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The Copywriter Club Podcast

Ideas and habits worth stealing from top copywriters.

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TCC Podcast 11: Advice for a Beginning Copywriter with Amy Posner

In the 11th episode of The Copywriter Club Podcast, Kira and Rob talk with direct response copywriter Amy Posner running an agency and her move to freelancing, her lead magnet and what she includes with it to close more projects, her sales process and how she closed a $27,000 project, and the advice she would give to a copywriter who is just starting out. Great advice here. Don’t miss it.Click the play button below, or scroll down for a full transcript.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:Sponsor: AirStoryThe Copywriter MastermindKolbe ProfileAmy's Info KitRamit SethiAmy's WebsiteKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupIntro: Content (for now)Outro: GravityFull Transcript:KH: The Copywriter Club Podcast is sponsored by Airstory, the writing platform forprofessional writers who want to get more done in half the time. Learn more at airstory.co/club.RM: What if you could hang out with really talented copywriters and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work process and their habits, then steal an idea or two to inspire your own work? That’s what Kira and I try to do every week at The Copywriter Club Podcast.KH: You’re invited to join the club for episode 11 as we chat with freelance copywriter Amy Posner about her client proposal process, cold prospecting, being a direct response copywriter, and her thoughts about certifications for copywriters.Thanks for coming back, Amy. I feel like we should share that we already have a interview due, and had a conversation with you, and it erased by accident and it was gold. It was pure gold.RM: We lost it, and we are sorry, but we are grateful to have you back.AP: Yeah. I hope I can do whatever magic it was last time. I can’t remember.KH: The good thing is, it’s been a couple of weeks, so I have actually forgotten most everything we talked about, so this all feels fresh and new to me. We’ll just start from scratch here.AP: Sounds good.KH: To start, Amy, I know that you’ve had a really evolved last year. You changed a lot in your business, and you joined The Copywriters Mastermind. Could you just share just kind of an overview of how your business has changed over the past year?AP: Wow. That’s a big question. I’ll preface it by saying, I’ve been an entrepreneur for a long time and I seem to thrive on change, so that’s kind of like my MO. I’m not sure that that’s the best thing, but what’s happened this year has been really good. I have resisted choosing a niche for many years. I kind of niched in copy as opposed to like in a, in an industry sector.One of the things that I realized, at some point last year, was that I wanted to streamline my business. I started this ... What is this? 2016? The end of 2014, I developed this little mantra, which was “work less, earn more.” I set about trying to figure out, “How do I do that?” What I realized was I get bored easily, so I’ve always really enjoyed diversity. Doing different things. Working for different clients. I did a lot of jobs that were involved and complicated and many of them were one-offs.Sometimes clients would come back after a year or two but I didn’t have a lot of regular, repetitive business. That meant two things. One is that I was learning. I was taking a big learning curve all the time, and I was enjoying that for a long time.The other thing was it meant I was always on the hunt. I decided that that wasn’t the most efficient way to run my business, so I looked for ways to streamline my efforts, and fulfill this “earn more, work less” kind of thing that I set up for myself. I don’t know if I answered your question exactly, but those are some of the broad strokes.RM:  Amy, I’m really curious. You mentioned that you haven’t really niched yourself except to say that you’re a copywriter, but in a lot of ways you’ve, over the last few years, sold yourself as a direct response copywriter.

46mins

31 Jan 2017

Rank #1

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TCC Podcast #39: Cold Emailing with Jorden Roper

Copywriter and cold emailing specialist, Jorden Roper, joins Kira and Rob in The Copywriter Club Podcast studio for the 39th episode. Jorden is a three time college dropout who lost her job (the same day her husband lost his job at the same company) and managed to find several freelance clients within a month. She shares how she did it, and how she used cold emailing to find clients plus:•  How you can do cold emailing that lands clients on day one•  The cold emailing formula she used to grow her business•  How she used Pinterest to brainstorm her brand•  How to be fearless as you “put yourself out there”•  How she uses Youtube to attract a different audience to her blog•  How much work she put into creating and launching her course•  The biggest mistake she sees new writers making todayThis one is packed with useful information and ideas any writer, beginner or expert, can use to grow and improve their business. Click the play button below, or scroll down for a full transcript.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:Sponsor: AirStoryCraig’s ListProblogger Job BoardLimeleadsPinterestJorden’s video about haters on YoutubeWriting Revolt BlogCold Emailing CourseMariah Coz’s Launch Your Signature CourseMaggie PattersonJorden’s FB CommunityJorden on TwitterKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupIntro: Content (for now)Outro: GravityFull Transcript:The Copywriter Club Podcast is sponsored by Airstory, the writing platform for professional writers who want to get more done in half the time. Learn more at Airstory.co/club.Rob: What if you could hang out with seriously talented copywriters, and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work processes and their habits, then steal an idea or two to inspire your own work. That’s what Kira and I do every week at the Copywriter Club Podcast.Kira: You’re invited to join the club for episode 39 as we chat with copywriter Jorden Roper about getting fired from bad jobs, and finding copywriting to pay the bills, using YouTube for brand building and outreach, what she has done differently from other copywriters to get an edge, and how copywriters can find great clients with cold emailing.Rob: Hey, Kira. Hey, Jorden.Jorden: Hey, guys.Kira: Hello. Welcome, Jorden.Jorden: Thank you. Thank you so much for having me.Rob: Yeah. It’s about time. We’ve been trying to get you on the podcast for a little while. It’s time you got here.Jorden: Yes, I’m so excited to be here. Thank you so much.Rob: Jorden, I think maybe we should start with your story. I know you’ve shared this a lot with your list, but a lot of our listeners probably haven’t heard it. You went through a time in your life when you were going through different jobs and landed where you are. Tell us about that.Jorden: Well, before I started my freelance writing business, pretty much right before, I had been working at this full-time job at a marketing agency. I was doing some writing there. It was very stressful. It was a super toxic work environment. I know a lot of people who are probably trying to break into freelance writing can relate to that, like just going to work every day, sitting in your car in the morning, and just wanting to scream or cry or whatever before you walk up to the office.That’s kind of the situation that I was in. I ended up getting fired from that job. Just a few months before that actually, my husband started working at the same job. When his contract ended, they decided to just let me go, too.Kira: What?Jorden: Yeah, we’re both out of work on the same day.Kira: Oh, no.Jorden: We walk out of the office together like, “Oh my God. What are we going to do? This is insane.” It was very stressful. Actually, I had some other stuff going on at the time, too, just within ... I think within the same week before this happened,

36mins

27 Jun 2017

Rank #2

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TCC Podcast #58: Writing financial copy with Jake Hoffberg

