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Columbus Entrepreneurs' Podcast

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Columbus Entrepreneurs' Podcast is primarily for members of the Columbus, Ohio chapter of Entrepreneurs' Organization (EO). Our members include business owners with a majority ownership in companies with at least $1 million in revenue. The stories are inspiring and focus on core principles of EO, including speaking from experience instead of advice giving, building peer learning experiences, and focusing on the top and bottom 5% of our lives. EO is a global organization that offers many benefits and learning opportunities. If you would like to learn more about EO, please visit www.eonetwork.org.

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Columbus Entrepreneurs' Podcast is primarily for members of the Columbus, Ohio chapter of Entrepreneurs' Organization (EO). Our members include business owners with a majority ownership in companies with at least $1 million in revenue. The stories are inspiring and focus on core principles of EO, including speaking from experience instead of advice giving, building peer learning experiences, and focusing on the top and bottom 5% of our lives. EO is a global organization that offers many benefits and learning opportunities. If you would like to learn more about EO, please visit www.eonetwork.org.

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Great for local entrepreneurs!

By Sunnydac - Oct 03 2017
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Love to hear stories about Columbus business owners!

iTunes Ratings

5 Ratings
Average Ratings
5
0
0
0
0

Great for local entrepreneurs!

By Sunnydac - Oct 03 2017
Read more
Love to hear stories about Columbus business owners!
Cover image of Columbus Entrepreneurs' Podcast

Columbus Entrepreneurs' Podcast

Latest release on Oct 03, 2017

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail about 24 hours ago

Rank #1: 021: Good Nature Organic Lawn Care

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We’re back with a brand new episode! On today’s episode, Matt Cellura joins Kevin to talk about his entrepreneurial ventures with Good Nature Organic Lawn Care. Matt shares his story of how he got started in the business, as well as what their future plans for the company are. He talks about some of the challenges of expanding a small business, as well as the unique components of their company that set them apart from others.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:32] Matt shares his lifeline. He grew up in Northeast Ohio, and received his Finance degree from Ohio University. He took his first job out of college working for Enterprise Rent-A-Car as part of their management training program. Though he left that job because it wasn’t what he really wanted to do, he gained experiences that have benefitted him even to today.

[2:15] As he started to think about what he really wanted to do, he realized he wanted to do something that would make an impact, or be part of something that was growing. This is where he got his entrepreneurial start. He teamed up with an acquaintance-turned-business partner and began managing the operations for Good Nature, an organic lawn care company. When they decided to expand, Matt founded the Columbus branch in 2008. Since then, they’ve grown to service about 2000 clients in the central Ohio area.

[5:15] When they were brainstorming different cities to which to expand, Columbus seemed like a fast-growing, fast-paced city that would have the customer-base they would look for.

[6:57] The year at a glance: They try to get started at the end of February or the beginning of March, but it really depends on the weather. The spring is their big burst of new customers; the summer is still busy, but it steadies out a bit. Late summer and early fall is another busy time as they add a new group of services. They end before the holidays in December, and then use the off-months to focus on their processes as a business, and tune-up whatever needs to be addressed, whether it be equipment or business aspects.

[9:10] One of the biggest struggles was when they needed to bring on a lot more people — finding and retaining good people can be hard. Delegating work was also a struggle, but necessary to continue to grow the business.

[10:45] Outside of the business, Matt is very interested in EO, after having his first introduction while he was in Cleveland. He also participates in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Matt has two kids, and enjoys spending time with his family, and doing projects around the house.

[12:51] One of their goals at Good Nature is to open their next office. Ideally they would hire internally, but they have also entertained the idea of franchising. Their focus is on expanding, but to do it in a way that won’t require a large investment. Hopefully they will be able to launch another branch next year. Another project is getting all their processes in line as if they were a franchise, to make it easier to possibly hand off to someone else to get a new branch started.

[15:25] At Good Nature, they don’t really compare themselves to the large commercial lawn care companies, because they are quite different in terms of product and focus. As they are building their brand, they have become one of the largest organic lawn care companies in the nation. While they still want to expand, it is important that they keep their impact a priority.

[17:24] The approach they take at Good Nature is soil health first. By creating a healthy soil with microbiology and earthworms, it encourages activity that is beneficial for grass and other plants on the properties they work with. Traditionally lawn care products generally are always fighting symptoms. At Good Nature, the goal is to create a sustainable lawn that has less issues over time. Matt talks about some of the other differences that make their company unique.

