a number of different tasks, and it has yet to fail me!

Aug 23 2015

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418 The Bora Wide Track Clamp Edge

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The guys over at Bora Clamps recently introduced their latest clamping system, the Bora Wide Track Clamp Edge. A straight edge clamp that works very much like a traditional clamp with the added benefit of having a straight edge body attached to it.

The beauty of a straight edge clamp is you can attach it to a surface, such as a workpiece or a tabletop/workbench and run your circular saw, router, jigsaw or most portable tools along the edge. It's a great system for those with limited space or jobsites where you don't have the luxury of large tools with fences and the like.

Add to all of this the fact the Bora Wide Track Clamp has an extra wide body that will not flex while using, extra thick soft pads that can easily handle stock up to 1-1/2" thick, have the ability to angle the clamp body 22-1/2 degrees left or right while clamping or the fact that the body has a T-track system built in.

Aug 23 2015

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419 Maple Child's Dresser Pt 5

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Today's episode is the 5th part of the series on the Child's dresser. We've jumped ahead a little bit as in real time I started to fall behind so I did some assembly work with the camera off. I'm trying to document as much as I can on these projects, but occasionally things kind of fall through the cracks.

For the most part, today's episode covers drawer front construction from rough to finish. And glue up of the dresser top.

Aug 23 2015

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420 Czeck Edge Ruler-Stop

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Today's Try It Tuesday is a look at the Czeck Edge Ruler-Stop currently available at Highland Woodworking. A handy little tool that literally fits in the palm of your hand but still has the ability to do great big things.

The Czeck Edge Ruler-Stop works much like a traditional square, but with one big exception...you're not stuck with only using one kind of ruler. The vise like action of the Ruler-Stop opens to a maximum width of 1-1/4" and can accept rulers, shop made story sticks and just about anything that can fit within it's grasp. And because the sides of the body are ground flat and square to the jaws, it can easily be used much like you would a traditional square to layout lines on your projects.

There's a lot the Czeck Edge Ruler-Stop can do, but you won't know until you try it out for yourself. Mine sits in my shop apron pocket so I never have to be without it. But check it out for yourself.

Aug 23 2015

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421 Maple Child's Dresser Wrap Up

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Today's episode is the final in the series on the Maple, Child's Dresser build. Unfortunately as will happen on this show, I did have to jump forward in time a little as I started to fall behind my original schedule to have it completed. Up to this point the vast majority of the construction has been documented, and the only thing that was left to complete was the drawers.

We can come back on another episode and talk more specifically about the drawer construction, but in this episode I'll touch briefly on what I did in this project to make them. As part of the final wrap up on the build I'll touch on some of the subtle details I used to make the dresser as kid friendly as possible.

Hope you've enjoyed it, and if you have any questions don't hesitate to contact me. Coming up for the next build project...the Maple, Child's Bookcase!

Aug 23 2015

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422 Veritas Surface Vise

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There are a lot of workbench accessories on the market, but typically they're either something that needs to be built as part of the workbench top and are nearly permanent components or they're small useful items, but don't have much versatility to them.

A newer accessory that hit the market in the past year is the Veritas Surface Vise. It's a great tool that adds a ton of versatility and options to my less than adequate bench. The basic tool right out of the box worked amazing, and because it's removable head is designed to have shop made accessories attached...if necessary...the options for it's use increases dramatically.

Aug 23 2015

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423 A Day At The Lie-Nielsen Toolworks Show

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We all want to kick the tires before we buy, but when it comes to certain things in life it's not always possible. Thankfully the folks at Lie-Nielsen understand this and travel across the states and into the great white north to give every woodworker an opportunity to man handle their planes, saws, chisels and more. While the events are slightly different from venue to venue, they're a lot of fun to attend!!

Thanks to everyone who made it to Jeff Miller's in Chicago for the show. It was great to meet all of you and thanks for saying HI, Aiden couldn't believe people actually knew me LOL!!

Aug 23 2015

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425 Milescraft SignPro

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There are times when I just want to make something for fun and I don't want to spend a lot of time worrying about all the details to make it right. Of course, I do want to make sure it's something I don't mind my name being associated with too! One type of project that's fun and can make a great gift for a loved one is a custom wooden sign.