For the 58th episode of The Copywriter Club Podcast, Kira Hug and Rob Marsh sit down to talk with financial copywriter, Jake Hoffberg about all kinds of things related to writing copy in the financial niche, including:•  his first exposure to direct response and how he got into internet marketing•  how he was rejected by every division of Agora but one before he landed his first project•  the terrible cold email pitch template he used (we share it, don’t use it)•  his contrarian “I want to make money” path to copywriting•  the kinds of projects he willingly took on just to get started•  how he leveraged his new relationships into more jobs and more clients•  the real value that copywriters provide their clients (it’s not writing copy)•  the process for pitching new ideas and getting the next project, and•  how to double your income in 6 monthsPlus we also asked for his thoughts about getting royalties, which clients will pay them, and how to structure royalties the right way and he shared the advice he give other writers about how to get into financial copywriting... hint: don’t think you should start at the top. All that and more is in this money-packed episode (not literally). To hear it all, click the play button below, or scroll down for a full transcript.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:Sponsor: AirStoryEban PaganJeff WalkerAgora FinancialMotley FoolDent ResearchSale of a LifetimeFreelance Financial Copywriter GroupJakeHoffberg.comKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupIntro: Content (for now)Outro: GravityFull Transcript:The Copywriter Club Podcast is sponsored by Airstory, the writing platform for professional writers who want to get more done in half the time. Learn more at Airstory.co/club.Rob: What if you could hang out with seriously talented copywriters and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work processes, and their habits, then steal and idea or two to inspire your own work? That’s what Kira and I do every week at the Copywriter Club Podcast.Kira: You’re invited to join the Club for episode 58, as we chat with financial copywriter Jake Hoffberg about his path to becoming a copywriter and choosing the financial niche, writing long-form sales pages and VSLs, what a new writer should do today to break into financial copywriting, and advertising to the affluent.--Rob: Welcome, Jake!Jake: Thank you for having me!Kira: Yeah, it’s great to have you here.Rob: We’re excited to learn a little bit more about you and your niche and how it all came about, which is probably a good place to start. Let’s talk about your story and how you became a copywriter.Jake: Sure. So, I guess the story probably actually starts in 2008... 2009... and I had a copy of Eban Pagan’s Get Altitude Training—I forget how I got it, but I did—and that was really my first exposure to direct response. This whole world of people that were making money on the internet and running these virtual businesses and putting boards together and getting paid and I just—I thought that was fascinating. I was in direct sales at the time and I was knocking on doors and doing it the hard way and man, it was just so awesome sounding. So I probably spent the next five, six, seven years on and off trying to get into internet marketing and figure out how to run an info-product business and kinda went down that rabbit hole for a long time and tried a lot of things that did not work over the years.This is all while I was doing sales, and switched sales jobs a couple times, and think it was two years ago—something like that—it was July of 2015—I was running a consulting business and I had that moment that everyone has at some point in their life where they’re just like, F it! I’m done with this! I’m tired of this crap! And I had a not so friendly conversation with my boss,

50mins

21 Nov 2017

Rank #3

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TCC Podcast #83: Copywriting Secrets Learned from a Legend with Bond Halbert

In the direct response world everyone knows the name, Gary Halbert. He’s often called the best copywriter who ever lived. And if we could, we’d ask Gary to be on the show, but alas, that’s not possible, so we’ve done the next best thing. Bond Halbert is the guest for episode 83 of The Copywriter Club Podcast. Kira and Rob sat down with Bond to talk about his famous dad and the lessons he’s learned from a lifetime (literally) learning copy. We talked about:•  his path into the world of copywriting (it all starts with his dad)•  the story behind The Boron Letters and why Gary wrote them to Bond•  why Gary Halbert went to prison for a crime he didn’t commit (really)•  the 2-3 most important lessons he learned from Gary Halbert•  how he divides his work into thirds•  the four kinds of readers you’ll attract to your copy•  why copywriters are good at headlines but bad at closes•  what he does to nail the close•  the importance being persuasive in person (not just in copy)•  where good copy really comes from•  what Bond’s research process involves•  his hack for finding the problems your customers want to solve•  why expertise is relative (the differing levels of expertise)•  the formula he leans toward when he writes for his clients•  why you need to create a compelling sense of urgency in every sales message (and how to do it)•  why he wrote Part III of The Halbert Copywriting Method first•  how he talks differently about positive and negative ideas in his copy (we hadn’t heard this anywhere else before)•  how (and why) Bond’s relationship with money is different from his father’sThis interview was so good that it went a little long, but we think you'll learn a lot from the extra time we spent talking about copywriting. To get this one, visit iTunes, Stitcher or your favorite podcast app. Or simply click the play button below. And of course, you can scroll down for a full transcript.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:The Boron LettersParris LampropolousHow to Make Maximum Money in Minimal TimeGlenn Gary Glen RossBig Jason HendersonSam MarkowitzThe Halbert Copywriting Writing Method, Part IIIBondHalbert.com TheGaryHalbertLetter.com Halbertising.comEmail: bond@thegaryhalbertletter.comKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupIntro: Content (for now)Outro: GravityFull Transcript:Rob: What if you could hang out with seriously talented copywriters and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work processes and their habits, then steal an idea or two to inspire your own work? That’s what Kira and I do every week at The Copywriter Club Podcast.Kira: You’re invited to join the club for episode 83 as we talk with copywriter and marketer Bond Halbert about the most important lessons he learned from his father, the man many called the greatest copywriter ever lived; the story behind The Boron Letters; the formulas, tactics, and strategies he uses to make effective copy; and what he’s doing to carry on Gary’s legacy.Rob: Hey Bond!Kira: Welcome, Bond!Bond: Hi! Thank you for having me here!Rob: Yeah we’re thrilled to have you; when we made a list of all of the guests that we wanted to interview eventually on the podcast, your name was one of the first ones that we added, and so it’s taken us a little while to get to you, but we are glad that you’re finally here.Bond: Oh! I didn’t know that, I would have come sooner! Laughs.Kira: Laughs. This is perfect; perfect timing. Episode 83 is a good episode. So Bond, let’s start with your story, especially for people who are less familiar with you, you know; how—how did you get into this wonderful world of copywriting and marketing?Bond: I’m going to try to make this really short, because I know I’ve given this to people who’ve heard me on other podcasts, and I like to give people as much, like, new stuff as I can,

37mins

15 Mar 2018

Rank #4

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TCC Podcast #136: Building a Niche Copy Business with Nikita Morell

