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Art of the Score

Updated about 1 month ago

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TV & Film
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Art of the Score is the podcast that explores, demystifies and celebrates some of the greatest soundtracks of all time from the world of film, TV and video games. In each episode we’ll be joined by Andrew Pogson, Dan Golding and Nicholas Buc as we check out a soundtrack we love and break down its main themes, explore what makes the score tick and hopefully impart our love of the world of soundtracks.

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Art of the Score is the podcast that explores, demystifies and celebrates some of the greatest soundtracks of all time from the world of film, TV and video games. In each episode we’ll be joined by Andrew Pogson, Dan Golding and Nicholas Buc as we check out a soundtrack we love and break down its main themes, explore what makes the score tick and hopefully impart our love of the world of soundtracks.

iTunes Ratings

306 Ratings
Average Ratings
293
10
1
2
0

Lawrence of Arabia‼️

By LotuSviLLe - Jun 01 2020
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Officially Requested‼️

The podcast I never knew I needed

By Dankersaurus - May 16 2020
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Great for movie and music people alike- I love the little theories, revelations and insights they pepper into their episodes. The mixture of musical and thematic examination as it relates to the movie is amazing. I’m hooked!

iTunes Ratings

306 Ratings
Average Ratings
293
10
1
2
0

Lawrence of Arabia‼️

By LotuSviLLe - Jun 01 2020
Read more
Officially Requested‼️

The podcast I never knew I needed

By Dankersaurus - May 16 2020
Read more
Great for movie and music people alike- I love the little theories, revelations and insights they pepper into their episodes. The mixture of musical and thematic examination as it relates to the movie is amazing. I’m hooked!
Cover image of Art of the Score

Art of the Score

Latest release on Apr 21, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail about 1 month ago

Rank #1: Episode 18: James Bond - Part 1

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In Episode 18 we begin one of our most ambitious musical projects yet – the music of the James Bond franchise. Over the next three episodes, we’ll be looking at the sounds of Bond, James Bond, across 50 years, 24 films, and a great many composers, theme songs, and one-liners. In this first episode, we’re covering everything from the birth of the cinematic Bond to the end of the Sean Connery era, with a particular focus on how John Barry created that classic – and timeless – Bond sound.

Episode notes:

4:45 – Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass make an unscheduled appearance
6:35 – The evolution of the Bond franchise and its importance in film history
10:23 – “The best Bond film is the next Bond film”
12:40 – The birth of the Bond theme, with Monty Norman’s sitar
15:30 – John Barry’s swinging ‘60s style
22:23 – Monty Norman’s Dr. No score
24:10 – ‘Three Blind Mice’ and Norman’s Jamaican grooves
26:30 – Bond and orchestra swat a bug
31:12 – Lionel Bart’s ‘From Russia With Love’, the first title song
38:15 – John Barry’s 007 theme
42:11 – John Barry’s idiosyncratic action cues and quotations of the main theme
45:47 – James Bond’s travelogue music
51:13 – Goldfinger’s swinging ‘Into Miami’
55:55 – ‘Alpine Drive’ and ‘The Raid on Fort Knox’
1:00:34 – Thunderball’s alternate themes
1:07:14 – Barry’s underwater fight scenes
1:10:05 – The brass-fanfared evil lair
1:13:08 – You Only Live Twice’s slow-moving villainous space capsule
1:20:48 – Nancy Sinatra’s ‘You Only Live Twice’
1:23:05 – The ‘Japanese’ music in You Only Live Twice
1:27:43 – On Her Majesty’s Australian Service
1:31:09 – ‘We Have All The Time In The World’
1:35:04 – “This never happened to the other synth”
1:41:00 – The horny saxophone
1:43:11 – Diamonds Are Forever
1:46:33 – The creepy saxophone

We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

Jul 02 2018

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Rank #2: Episode 13: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone

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From Hedwig’s theme to Quidditch matches, the musical world of Hogwarts may be one of the most iconic musical contributions to the film world this millennia. John Williams worked orchestral magic and brought us a unique contribution of fantasy, off-beat fanfares, and even a bit of jazz harmony. But what makes this great score tick? Join us as we dissect the power, the charm, and the enchantment of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone.