[20:47] Is there anything members of EO can help you with? Matt is interested in pulling from other people’s experience, in terms of expanding a business, and how to get everything together to give, to make it easier for a new person to get a new office up and running.

[23:59] They do try to advertise the benefits of the products they use, but they also want people to know about their commitment to customer service, and this is where they try to keep their focus. Other marketing they do is try to partner up with services that support similar aims and go to events that may attract people who would be interested in their products.

Mentioned in This Episode:

Columbus Chapter of Entrepreneurs Organization

Good Nature Organic Lawn Care

Aug 08 2017

27mins

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Rank #2: 016: Alberto Scirocco

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Today’s guest is a newer member of EO. Alberto Scirocco joins Kevin to talk about moving here from Italy, and how his freelance design turned into a business. Since starting the company, he discusses the change in the demand and the field, and how they as a company have had to change and evolve to keep producing the best product. Tune in today to hear about some of their specific projects at Left Channel, and what Alberto hopes for the city of Columbus, when it comes to creative engagements.

Key Takeaways:

[:29] Alberto is a newer member of EO, and is here to share his lifeline. He is originally from Milan, Italy, and he moved to Columbus when he was 20, and attended the Columbus College of Art and Design. Coming here allowed him a lot of different artistic learning opportunities, and after he finished school he working doing design in motion for a production house.

[2:35] He fell in love with the profession and advanced very quickly, and then began freelancing. His freelance venture grew to include more employees, and suddenly Alberto was running a studio/business. This began in 2008, and in the last five years, the business has been changing. There is more organization and intention about the way they are doing business. The focus now is more on solving people’s problems, which has led to a deeper satisfaction.

[6:44] Originally they used to interact more with advertising agencies and operated more as an execution group. Now they interact more with companies, forming deeper connections and long-lasting relationships with their clients.

[7:46] The turning point came around 2011 when Alberto had to reorganize some roles when people left, and it brought to light some of the work that had been done, and the work that was being done by others in the field. All in all, it has led to a much more positive outcome, despite the constant change. Alberto speaks to how this change in demand has affected their efforts and product.

[11:50] Fortunately there are still creative opportunities for Alberto, while he’s working to develop the business side as well. There are still visual things he wants to solve, but he tries to balance the work he does for his clients with the passion projects they work on as a team.

[13:55] Alberto talks about the importance of having a team. It allows for a lot of idea share that allows everyone to do stronger work. Some of Alberto’s favorite projects are the ones that play to the natural strengths of his team; their excitement makes a great work environment. Alberto talks about some of the different types of projects they have handled, as well as the ways they’ve tackled some projects that aren’t quite as exciting or demanding.

[19:13] While the variety of projects they do keeps creativity fresh, it does present a bit of challenge for the business side. They are wanting to move closer to relationships and longer engagements. Project work requires more planning and hunting for projects.

[21:08] Alberto talks about growing up in Italy, and where his entrepreneurial aspirations stemmed from. Growing up, he had a difficult time in school. It was when he started studying martial arts (jiu jitsu) that he felt empowered, and this translated to many other avenues of his life, including school. This experience taught him the importance of being exposed to great teachers, and served as a catalyst for his creative and entrepreneurial ventures.

[26:19] Kevin and Alberto talk about the transition from Milan to Columbus. Even though they’re both big cities, there is a different mindset between the two cities. Alberto enjoys that Columbus allows opportunities to be in the fray or to take a step back from the bustle, while still being in Columbus.

[30:50] Alberto got involved with EO when he began speaking at conferences. As he got to know his competitors and have a chance to talk to them, he desired to find that same community in Columbus. When he was expressing this to his friend Chris, he was introduced to EO, and it has been a great experience so far. It has provided a great platform to talk about shared experiences with people who understand, and are going through the same things.

[36:50] Right now Alberto’s team is working on a lot of housework — organizing and rethinking some of their branding. They have a lot of projects coming up that should be pretty exciting for him and the team.

[40:38] Recruiting can be difficult as a creative company where a lot of their competition is outside of the area. Currently they are looking to recruit more on the business side, preferably people who have some experience in business-specific roles.