Nikita Morell is our guest for the 136th episode of The Copywriter Club Podcast. We’ve known Nikita for a while now and given the success she’s had, it's a shame we haven’t had her on the podcast before now. Nikita has found a lot of success by niching her business and delivering exactly what her ideal clients need. We talked to her about:•  how she went from selling bread to selling ads to writing copy•  her accidental sales pitch that saved her sales job•  how a job in marketing taught her skills that she uses as a copywriter•  why she chose her niche—working only with architects and the impact on her biz•  how she changed her business to accommodate having a baby•  what she does to find clients—she’s a “prospecting nerd”•  what she did to raise her rates adding thousands of dollars to every project•  how she thinks about her brand and why she takes her brand seriously•  the marketing pieces she is using in her prospecting process•  how she makes her cold emails feel like warm emails•  this mistakes she’s made along the way—it hasn’t all been smooth sailing•  what she does to get a lot of “busy work” done and still avoid burnout•  the things she has done that have made the biggest difference in her businessWe also asked Nikita about working with subcontractors, creating a “pretty” framework to show how her process works and why she spends a lot of time with a Japanese floor loom. Nikita shares a lot of advice worth listening to in this episode. To hear it, click the play button below or find it on your favorite podcast app. Readers can scroll down for a full transcript.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:Seth GodinThe Copywriter Think TankMel AbrahamKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupThe Copywriter UndergroundIntro: Content (for now)Outro: GravityFull Transcript:Rob:   This podcast is sponsored by The Copywriter Underground.Kira:   It's our new membership, designed for you, to help you attract more clients, and hit 10k a month, consistently.Rob:   For more information, or to sign up, go to thecopywriterunderground.com.Kira:   What if you could hang out with seriously talented copywriters and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work processes, and their habits, then steal an idea or two to inspire your own work? That's what Rob and I do every week at The Copywriter Club Podcast.Rob:   You're invited to join the club for episode 136, as we chat with copywriter Nikita Morell about helping architects with copy and marketing strategy, her approach to choosing a niche and then narrowing it even further, why she created a framework for her process, and the role weaving plays in her life and business.Kira:   Welcome Nikita.Rob:   Hey Nikita.Nikita:            Thank you, hi.Kira:   Yeah, we're excited to have you here. You are one of our members of our Think Tank, so we've been able to witness your business growth, and we're really excited to share what's working, because so much is working for you in your business. So let's just kick this off with your story.Kira:   How did you end up as a copywriter?Nikita:            So, I started in corporate marketing for L'Oreal and George Weston Foods, which is Australia's biggest bread brand, and I quite quickly realized this corporate life just wasn't for me. I think it was just all the layers and I just wasn't that great at taking direction. And it was round about this time I was earning a full time salary, so I was frequenting lots of bars and different restaurants, and after a night out, my friends would come back and comment on the food, or the music, or the cute boy sitting on the bar stool, and I would be looking at the copper lights, or the timber joinery; and I think it was about this time I just became obsessed with everything design related. I signed up to an interior design diploma,

52mins

14 May 2019

Rank #5

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TCC Podcast #183: The Ins and Outs of SEO with Meg Casebolt

SEO Consultant (and reformed web designer) Meg Casebolt is our guest for the 183rd episode of The Copywriter Club Podcast. Since this is an area that we don't have real deep knowledge in, we asked Meg all about what copywriters need to know about SEO and what they should be trying to rank for. And we spent a lot of time talking about the 3-week challenge she put together last year and how it helped grow her list. Here's a pretty good list of what we covered:•  how she went from graphic design to SEO—it’s about grabbing opportunity•  what she did to learn SEO in the first place•  what she did to work through the pivot from design to SEO•  Meg’s advice for anyone working through their own pivot (or choosing a niche)•  how she ramped up her client acquisition after the first few referrals•  the best thing she’s done to grow her authority since her pivot•  the surprising thing that scared Meg as she was running her challenge•  how she ran her challenge and how she engaged her affiliates•  why her challenge took off (and why people joined in the middle)•  how she structured her challenge from start to finish•  the results that participants got as they went through the program•  how Meg kept people engaged in the Challenge from start to finish•  why adding a deadline helped people finish their Challenge assignments•  why she no longer does PPC as part of her services•  what a copywriter needs to know about SEO and getting online traffic•  why you shouldn’t try to rank for a term like “copywriter”•  the importance of putting great content on your own website•  how she has dealt with mindset issues around working with clients•  the end-product she provides clients after a consulting session•  why she decided to rebrand her services as she grew her team•  what her team looks like today and where Meg spends her timeWe covered a lot of ground in this one. To hear it, click the play button below, or scroll down for a full transcript. Or subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher so you don't miss an episode.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:The Copywriter AcceleratorTanya GeislerSEOctoberMemberVaultMeg’s WebsiteKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupThe Copywriter UndergroundFull Transcript:Kira:  This episode is brought to you by The Copywriter Accelerator, the 12-week program for copywriters who want to learn the business skills they need to succeed. Learn more at thecopywriteraccelerator.com.Rob:   What if you could hang out with seriously talented copywriters and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work processes and their habits, then steal an idea or two to inspire your own work? That's what Kira and I do every week at The Copywriter Club Podcast.Kira:  You're invited to join the club for Episode 183 as we chat with SEO strategist, Meg Casebolt about planning and writing search friendly content, why SEO needs to be a part of your marketing mix, what it takes to run a month-long challenge as well as the results she got and why has she rebranded and refocused her business solely on SEO.Welcome Meg.Rob:   Hey, Meg.Meg:  Hey, it's so nice to be here with you guys.Kira:  Yeah, it's great to have you here. I've been able to get to know you over the last nine months or so through Tanya Geisler and I'm excited to just dig into your business more and talk about a lot of the changes that you've made and challenges that you've taken on, so let's kick it off with your story. How did you get into SEO?Meg:  Okay, so my story is, I think a pretty common one, which is that I had been working in communications for many years. I worked in nonprofits. I worked at an architecture firm for a couple of years doing all of their marketing. I got married, I got pregnant, and I looked at the cost of childcare and I don't know if I can swear on this podcast, but I swore.

1hr 7mins

14 Apr 2020

Rank #6

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TCC Podcast #159: 4 Ways to Work as a Copywriter with Matt Hall

Copywriter Matt Hall joins us in the studio for the 159th episode of The Copywriter Club Podcast. Matt is a member of The Copywriter Think Tank and has a ton of experience as a copywriter and agency owner. He's worked in-house, as an agency employee, and has started his own agency—twice. Here's what we talked about:•  the high school experience that made him want to know everything•  how he decides what he needs to learn next—without the stress of keeping up•  getting permission to be different and not live up to other’s expectations•  the system he uses to stay up-to-date on his favorite topics•  why he made the shift from eternal student to content writer and strategist•  working with a variety of clients•  why he likes to do a lot of different kinds of work•  the different roles a copywriter can choose (and why to do each one)•  his biggest struggle as a business owner•  his $30K month and the work he had to deliver•  the challenge and benefit of working with a spouse•  his system for managing all the house-hold stuff so work gets done•  the practice that keeps him from having a scarcity mindset•  how he attracts clients to his freelance business•  his thoughts about the trends in conversion copy and designThis is a good discussion you definitely don't want to miss. To hear it, click the play button below or subscribe with your favorite podcast app. You'll find a full transcript below.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:KajabiRob BraddockThe Dunning Krueger EffectPrerna MalikLinda PerryKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupThe Copywriter UndergroundFull Transcript:Rob:   What if you could hang out with seriously talented copywriters and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work processes, and their habits, then steal an idea or two to inspire your own work? That's what Kira and I do every week at The Copywriter Club Podcast.Kira:   You're invited to join the club for Episode 159 as we chat with copywriter and all-around renaissance man, Matt Hall, about how he became a copywriter, different roles copywriters can take on and how they all compare, conversion design, what it is and how copywriters should think about conversion, and what Matt has done to bring business in the door for his agency.Welcome, Matt.Matt:   Hi. Really happy to be here.Kira:   Yeah. Great to have you. I have this huge smile on my face and I don't know if it's the cold Chinese food I'm eating or if it's just ... I'm so excited to hang out with you. So let's kick this off with your story. How did you end up as a renaissance man/conversion, optimization socialist/copywriter/many other things?Matt:   All of the things. I'm hoping more of a jack of all trades rather than a master of none. But it started back in high school and I overheard a conversation when I was like, 14. And some of my classmates were talking about one of our friends saying, ‘She is so interesting. She can talk about literally anything, like your car's dashboard and she knows about it.’And something about the idea of being able to engage with somebody over literally any topic at any given time and actually know what you're talking about really connected with me. And that stuck with me, even when I was an undergrad, I did a master's in English with the focus on professional writing, but I got ... I built my own minor.It was a combination of graph design and PR and building documents with tech and just combining a whole bunch of things. I ended up having something like 200 credits when they finally kicked me out school and said, ‘You got to graduate, dude. It's time to go.’ And then I went and got a Master's in American studies which is another field that's like combining a few different fields. American studies lives on the edge of English but also history and a little bit of psychology or whatever you want to do.