Episode notes:

07:00 – a brief history of the franchise
10:45 – Harry Potter, one of the largest franchises of the 21st century
11:22 – John Williams on how he came to be involved with Harry Potter
15:00 – Hedwig’s Theme
16:42 – the celeste and its use in other films and, famously, Tchaikovsky’s Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy
18:15 – Andrew drops a bombshell
20:10 – Breaking down Hedwig’s Theme
26:20 – a recounting of the day the musicians first encountered the score
28:00 – Hedwig’s Theme and its variations
31:25 – is Hedwig’s Theme the last John Williams melody to enter pop culture?
33:00 – The Flying Theme or the Nimbus 2000 Theme
44:15 – Harry’s Theme or the Family Theme
50:27 – the appearance of the tri-tone
52:30 – Harry’s Wondrous World Theme
1:00:08 – the Hogwarts School Song
1:02:00 – we apologise for what is about to happen…
1:04:50 – Philosopher’s vs Sorcerer’s (Stone) and some of the localisations
1:08:10 – The Stone motif
1:16:00 – the Voldemort motifs
1:23:00 – the music of Diagon Alley
1:31:10 – some banquet music from Harry Potter and other films
1:36:50 – the Quidditch Fanfare and its similarity to other “arena” cues
1:40:30 – John Williams’ use of synthesizer for the Invisibility Cloak
1:43:10 – the diegetic (harp) music of Harry Potter
1:47:00 – the action music compositional style of early 2000s John Williams

We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

Nov 13 2017

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Rank #3: Episode 7: Star Wars - Part 1

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Forty years ago today, in 1977, the film universe was turned upside down by a galaxy far, far away. Star Wars may have changed the film industry forever, but John Williams’ score might just be as influential for the film music landscape. In this episode, our first of three on Star Wars, we take a look at the influence of John Williams’ music, and two of its major themes: the Main Theme (or Luke’s Theme) and Princess Leia’s theme.

Episode notes:

2:30 – The influence of Star Wars, the music, the film
4:30 – How Star Wars changed film history and the film school generation
8:00 – Star Wars and nostalgia
11:20 – Was there anticipation for Star Wars?
13:40 – This was not what films were supposed to sound like at the time
15:00 – Before the main titles: the 20th Century Fox fanfare
16:20 – The main Star Wars theme (Luke’s theme)
18:50 – The orchestration of the main theme
20:45 – The jazz-inspired harmony of the main theme
23:33 – “War drums in space”
25:03 – Development of Luke’s theme – first playing
26:55 – Luke’s theme begins to mature with the hero’s journey
32:00 – Luke’s theme on the Death Star
34:44 – The shootout on the Death Star, Luke’s “boy’s own adventure” moment
39:15 – Influences on Luke’s theme: Ivanhoe and King’s Row
50:06 – The uses of Luke’s theme in the final Death Star dogfight
53:15 – The (mis)uses of the main theme (?) in Rogue One
54:45 – Leia’s theme and the development of ‘concert versions’
1:01:10 – John Williams and the romantic major sixth
1:03:14 – The first time we hear Leia’s theme
1:05:18 – Help me Obi-Wan Kenobi, you’re my only hope
1:07:38 – The full Leia’s message
1:10:10 – Luke meets Leia for the first time
1:11:30 – The Death of Obi-Wan and the abandonment of leitmotif
1:15:30 – High romance in the Leia concert suite
1:17:45 – The Star Wars NPR Radio Serials

We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

May 24 2017

1hr 19mins

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Rank #4: Episode 3: Jurassic Park