[44:35] One of the things Alberto wishes is that the people of the city took a braver approach at the self-perception of the city itself. Columbus has all the potential the people put into it, and it is a unique city that the people should take pride in. This may help to encourage some of the more creative businesses and originators in the city.

Mentioned in This Episode:

Columbus Chapter of Entrepreneurs’ Organization

Left Channel

Jun 06 2017

52mins

Play

Rank #3: 017: Kevin Stoller

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On today’s episode, our host becomes the guest! Bill Troy turns the table to have Kevin share his lifeline. Kevin talks about how he got started with his current business, Kay-Twelve. Not only does he share his business journey, but he shares some personal stories from his life, and talks about the business’s future as well as his family’s. This is an episode you won’t want to miss!

Key Takeaways: [:38] Kevin shares his lifeline: He grew up in Chicago with three brothers, and had a fairly idyllic childhood. He started working when he was about 14, and since then he’s always had a job, and always knew he wanted to do/start his own thing. He attended Miami University in Oxford and majored in Mass Communications. [4:01] His first entrepreneurial experience was at Miami University with a scholarship program that would allow students to do whatever project they wanted, would pay money, and give credit. Kevin made a documentary called “The Commercialization of Michael Jordan,” which introduced him to many different facets of business, marketing, and video production. [6:21] He originally thought he might want to do video production, but realized there weren’t a lot of jobs in the industry. His first job after college was driving the Eckrich FunHouse around the country. To further his career, he got a job selling copiers while working on his MBA in the evenings. While struggling to figure out what it is he really wanted to do, he went to work for a small company that specialized in compact storage. [10:43] This opportunity allowed him (and his business partner) to learn new skills and make connections in the Columbus area. They teamed up with another company and this sparked his interest in school furniture. [14:53] Kevin talks about his family dynamic during this time, including a tragedy, and how his business partner helped during this time. He also talks about the steps they took to buy out the business they were working for so they could further their business goals. [17:38] Kevin joined EO during the rough year, but it brought him into contact with other people that helped bolster their business decisions, as well as helping him through some personal stuff in his life. This includes his decision to buy out his business partner, as well as the time when his wife was diagnosed with cancer. [20:15] The business today has come full circle. They originally started Kay-Twelve with the intention of bringing in the ecommerce piece. They also balance this with inside and outside sales. Everything they do is about creating better learning environments. [22:14] When it comes down to it, they are selling furniture, but they approach it as a very consultative sale, of what is the specific learning outcome their clients are trying to achieve. Kevin talks about the motivation behind the company, and some of their goals to help further education. From here, they hope to build out the national sales team — specifically hoping to grow out in the West (Kevin is actually moving to Arizona). [25:50] With the changes to the company coming, how can people help Kevin with the transition? He’s already been getting connected with some people in the EO chapter in Arizona, but his biggest concern is ensuring that the office runs really well (both here and out West). Kevin talks about the scope of different types of learning they hope to accommodate. [28:20] Kevin talks about EO moments — Many members talk about forum, but there is so much more than that. Attending regional events allows you to meet members from other cities as well as different programs to get involved in. [34:05] Kevin talks about looking up to his dad as a father and a businessman, and how Kevin is using this inspiration to sort of make it on his own in his business.

Mentioned in This Episode: Columbus Chapter of Entrepreneurs’ Organization Kay-Twelve Recommended Podcasts: Serial StartUp How I Built This EO Global Conquering Columbus

Jun 13 2017

38mins

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Rank #4: 019: Michelle Galligan

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In this episode, Michelle Galligan joins Kevin to talk about her experience with entering into a joint venture. She shares her lifeline, and how she went from working in a firm to starting her company, and the steps taken to get to where she is today. She shares some advice on working with investment bankers, as well as the rationale behind her decision to maintain and grow the value of her company.

Key Takeaways:

[:30] Michelle was born in Springboro, Ohio, while it was still a small town. She originally went to school to be a chemical engineer, and then switched to the business school. While she was still in school, she worked for Ernst & Young, and discovered her knack for data.

[2:55] Due to family circumstances, Michelle had to take a leave of absence from her position with Ernst & Young. This ended being up a great opportunity to explore working in business development. Following this, Michelle talks about her journey through corporate America and how she ended up starting her own business.

[6:12] Michelle talks about the business, financial, and personal struggles that defined the first few years of her business — from joining with investors, to buying out the investors, and getting out of debt to move the company in her own direction.