54mins

29 Oct 2019

Rank #7

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TCC Podcast #68: Getting Things Done with Ashlyn Carter

Copywriter and calligrapher Ashlyn Carter joins Kira and Rob for the In 68th episode of The Copywriter Club Podcast and wow, does she deliver. In just a couple of years, she's built a six-figure business that is growing like crazy. In this interview, she shares:•  how she went from agency consultant to PR publicist to freelance writer•  what she learned from working with companies like Delta Airlines and Chick-Fil-A•  the difference between working with corporate brands and personal brands•  her struggle to do everything right, the repercussions, and how it led to the work she does today•  the process she used to break away from the negative behaviors that tied her down•  what happened when she chose a niche and had to fire some of her clients•  how she had to adapt new processes as a business owner (as opposed to being a freelancer)•  when she knew it was time to create a digital product•  the questions she asks to keep her team focused on getting things done•  how she organizes her time to get more done•  her onboarding “magazine” that sets boundaries and outlines processesAnd as we often do, we also asked about a couple of her non-copywriting hobbies. She sold us why she does calligraphy in addition to working as a copywriter, and the lessons she learned from dancing that have made her a better copywriter. To hear Ashlyn tell it, click the play button below. Or scroll down to read the transcript.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:TogglPowerSheetsStrengths FinderRest by Alex PangJenna KutcherJames WedmoreTodd Herman's 90 Day YearHoneyBookAmy PorterfieldAnne LamottChuck CloseMalcolm GladwellAshlynWrites.comKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupIntro: Content (for now)Outro: GravityFull Transcript:The Copywriter Club Podcast is sponsored by Airstory, the writing platform for professional writers who want to get more done in half the time. Learn more at Airstory.co/club.Kira: What if you could hang out with seriously copywriters and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work processes and their habits, then steal an idea to inspire your own work? That’s what Rob and I do every week at The Copywriter Club Podcast.Rob: You’re invited to join us episode 68 as we chat with copywriter Ashlyn Carter about what she learned managing crisis communications for brands like Delta and Chick-Fil-A, how choosing a niche has affected her business, the process she used to break her own negative behaviors, and how dancing has made her a better copywriter.Rob: Ashlyn, welcome!Ashlyn: Thank you so much! So excited to get to talk to y’all today.Rob: We’re excited to have you!Kira: I know, I know! All right, so, Ashlyn, I think a good place to start is with your story, of course, and how you ended up getting into copywriting!Ashlyn: Yes, so it turns out that if you chronologically file magazines under your bed growing up, you’re a shoe-in for a journalism major, so I went into college, like, no doubt what I wanted to be. I wanted to work in magazines. I wanted to do editorial stuff. So I was a print major in the journalism school in 2009, which, I’m sure all of us who work in this industry—that was a tough year for publications. So I promptly went back from my senior year, switched to the publications track, and knew that that’s what I wanted to do. Right out of college, I worked as a traveling consultant for a women’s organization. I worked the ultimate dream of working in—I grew up in Alabama so the big city of Atlanta is where I wanted to be—I wanted to work an agency life in Atlanta, so I did that! And was in agency for about four years all together and worked as a publicist as well for a chef and his slew of restaurants and then I moved on to working on my own! There are a lot of ups and downs and valleys but that, in a nutshell, is what happened.

45mins

16 Jan 2018

Rank #8

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TCC Podcast #146: How to Sell Anything to Anyone with Richard Armstrong

A-list Copywriter and best-selling author, Richard Armstrong, is our guest for the 146th episode of The Copywriter Club Podcast. Richard has been writing winning direct response copy for more than 30 years. And he just released his latest book, The Don Con. Kira and Rob invited Richard into the studio to talk about the book and a whole lot more. Stuff like...•  how Richard went from office boy to agency creative director•  the lessons he learned early on working on “junk” mail•  what’s changed in the world of direct response in 30 years—and what hasn’t•  his award-winning letter for Sea Turtle Rescue•  the go-to books he refers to again and again•  his favorite clients and the work he’s most proud of•  why he took long 3 martini lunches in his “Mad Men” days•  the one good copywriting habit he has•  the #1 thing that makes copywriters good at what they do•  what Richard learned while writing about con men•  the important difference between copywriters and confidence men•  his experience at Comic Con and FanCon•  what happened when he met Captain Kirk and The FonzDon't miss your opportunity to get the free copywriting samples and download that Richard mentioned during the interview. And check out a few of the many resources he mentioned. This is a good one. To hear it all, click the play button below, or download this episode to your favorite podcast app. And if you prefer reading, you can scroll down for a full transcript.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:FreeSampleBook.comClaude HopkinsDavid OgilvyEugene SchwartzThe Sea Turtle LetterThe Responsive Chord by Tony SchwartzThe Solid Gold Mailbox by Walter WentzBeing Direct by Lester WundermanBoardroomParris LampropoulosRichard ViguerieAgoraAWAIDavid DeutschClayton MakepeaceCarline Anglade ColeJim RutzThe Don ConJonathan FrakesKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupThe Copywriter UndergroundIntro: Content (for now)Outro: GravityFull Transcript:Rob:   This podcast is sponsored by The Copywriter Underground.Kira:   It's our new membership designed for you to help you attract more clients and hit 10K a month consistently.Rob:   For more information or to sign up, go to thecopywriterunderground.com.Kira:   What if you could hang out with seriously talented copywriters and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work processes and their habits, then steal an idea or two to inspire your own work? That's what Rob and I do every week at The Copywriter Club Podcast.Rob:   You're invited to join the club for episode 146, as we chat with author and direct response copywriter Richard Armstrong about the persuasion techniques used by con artists that copywriters use as well, what he's learned from 40 years of writing junk mail and what he writes today, his new book The Don Con, and a very useful free bonus he's sharing with copywriters. Richard, welcome.Richard:        Thank you very much. It's great to be here. I am a big fan of the emails you guys send everyday. A lot of tremendous personality and voice in those emails and I read them avidly.Kira:   Thank you.Rob:   That's nice of you to say. I think all of the personality is Kira. I'm kind of the boring side, so she deserves the credit for that.Kira:   That is not true, but thank you for saying that. That's very nice and I was just saying before we started recording, Richard and I are officially neighbors because I just moved to Washington, D.C. So we're going to hang out all the time, right Richard?Richard:        Absolutely. The only problem with being a citizen of Washington is that the rest of the country hates you. So when you go anywhere else on vacation, tell them you're from Brooklyn, you'll get a much better response.Kira:   Okay, these are things I need to know that you need to teach me,

53mins

30 Jul 2019

Rank #9

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TCC Podcast #59: 100 headlines a day for 100 days with Justin Blackman