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For our third episode, we look at another great Williams-Spielberg collaboration with the 1993 score to Jurassic Park. This landmark film redefined special effects and Hollywood itself, but what did it do for film music? Join us as we take a look at the main themes for the score and the hidden gems – and go from gospel, to jazz, to hymns along the way. Episode Notes: - 2:30 Notes on Jurassic Park as a Spielberg film and its place in film history - 7:10 Theme From Jurassic Park - 10:00 The main theme as a hymn - 15:00 The structure of the main theme - 17:20 The end credits version of the theme - 21:00 The ‘Journey to the Island’ theme - 23:30 Comparison with ‘Summon the Heroes’ - 26:00 The ‘sheen’ to the thematic orchestration - 29:56 The ‘panic’ theme - 31:45 Comparison with Dies Irae - 41:10 Comparison with later John Williams ‘suspense’ music - 43:45 Petticoat Lane - 47:00 Comparison with other John Williams celeste writing - 49:00 Triceratops music - 53:32 Dennis’s music and comparison with JFK - 55:40 Williams’ jazz influences - 57:15 The development of the action music - 1:00:25 The raptor motif - 1:01:00 The animation jazz and comparison with Gershwin - 1:03:30 Williams’ use of synth - 1:08:50 ‘Incident at Isla Nublar’ - 1:12:00 Comparison with 1990s synth action music We’d love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

Feb 27 2017

1hr 15mins

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Rank #5: Episode 15: The Force Awakens - Part 1

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In Episode 15, we return to the galaxy far, far away and take a look at how the musical landscape of Star Wars changed between the almost 40 years between A New Hope and The Force Awakens. In the first of a two part episode we look at Rey’s Theme, Kylo Ren’s motifs, and The March (or is that the fugue?) of the Resistance. Recorded last year in eager anticipation of The Last Jedi, we’re finally getting this episode to you just in time for its release on Blu-Rey (see what we did there?), so sit back and enjoy our return to perhaps John Williams’ greatest musical franchise.

Episode notes:

0:00 – A disclaimer (and possibly an apology!)
5:15 – Dan is writing a book about Star Wars
7:51 – The weight of expectation for The Force Awakens
10:00 – The legacy film
16:30 – The return of little-known composer John Williams
17:35 – Rey’s theme
22:40 – Rey’s riff
26:32 – Rey eats her lunch, on solo flute
30:41 – Rey’s abduction
33:11 – Rey’s impassioned bridge
36:15 – Comparison to other John Williams work: Potter and The Terminal
44:35 – Williams bringing Rey and The Force together in the end credits
46:40 – Rey’s theme – the dance remix
49:10 – Musically, Rey is a Jawa
50:33 – Kylo Ren’s theme
55:50 – The Kylo Ren B motif – the call of the dark side
1:00:00 – Ren and the Imperial March
1:01:45 – The March of the Resistance
1:04:51 – The March or the Fugue?
1:10:00 – Poe’s theme
1:16:39 – Finn’s rhythmic motif
1:19:00 – The mixed-meter Falcon theme
1:28:10 – John Williams as the bloodline of Star Wars
1:29:34 - …and more to come in Part Two!

We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

Apr 03 2018

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Rank #6: Episode 12: Back To The Future

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After a short hiatus, we’re Back – from the future – with a good look at Alan Silvestri’s score to the Robert Zemeckis time-travel classic. Back to the Future is, at its core, about a small group of characters, and yet it possesses a huge scale of feeling and mood, much of which can be attributed to Silvestri’s impressive orchestral score. Join us as we take in the jazz roots of this classic, the fanfares and motifs, and of course, the classic hit songs that power the film.

Episode notes:

0:45 – We’re back, from the future
4:40 – Following in the Spielbergian mould
13:10 – Romancing the Silvestri-Zemeckis relationship
16:10 – The main theme
20:00 – Asking questions through tritones
26:00 – Mysterious origins of the time machine
29:14 – Main theme variations
32:32 – Going through the gears
39:41 – The main theme, romantically
41:47 – Marty’s theme
44:39 – The time motif and the Back to the Future sound
49:05 – Doc’s turning wheels
53:00 – The octatonic scale
55:02 – The Biff motif
57:08 – Back to the Predator
59:33 – Art of the Score dissects the climactic suite
1:07:00 – Is it the best climax suite in film music?
1:09:54 – The songs! The Power of Loving Back to the Future
1:15:50 – Mister Sandman
1:26:10 – Night Train
1:32:13 – Earth Angel
1:37:19 – Andrew’s Johnny B Goode telephone authorship theory of doom