[11:17] She ended up hiring an investment banker to find someone to sell the business to. She entered into a joint venture with GBQ, which allowed an opportunity to build the business without debt and let Michelle focus on growing the company.

[15:45] Sixteen months in, they aren’t quite where they imagined they would be. They are still working towards full integration of their back office, and they had to re-evaluate their business coming from some of the smaller branches. GBQ is a BDO Alliance partner, and they are unique because of their leadership offerings. They are now working on building partnership agreements with different firms across the nation to offer inner leadership and accounting project work.

[16:25] When deciding which investment banker to work with, the same two recommendations kept coming up. They ended up going with a local bank called Copper Run, but this coincidentally also started the relationship between Michelle’s company and GBQ.

[20:43] Michelle talks about the transaction process of signing on with GBQ, and the deal actually going through, from the pricing of the transaction to the due diligence, and how the whole process set the company up for success later on.

[24:40] In addition to her company, Michelle has been doing some side-CFO work, which has been very fun! She is also working with a local tech company right now, working on some things to get ready for growth. She has also taken up diving as a hobby. Coincidentally, many of the people she dives with are also entrepreneurs!

[27:44] Her next focus is learning the expansion piece of her business. She has a plan to gain twenty strategic partners in four years, in the hopes that each can be grown into an actual location.

[30:12] What made Michelle decide to do a joint venture instead of selling her company? Ultimately it’s because 100% of the value is significantly less than 50% of the value it’s going to be, and it has allowed her to focus her time in the right places. The joint venture was more like a partial sale because it allowed her to clear the debt of the company. It also allows her freedom in her schedule and decision-making.

Mentioned in This Episode:

Columbus Chapter of Entrepreneurs’ Organization

ViaVero

Jul 04 2017

33mins

Play

Rank #5: 020: Jeff Flamm

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Today’s guest joins Kevin from Salt Lake City, Utah. Jeff experienced great entrepreneurial success in the business world. Jeff talks about creating (and selling in one case) two companies: Health Benefits America in eyeQ. In this episode, Jeff focuses on the attitudes and preparations he took to ensure that he was successful in his ventures.

Key Takeaways:

[:45] Jeff shares his lifeline. He switched his major several times during college, but graduated with a business degree and went into financial planning with his father and brothers. Right from the get-go, Jeff found a lot of success with financial planning. But after several years, he began to observe and seek out a new way to use his expertise.

[2:24] Jeff talks about what was going on with health care in the government, and how this served as an impetus for his business. He also talks about other instances where businesses were able to do something better, faster, and cheaper — a great opportunity to get on the map.

[4:57] In 1986, Jeff and his partner Ron started their company called Health Benefits America. In order to build their database, they traveled around the states to gather data so they could provide information on which health care plans were best in each state. This database made it much easier for corporations as well as the employee.

[10:22] They changed the industry by making things simply: doing it better, much faster, and much cheaper than the systems that were currently in place. In ten years, they picked up 127 Fortune-500 companies. After they built up the company in the West, they were able to sell services around the country.

[13:33] Jeff talks about how they were able to sell and grow so quickly. They got connected with ADP and were able to grow at an even quicker rate. This whole process of selling the company to ADP was done in ninety days.

[18:54] Jeff credits much of his desire to grow and “be the best” to his father. This initiative allowed him to use some of his past expertise, such as landscaping, as well his new knowledge.

[23:22] In 1996, Jeff began exploring ventures with his current company, Infinite Minds. This program helps to make kids better learners. Jeff got the rights in all English-speaking countries. They went to market in 2000.

[25:02] It is very hard to make it in Ed Tech; Jeff has stuck with it because, unlike some of his other businesses, Infinite Mind/EyeQ really helps to change lives. It only takes 5-7 minutes a day, and the payoff for reading speed and comprehension is huge.

[28:43] Some of the things Jeff is interested in, outside of work, are things that challenge him personally, rather than team sports. He is involved in triathlons, as well as climbing, and endurance runs.

[29:48] What’s next for Jeff? When he sold the company, he decided he was going to learn one new thing a year. So he’s been taking the opportunities to gather new experiences.

[31:30] Jeff talks about his influences, and what he finds inspirational in others. Overcoming obstacles makes you more driven — the secret to success is not your IQ, it’s your ‘I do.’