For the 59th episode of The Copywriter Club Podcast, in-house copywriter and creator of The Headline Project, Justin Blackman, is in the house to share how writing 100 headlines a day for 100 days changed his writing and his business. (We recorded this one a couple of months ago and are just getting around to publishing it now—apologies Justin.) In this episode Justin shares:•  his path from sports and field marketer to copywriter•  what his job as an in-house copywriter involves from one day to the next•  why he started a side gig as an outlet for his creativity•  how Shel Silverstein helped launch his first side gig—try, fly or walk away•  why more copywriters should consider in-house gigs instead of freelancing•  what in-house copywriters can expect to make (yep, we asked this question)•  what made Justin decide to write 100 headlines in 100 days•  some of the “tricks” he used for brainstorming to stay prolific•  how his “creativity muscle” grew as he did the work every day•  how he found motivation from the people he said he couldn’t do it•  how the Headline Project has helped him grow his business and listPlus we asked Justin how in the world he balances his work along with his side projects with his family duties, and we asked his advice on what copywriters should do to move their own businesses forward. To hear his answers, click the play button below, or scroll down for a full transcript.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:The Copywriter AcceleratorPT BarnumBill VeeckLianna PatchCopyhackersShel SilversteinHippo’s HopeThe Headline ProjectLaura BelgrayTackle Your Tagline cheatsheetJoel KlettkePrettyFlyCopy.comJustin’s TwitterKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupIntro: Content (for now)Outro: GravityFull Transcript:Rob: What if you could hang out with seriously talented copywriters and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work processes, and their habits, then steal an idea or two to inspire your own work? That’s what Kira and I do every week at The Copywriter Club Podcast.Kira: You’re invited to join the Club for episode 59, as we talk with copywriter Justin Blackman about his journey from marketing manager for companies like Red Bull and Five Hour Energy to copywriter and content manager, what it’s like as an in-house copywriter, balancing in-house work with freelance work and a family, and what he’s learned from his 100 day headline project.Kira: Justin, welcome!Justin: Hi!Kira: Thanks for being here. We’ve had a chance to get to know you better in The Copywriter Club and The Copywriter Accelerator and I think it’d be really fun to just start with your story and maybe parts of your story that we don’t know, specifically how you went from sports marketing to content creator to copywriter. So, can you share that path with us?Justin: Yeah! It’s kinda one of these paths that seemed obvious to everyone but me. I went to U Mass for sports marketing, mostly because I wanted to work for the New York Rangers, which was pretty “high school” of me but I had a good time there and learned a lot. The biggest change was that I had one professor there that talked about P.T. Barnum and Bill Veeck, who was a baseball promoter—he owned the Chicago White Sox and the Cleveland Indians—and really, focused more on big-time promotion and making the game fun. And these guys didn’t sit in the skybox, they were down in the cheap seats with the bleacher creatures and just having fun and talking to the people.So, I realized pretty quickly that as much as I love sports marketing, it was more the marketing side that I liked, and that branched me into field marketing. And field marketing is essentially a fancy way of saying “consumer sampling”. So, anytime you go somewhere and they’re handing out different promotional items—could be drinks, or Chapstick,

44mins

27 Nov 2017

Rank #10

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TCC Podcast #125: What it means to be a conversion copywriter with Lisa Pierson

Conversion copywriter, Lisa Pierson, joins us for the 125th episode of The Copywriter Club Podcast. We’ve known Lisa for a couple of years and have witnessed as she’s built a growing freelance business in a short time—creating demand for her copywriting and her presence on stage to talk about increasing conversions. This was a great conversation that covered:•  how Lisa went from journalism and PR to copywriter•  why she joined a mastermind when she wasn’t sure what a mastermind was•  how she landed her first clients•  how she managed to start a business in the middle of massive life changes•  why putting your self matters (and how it helps)•  when things started to “click” and how Lisa’s business has changed•  how joining Match.com and online dating led to her first speaking gig•  the impact that speaking has had on her business•  what else Lisa’s done to build her authority as a copywriter•  what it takes to be more competitive as a copywriter today•  what she’s done to make her retainer agreements work•  what it means to be a “conversion” copywriter—it’s all about process•  how she started “copy training” for companiesThis is a good one. You know the drill. To hear it, click the play button below or download the episode to your podcast app. And, as always, you can scroll down for a full transcript.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:CopyhackersInboundtheconversioncopywriter.comLisa’s TwitterLisa on YouTubeKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupThe Copywriter UndergroundIntro: Content (for now)Outro: GravityFull Transcript:Full transcript coming soon...

46mins

19 Feb 2019

Rank #11

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TCC Podcast #128: Leading as a copywriter with Keli Chevalier

Copywriter Keli Chevalier was the final speaker at TCCIRL19 and she brought down the house with her chant about booty call brands (get the videos to see what we’re talking about). Now she’s our guest for the 128th episode of The Copywriter Club Podcast. We had hoped to get this out last week before the event, so you could have a taste of what she was going to speak about, but it works as a follow up too. Here’s what we covered:•  how she unknowingly started writing copy while selling weapons for the Army•  what she did as an Army Major (she was a pretty big deal)•  how she developed her writing process—the BOMB method—while under fire in Iraq•  the “Sitcom Principles” that apply to sales pages and kick starter campaigns•  why she likes to work with frameworks and the impact on her business•  her thoughts on leadership and how it applies to copywriting•  what she did to attract her first clients and get traction•  what else she knows beyond copywriting•  how to rock a conference (even before you get there)•  what she’s done to uplevel her business over the past few years•  the people she has on her team—there are a few you might not expect•  the process she stole from the Army to get everyone on the same page•  the thing she’s done that has had the biggest impact on her business• how harsh feedback changed her approach to everything she doesWe also talked about the imposter complex and her big goal for the coming year (it’s a good one). Click the play button below, or scroll down for a full transcript. Or if you prefer, download this episode to your favorite podcast app.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:Text: "LaunchMe" to 39492TCCIRL 2020 Videos (link coming soon)Keli’s websiteKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupThe Copywriter UndergroundIntro: Content (for now)Outro: GravityFull Transcript:On it's way....