We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

Oct 18 2017

1hr 47mins

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Rank #7: Episode 10: Batman

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Today, Batman is undergoing yet another renaissance – fresh off the Dark Knight trilogy, he’s heading up a whole new Justice League. But in 1989, Batman was only starting to become the Dark Knight of popular culture – and Danny Elfman’s landmark score to the Tim Burton film helped him along the way. In this episode of Art of the Score, we take a look at the 1989 score, and pull apart its main themes, its musical influences and style, and ask the ultimate question: just where does he get those wonderful (musical) toys?

Show notes:

2:50 – An intro to Danny Elfman
4:20 – Batman (1989), Tim Burton, and franchising in Hollywood
10:42 – Is this the most iconic Batman theme ever?
12:45 – Breaking down Elfman’s Batman theme
16:10 – The influence of Herrmann on Elfman
21:00 – The Dark Knight rides again
23:56 – The versatility of the Batman theme
26:00 – The Batutsi
26:55 – 6/8 versus 3/4 timing for Batman
30:20 – How does the Elfman theme fit into the history of Bat-music? The 1949 serial, the TV series, Goldenthal, and Zimmer
35:05 – Is Zimmer’s theme just the bare elements of Elfman’s? Dan says yes: https://vimeo.com/193995233
36:40 – Or is it all just building on Wagner?
38:00 – How does Prince’s music work with the score? Listen to the Love Theme and find out
42:00 – Beautiful Dreamer, the Joker’s Parlour Song
46:00 – Dancing with the Devil in the Pale Moonlight
53:44 – Waltzing to the Death (and Dan’s frustration)
58:11 – The Henchmen’s piano
1:01:35 – Alfred Hitchcock directs Batman
1:05:52 – The henchmen’s boom box
1:08:45 – It’s a Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight
1:11:50 – Advertising for the Joker
1:18:30 – Nick’s favourite cue in the score
1:22:30 – Dan has a bone to pick with Batman
1:26:50 – The finale to Batman – the Light Knight?

We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

Jul 23 2017

1hr 33mins

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Rank #8: Episode 17: Gladiator

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In the year 2000, the sword-and-sandal epic was revived, with Russell Crowe trebucheted to international stardom as the star of Ridley Scott’s hugely successful film, Gladiator. But fame was also found for Hans Zimmer, today the biggest music man in Hollywood, but who along with Australian composer and singer Lisa Gerrard wrote some of the most influential film music in decades for Gladiator. In Episode 17, we take a look at what makes Zimmer’s sound so pervasive, how Lisa Gerrard’s voice intensifies the film’s emotions, and just where all that strength and honour comes from.

Episode notes:

3:02 – Gladiator as the breakthrough Hans Zimmer score
5:09 – Some background on the significance of Gladiator, sword and sandal films, epics, and peplum
14:24 – Hans Zimmer style and the 1990s action film
21:00 – Hans Zimmer and the synth
23:52 – The unusual instrumentation of Gladiator
25:25 – A duduk demonstration
27:10 – The themes of Gladiator – Commodus’ theme
33:15 – The power of Lisa Gerrard’s voice
39:48 – Maximus’ hymn
43:00 – Maximus’ polyrhythms
45:32 – Zimmer’s Vangelis’ moment
48:01 – Once Upon a Time in Ancient Rome
53:11 – The Earth theme – Gladiator’s musical soul
1:00:56 – Lucilla’s theme
1:05:17 – The Gladiator waltz
1:08:15 – A Holst heist?
1:12:34 – Gladiatorial piracy
1:16:41 – The death of an emperor (or, Mozart’s Da Vinci Code)
1:21:02 – To Zuccabar
1:24:00 – Gladiator’s establishing music (and a surprise)
1:29:21 – Zimmer’s answering horns
1:31:43 – The Might of Wagner
1:39:18 – The Hans Zimmer Olympics
1:41:27 – Gladiator’s finale: Now We Are Free

We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

Jun 04 2018

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Rank #9: Episode 8: Star Wars - Part 2

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In our second Star Wars episode, marking the fortieth anniversary of the film, we complete our exploration of the themes for this landmark film and score from 1977. We take on the franchise’s most defining melody: the Force Theme, and also throw in the Rebel Fanfare, Vader’s motif, and the Death Star, before ending on that eternal question: what links Star Wars and Metallica?