Whether it's an address plaque so the pizza delivery person knows NOT to miss my door once again or so help me I'll...or a humorous expression for reminding guest they're welcomed to visit but don't plan on staying long. Custom wooden signs are great projects. To make them even better and easier to knock out in your shop, Milescraft created the SignPro Kit. In the box is everything you need to make a wide variety of wooden signs, from horizontal to vertical...letters to numbers...large or small.

All you need is some wood and maybe a dictionary so the neighbors don't shake their heads in disbelief, again. For the typical signs I've created with the SignPro, it's taken only minutes to have everything laid out and ready to route. Quick, simple and time well spent in the shop!

Aug 23 2015

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427 GRR-Ripper

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It's Safety Week 2010 and it only makes sense for this week's "Try It Tuesday" to be a safety device. A while ago we had a chance to give-away a Micro-Jig GRR-Ripper as part of our monthly schwag drawing. I couldn't just give one away without trying it out for myself, so for total openness...YES I did get one to tryout and talk about on the show.

That was several months ago, and in that time I've had a chance to run the GRR-Ripper through it's paces. What are the final results and my thoughts? I LOVE IT! Why do I love it? One very specific reason...I feel safe and in control of my stock while using it. How many times can you say that about a tool that can be the difference between injury and a great day in the shop?

To find out more about the GRR-Ripper, visit www.microjig.com. There's quite a few options and accessories for the GRR-Ripper, check them all out for sale at Highland Woodworking.

Aug 23 2015

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428 Checklist for Safety

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We're close to wrapping up SAFETY WEEK 2010 and I stumbled across a great article at WOOD Magazine's website. Not one to let a good thing slide by, I asked the folks at WOOD for permission to share it with all of you. Thankfully they said yes!

Today's episode is based on the 12 point checklist mentioned in Shop Safety Checklist. It's a great read and something worth checking out to make sure you're working safe too.

A huge thanks to WOOD Magazine for permission to share this with all of you!

Aug 23 2015

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429 Kreg Multi-Mark

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It's another Tuesday and that means it's time for another "Try it Tuesday". This week we have the Kreg Multi-Mark, a great little multi-marking tool for a wide assortment of jobs in and out of the shop.

With three possible blade positions for quick measuring and marking the Kreg Multi-Mark is a handy tool for setting up your blades and bits or creating relief lines around doors and windows for carpentry jobs. And that's just the start, I'm sure you'll find more jobs in your own shop.

Checkout one today at either Amazon.com
or at Kregtool.com.

Aug 23 2015

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431 Shop Apron

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Today's "Try it Tuesday" is all about my shop apron, more specifically the Leather Apron from Highland Woodworking. With it's generous proportions, it's deep flap covered pockets and it's really comfortable feel (once it's properly broken in that is) this is a great apron for any woodworker.

Why would you need a shop apron? With all the little things you have laying around your benchtop, or on top of your stationary tools it's great to have a place to put them where they can be reached quickly and easily. That's exactly what a good shop apron will do. Not to mention protecting you from flying debris and keeping you from being caked in sawdust.

Regardless of whether it's leather, canvas, cotton or polyester? A good shop apron will pay for itself in no time, especially when you don't have to search for your pencil or square.

Aug 23 2015

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432 Handplane Screwdriver

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Today's Try it Tuesday is the Lee Valley Handplane Screwdriver. Since the next few episodes will be continuing our discussion of hand planes, it only makes sense we need to cover some tools or accessories that go along with them.

The Handplane Screwdriver is one such accessory. Unlike an ordinary screwdriver, the full length slot and brass ferrule completely grip the chipbreaker screw ensuring it won't be damaged and make it amazingly easy to tighten and loosen. Along with the easy to grip handle, the handplane screwdriver is perfect for the handplane user.

Aug 23 2015

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iTunes Ratings

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Common Sense Woodworking

By jointer46 - Feb 23 2013
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Great job showing how to do projects and what to do if you make a mistake. Keep up the great work.

Been watching a while now

By bkbiggs - Nov 04 2012
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Matt's one of us. 'nuff said? Make sure you also check out his spoken wood podcasts.