53mins

19 Mar 2019

Rank #12

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TCC Podcast #157: Cold pitching with Laura Lopuch

Copywriter and expert cold emailer, Laura Lopuch, is our guest for the 157th episode of The Copywriter Club Podcast. In this interview, Kira, Rob and Laura covered a lot of ground when it comes to what to say when you're cold pitching new prospects. Here's a pretty good list of what we covered:•  the path Laura took from paralegal to copywriter•  what made her decide it was time for a job change•  how she attracted her first clients when she went out on her own•  how to cold pitch effectively•  the difference between personalization and relevance and why it matters•  the thing that no one talks about when it comes to cold emails•  what Laura does BEFORE she starts to write a cold pitch•  why you might need to indulge your inner stalker when you cold pitch•  how to tell if a potential client is ready to invest in what you can offer•  the best way to phrase the call to action so you get results•  the subject lines that work well—Laura’s “backslash secret”•  the ways a cold pitch email differs from a regular email to your list•  how she figured out the niche to focus on in her business•  the basics of a good presentation and how it all comes together•  why she doesn’t focus her mentorship on learning•  how she became a travel hacker so she could travel for free•  where Laura thinks copywriting will go in the future•  the templates she used to land +$20K in businessIf that seems like a lot, it is. And it's good stuff. To hear this interview, click the play button below or subscribe to The Copywriter Club Podcast using your favorite podcast app. And if you prefer to read, you can scroll down for a full transcript.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:CrystalknowsCopyhackersShine BootcampMicroConfHayley HopsonTarzan Kaythepointsguy.comLaura's websiteKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupThe Copywriter UndergroundFull Transcript:Rob:   What if you could hang out with seriously talented copywriters and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work processes and their habits, then steal an idea or two to inspire your own work? That's what Kira and I do every week at The Copywriter Club Podcast.Kira:   You're invited to join the club for episode 157 as we chat with email copywriter, Laura Lopuch about why she loves writing emails, the worst mistakes we make when writing emails, the relevancy method and how to structure a cold pitch so potential clients become actual clients, and how she became a travel hacker.Kira:   Welcome Laura.Rob:   Hey Laura.Laura:            Thanks guys for having me. I'm very excited to be here.Kira:   Yeah, we're excited to chat and we want to kick this off with your story. So how did you end up as a copywriter?Laura:            I took a long detour through the legal field. I thought I wanted to be a lawyer. You can blame Jerry Maguire and all those awesome John Grisham novels and all that kind of stuff for it. I just thought, yeah, this would be cool. I like arguing. I could be a lawyer. So I did something smart and actually took a job at a law firm to see real world experience if A, I wanted to be a lawyer, before I spent B, all that money to get a fancy dancy law degree. Fast forward a couple of years and I figured out no, I didn't want to be a lawyer. But it was a really good job and I was learning a lot. I really liked the stories. We were a civil defense law firm. For example, if you get in a car accident, we were usually the insurance for the law firm that your insurance company would hire to defend you against the plaintiff, the person who's suing you.So I got to see some really interesting cases and stories. People do some crazy, crazy stuff, let me tell you. But I got seduced by a steady paycheck and a good job, until I just couldn't take it anymore and I quit. And so at that point I was like,

50mins

15 Oct 2019

Rank #13

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TCC Podcast #187: What Copywriters Need To Know About Design with Melissa Burkheimer

Conversion designer and sales page specialist Melissa Burkheimer is the guest for the 187th episode of The Copywriter Club Podcast. We talked a bit about why copywriters and designers don't always see eye-to-eye and what we all can do about it. We also asked Melissa about why she niched to conversion design and sales pages and her design process. Here's what we covered:•  how Melissa became a “conversion designer” and started her own business•  what she learned from investing in several programs and courses•  how she connected with Amy Porterfield through a friend of a friendthe “relationship” process she followed to keep adding clients to her roster•  her thoughts about “pay to play” and what we think about it too•  what she would do to get traction if she had to start over today•  why she niched to working only on sales pages and the impact on her biz•  how she prices her sales pages and the packages she offers•  what it takes for copywriters to work closely with a designer•  the difference between a regular designer and a conversion designer•  her design process and how she works on a project•  her thoughts on wireframes provided by copywriters•  what to do when the designer wants to cut your copy•  the things that copywriters do that bug designers•  what Melissa is working on today and the future of conversion designIt's another great discussion that will give you plenty to think about. Ready to hear what Melissa has to say? Click the play button below. Or scroll down for a full transcript. Or subscribe on your favorite podcast app so you never miss an episode.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:Rick MulreadyB-SchoolAmy PorterfieldErica LyremarkElizabeth DialtoSage PolarisGin WalkerMelissa’s podcastMelissa’s websiteThe Conversion Design SchoolKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupThe Copywriter UndergroundFull Transcript:Kira Hug:   This episode is brought to you by The Copywriter Underground, the place to be if you want to master marketing mindset and copywriting in your business and hit 10K a month in your business without losing your mind. Learn more at thecopywriterunderground.com.Rob Marsh:   What if you could hang out with seriously talented copywriters and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work processes and their habits then steal an idea or two to inspire your own work? That's what Kira and I do every week at The Copywriter Club Podcast.Kira Hug:   You're invited to join the club for episode 187 as we chat with conversion designer Melissa Burkheimer about what copywriters need to know about the design process, how good design makes your copy way more effective, why she only works with seven clients a year and why she created the Conversion Design School. Welcome Melissa.Rob Marsh:   Hey Melissa.Melissa Burkheimer:   Hi, Kira and Rob, thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited to be here.Kira Hug:   We're excited to have you here. You and I met, I don't know, three or four years ago, maybe working on a sales page project for Rick Mulready, and that's when we first met. And it was such a positive experience to work with you on the design side because I know, we'll talk about this today, but oftentimes it feels like copywriters are battling designers and designers are battling copywriters on projects.But when we worked together, it was just really collaborative and we became friends too, which it was a great surprise too. So a lot of what we're going to talk about today is how we can work together more effectively. But before we dig into that, why don't we just start with you and your story? How did you end up as a designer?Melissa Burkheimer:   So it's a funny story. So I actually had a business, I was a professional paid singer as a kid when I was eight and I quit when I was 11. And by the time I quit,

57mins

12 May 2020

Rank #14

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TCC Podcast #171: Writing Sales Letters with Stefan Georgi

It's a bit early to pick a best episode of 2020, but we predict this will be an early contender. Master copywriter, Stefan Georgi, joined us for the 171th episode of The Copywriter Club Podcast, to talk about how he became a copywriter who has helped his clients earn $700 million is sales. That is NOT a typo. Stefan is a terrific copywriter and this interview is practically a workshop on writing better sales letters. We talked about:•  the lucky poker game that turned Stefan into a copywriter•  how he landed his first two clients (and $300) 24 hours after calling himself a copywriter•  growing into clients and selling almost $700 million worth of products•  the crazy amount of work that earned Stefan $80K a month•  how he ended up writing 8 out of 10 of the top performing pages on click bank•  how he obsessed over the craft of copywriting (and what that involved)•  his favorite copywriting resource—we’ve included a link so you can get it too•  the RMBC method for writing a sales letters•  the genius way he breaks the “mechanism” into two parts that increases sales•  the different things you need to do with the lead of a sales page•  Stefan’s point-by-point script for a sales page that you can use when you write•  the most common mistakes copywriters make when writing a sales message•  the ROI escalation method and how Stefan uses it to justify his rates•  how his mindset has shifted as he’s grown in his business•  how he got his clients to recommend him to future clients•  how he balances his time writing for elite clients with time for his familyYou won't want to miss this one. To get it, download it to your favorite podcast app (or better yet, subscribe so you never miss an episode), click the play button below, or scroll down for a full transcript.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:TCCIRLWarrior ForumClickBankSoftware ProjectsThe Fascinations DocStefan and Justin’s MastermindStefanpaulgeorgi.comKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupThe Copywriter UndergroundFull Transcript:Rob:   This episode is brought to you by The Copywriter Club In Real Life, our live event in San Diego, this coming March 12th through 14th. You can get your tickets now at thecopywriterclub.com/tccirl.Kira:   What if you could hang out with seriously talented copywriters and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work processes and their habits, then steal an idea or two to inspire your own work? That's what Rob and I do every week at The Copywriter Club Podcast.Rob:   You're invited to join the Club for Episode 171 as we chat with copywriter Stefan Georgi about his approach to writing long copy, the ROI escalation ladder and how we can use it in our businesses, what it takes to write copy that produces $700 million in revenue over six years, and how he gets his clients to sell his services for him.Kira:   Welcome Stefan.Rob:   Hey, Stefan.Stefan:           Hey, guys. Thank you. It's great to be here.Kira:   Yeah, we're excited to have you here. We met you through Brian Kurtz, through the Titans Masterclass, and so, glad we can hang out today. And also you're going to be speaking at our event in March, which is really exciting.Stefan:           Yeah, I'm thrilled for that. I really appreciate you guys inviting me to come speak, but I cannot wait for that.Kira:   All right, so why don't we start off with your story? How did you end up as a copywriter?Stefan:           Yeah, so it's definitely one of those sort of funny twists of fate or things that are, it's a bit unexpected, I suppose you'd say. In 2011, I was teaching at an outdoor school in Marble Falls, Texas, which is about an hour and a half outside of Austin. And I was at this place called The Outdoor School, which was like a summer camp during the summer and a outdoor Ed type facility during the spring and the fall,