Episode notes:

2:15 – The Force Theme (or Ben Kenobi’s theme)
2:50 – Binary Sunset
7:25 – the Alternate Binary Sunset cue
12:30 – the Burning Homestead cue
14:50 – Rogue One: The Master Switch cue
17:10 – the first encounter with Ben Kenobi
18:55 – development with Kenobi, Tales of a Jedi Knight
22:45 – The Force Theme as anxious suspense
24:50 – Luke mourns Ben
26:30 – the martial Force Theme at the Battle of Yavin
28:30 – Use the Force, Luke
32:10 – The Force Theme in Superman?
34:40 – The Rebel fanfare motif
37:21 – The Blockade Runner and Imperial Attack, combining the Rebel and Imperial motifs
42:10 – Rebel fanfare as dramatic relief after the destruction of the Death Star
43:49 – Darth Vader’s motif
49:00 – development in Imperial Attack
55:00 – Ben’s recollections of Vader for solo clarinet
57:50 – Is Vader’s theme really Metallica in disguise?
1:01:11 – the Death Star motif
1:03:00 – Burning Homestead as a theme showcase

We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

Jun 09 2017

1hr 7mins

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Rank #10: Episode 14: Stranger Things

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After a short break, Art of the Score enters the new year with a trip to the Upside Down to take a close listen to Stranger Things. With the help of synth expert, musician, and podcaster Seja Vogel, we pull apart this wonderfully analogue score, its influences, and how it all works over the course of Season One of the Netflix hit.

Episode notes:

2:35 – Welcome to special guest Seja Vogel. Find Seja’s podcast, ‘Hear Sej’ here (https://itunes.apple.com/bw/podcast/hearsej/id1168366353?mt=2), and her amazing Etsy store for felt synth models here (https://www.etsy.com/shop/pulsewidth).
5:20 – Into the nostalgic world of Stranger Things
8:41 – The ‘nostalgia film’ and Fredric Jameson
10:30 – Michael Stein and Kyle Dixon and their analogue synth band S U R V I V E
13:24 – ‘Dirge’, the track that formed the Stranger Things sound
15:05 – The influences and musical tools of S U R V I V E
19:00 – How the music works in Stranger Things – a scene comparison with Williams’ E.T.
25:14 – The main title – is it E minor or C major?
28:51 – Seja breaks down the synths involved
31:47 – Seja’s meticulous reconstruction of the Main Title
34:00 – Square waves and pulse waves, filter sweeps and resonance
44:33 – ‘Kids’ and keying between worlds
51:55 – Nancy and Barb
55:06 – Eleven’s theme and its development throughout season one
1:05:45 – Lay-Z-Boy couch theme
1:10:20 – The Upside Down
1:13:55 – The Demogorgon
1:18:11 – Searching the woods
1:20:42 – The government evildoers in portamento bass
1:26:37 – ‘This isn’t you’
1:32:01 – Linking sound with image – was Stranger Things written to footage?
1:35:45 – How each kiss is scored
1:40:04 – Pop music in Stranger Things: The Clash – Should I Stay or Should I Go?
1:44:02 – Stranger Things’ secret pop: We Can Be Heroes

We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

Jan 11 2018

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Rank #11: Episode 9: Star Wars - Part 3

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In our third and final Star Wars episode, we take a look at some of the lesser known cues that round out this incredible score. We discuss the giant bantha in the room: the musical influences that inspired Williams and the temp music that helped to shape some of his artistic choices. Finally, we take a whirlwind tour of the action music, explore the groovy Cantina Band tunes and debate whether Star Wars is in fact the greatest film score of all time. Is it?