[33:50] Jeff’s current goal is to get eyeQ in all schools. It’s more than just speed reading, it’s brain training.

[35:05] Jeff is willing to talk to people and share ideas about how to get started. His biggest advice is that you’ll never make it until you know something well. Spend some time getting to know the business you want to help change, and let them pay for your learning time before you try to implement your ideas. Don’t get into businesses you don’t know.

Mentioned in This Episode:

Columbus Chapter of Entrepreneurs’ Organization

Health Benefits America (now owned by ADP)

ADP

eyeQ

Jul 11 2017

37mins

Play

Rank #6: 015: Jason Carpenter

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Kevin Stoller is joined by Jason Carpenter of the Columbus, Ohio chapter of Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) to discuss Jason’s Lifeline (1:09), after high school (4:54), starting his business (9:00), revitalization of the company (15:16), Karen becoming involved (20:24), turning the business around with new software (25:00), residential and apartment complexes (29:48), lightbulb moments (31:00), joining EO (31:50), what's your “why” (34:35), mentorship (35:11), working with his wife (37:38), “Flight of the Buffalo”(39:10), forum experience (45:35), and his family in the business (47:45).

Mentioned in this episode:

Columbus Chapter of Entrepreneurs’ Organization

Environmental Pest Management

Flight of the Buffalo, by James A. Belasco

May 31 2017

55mins

Play

Rank #7: 014: Timeless Skin Solutions

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In today’s episode, Dr. Carol Clinton shares her inspiring story of persistence and perseverance as she worked to open her own business. She talks about her personal struggles with cancer, and how she worked through that time with the support of her family and friends to grow her skin care and body sculpting business. Nearly twelve years after the start of her business, they have expanded to multiple facilities, and are looking to grow additional aspects.

Key Takeaways:

[:48] Carol shares a snapshot of her lifeline: She was born into a very large, very close family. After an experience with an avian-borne illness as a child, she was inspired by her pediatrician, and decided that’s who she wanted to be when she grew up. She ended up going into nursing, and then on to medical school.

[5:45] She thought for a while she was going to do dermatology, but she began working in the ER, and did that for fifteen years. Due to the time demands, she later moved in a new direction, and trained herself to do botox injections, and within six months she focused her full time and effort on this venture.

[10:12] She grew out her own facility and began to build up her business, and she’s been doing this ever since. Just before the opening of her new facility in 2005, she had to undergo surgery for a cancerous tumor on her ovary, and chemotherapy treatment. Despite all this, she didn’t let it keep her from pursuing her business venture.

[18:38] Thirteen years later, she is working her business: non-surgical skin care and body sculpting. The business has grown as acceptance has become more widespread, and there has been more to do. The vision remains the same: she wants patients taken care of by people who want to take care of them and who are really interested in the results.

[20:00] Carol joined EO about six years ago — one of her patients actually enlightened her and encouraged her to join. When she was introduced to EO, that’s when she learned about the EMP program, and learned more about “the ways of business.” Her business was a great place to institute some of the things she learned.

[24:17] Over time, she has transitioned from being heavily involved in to the process, to stepping back and taking on only some cases, so she can really work on the business. She’s found she really enjoys the leadership side of things.

[26:45] Since opening, she has expanded practices to two locations, and has also expanded the facilities to include an off-site location for marketing, financial, and other administrative work.

[27:11] What does the future look like? Right now they are figuring out how to get a sales force for themselves. Their business has a unique focus on how to help patients get their skin healthy and keep them healthy. Their business model is that there is a physician-led person in each office, and Carol serves as the medical oversight and vision for the whole practice. This leads to consistent procedures and outcomes.

[30:10] Carol is open to hearing ideas about her secondary sales force, and what that might look like for her and her business. She also really needs a personal assistant, and advice on how to utilize someone in that position (delegation, etc). Any honest feedback about your experience or hesitance is welcome!

[34:32] Carol talks about some of her segments on a television show, and what that work has evolved into now. It is an excellent way to share her expertise and give some publicity to her company as well. These have also helped Carol to become better at public speaking, and allowed her to be authentic on camera.

[38:20] Carol shares more about her family, and how she met her husband. Both her husband and kids have been incredibly supportive of her through all of her career endeavors, as well as her personal struggles.