1hr 4mins

21 Jan 2020

Rank #15

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TCC Podcast 22: The Next Million Dollar Copywriter with Brian Kurtz

Direct response guru Brian Kurtz joins The Copywriter Club Podcast to talk copy. But interviewing Brian isn't like interviewing most people. He's a bit like a jazz musician who takes your question and riffs on it—sharing all kinds of great stories and advice in the process. You just let him go. In this episode, Kira and Rob asked Brian about his article, The Next Million Dollar Copywriter, in addition to questions about mastermind groups and what baseball can teach us about copywriting (listen to the end of this admittedly long interview for his fantastic answer). This is one of our favorites and once you listen, you'll understand why. Special bonus: Brian broke our record for the most people and stuff mentioned in a single episode. Check them all out.Click the play button below, or scroll down for a full transcript.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:Sponsor: AirStoryMel MartinGene SchwartzParris LamprolousHow to Write a Good Advertisement by Victor SchwabBreakthrough AdvertisingBencivenga BulletsBoardroomMarty EdelstonJim RutzDavid DeutchClayton MakepeaceJim PunkreJudy WeissJoan ThrokmortonKim Krause SchwalmCarline ColeBill JaymeDick BensonGordon GrossmanTitans of Direct ResponseDan KennedyEric BeteulArthur JohnsonKen McCarthyPerry MarshallJay AbrahamJoe SugarmanGreg RenkerFred CatonaThe Advertising SolutionJeff WalkerThe next million dollar copywriterJohn Carlton’s courseYou may not know it when you see itGenius NetworkNational EnquirerDan Sullivan’s Strategic CoachMariano RiveraTheLegendsBook.com BrianKurtz.meKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupIntro: Content (for now)Outro: GravityFull Transcript:Rob: The Copywriter Club Podcast is sponsored by Airstory, the writing platform for professional writers who want to get more done in half the time. Learn more at Airstory.co/club.Kira: What if you could hang out with seriously talented copywriters and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work processes and their habits, then steal an idea or two to inspire your own work? That’s what Rob and I do every week at The Copywriter Club Podcast.Rob: You’re invited to join the club for episode 22, as we chat with marketing titan and direct response expert, Brian Kurtz, about working with A-list copywriters like Gary Bencivenga and Gene Schwartz, what the next million dollar copywriter will be doing, what copywriters need to know today about lists and direct mail, and what baseball can teach us about marketing.Kira: Hey, Brian. Hey, Rob. How are you?Rob: Kira, Brian, we’re thrilled to have you.Brian: I like those fascinations, you know? Gene Schwarz and Mel Martin and a host of other copywriters would be proud of your teaser bullets.Rob: It might not be quite the level of something Parris would write but we sure try.Brian: At Boardroom, we call those fascinations and it’s something that ... and you mention Parris Lampropoulos, who’s one of my close friends and a copywriter who we made millions together at Boardroom and he has copy cubs that he works with and I believe he still ... One of the first things he does, he makes them read Victor Schwab’s book and makes them copy the first three chapters of Breakthrough Advertising by Gene Schwartz, hand write copy. One of the things Parris does, I think for the first big chunk of time that he trains his copywriters is teaching them how to write bullets, teaching them how to write fascinations.Kira: Interesting.Brian: Don’t worry about the body copy. Don’t worry about the narrative. Don’t worry about the storytelling. Get the copy, get the bullets down. Gary Bencivenga called his newsletter Bencivenga Bullets.It’s sort of like getting the technique down in a way so that you start really thinking like your prospect, what’s going to get under their skin,

51mins

9 Mar 2017

Rank #16

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TCC Podcast #104: Writing seductive copy with Colin Theriot

Copywriter Colin Theriot joins Rob and Kira for the 104th episode of The Copywriter Club Podcast. Colin is well known as the leader of the Cult of Copy (as well as four or five other related Facebook groups). He often jumps into the club to answer questions or comment on something, and we thought it was about time to talk shop with him. In our discussion, we covered:•  how Colin became a copywriter•  why he started The Cult of Copy•  the short cut to getting people to know who you are•  how beginning copywriters can create a copy learning experience•  the most important thing for beginners to learn (this skill is portable)•  his philosophy for running more than one Facebook group•  why he offers a “jobs” group and why you probably shouldn’t use it•  the five Vs of the Viking Velociraptor Formula <-- this is gold•  the “artist vs. cabinet maker” mistake copywriters tend to make•  the scalability secret for earning more by doing less•  why you need to treat your business like a business•  why he tells copywriters to read books that aren’t copywriting booksClick the play button below, or scroll down for a full transcript.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:The Cult of CopyUnderstanding Comics by Scott McLoudBooks by Elmore LeonardKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupIntro: Content (for now)Outro: GravityFull Transcript:The Copywriter Club Podcast is sponsored by Airstory, the writing platform for professional writers who want to get more done in half the time. Learn more at Airstory.co/club.Kira:   What if you could hang out with seriously talented copywriters and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work processes and their habits, then steal an idea or two to inspire your own work? That's what Rob and I do every week at The Copywriter Club Podcast.Rob:   You're invited to join the club for episode 104, as we chat with Copywriter and cult leader Colin Theriot about starting a cult and running a Facebook group with nearly 25,000 members. The 5 Vs of the Viking Velociraptor Formula, what most copywriters are doing wrong today and why, when asked about his favorite books about copywriting, he doesn't recommend books about copywriting.Kira:   Welcome Colin.Rob:   Hey Colin.Colin:  Hi guys. Thanks for having me.Kira:   Yeah, great to have you here.Colin:  Sweet.Kira:   So Colin, let's kick this off with your story. How did you end up as a copywriter?Colin:  I was working at an internet marketing company. It was an eCommerce company. I was working there as a graphic designer/SEO analyst/content writer. One of the owners of that eCommerce site and his other marketing partner in other ventures, they decided to launch this thing called StomperNet and I was working there making their web pages at the time, so I helped them, stayed up on launch night, making some HTML for that. And they launched it and it was a big record breaking launch. I think was like $24 million at the time. And so I got called over from the eCommerce site to go work on that. And then while we were wiring, my boss at the time, Andy Jenkins, his house for Wi-Fi so we could work there legally, while I was doing that, the writer we had on staff at the time, I can't remember to this day if she was sick or if we were just busy and had too much stuff going on, but it was sort of like a voluntary basis, ‘Hey, we need this sales letter rewritten, because we're about to relaunch with all these new features we've added.’ So I took a shot at it and Andy was like, ‘This is pretty good. Do you like doing it?’ And I'm like, ‘Yeah. It's easier than wiring your house for Wi-Fi.’ And he's like, ‘Well cool, because you're the chief marketing copywriter, so get good at it.’Over the next, I think it was a little under two years, I worked with all the high end marketing faculty they had there that were all copywriters in their own ...