Show notes:

3:20 – the music for the Jawas
5:40 – finding the downbeat in “The Little People”
7:28 – is this the highest Tuba line ever?
11:03 – the music for the Sand People
14:39 – Williams’ family relations and a link to Toto
15:28 – use of the Timpani
18:08 – a comparison with Jerry Goldsmith’s Planet of the Apes
20:26 – discussing the Bantha in the room: the musical influences on Star Wars
26:05 – The Dune Sea of Tatooine vs Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring
30:17 – The Rebel Blockade Runner vs Holst’s The Planets
32:02 – Some Bernard Herrmann references in Star Wars
36:56 – The Throne Room vs Dvorak and Elgar
42:21 – The Throne Room’s reappearance in Return of the Jedi
44:55 – rude trumpets and the performance/recording of the score
47:03 – the musicians who made contributions to Star Wars
48:53 – the action music of Star Wars and Williams’ hip grooves
53:11 – Dan’s dissapointment in Star Wars’ lack of musical numbers
56:15 – The Battle of Yavin vs The Battle of Britain
1:02:35 – The Cantina Band, is it jazz or jizz?
1:06:20 –Sing Sing Sing as temp music
1:08:48 – the 2nd Cantina Band song
1:11:18 – the original Star Wars trailer music and Vivaldi’s Four Seasons
1:15:46 – the studio’s woeful attempt at marketing Star Wars
1:17:42 – is Star Wars the greatest film score of all time?

We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

Jul 04 2017

1hr 24mins

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Rank #12: Episode 23: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban - Part 1

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In Episode 23 we return to the wizarding world with the first of a two part listen to Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. Far from resting on prior achievements, the final John Williams Potter score knocks it out of the park, giving us everything from medieval music to waltzes, bebop jazz, and some of the most majestic flight music ever written. Join us, as we solemnly swear we are up to no good and journey with Harry and co for their third year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

Episode notes:

2:32 – Dan makes a big claim
6:35 – Some Azkaban homework
14:45 – Hedwig’s theme goes on holiday
16:23 – Something wicked this way hums
27:50 – Crumhorn, Sackbut, and Azkaban’s medieval sound
30:51 – Meeting Buckbeak
33:04 – Searching for the Fat Lady
35:33 – Some sleeping celeste
39:09 – The renaissance fair
46:49 – A Window to the Past
1:00:00 – Some serious Sirius
1:04:13 – Pettigrew’s motif
1:07:12 – Buckbeak’s brilliant flight
1:13:15 – Buckbeak’s equally brilliant second flight
1:17:26 – The Dementor’s dialectic. Thesis: aleatoric horror
1:21:39 – Antithesis: the angelic Patronus
1:23:06 – Synthesis: the Dementors converge

We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

Nov 19 2018

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Rank #13: Episode 19: James Bond - Part 2

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In Episode 19 we continue our ambitious attempt to analyse every James Bond score ever. Having covered the Connery classics in Episode 18, we’re now onto the 1970s, 1980s, and even the early 1990s, covering Moore, Dalton, and a little bit of Brosnan as James Bond goes from funk to disco to acid jazz and even a little early hip-hop. Join us as we look at some of the kitschiest Bond music out there – and, some of the all-time greats.

Episode notes:

3:38 – Roger Moore’s more George (Aston) Martin Bond music
9:11 – The 1970s funk boat chase
12:45 – Nick has a problem with The Man With the Golden Gun’s parallel motion
16:43 – The Spy Who Wrote A Fantastic Opening Song
18:10 – James ‘Disco Stu’ Bond
24:30 – The singing pyramids
28:33 – The Space Who Loved Me
32:45 – Bossa, James Bossa
35:38 – Bill Conti’s For Your Funk Only
43:40 – John Barry’s finale: Octopussy, A View To A Kill, and The Living Daylights
49:12 – Dalton’s daylight drum machine
54:50 – Michael Kamen’s License to Trill
1:01:04 – Bond’s power ballad romance
1:04:50 – Serra’s synth sound for Goldeneye and the sonic reinvention of James Bond
1:13:34 – Acid James
1:17:40 – Escaping the Archives
1:19:04 – Goldeneye’s Tank Chase and John Altman’s replacement music

We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

Jul 22 2018

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Rank #14: Episode 16: The Force Awakens - Part 2

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In Episode 16, we finish our look at Williams’ seventh entry into the Star Wars universe by looking at what’s returned and what hasn’t. We take apart the reoccurring Star Wars themes and how they’re used in The Force Awakens, and make a number of bold and possibly a little reckless predictions for The Last Jedi (then unreleased).
 