Mentioned in This Episode:

Columbus Chapter of Entrepreneurs’ Organization

The Rhythm of Life, by Matthew Kelly

Carol’s Website — Timeless Skin Solutions

Carol’s Video on YouTube

May 23 2017

42mins

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Rank #8: 010: Angela Petro

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In this episode, founder and CEO of Two Caterers, joins Kevin to talk about her current ventures. After a successful start-up, she is now working to expand her company to a multi-unit venture. She shares her story of how she got started, some of the current struggles she’s facing with an established business and a start-up, and how EO has benefitted her along the way.

Key Takeaways:

[0:30] Angela begins the episode by sharing her history and her lifeline. Growing up in Akron, education was not necessarily an important part of her family’s background. When she was 19, she travelled to Germany, worked in a hotel, and travelled and saved $5000. When she moved back to the states, she studied at Ohio State. On graduation, after a few small jobs, she and a friend started their catering company, Two Caterers.

[6:38] Highs & Lows: They started their sandwich shop/catering business in a bar, and then ended up in a new location that had fallen through for some other friends. This is where the business really started. Her business partner left, and Angela ended up having to buy the business from her — listen to hear how she got the money!

[12:28] What happens after Angela joined EO? Once she joined EO, she finally felt like she had all these people who understood her place in life, and consequently found a host of opportunities and new experience. Since joining EO, she bought her own building for the catering company, and now they are looking at expanding to a food truck and a second location.

[18:17] During these experiences, she learned that her real talent is being able to putting things together that will help or empower other people to be part of something.

[20:15] What’s next — what does the future look like for Angela and her business? She started working with a facilitator for EOS, so they’ve created a one-year, three-year, and ten-year plan. Sweet Carrot was always intended to be multi-unit, so the second one is on it’s way. The ten-year picture is to open as many Sweet Carrots as the world wants.

[22:16] Kevin and Angela talk about capital. While they have some investors for Sweet Carrot, the seed money only goes so far. There’s a bridge period between the size they are now and having enough EBITDA to be interesting to an equity investor. Despite their success with Sweet Carrot, Angela was told she would probably never be able to finance the growth with the help of a bank.

[26:38] When looking for people who might want to invest in seed capital, Angela had a really hard time finding other female business owners who would hear her pitch. When you don’t have access to the same networks, it can be difficult to get started. Kevin and Angela talk about how it is also difficult to obtain financial help, once you’re relatively established but still looking to grow.

[30:13] Angela talks about how EOS is working with her business, and she and Kevin talk about what they’ve learned about leadership by going through the EOS process. What does it mean to lead your company and not just work in it every day?

[37:15] Her employees have been shared between the two ventures, so they could have the opportunities that come with both. There are labor laws that have made this difficult for some employees, but for the most part they have been able to provide growth for employees between companies.

[39:13] Angela’s motto for her life: “Hang in there baby,” via a motivational poster from the 70’s. She has taken it to mean, if an opportunity presents itself, go for it!

[40:20] Within the community of EO members, the best thing to do for each other is to be there for them to talk, or vent, or bounce ideas off each other. When you can relate to others in a similar situation, it can be very affirming.

Mentioned in This Episode:

Columbus Chapter of Entrepreneurs’ Organization

Two Caterers

Sweet Carrot

Apr 25 2017

43mins

Play

Rank #9: 006: David Butcher, FlyBy Entrepreneurship

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Today’s guest, a Columbus Student Entrepreneur Award winner, is involved in the student entrepreneur program of EO. Currently pursuing his undergraduate degree at Ohio State, David Butcher is also running a business called FlyBy BBQ. In this episode, David talks about the start of his current business, what inspired him to become an entrepreneur, the various business plan competitions he’s been involved in, and he shares some advice for young people who want to become entrepreneurs.

Key Takeaways:

[:47] David shares how he got to where he is now: His entrepreneurial ambitions stemmed from his family, watching his dad turn his normal job into a business that not only supported his family, but also gave opportunity to other community members. The past few years have been David trying to figure out exactly what it is he wanted to do. This culminated into his current project: FlyBy BBQ.

[3:56] While he was working on a different idea for a business plan competition at Ohio State, his meetings led to many observations about how people like to eat. FlyBy is working to revitalize barbeque and make it something fun.

[5:02] As a student who also has a running business, what is more important? David reckons it’s usually about a 70-30 ratio of business to school. His preparations in high school set him up to be in a good place with his college courses before he even got there.