49mins

9 Aug 2018

Rank #17

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TCC Podcast #118: Copy and branding with Sorcha MacKenzie

Copywriter and brand specialist, Sorcha MacKenzie, is our guest for the 118th episode of The Copywriter Club Podcast. We've admired Sorcha for quite awhile now, and have followed along as she's launched her own brand and website. We asked Sorcha about that process and this stuff too:•  her path from acting to branding to copywriting•  what her business looks like today•  what it’s like to work for big brands like Marvel and Disney•  how research impacts the creative process and brand development•  working with chronic pain so that clients still get what they need•  how Sorcha pads her timelines to give her extra time to get work done•  how she conducts the research for a brand audits and branding work•  the pitfalls of doing group research and focus groups•  how she applies the branding process to her own business•  what she’s done to develop her own brand as a branding expert•  her experience starting her own business•  how she came up with the products she offers for her clients•  her biggest struggles as a freelancerWant to hear what it's like to go from working on an Ant Man promotion to the daily grind of freelance life? Then click the play button below. You can also scroll down for a full transcript.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:Sorcha’s websiteThe Copywriter AcceleratorCopyhackersThe Brand GapThe 22 Immutable Laws of BrandingThe Copywriter Club In Real LifeKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupIntro: Content (for now)Outro: GravityFull Transcript:Rob:   This podcast is sponsored by The Copywriter Underground.Kira:   It's our new membership designed for you, to help you attract more clients and hit $10K a month consistently.Rob:   For more information or to sign up, go to thecopywriterunderground.com.Kira:   What if you could hang out with seriously talented copywriters and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work processes and their habits, then steal an idea or two to inspire your own work? That's what Rob and I do every week at The Copywriter Club Podcast.Rob:   You're invited to join the club for episode 118 as we chat with copywriter and brand specialist Sorcha MacKenzie about working for big clients like Disney and Marvel, understanding brand strategy, the struggles she's had leaving the agency world for freelance, and why puppies make the best and worst office mates.Kira:   Welcome, Sorcha.Rob:   Hey, Sorcha.Sorcha:   Thank you for having me. I'm thrilled to be here.Kira:   Yeah, we're excited to have you here. We know you well through both The Accelerator and The Think Tank program that you're participating in. But I feel like we're going to get to know you even better today, so let's start with your story and how you got started in copywriting and branding.Sorcha:   Sure, so I'm an accidental copywriter, probably like a lot of people. I was actually trained as an actress until I was about 20 years old. I was going to be a theater actress, and then I kind of bored of the stage world and went to film school. I got an MA in Film Studies. I wrote my dissertation on Grey's Anatomy like all good people do.I ended up interning for Disney afterwards. I did a year's internship and I just never left. I got a really good grounding there. I got to do the creative stuff and learn lots more about the marketing side and all that. So that's really how I got into things, just absolutely stumbled into it.Rob:   Okay, so I've got to know more about the dissertation on Grey's Anatomy. What was the topic? What did you do? What did you write?Sorcha:   So, it was the representations of gender and sexuality within the first season of Grey's Anatomy. So there was lots of like stuff about the gays, the female gays, and all of the kind of representations of different people and all that. It was kind of a groundbreaking show back in the day.

48mins

11 Dec 2018

Rank #18

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TCC Podcast #172: Running a Scrappy Launch with Allison Evelyn

Allison Evelyn Gower is our guest for the 172nd episode of The Copywriter Club Podcast. We asked Allison about her experience creating her first program, what inspired her to move fast, and how she got scrappy to fill it. She offers plenty of learning and advice to anyone who is thinking of creating a program or course. Here's the outline of what we covered during this interview:•  what inspired her transition from film production to copywriting•  how she learned to be “scrappy” as a production assistant•  how Allison landed her first few clients•  what’s happened in her business since she launched—lots of changes•  the process she went through to find her niche•  the 3 things that have been the biggest game changers for her business•  how she pulls brand personality out of her clients•  the answers Rob and Kira gave to one of Allison’s on-boarding questions•  how to get feedback from clients on the words that describe you•  secrets for identifying the language that shows off your personality•  how you project your personality into the world•  what she did when she launched her day-rate package•  why she decided to launch a group program—and how Kira lit a fire under her•  how Allison mapped out her program and created her content•  what she did to fill her first program—an idea she stole from Tarzan Kay•  the things she’s doing differently as she relaunches the course•  how to run a business while moving across the countryIf your copywriting business could be scrappier or you're looking for some launch inspiration for your first product, you won't want to miss this interview. Click the play button below, or scroll down for a full transcript. Better still, subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher so you never miss an episode.The people and stuff we mentioned on the show:Joe NefzigerTarzan KayLaura BelgrayThe Copywriter Think TankAllison's WebsiteThe Brand with Bite PodcastKira’s websiteRob’s websiteThe Copywriter Club Facebook GroupThe Copywriter UndergroundFull Transcript:Kira:   This episode is brought to you by The Copywriter Club In Real Life, our live event in San Diego, March 12th through the 14th. Get your tickets now at thecopywriterclub.com/tccirl.Rob:   What if you could hang out with seriously talented copywriters and other experts, ask them about their successes and failures, their work processes and their habits, then steal an idea or two to inspire your own work? That's what Kira and I do every week at The Copywriter Club Podcast.Kira:   You're invited to join the club for episode 172 as we chat with copywriter and product creator Allison Gower about how she became a copywriter, her first big solo product launch. How she's changed the work she does over time, launching a podcast and running a business while moving across the country. Welcome Allison.Allison:          Hey mates. How's it going?Kira:   Good. It's always good with you. It's always good. So we're so excited to have you here to talk more about your story. Let's kick it off with how you became a copywriter.Allison:          Oh my life, in a summary. Yes, let's go. So the long story short, I was always making up ads and writing as a kid and doing all these things that had no idea what actually does something later in life. Right? Like I think a lot of us, copywriters and people in brand, we look back as kids and are like, ‘Oh yeah.’Rob:   We don't normally interrupt you in the story. But ads as a kid, what were you writing ads of?Allison:          Me and my best friend, elementary school, we came up with this candy bar and we called it a nitwit bar and we created the packaging. We actually made a barn, created the design and then we created commercials for it. And then we had a school project where honestly, you didn't really have to do very much but we went real hard and then create a commercial and performed it.

1hr 9mins

28 Jan 2020

Rank #19