Episode notes:
 
3:01 – Yes, this was recorded before The Last Jedi was released, and we’re sorry
4:04 – What were our reactions to The Force Awakens’ music when it was released?
9:50 – Ice Landing and the Rebel Fanfare
12:48 – Han Solo and the Princess in The Force Awakens
20:06 – Scherzo for X-Wings and the undanceable dance
26:02 – The Force Theme Awakens
30:00 – The Homestead Burns Again
36:20 – The sonic signature of The Force Awakens
37:30 – Williams’ emotional mood shifts and the journey to Luke Skywalker
39:54 – The brief return of Darth Vader
41:35 – Nick promises to walk out of The Last Jedi in disgust (Narrator: he did not)
48:54 – Andrew embarrasses himself with some music-inspired Last Jedi predictions
52:15 – The Skywalker map and the tritone
56:12 – Snoke’s supreme choir – and Andrew embarrasses himself again
1:04:29 – The death scenes of The Force Awakens and John Williams’ string lament’s across episodes
1:19:50 – Finn’s Phantom Confession
1:21:09 – Maz Kanata’s Jabba Flow
1:24:03 – Dan hopes for some more zany Williams jazz (Narrator: he got it)
 
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May 11 2018

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Rank #15: Episode 4: Vertigo

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For our fourth episode, we’re moving to a different great director-composer collaboration from a different era. It’s Alfred Hitchcock and Bernard Herrmann with perhaps their greatest work: 1958’s Vertigo. This film recently dethroned Citizen Kane as the greatest of all time according to the American Film Insitute – but how good is Herrmann’s score, and how does it work? Join us as we take a look at the central musical ideas at work here – and how Bernard Herrmann creates a musical landscape of the subconscious. Episode Notes: 3:25 – Historical context for the film and the Hitchcock-Herrmann relationship 5:00 – Why did people dislike Vertigo at the time? 8:10 – Herrmann’s compositional style 9:30 – The musical landscapes of Hitchcock-Herrmann films 11:00 – Nick on conducting Psycho live in concert, 13:10 – The Vertigo main titles 16:20 – The ‘Hitchcock chord’ 20:15 – Musical spirals in Vertigo reflecting visual and thematic spirals 26:30 – The love theme 29:40 – The sad romance of the love theme 31:35 – Nick blows our minds by revealing that the love theme is hidden in the Prelude 32:50 – Similarities to Wagner’s Tristan and Isolde and the inability for the music to truly resolve 37:25 – Close analysis of the Scene D’Amour 39:40 – Discussion of Ludovic Bource’s score for The Artist 42:25 – Did Herrmann reference and develop this musical idea in other Hitchcock films? 46:10 – Is Herrmann developing a musical language or is he self-plagiarising? 47:10 – Torn Curtain 50:35 – The Ostinato motif in Vertigo 52:40 – The Habañera rhythm 55:45 – A link to Ravel 58:20 – The development of the Herrmann-Hitchcock ostinato across other films 1:03:00 – The Hitchcock style versus the Herrmann style? 1:05:05 – Alternating polychords in the tower sequence and similarities to The Matrix 1:06:45 – Danny Elfman’s inspiration from Herrmann 1:08:13 – Source music and Mozart in Vertigo 1:12:10 – The musical resolution at the beach 1:14:00 – The film’s finale and musical conclusion – is Herrmann’s music less ambiguous than the images? 1:17:20 – Hitchcock crediting Herrmann with the quality of Vertigo We’d love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

Mar 28 2017

1hr 20mins

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