[6:19] David reflects on his experience in different business plan competitions. His biggest takeaway has been realizing that the importance of a business plan is being able to start something — once you get started, there is opportunity for ideas to develop and change as you go along. But you have to take that first step forward. He also speaks about how valuable the actual pitch is — designing and being able to articulate your story is important for doing well.

[11:10] What was David’s entrepreneurial spark? Although David’s dad showed him what it was, he never really taught him about it. As a kid David really admired Steve Jobs, and he was inspired by the idea that he could change things and build his own things and have influence. His school environment also fostered growth and independence, which was really empowering for his entrepreneurial spirit.

[15:04] Many people from the younger generation have a desire to make an impact on the world. David and Kevin talk about entrepreneurship as a vehicle to make this impact. David feels that with the way things are constantly changing, entrepreneurship allows you to do something for yourself, and if something happens, it’s on your own terms. From the financial side, many people are enticed by the monetary reward and feel it’s worth the risk.

[17:40] David talks about his team for FlyBy BBQ. Using his resources, he found people who were knowledgeable in their fields, and their expertise would benefit the operations of his business.

[18:41] How can Kevin and EO help FlyBy BBQ? David is always looking for feedback and people to share their story. They’re currently in their last phase, which is the food truck. It’ll be launching in Dayton in mid-April in the Fair Warren/Beaver Creek area, so come on down!

Mentioned in This Episode:

FlyBy BBQ

Find them on social media: flybybbq

Columbus Chapter of Entrepreneurs’ Organization

Mar 28 2017

21mins

Play

Rank #10: 004: Bill Troy’s Entrepreneurial Adventures

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Today’s guest is Bill Troy, who will be the incoming EO Education Chair, and the President Elect for 2018-2019 year. In this episode, Kevin and Bill talk about Bill’s start in entrepreneurship, starting his own business and writing a book, and how EO has helped him navigate some of the twists and turns he has experienced in his career.

Key Takeaways:

[1:04] Bill shares his “lifeline” — after meeting his wife in college, he left college and went to broadcasting school, and after broadcasting school he got into the radio business for about ten years. When they switched gears to follow his wife’s career, they ended up in Columbus, and he started his own internet-based market research company, Troy Research.

[5:15] What did Troy recognize in himself that he had the entrepreneur mentality? For him, the missing piece was sales. After he did that for his work with a market research company, he had the knowledge and the confidence to start his own business.

[6:19] Getting integrated into the Columbus community: coming from the city, the adjusting was difficult, but once they settled in their home in Ohio they realized that it is a great place to be.

[9:01] Bill’s financial advisor encouraged him to join EO. Immediately, being a part of EO helped Bill realize that all the things that made him think he wasn’t an entrepreneur were actually the evidence that he was an entrepreneur. Bill talks about how he got involved in other aspects of EO, particularly becoming a member of the board.

[11:24] Bill talks about the impact of forum as a process, and how the principles apply to other areas of his life.

[14:20] This involvement, and the experiences he gained through the work he had to do, actually ended up having an effect on the growth of his personal business. Bill’s story is a great example of the kinds of things people are experiencing by being involved in EO.

[16:08] Being able to see and recognize that there is a bottom and top five percent is really important because it leads to the ability to turn one into the other (preferably your bottom five into your top five).

[19:00] Bill and Kevin talk about Bill’s book, and how the idea for that came around. As Bill is changing directions in his business to focus more on using online marketing tools for relationship-based marketing rather than impersonal transactions, he is hoping this book will help bring in some others who believe in the same things.

[22:57] Where does Bill see things going in the future? For Civilis Marketing, they are working toward building a business that is not “Bill-related.” Ideally as they move forward his wife will take over more over the actual running of the business. Bill also talks about the services they are hoping to provide through Civilis Marketing.

[27:11] Kevin asks the age old question: how can he, or anyone in the audience, help Bill out? Bill really wants members to be more proactive about getting involved. When members take ownership of growing their interests through the program, it helps everyone.

[31:51] Both Kevin and Bill are writing books — they talk about the different routes of publishing and what the process has been like for Bill so far.

Mentioned in This Episode:

Civilis Marketing

Troy Research

Contact Bill: bill@civilismarketing.com

Columbus Chapter of Entrepreneurs’ Organization

Mar 14 2017

36mins

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